Tree Frog Forestry News

Daily Archives: February 3, 2012

Business & Politics

Domtar 4Q net income falls sharply on weak prices

Associated Press
February 3, 2012
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada

MONTREAL — Canadian pulp and paper maker Domtar Corp. said its fourth-quarter net income fell sharply from the same period a year before as global pulpwood prices plunged. While net income was down, it still widely beat Wall Street expectations and shares rose almost 2 percent Friday. Domtar said it expects pulpwood prices to remain under pressure in 2012, while North American demand for fine paper will fall between 2 percent and 4 percent. But the company said any uptick in hiring could spur more demand.

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Domtar profit tumbles, sales flat

Globe and Mail
February 3, 2012
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada

Domtar Corp.  profit tumbled in the fourth quarter as the paper and pulp producer was affected by both a seasonal slowdown and the rapid decline in global pulp prices. The Montreal-based company says profit dropped to $61-million (U.S.), or $1.63 per share in the three month period ended. That compares to a profit $325-million, or $7.59 per share a year earlier.

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Update on Fibrek’s Ongoing Strategic Alternatives Review Process

by Fibrek
Canada News Wire press release
February 3, 2012
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada

MONTREAL – Fibrek Inc. announced today that a proposal has emerged from its strategic alternatives review process, which was initiated by Fibrek’s Board following the unsolicited insider bid (the “Insider Bid”) made by AbitibiBowater Inc. on December 15, 2011. The Board of Directors and Management are currently in negotiations with a number of third parties in response to the Insider Bid. While it is impossible at this stage to predict whether any other competing offers will emerge, the Board expects to receive alternative proposals from such third parties. Third parties have until 5:00 p.m. today, February 3, 2012 to submit their proposals. Fibrek will update the market as appropriate as this process continues, but there can be no assurance that a transaction will take place.

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Domtar Q4 profit falls on weak pulp prices

Reuters
February 3, 2012
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada

Paper and pulp producer Domtar Corp’s quarterly profit fell 80 percent, hurt by weak pulp prices and lower paper shipments, and said pulp prices are likely to remain depressed. The Canadian paper maker is trying to ramp up its personal care business as falling pulp prices weigh on its core business. Wood pulp futures has fallen more than 11 percent in last year to trade at its lowest levels in two years.

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NewPage workers suing company for $168M

Cape Breton Post
February 2, 2012
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada East, Canada

POINT TUPPER — The union representing workers at NewPage Port Hawkesbury has filed a $168-million lawsuit against the company for severance, pensions and other benefits that it says the employees are owed. The claim by the Communications, Energy and Paperworkers Local 972 against NewPage Port Hawkesbury Holding LLC was filed in the U.S. Bankruptcy Court in Delaware on Tuesday. The claim is contingent on the company being wound up and it being unable to pay the debts that it owes the union, its members and the pension plans.

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More layoffs at Kruger’s Corner Brook mill (plus video)

CBC News
February 1, 2012
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada East, Canada

Kruger Inc. has laid off 39 workers — including 31 CEP workers — at its pulp and paper mill in Corner Brook. Eight machinists received their notice earlier Wednesday. Four more machinists will be laid off at a later date, sources told CBC News – that will bring the total number of layoffs so far to 43. …The company is holding meetings Wednesday with officials from the eight unions representing workers at the mill. It’s expected more job cuts will be annouced.

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Feds and New Brunswick ante up $17 million to help reopen shuttered mill

Canadian Press
February 3, 2012
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada East, Canada

MIRAMICHI, N.B. – More than $17 million in public money will go towards reopening a mill in northern New Brunswick that was shut down five years ago, the provincial and federal governments announced Friday. The funds will go to Arbec Forest Products, which purchased the former Weyerhaeuser mill in November. The plant made oriented strand board, a material used in home construction, before it closed in 2007 and laid off 140 people. New Brunswick will provide a $15.3-million package that includes payroll rebates, a $5.6-million loan and a $7-million loan guarantee. The Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency will give the Quebec-based company $2 million.

