Tree Frog Forestry News

Daily Archives: January 30, 2012

Business & Politics

U.S. reduces claim in timber stumpage spat

Prince George Citizen
January 29, 2012
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada

The U.S. claim under the Softwood Lumber Agreement (SLA) against Canada for alleged subsidies on British Columbia’s timber stumpage rates has been reduced by nearly 200 million, an industry observer says. Madison’s Lumber reporter publisher Keta Kosman said Friday the U.S. Trade Representative’s (USTR) Office has reduced its claim to $303.6 million from $499 million U.S. – a near 40-per-cent reduction in the penalty the U.S. has been seeking. The rebuttal as filed with the London Court of International Arbitration on Dec. 23 and posted on the USTR’s website this week. “This reduced request to the international tribunal is in response to the Canada’s defense, which was filed in November,” Kosman said in a statement.

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Forestry veteran recruited to help Burns Lake recovery

BC Ministry of Jobs, Tourism and Innovation press release
January 27, 2012
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

BURNS
LAKE – Forest industry veteran Bob Clark, vice-president of forestry
consultants J B Clark and Co., has been recruited to lead the provincial
government’s on-the-ground Burns Lake economic response efforts, announced
Minister of Jobs, Tourism and Innovation Pat Bell.
  Clark’s
appointment was announced after Bell, accompanied by Nechako Lakes MLA John
Rustad, met with municipal, First Nations and union leaders in Burns Lake. Bell
travelled to the village to hear from the community about ways the Province can
help the region’s short- and long-term economic recovery efforts after the
destruction of the Babine Forest Products mill.

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Hampton willing to rebuild, says Bell

Prince George Citizen
January 29, 2012
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

After a week of doubt, a glimmer of hope arose Friday that Babine Forest sawmill could make a comeback.  The Burns Lake sawmill was destroyed in an explosion and fire Jan. 20, and a week later, its owners expressed interest in rebuilding, according to B.C. Jobs Minister  Pat Bell.  Speaking in a telephone press conference from Burns Lake, Bell said Oregon-based Hampton Affiliates, which has a 90 per cent stake in the mill, must first gain confidence in the timber supply before determining whether to start anew.  …Robert Luggi, 45, and Carl Charlie, 42 died in the disaster, the B.C. Coroners Service confirmed Friday.  Forest industry veteran and the B.C. government’s former “beetle boss,” Bob Clark, was named the lead in the town’s economic recovery effort. Bell said his task is to provide Hampton “with the best possible information as to what that fibre supply looks like.”

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Burns Lake community attempts rise from ashes

The Province
January 28, 2012
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

Burns Lake residents are collectively holding their breath and
preparing for hardship after a devastating mill fire last weekend
destroyed the town’s biggest employer.  “It’s the hardest time I’ve
seen in the 41 years I’ve lived here,” says retired teacher John Barth.
“The community is holding its breath. There is a fear for the future.”  Barth’s wife, Sandra, explains it as a town about to look at a “different reality.  “With the mill gone, the question is: What’s our identity?” she says.  Burns Lake, a town of 2,700 located in the geographical centre of B.C., is reeling after the Jan. 20 blaze.  The
Babine Forest Products sawmill employed 250 townspeople and processed
enough timber annually to build more than 16,000 houses.

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Port of Nanaimo experiences jump in log exports

Lumber volumes hit 115,000 tonnes, a 200% increase and the highest level since 2008
Nanaimo Daily News
January 28, 2012
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

The Port of Nanaimo just ended its best year in recent memory, and log exports helped make it happen.  Cargo traffic rose overall last year, the Island’s busiest port reported this week.  Lumber and logs made up most of the tonnage carried in 2011….Rising Chinese demand for wood fibre, either as milled lumber or as
logs, has revitalized B.C.’s faltering forest industry. Mill workers
appreciate additional manufacturing jobs but remain opposed to shipping
unprocessed logs overseas. ..”By the middle of 2010 things turned around and (we began) to see wood
products move again,” said Doug Peterson, port authority marketing
manager. “Then for the start of 2011 it just continued to grow.”