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Company receives financial assistance and wood allocation to reopen Miramichi mill

New Brunswick Government press release
February 3, 2012
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada East, Canada

MIRAMICHI – The provincial government is providing a financial package and wood allocation agreement to assist Arbec Forest Products Inc. in reopening an oriented strand board (OSB) mill in Miramichi. “Forest-product manufacturing is a major focus of our government’s plan to help communities grow and create new jobs throughout New Brunswick,” said Premier David Alward. “Arbec Forest Products Inc. recognizes the tremendous opportunities for growth that exist in the Miramichi region. Our government is proud to work with them and with other partners to provide real hope for Miramichi families.”

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Weyerhaeuser Reports Fourth Quarter, Full Year Results

By Weyerhaeuser Company
MarketWatch (press release)
February 3, 2012
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States

FEDERAL WAY, Wash. — Weyerhaeuser Company WY +3.90% today reported net earnings of $65 million for the fourth quarter, or 12 cents per diluted share, on net sales from continuing operations of $1.6 billion. This compares with net earnings of $171 million, or 32 cents per diluted share, on net sales from continuing operations of $1.5 billion for the same period last year. Earnings for the fourth quarter of 2011 include net after-tax charges of $12 million for restructuring and asset impairments. Excluding these items, the company reported net earnings of $77 million, or 14 cents per diluted share. This compares with net earnings before special items of $52 million in the fourth quarter of 2010.

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Int’l Paper’s EPS Tops, Sales Misses

Zacks.com
February 2, 2012
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States

International Paper Co. (IP) reported fourth quarter adjusted EPS of 66 cents, a 3% drop from the prior-year quarter but outperforming the Zacks Consensus Estimate of 61 cents. After including special items EPS in the quarter stood at 59 cents compared with 73 cents in the prior year quarter. Net sales were $6.37 billion, versus $6.53 billion during the year-ago quarter, missing the Zacks Consensus Estimate of $6.46 billion.

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Weyerhaeuser profit down 62% on revamp charges

MarketWatch
February 3, 2012
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States

Weyerhaeuser Co.’s WY +5.46% fourth-quarter income fell 62% as the forest-products company booked restructuring charges and write-downs, while the wood products segment posted a wider sequential loss and softer sales. Weyerhaeuser, one of the nation’s largest wood-product companies, had seen results supported by increased demand from China, though that demand has eased. A sluggish home building market has also been a stiff headwind recently.

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At LBM Expo, economist muses on the “recovery”

Home Channel News
February 1, 2012
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States

“There has actually been recovery since 2009, but there’s probably nobody in this room who believes that,” said economist Bob Berg during a luncheon presentation at the Northeastern Retail Lumber Association’s (NRLA) 2012 LBM Expo. He added to the positive news by suggesting that banks are starting to lend money again, as the nation’s financial institutions slowly realize that one of the few ways for them to make money is to lend it the old-fashioned way. Berg, a founding member of RISI and analyst with more than 30 years experience following the North American solid wood products and timber markets, delivered his presentation “Two-year outlook for the North American Panel and Softwood Lumber Markets” during the NRLA event at Foxwoods in Mashantucket, Conn.

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Boise Cascade adds sawmill in Washington to its Inland Region group

La Grande Observer
February 2, 2012
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States, US West

Boise Cascade Wood Products announced yesterday it has closed the deal on the Stimson Lumber Company sawmill in Arden, Wash. The mill becomes a part of Boise Cascade’s Inland Region, which includes mills in La Grande, Island City, Elgin and Pilot Rock in northeast Oregon, and also in Kettle Falls, Wash. Inland Region Manager Tom Insko said the Arden mill fits well in the region’s operations because it is ideally located and well equipped. “Given that the mill is geographically located near our Kettle Falls operations and is a well-designed, highly efficient facility, it’s a nice complement to our lumber business,” Insko said.

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Finnish company to build pulp to biodiesel refinery

BioEnergy News
February 3, 2012
Category: Business & Politics
Region: International

Finnish paper producer UPM is to build a biorefinery that will produce biofuels from crude tall oil derived from pulp in Lappeenranta, Finland. The facility will be commercial size and produce about 100,000 tonnes of biodiesel a year to be used as vehicle fuel. The biodiesel is called BioVerno and produces 80% less greenhouse gases than traditional fossil fuels. Construction on the biorefinery is expected to start in the middle of 2012 and scheduled for completion by 2014, with the development costing about €150 million.