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Province to find jobs for Burns Lake mill workers

CBC.ca
January 27, 2012
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

A rapid response team led by B.C. jobs minister Pat Bell is in Burns
Lake, B.C., Friday to meet with community leaders about the village’s
economic future and to help find work for residents suddenly made
jobless.  …Bell said officials are tracking down short term jobs at mills and
mines in neighbouring communities, and examining transportation options
to help people commute to work from Burns Lake.  Employees collected their final paycheque on Thursday and many have filed for Employment Insurance. …”The goal is to allow them to continue to live in Burns Lake while we
work through the timber supply analysis, and if Hampton decides to
rebuild the mill, keep them employed until the mill reopens.

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Deadly Burns Lake tragedy leaves town picking up the pieces

by Gordon Hoekstra
Victoria Times Colonist
January 27, 2012
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

Workers on the Friday night shift at the Babine Forest Products mill in Burns Lake were getting little relief after nearly a week of extreme cold.  The mercury had plunged to -36 C three days before, and dipped below -40 C the next two days and, although the temperature had risen to -20 C by Friday, a pipe burst spilling water into the sawmill basement. It had to be shut off and repaired. Workers said hoses on equipment that contain materials such as hydraulic fluid were also breaking.  Sam Tom, a 33-year veteran at the mill, was in the log yard that night, running a loader that feeds timber to the sawmill.  A sprawling plant, Babine Forest Products, which started operating in 1975, also includes a planer mill (which puts a smooth finish on boards), large kilns where the lumber is dried before its shipped to market, as well as industrial shops and administrative offices.

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Sawmill loss raises timber questions

Houston Today
January 29, 2012
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

Burns Lake’s loss of a sawmill is raising questions about the long-term timber supply along the Highway 16 corridor.  …”We have to take a significant look at the whole area and see whether there are viable options that can make things work,” said John Rustad, the Liberal MLA for Nechako Lakes and a member of the task force.  Rustad said some 300 million cubic metres worth of timber lie unallocated in the Fort St. James and Mackenzie timber supply area. South of Ootsa Lake is another 5 million cubic metres that may be an option if prices stay high, he added.

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Former mill employees go looking for work outside Burns Lake

Globe and Mail
January 28, 2012
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

Burns Lake residents will have to fan out across the region to find work after a fire destroyed a mill that was the town’s main employer, but they shouldn’t have to abandon the community, B.C.’s jobs minister says.

Pat Bell said that while the province makes the case to the owners for rebuilding the sawmill that burned on Jan. 20, the 280 direct employees and others affected should be able to commute to jobs within an hour of the small town about 200 kilometres east of Prince George.

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Fewer people to be working at local mill

Fort Frances Times Online
January 27, 2012
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada East, Canada

Fewer mill employees will be going back to work once paper production resumes at the Resolute Forest Products mill here early next month.  “We’ve been told by the company that when they restart, that we’ll lose probably 16 percent of our membership—roughly 45 jobs won’t be recalled,” Communications, Energy and Paperworkers Union of Canada Ontario vice-president Kim Ginter confirmed this morning.  “If some people retire, that will be less,” he noted. “Other unions are affected differently—by the same means but maybe the percentage is different.  “We’re not negotiating concessions or anything,” Ginter stressed.

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Forest jobs bill an act of compromise that clearly creates jobs

The Missoulian
January 26, 2012
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States, US West

The Forest Jobs and Recreation Act balances timber harvests with
conservation of the most scenic and wild places in Montana.
Intended to promote cooperation and collaboration in the management
of national forests, it is the result of just that.  The bill already has the backing of timber interests from the
Montana Wood Products Association to the Montana Logging
Association, as well as local timber mills like Sun Mountain Lumber
and RY Timber. It also has the backing of conservation groups, from
Montana Trout Unlimited to the Montana Wilderness
Association.

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Act uses compromise to break the gridlock

Helena Independent Record
January 29, 2012
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States, US West

Seeking a better way, groups representing the timber industry
and recreational interests developed the Beaverhead-Deerlodge
Partnership five years ago, staking out common ground. Through the
help of Sen. Jon Tester, their initial proposal became part of the
Forest Jobs and Recreation Act (FJRA), an effort to break the
gridlock surrounding these issues on the Beaverhead-Deerlodge
National Forest and portions of the Lolo and Kootenai national
forests.  More than 20 years ago, many of the same individuals and groups
participated in a process that resulted in the Deer Lodge
Settlement agreement facilitating the withdrawal of lawsuits
against the Deer Lodge Forest Plan and allowed the Forest Service
to move from gridlock to management. These groups have a history of
resolution, not obstruction.

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Gunns’ debt deadline looms

ABC News, Australia
January 30, 2012
Category: Business & Politics
Region: International

The deadline is looming for Tasmanian timber company Gunns to repay its $340 million debt facility with the ANZ bank.  Gunns has been trying to renegotiate its debt with ANZ which is due for repayment on Tuesday.  The company has been seeking an extension until December but it is unclear whether that has been approved.  A spokesman for Gunns says it will make an announcement to the market when it is appropriate.

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Forestry face off

ABC News, Australia
January 30, 2012
Category: Business & Politics
Region: International

Forest workers and environmentalists have faced off outside the Hobart headquarters of timber processor Ta Ann Tasmania.  Ta Ann is trying to rebuild its image after what it calls a misinformation campaign by environmental groups.  Operations
manager Paul Woolley says green groups have damaged the company’s
international reputation, by claiming Ta Ann processes old growth
timber.  The claims cost the company a contract with a London Olympics flooring manufacturer in the UK.  Mr Woolley says the company only uses regrowth timber, but has been
targeted by activists since the forest peace deal was signed last year.

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Wood, Paper & Green Building

A new use for hay

Kennebec Journal
January 30, 2012
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: Canada East, Canada

VASSALBORO — Peter Bragdon proudly showed off his prototype “hay log” at the kitchen table. Bragdon, who has been haying for 30 years on his 170-acre
farm, said his hay log — a solid fuel that can be burned in place of
wood in furnaces, stoves, fire pits, chimeras and camp fires — is good
news for farmers. The production of the tightly compressed 4-by-12-inch grassy logs will be an outlet for their excess hay.

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Jody Racicot aims for A higher fidelity

National Post
January 28, 2012
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: Canada East, Canada

Designer Jody Racicot likes to fuse unlikely elements in his Modern
Revision line, such as a desk made of a 1960s Formica dinette table top
with traditionally dovetailed drawers and pulls made from vintage key
heads. This year, the Prince Edward Island creator mashes style with
technology in HiFi, his showpiece in the Studio North exhibit at the
Interior Design Show in Toronto.

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Victorian Woodworks in administration

Timber Trades Journal
January 27, 2012
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: International

The UK’s largest stockholder of reclaimed timber for flooring has gone into administration.  Victorian
Woodworks, which has its own sawmill in Upminster and a showroom in
Knightsbridge, has appointed Ken Touhey and David Oprey of Chantrey
Vellacott as joint administrators.  The company sources reclaimed
timber from all over the world, which it processes into reclaimed and
antique flooring. It also supplies new solid and engineered wood
flooring.  It has manufactured bespoke flooring and surface
solutions for the UK’s leading retail outlets, restaurants and leisure
facilities, as well as for the headquarters of some well-known brands.

Read More

Forestry

Apolitical silviculture group gives Dix a shot at keynote speech

Kamloops News
January 27, 2012
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Big political players will exchange ideas on B.C.’s forest policy at a conference in Kamloops beginning Wednesday.  Jobs, Tourism and Innovation Minister Pat Bell is scheduled to speak Thursday afternoon to the Western Silviculture Contractors’ Association. Chief forester Jim Snetsinger will speak to members the same morning in an event at Coast Kamloops Hotel and Conference Centre Wednesday to Friday.  But in a twist, Opposition leader Adrian Dix will make the keynote address Thursday evening.  John Betts, executive director of the association, said the group is apolitical and is not intending to upstage government ministers by inviting the New Democrat leader as its keynote speaker.