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Extreme challenge for the forestry industry

ABC News, Australia
February 3, 2012
Category: Business & Politics
Region: International

The Tasmanian Sawmillers Association is warning the woodchip export downturn is now an extremely serious situation. Two McKay Timber sawmills and the Barber’s sawmill in Launceston have stood down more than 30 workers after Artec, the state’s only native woodchip exporter, temporarily closed. But the association’s Fred Ralph says the industry is not collapsing yet. “That is not to downgrade the seriousness of the situation the industry is confronted with,” he said.

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Timber export roads lead to China

ABC News, Australia
February 3, 2012
Category: Business & Politics
Region: International

An analyst who has been reviewing Forestry Tasmania’s operations believes the company’s future lies in tapping into the Chinese woodchip market. Andrew Morton has released the first part of a review into the state-owned company. It shows demand for Forestry Tasmania’s hardwood products in Japan has virtually dried up. Mr Morton says China is the emerging player, last year importing 6 million tonnes of woodchips. He says demand from China is soon expected to exceed Japan’s but it will be a challenge.

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TPT Export market report |

International Forest Industries
February 3, 2012
Category: Business & Politics
Region: International

2011 has proven to be another strong year for NZ log exports, with 11.9 million jas shipped from NZ ports over the year. This is a 12% year on year volume increase over 2010’s 10.6 million jas. NZ’s harvesting/transport and port infrastructure have managed this increased well, albeit not without some signs of stress, but will have ongoing challenges if export volumes continue to rise at rates seen in recent years. The Chinese market had a strong finish to 2011, with some 60% of NZ’s log exports heading in to this market over the year. Reduced Chinese inventory levels have allowed for a positive start to 2012, but as is normal for the period preceding and during Chinese New Year; the market has now slowed down and is expected to remain this way until late February.

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Tasmanian woodchip markets decline

ABC News Australia
February 3, 2012
Category: Business & Politics
Region: International

MARK COLVIN: The only native forest woodchip exporter left in Tasmania, Artec, has suspended operations. The move has temporarily shut down two sawmills. Tasmania used to be home to Australia’s biggest native forest woodchipper, Gunns. But Gunns has stopped logging native forests and closed down its woodchip export mills.  And the future for woodchip exports is far from rosy. The State Government has today released a report that shows markets to Japan have dried up, while new markets in China are not yet sustainable. Felicity Ogilvie reports from Hobart. FELICITY OGILVIE: An independent report that’s been prepared by the company URS has found that Tasmanian woodchip exports to Japan have collapsed. Andrew Morton from URS says the decline has been caused by the high Australian dollar and a preference for plantation chips. 

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Wood, Paper & Green Building

North American structural panel production stagnated last year

EUWID Wood Products and Panels
February 2, 2012
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: Canada, United States

Total North American structural panel production across all regions has stabilised at year-ago levels in 2011 as a whole, in spite of a slight weakening in the fourth quarter. According to APA-The Engineered Wood Association a total of 23.203 million m³ of structural panels was produced in North America last year. OSB output at 13.622 million m³ was practically on par with the year before, whereas softwood plywood output sustained a minor fall by 1.3% to 9.581 million m³. As a result, OSB increased its share in the total production a little to 58.7%.
END

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More artisans are turning to salvaged wood

Toronto Star
February 3, 2012
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: Canada

Last weekend, I took a quick trip to the Interior Design Show where I took refuge in Studio North, the section where local artisans hang out. I must confess to a certain fatigue with our consumer society’s obsession for decor, the constantly changing fashions that make colour and furniture choices look dated so quickly. So why not look to the handcrafted, and yes, more expensive, but artistic pieces that will last. Just as I found at the One of a Kind Show last November, the go-local trend is gaining momentum among woodworkers, as is the practice of using salvaged materials. Rob Day, of Carroll Street Studio ( www.carrollstreet.ca), was sitting at a table he had made from two-by-fours torn out of a Rosedale home. (Renovator Greening Homes sends discarded materials his way.) A native of the New York City area and with a history degree from NYU, Day picked up the skills of his craft on the job in woodworking shops. Marriage brought him to Toronto.