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Reforestation plan falls short of need: Simpson

Prince George Citizen
January 29, 2012
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Cariboo North MLA Bob Simpson is disappointed the province isn’t going far enough to heal beetle-killed pine forests.  The province announced an initiative Friday to allow companies to replant Crown forests damaged by the mountain pine beetle and forest fires in exchange for carbon credits.  Simpson, an independent MLA who formerly served as the NDP forest critic, said the proposal falls far short of the need to replant Crown forests.  “The only reason this is possible is because in 2002 the government changed the law that required the Crown to take care of forests that are damaged by fires, pests and  disease,” Simpson said.  “They say they hope to do as much as 10,000 hectares a year. Even using the numbers the provided in their press release, 800,000 hectares, that’ll be 80 years to meet the demand of today.”

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Branding ‘Ottawa’s Great Forest’

Ottawa Citizen (blog)
January 29, 2012
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

It’s fascinating to watch, in real time, the effort to turn part of
the woods on the South March Highlands into a thing it’d practically be a
crime to cut down and build on.  The latest thing is a voting contest connected to the Canadian Institute of Planners,
asking people to pick some of Canada’s greatest places. The South March
Highlands generally are currently ranked 20th, with 417 votes, behind
such great places as Vancouver’s Dr. Sun Yat-Sen Classical Chinese
Garden (go when it’s raining, I suggest). …The description somebody wrote for the contest
is downright inspiring. Apparently it’s “old-growth,” which last I
heard isn’t the case — it’s second-growth. It’s also both “threatened by
urban sprawl” and “within a major urban city” and “so close to the
city’s downtown core,” which seems contradictory.

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The Toilet Paper Chase – Marketplace Episode

CBC Marketplace
January 27, 2012
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada
Canadians love their soft toilet paper, and some of the softest
toilet paper comes from new trees. For the environmentally conscious
shopper, eco-labels on products such as toilet paper can put their mind
at ease — a guarantee that the forest the paper comes from is being
protected.  Organizations promising the long-term
protection of forests have standards companies must follow before they
can put those logos on their products. You may have seen them on paper
products, or wood products.  But what do these eco-logos mean on the ground? And what do they mean to Canadians?
Watch the entire episode.

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Hudak promises to scrap the Far North Act

Timmins Times
January 27, 2012
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

Ontario Opposition Leader Tim Hudak won a round of
applause in Timmins Wednesday when he said he wants to scrap the
controversial Far North Act. Hudak was in Timmins as part of a week long tour of the North… Speaking to a Timmins Chamber of Commerce luncheon on Wednesday,
Hudak called Bill 191 “a colossal ball of red tape” that he said would
turn Northern Ontario “into a virtual museum.” Hudak claimed the
act did not take in the interests of Northerners but instead was
inspired by the concerns and criticisms of  Southern Ontario
special-interest groups. “They want see Northern Ontario as one giant park,” said Hudak.

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US Forest Service streamlines appeal process; critics object

The Missoulian
January 29, 2012
Category: Forestry
Region: United States

What’s the difference between an appeal and an objection?  When dealing with the U.S. Forest Service, it determines whether
your complaint gets dealt with on paper or face-to-face. A recent
change in Forest Service decisionmaking requires project opponents
to argue their points much earlier in the process.  Proponents of the change expect better, faster decisions on
logging sales, special use permits and other activities on national
forests. Agency sparring partners fear it limits people’s ability
to block bad decisions.  “Frankly, we think it’s going to be a huge improvement,” said
Keith Olson of the Montana Logging Association. “In order for
somebody to become a litigant, they have to have involvement in the
project. They can’t come in at the 11th hour and throw a monkey
wrench in the works.”

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Book review: ‘The Global Forest: 40 Ways That Trees Can Save Us’

Miami Herald
January 30, 2012
Category: Forestry
Region: United States

This is a book to keep on the nightstand and maybe give yourself the treat of one beautiful essay a night. “The Global Forest: 40 Ways That Trees Can Save Us” (Penguin Group, $15), may not be the best title. It sounds kind of like a how-to book. A checklist of things to tick off. Instead, this is an elegant, eloquent collection of essays that conveys the author’s reverence for forests in one area after another – in its nuts, in its medicinal properties, in its sacred connections. Author Diana Beresford-Kroeger is a botanist and expert on the medicinal, environmental and nutritional properties of trees.


Read more here: http://www.miamiherald.com/2012/01/30/2615392/book-review-the-global-forest.html#storylink=cpy

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How to Manage U.S. Forests, Version 3.1

New York Times
January 27, 2012
Category: Forestry
Region: United States

In the high-tech world, new versions of programs are released to fix
new bugs. In the federal regulatory world, new versions of management
blueprints are released to address legal problems. Each is generally
judged by a simple metric: did the fixes work, or will they have to be
redone?  By that standard, efforts to update a land management
planning rule for the National Forest System have not exactly been a
success.  The Bush Administration’s attempt to overhaul it was
rejected by a federal judge who said it did not provide adequate
safeguards for flora and fauna. When the Obama administration unveiled
its first attempt at adjusting the rule 11 months ago, environmentalists
criticized it as weak in terms of protecting water purity and
biodiversity. So on Thursday, the administration released a new version.

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A solution for the forests

OregonLive.com – Opinion
January 28, 2012
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

In this highly charged, often nasty, political climate it takes no small
amount of courage and trust to cross party lines to turn a crisis into a
solution.   Congressmen Peter DeFazio, Greg Walden, and Kurt
Schrader have shown their mettle by doing just that as they craft a
solution to the O & C crisis – – for the benefit of Oregonians
living in rural counties who have historically depended on timber
harvest revenues from these lands to pay for vital community services.   The
last federal check to Oregon’s rural counties to help offset the loss
in payments to timber-dependent counties was mailed January 19th. And
sadly, these lands are still in a kind of limbo with a spotted owl
forest management regime that gives conflicting and sometimes confusing
direction when it comes to lands not protected for owl habitat.

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County timber payments: Put public lands ahead of politics

OregonLive.com – Opinion
January 28, 2012
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

There is no denying that Oregon’s congressional delegation is under
enormous political pressure because of the expiration of federal
payments to support county budgets and that there are difficult choices
to be made about how to keep counties afloat (“A new forest policy or bust,” editorial, Jan. 23).
But short-term political self-interest is not an excuse for elected
officials attempting to sacrifice clean water, wildlife and America’s
public lands.  Unfortunately, Reps. Peter DeFazio, Kurt Schrader
and Greg Walden appear to be favoring short-term political expediency
over finding a viable solution to the county payments impasse. They are
poised to partner with the House Republican leadership on a plan to bail
out county budgets by relinking them to clear-cut logging on public
lands. Most Oregonians strongly oppose such a plan, and these
representatives know it.

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Forests of carbon: Reasonable approaches can sort out complex forest policy issues

By Jim Boyer
OregonLive.com – Opinion
January 29, 2012
Category: Forestry, Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: United States, US West

Informed readers might find themselves confused about what the right
policy is for Oregon’s public forests. Just reading about it in the
newspaper can be daunting.  Recently this newspaper has published
stories about the leadership of Gov. Kitzhaber and Oregon’s
congressional delegation to break 20 years of impasse around federal
forest management. Stories have covered the fate of timber-based rural
counties facing economic collapse, but also biomass and carbon research
seemingly at odds with actively managing forests for health and economic
benefits.  Whatever your views, it’s a certainty that science
will reveal even more about forests, carbon and climate change; wood
biomass energy; and sound forestry practices. But future science should
not stall informed public policy. We already know a great deal, and what
we do know aligns with a common sense approach to forest management.

Read More

Mountain Pine Beetle project donations on the rise

Black Hills Pioneer
January 28, 2012
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

DEADWOOD — Property owners in the Northern Hills are seeing
firsthand the devastation of the Mountain Pine Beetle in their own
back yard, and have joined the efforts of Lawrence County and the
U.S. Forest Service in battling the epidemic by contributing to the
fight fund.  On Tuesday, Lawrence County Commissioners accepted a $5,000 check
from the Black Hills Fly Fishers and a $50,000 check from Jim
Neiman of Neiman Enterprises, which operates Spearfish Forest
Products. Neiman has also pledged a $50,000 in-kind donation toward
the fight, which has already included recon crew assistance,
mapping and snow removal.