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Weyerhaeuser launches fire protected I-joists

Timber Trades Journal
February 1, 2012
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: United States

Weyerhaeuser has launched a fire protection system for its TJI-joists.  The company’s new “Flak Jacket” protection involves a specialty coating applied to TJI-joists to improve their fire protection.  The coating, which confers a grey colour to the OSB web and part of the LVL flange, is designed to provide builders with a way to achieve one-hour floor/ceiling assemblies and comply with new International Residential Code fire protection requirements.

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Comparing different woods

Grand Junction Sentinel
February 3, 2012
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: United States, US West

Wood products are known for their natural beauty, but when selecting a type of wood for your next cabinetry, flooring, furniture or millwork project, it is important to also consider the level of durability by understanding the difference between wood types. Each type and species of wood has an individual cellular structure that creates unique physical properties that determine suitability for different uses. For example, the hardness of woods varies widely, so certain hardwood species are not recommended for flooring because they are not hard enough to withstand heavy wear and tear.

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Forestry

Province unsure of its unrestocked forest base

Prince George Citizen
February 2, 2012
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Massive swaths of B.C. forestry land are in need of replanting. The question is just how much of it is there? The amount of unrestocked forest in B.C. may be over 12 times higher than Ministry of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations estimates, according to veteran forester Anthony Britneff. According to the ministry, 730,000 hectares of B.C.’s forest land as not satisfactorily restocked (NSR). But Britneff said his estimates put the number closer to 9.1 million hectares – 2.3 million hectares of which could realistically be replanted while the rest presents challenges. In September the Forest Practices Board, the province’s independent forestry watchdog, launched a special investigation, and today, Forest Practices Board special investigations manager Marvin Eng is expected to give an update on the investigation at the Western Silvicultural Contractors Association’s AGM in Kamloops. “Up to 20 per cent of the forested area is not growing trees to the productive potential of the land,” Britneff said. “Is the timber

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Interior will pay price for gov’t neglect of dead forests, Dix says

Kamloops Daily News
February 2, 2012
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

The B.C. Liberal government is ignoring dead forests — a policy that will haunt the Interior economy for decades, Opposition leader Adrian Dix charged Thursday. “We don’t know key questions about the inventory in our own province. That’s one of the things they learned today at this conference,” Dix told reporters in an interview. The New Democrat, fresh from a poll that places him as B.C.’s most popular leader, was the keynote speaker at a Western Silviculture Contractors’ Association conference in Kamloops. Dix said the province is ignoring forests killed by mountain pine beetle that have either not been replanted or have not regrown naturally. Those areas are known in ministry lingo as not sufficiently restocked.

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Carleton’s David Miller spearheads new and natural ways to fend off …

Research taps into forestry possibilities
Telegraph Journal
February 1, 2012
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

FREDERICTON – From budworm-resistant trees, to perfumes made from smelly pulp effluent, to bio-pharma and bio-fuels, innovative, bio-tech breakthroughs are shaking Canada’s forestry sector to its roots. People working in the industry, whether they’re in charge of large forest companies or private woodlots, are realizing there’s more to trees than wood. “As far as new products go, we all have heard that there has to be more to our forests than just lumber and pulp,” said Peggy Mc-Dougall, a professional forester who helps look after a 5,500-acre woodlot at Thulium Farm in southeastern New Brunswick. “There are other resource values. Medicines, oils, fuels – we have First Nations who are very knowledgeable on this and we should be working with them. There are a lot of products we can get from our forests and we need to take a harder look at the opportunities.”

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Fire breaks cleared at PEI National Park

CBC News
February 3, 2012
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

Parks Canada is thinning the forest at Stanhope campground to make it easier for firefighters if there is a fire. Trees that are farther apart create what’s called fire breaks. The fire breaks also make it harder for blazes to spread, protecting neighbouring lands, and they create a safer environment for firefighters to tackle a potential fire. The risk of a forest fire at Stanhope is fairly low, said Arja Page of Parks Canada, but it’s best to be prepared.