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Guest opinion: Coalition built trust to create balanced forest bill

Billings Gazette
January 28, 2012
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Montana’s Forest Jobs and Recreation Act again came close to
passage last month. The bill aimed at creating jobs and improving
forest management enjoys strong support in Montana and growing
support in the U.S. Senate.  But as FJRA gains momentum, opponents appear to be shifting
tactics. Because so many Montanans have united around FJRA’s
collaborative approach to creating jobs and resolving national
forest conflicts, outright opposition has become politically
imprudent.  So we now hear proposals to change the forest jobs bill by
requiring completion of the logging and thinning before
resource-protection provisions take effect. Known as “trigger
language,” this suggestion is a red herring — a made-in-Washington
poison-pill provision that Congress has rejected time and again as
unworkable.

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Forest Service limiting road access due to logging of mountain beetle infested trees

Associated Press
January 29, 2012
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

SPEARFISH, S.D. — The Northern Hills Ranger District says it is closing some roads to give more space to loggers cutting trees affected by mountain pine beetles.  District recreation specialist Bonnie Jones tells the Rapid City Journal that the roads are narrow and icy and there have been several close calls between private vehicles and log trucks.  The district is closing Besant Park Road, Long Draw
Road and a short portion of South Rapid Creek Road for public safety as
there is a high volume of heavy logging traffic in the area.

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Today in History: Jan. 29, 2012

Record-Searchlight
January 29, 2012
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

In 1962: Twenty-five members were added to the rolls of the Shasta
Cascade Hoo Hoo club No. 133. About 140 persons attended the initiation.
Hoo Hoo is an international fraternal order devoted to the interests of
the lumber industry. Its members are chosen from industry executives,
supervisors, foresters and other officials.
END

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DEEP Announces Urban Forestry Grants

EastHampton-Portland Patch
January 29, 2012
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

The Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental Protection
has announced the winners of 17 winners for the agency’s municipalities
and non-profit urban forestry grants, including Rocky Hill, which will
get $2050 to plan sugar maple trees in Elm Ridge Park.  In all the DEEP will award $81,425 in America the Beautiful
grants for the urban forestry projects in communities.  These grants
cover a range of urban forestry activities, including an urban tree
canopy assessment in New Britain, improvements to a volunteer tree
nursery in Milford and the replacement of trees lost to Tropical Storm
Irene in Sprague.

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Annual forest stand examination list available for review

Alexandria Echo Press
January 29, 2012
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

The annual stand examination list (ASEL) for state-administered forest
land, prepared by the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources (DNR),
is available for public review. …Proposed stand examination locations, preliminary management
prescriptions and forest inventory information can be viewed on the DNR
website at www.dnr.state.mn.us/maps/forestview/index.html . Comments
regarding a proposed stand examination site can be submitted to the DNR
using this website.  People
without Internet access or those who prefer to review and discuss the
annual stand examination list information directly with a forester, may
contact or visit a local DNR area forestry office. Individuals should
contact the local area forestry office prior to a visit to ensure the
appropriate forestry staff will be available.

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Millions of acres in Highlands ‘suitable’ for trees

BBC News
January 28, 2012
Category: Forestry
Region: International

More than two million
acres in the Highlands could potentially be planted with trees to aid
aspirations for 25% of Scotland to have woodland cover.  The Woodland Expansion Advisory Group is consulting on the Scottish government’s proposal to expand woods and forests.  In a draft response, Highland Council said it had identified suitable land.  But it said large areas of agricultural land were involved and farmers and crofters may not want to lose it.  More than 988,000 acres (400,000 hectares) has been deemed suitable for
all types of woodland and more than a million acres (520,000 hectares)
has potential for woods with large open spaces.