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New forest-management plan weakens wildlife protection

The News Tribune
February 2, 2012
Category: Forestry
Region: United States

Back in the 1980s, when conservation advocates were trying to stop logging in old-growth forests in the Pacific Northwest, they relied on a 1982 regulation that required the National Forest Service to protect wildlife such as the spotted owl throughout its range. They won, and a new Northwest forest plan in 1990 greatly reduced logging in the region’s old-growth forests on federal land.  Now the national planning rule that governs individual national forest plans is about to change, for the first time since the Reagan era. Scientists and environmentalists say many of the changes are improvements, but they object to a key change in the way the plan would protect wildlife.  That part of the plan always has been controversial. The timber industry opposes it. Conservationists say it was vital to winning protection for old-growth forests.

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US Forest Service Highlights Expansion of Restoration of National Forests

USDA Forest Service Press Release
February 2, 2012
Category: Forestry
Region: United States

WASHINGTON —Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack today announced a new report, Increasing the Pace of Restoration and Job Creation on our National Forests, that outlines a strategy and series of actions for management on 193 million acres of national forests and grasslands managed by the U.S. Forest Service. As part of the accelerated restoration strategy, $40 million for 20 forest and watershed restoration projects have been announced for the upcoming year. The funding includes ten new projects under the Collaborative Forest Landscape Restoration (CFLR) program, continued funding for the original 10 projects selected under the CFLR program in 2010, and an additional $4.6 million to support other high priority restoration projects.

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Tightening tree-growth tax law, legislators point to Poliquin case

Press Herald
February 3, 2012
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

AUGUSTA — State lawmakers and officials in coastal towns are calling for tighter limits on a property tax exemption for tree-growing that they say is being abused as a tax shelter by wealthy oceanfront landowners. On Thursday, some legislators pointed to one particular landowner: state Treasurer Bruce Poliquin. Poliquin’s 12.3-acre peninsula in Georgetown was cited in a state report in 2009 as the type of high-value property that fuels concern that the program is being used to shift the tax burden from wealthy landowners to other taxpayers. The report said Poliquin wasn’t necessarily breaking any rules but may not have been using the tax exemption to promote commercial tree harvesting, as the law intended. 

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Invasive red pines to be cleared from Minot Forest

SouthCoastToday.com
February 3, 2012
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

WAREHAM — There’s a war under way in Minot Forest: the red pines versus the white pines. The red pines are the interlopers; native to Northern New England and Canada, they are not suited to the warmer climate in Southern New England. And as they die off, they leave behind debris that inhibits the growth of the native white pine. The reds were planted throughout SouthCoast after Massachusetts was ravaged by the New England Hurricane of 1938. They were favored for their lumber but have been dying out, especially over the past year, and the dead trees have no value as lumber. Tropical Storm Irene hastened their demise, knocking down many frail red pines.

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Labor eyed shutdown of native logging

The Age Australia
February 3, 2012
Category: Forestry
Region: International

THE Brumby government considered shutting down Victorian native forest logging before the last election and commissioned a secret report that showed an immediate end to the industry would cost taxpayers up to $120 million. Former environment minister Gavin Jennings said he commissioned the modelling after finding the industry was in the same precarious state it had been 20 years earlier, when he was an environment adviser to the Cain-Kirner government.

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Logger denies damaging protester’s car

ABC News, Australia
February 3, 2012
Category: Forestry
Region: International

A logging contractor says he is not responsible for damaging a protester’s car with a chain in the Boyne State Forest, north of Batemans Bay, on the New South Wales far south coast. South East Forest Rescue has accused Boss Logging of using the chain to shatter a windscreen and dent the roof of a car during a protest. The company’s manager, Matthew Van Dam, says he threatened to chain the group’s cars together, but is not responsible for the damage.

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Logging trucks are not wanted

Marlborough Express
February 3, 2012
Category: Forestry
Region: International

The Marlborough District Council has yet to formally consider an application to increase the number of logging trucks on Port Underwood Rd, but it is likely to be turned down.  Members of the council’s assets and services committee were generally opposed yesterday to any more logging trucks using the road when discussing the application by a prospective buyer of Whataroa forest. The full council will consider the application at its meeting later this month, but the committee has recommended that additional trucks on the Port Underwood Rd be rejected and applicants be encouraged to find other ways of removing the logs.