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Conference set to increase Maori potential in Forestry

By Forestry Industry EngineeringAssociation
Scoop Independent News
January 30, 2012
Category: Forestry
Region: International

The Futures Forestry Finance Conference has been touted as the most important event of the year for Maori in forestry.  “The opportunity for Maori trustees to learn from international forestry market experts and to get alongside senior managers from other forest producers and financiers only comes around once every two years, ” says FIEA Director John Stulen.  The Forestry Industry Engineering Association has specifically focused on accommodating for Maori Authorities and businesses to connect with key industry leaders at their upcoming conference in March from the 7th to 8th at the Crowne Plaza in Auckland.

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Activists to stand in the way of Warrup being logged

Farm Weekly
January 30, 2012
Category: Forestry
Region: International

ONGOING controversy over the fate of the Warrup forest block near
Bridgetown may come to a head this summer after confirmation the area
will be logged.  Activists have confirmed they will do everything they can to stop the logging.  Bridgetown-Greenbushes Friends of the Forest (BGFF) president Richard Wittenoom said the logging in Warrup was imminent.  However, he said Arcadia would be logged first.  “My understanding is Arcadia first, then Warrup 06 and later Warrup 08 and 02,” Mr Wittenoom said.  Mr
Wittenoom said in the near future the BGFF would further highlight to
residents the impacts this logging will have for the region’s forestry
and disseminate information on climate change impacts and national park
issues.

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Toxic moth outbreak killing trees

BBC News
January 27, 2012
Category: Forestry
Region: International

Plans are in place to eradicate a toxic caterpillar from west Berkshire following an outbreak last year. The oak processionary moth (OPM), which hatches in July and August, was discovered in Pangbourne. The Forestry Commission will survey an extended area around
the original infested site in March and tree spraying will begin in
April. OPM hairs contain a toxin that can cause itchy skin rashes as well as eye and throat irritations.

Read More

Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy

Job creation with a green touch

Vancouver Sun
January 29, 2012
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: Canada, Canada West

Want a recipe to create jobs in British Columbia? Here it is: bold
political commitment to a job-creating program that makes both
environmental and fiscal sense. We need to create jobs, but we need to
fight climate change just as urgently. The fact is, the two can go hand
in hand. Two sectors in our province’s economy have real potential to
create green jobs: retrofitting energy-inefficient buildings and public
transit infrastructure investments. The easiest and fastest way to
reduce B.C.’s energy consumption — and diminish climate-altering
greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions — is to improve the energy efficiency of
buildings. Families, businesses, public agencies and not-for-profits all
occupy buildings that consume energy and emit around 7,700 kilotons of
carbon dioxide per year, more than B.C.’s entire manufacturing industry.

Read More

Forests of carbon: Reasonable approaches can sort out complex forest policy issues

By Jim Boyer
OregonLive.com – Opinion
January 29, 2012
Category: Forestry, Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: United States, US West

Informed readers might find themselves confused about what the right
policy is for Oregon’s public forests. Just reading about it in the
newspaper can be daunting.  Recently this newspaper has published
stories about the leadership of Gov. Kitzhaber and Oregon’s
congressional delegation to break 20 years of impasse around federal
forest management. Stories have covered the fate of timber-based rural
counties facing economic collapse, but also biomass and carbon research
seemingly at odds with actively managing forests for health and economic
benefits.  Whatever your views, it’s a certainty that science
will reveal even more about forests, carbon and climate change; wood
biomass energy; and sound forestry practices. But future science should
not stall informed public policy. We already know a great deal, and what
we do know aligns with a common sense approach to forest management.

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Biomass projects burned by low natural gas prices

To reduce its natural gas use, a Benson, Minn., ethanol plant installed technology to gasify wood chips and corncobs. But the low price of natural gas makes the alternative energy uneconomical.
Minneapolis Star Tribune
January 28, 2012
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: US East, United States

Rock-bottom natural gas prices are undercutting Minnesota’s
taxpayer-supported efforts to expand home-grown energy sources like wood
chips and cornstalks.  Minnesota has spent more than $11 million in taxpayer and utility
funds to advance technologies that burn biomass for heat and electric
generation or convert it to a synthetic gas. Now, it’s getting difficult
for the technology to compete.  “The era of low-priced natural gas has blunted opportunities for
biomass and other renewables,” said Doug Tiffany, an agricultural
economist at the University of Minnesota.

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