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Difficulties in Protecting Kalimantan Forests

Tempo Interaktif
February 3, 2012
Category: Forestry
Region: International

Based on the national forest expansion map, protecting 45 percent of Kalimantan forest areas is near impossible, says Greenpeace. “If we look at the size of protected and conservation forests, that’s still inadequate,” Greenpeace forest campaigner, Munhur, said in Jakarta yesterday. Munhur said that if the government was committed to protecting 45 percent of Kalimantan’s forest to conserve biological diversity, overlapping concession permits must soon be reviewed. Otherwise, the Presidential Regulation no.3/2012 will be meaningless, he said.

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$156m plantation sale

Tasmania Mercury
February 2, 2012
Category: Forestry
Region: International

THE $156 million sale of Taswood Growers softwood plantations to New Forests on behalf of the Australian New Zealand Forest Fund has been completed. The settlement for the plantation half owned by Forestry Tasmania and GMO Renewable Resources comes two months after the agreement was announced. The 46,000ha estate will continue to be managed by forest management company Timberlands on Tasmanian Government-owned land under a long-term Forestry Right, which gives New Forests the authority to establish, maintain and harvest the timber plantations until 2069.

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Brazilian forest code: the battle continues

Greenpeace International (blog)
February 3, 2012
Category: Forestry
Region: International

At the end of 2011, before government officials closed up shop for the holidays, President Dilma demanded final approval on the new Forest Code in Brazil. This new proposal condemns the Brazilian forests and is a deal between government and agribusiness that was made in back rooms and secret meetings. But strong public pressure against the dangerous new code and a lack of consensus inside the Congress prevailed and the final vote was left to 2012. The Brazilian Congress returned to work yesterday, and the stage is set for the battle for the Amazon to resume.

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Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy

REDD: The Amazon’s carbon cowboys

Amid the hunt for credits in the Amazon, worries that locals won’t benefit. Part III
Global Post
February 1, 2012
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: International

IQUITOS, Peru — For many impoverished rainforest communities in Latin America, Africa and Asia, REDD — the effort to reduce carbon emissions by preventing deforestation — promises a rare shot at economic development. For others, it threatens to become yet another resource grab. As governments struggle to pass laws to regulate the emerging markets in forest carbon, entrepreneurs are striking deals with indigenous groups in need of cash.

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If India begins to use more renewable biofuels, the whole world will benefit from it

Zee News India
February 3, 2012
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: International

Pasi Rousu, Partner and Co-founder of Finland-based Chempolis, talks to OneWorld South Asia ahead of Delhi Sustainable Development Summit (DSDS) 2012, about biofuel being a potential source of renewable energy for India.  Pasi Rousu, Partner and Co-founder of Finland-headquartered Chempolis, is leading by example the sustainability technology leader’s Asia Pacific operations. Apart from authoring many publications, he holds several environmental process technology patents. He talks to OneWorld South Asia’s Rajiv Tikoo on the eve of the Delhi Sustainable Development Summit (DSDS) 2012 hosted by TERI.

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REDD: Saving the Amazon rainforest

A global carbon market aims to curb emissions by protecting the forests. Will it work?  Part 1
Global Post
February 1, 2012
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: International

LIMA, Peru — International negotiators are closing in on a new solution for combating climate change — and saving the world’s remaining forests. Some 20 percent of all greenhouse-gas emissions now come from deforestation, especially in the lush, green band of tropical rainforest that circles the earth.
That is more than from global transport. So representatives from member states involved in UN climate negotiations are attempting to hammer out a way to make it more profitable to protect forests than destroy them. By providing cash for maintaining healthy forests, they hope to undermine the economic imperative for poor countries or individuals to cut down trees for timber, to free land for agriculture, or to make way for roads, housing and other infrastructure.

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General

Feds announce $40M for forest restoration projects

The Olympian
February 3, 2012
Category: Uncategorized
Region: United States, US West

The Obama administration announced Thursday that $40 million is going to new forest restoration projects intended to boost timber production and create jobs while making forests healthier and less vulnerable to wildfire. Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack said that over the next three years, the 10 projects from Oregon to North Carolina will expand the number of acres thinned and restored on national forests by 20 percent and increase timber production by 25 percent. They will maintain or generate 1,550 jobs. The projects were submitted by local organizations made up of timber, conservation, and community groups that have been working for years to produce a reliable stream of timber from national forests while reducing fire danger, insect infestations, and reduce erosion.

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