Tree Frog Forestry News

Daily Archives: March 19, 2012

Froggy Foibles

Turning butter into financial independence

Globe and Mail
March 17, 2012
Category: Froggy Foibles
Region: International

There’s a gold rush on in the African nation of Mali, but it has nothing to do with the metal. This gold grows on shea trees, the nut of which is being processed into a multipurpose butter that not only represents economic independence for the women producing it, but also the hope of sustenance in a country staring down the barrel of a potentially major food crisis.

Read More

This Tree Looks Like A Dinosaur

Buzz Feed
March 17, 2012
Category: Froggy Foibles
Region: International

A tree in Norfolk, England is a dead ringer for a T-Rex. “Dead ringer” because trees have rings, get it?  END [Ed. note – this is their caption, not ours!]

a
a
a
a
a

Read More

Business & Politics

Resolute Updates Status and Extends its Offer for Fibrek to March 29

Canada News Wire press release
March 19, 2012
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada

MONTREAL, – AbitibiBowater Inc., doing business as Resolute Forest Products ), today announced that the Québec Court of Appeal has accepted to hear the Company’s appeal from the Court of Québec’s decision reversing the cease trade order on Fibrek Inc.’s (TSX: FBK) private placement of 32,320,000 special warrants to Mercer International Inc. (Nasdaq: MERC) (TSX: MRI.U). The cease trade order was issued on February 23 in a decision of the Bureau de décision et de révision (Québec). The appeal will be heard in the week of March 19, 2012. 

Read More

BC tries to revive ‘win win’ project with Powell River and mill

Globe and Mail
March 18, 2012
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

B.C. Jobs Minister Pat Bell says he is trying to get a project back on the rails that would see the city of Powell River fix its deficient sewage-treatment system while helping to keep its major industrial taxpayer, financially troubled Catalyst Paper, afloat. The city and the mill’s owners reached a deal billed as “win-win” last year. The city, which is failing to comply with provincial environmental standards for its sewage outfall, would hook up to the paper mill’s treatment system. It would provide a low-cost solution for the city, and a steady income to the mill’s owners.

Read More

Barnett reacts to criticism over record lumber exports

HQ Cariboo
March 15, 2012
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

Liberal MLA Donna Barnett has responded to criticism over the record number of log exports from BC last year: “we’re sending manufactured wood, I have been told there are no log exports from the Interior so if that changes I’ll certainly be asking why.” Barnett says most of the exports are being sent from Vancouver Island which she says creates and supports employment there. Both the NDP and Steelworkers Union in Williams Lake have been critical of news that lumber exports hit a record 5.5 million cubic meters in 2011.

Read More

Chamber hands out hardware

Vernon Morning Star
March 18, 2012
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

Ten businesses were honoured during the Greater Vernon Chamber of Commerce’s Business Excellence Awards Gala at the Best Western Plus Vernon Lodge Saturday. This year’s winners are…

  • Business of the year: Tolko Industries
  • Employer of the year: WestwoodExporter of the year: Tolko Industries

Read More

Kraft mill shut down

Fort Frances Times Online
March 16, 2012
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada East, Canada

The kraft mill here was shut down yesterday due to a lack of qualified personnel for the 2nd class stationary engineer positions, Resolute Forest Products confirmed this morning.
It will be down for a period of one week, affecting about 70 employees, Pierre Choquette, director of Canadian Public Affairs for the company, said in an e-mail to the Times.

Read More

Paper plant’s ‘hot idle’ could apply to schools

Chronicle Herald
March 18, 2012
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada East, Canada

Along with “salty fog,” now a synonym for silly excuses, thanks to Nova Scotia Power, we can add “hot idle” to the lexicon of Nova Scotia tomfoolery. “Hot idle” is the new government euphemism for pouring good money down the drain. More than $20 million has now been granted to keep the Point Tupper paper mill in “hot idle” during the sale process, which could drag on until fall. Last fall, when hopes for a quick sale were high, the province allocated $5 million to keep the mill idling.

Read More

Lumber mill damaged by three-alarm fire

KPTV.com
March 16, 2012
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States, US West

LYONS, OR (KPTV) – A three-alarm fire damaged a lumber mill in the town of Lyons early Friday morning. Firefighters were called to the Freres Lumber Company on 14th Street just off Main at about 3 a.m. They found a maintenance shop there fully engulfed in flames with equipment inside. It took hours for crews to fully extinguish the fire. There were no injuries reported.

Read More

Lane Co. expects layoffs as timber payments drop

Albany Democrat Herald
March 17, 2012
Category: Business & Politics
Region: US East, United States

The approaching end of federal timber subsidies has Lane County government preparing itself for layoffs and closing empty positions. More than 80 positions in the sheriff’s office are expected to be eliminated, along with a still-to-be-determined number in the rest of county government.

Read More

Domestic demand shores up German growth

March 19, 2012
Category: Business & Politics
Region: International

Germany is often called the economic powerhouse of Europe, and with good reason. It recorded an impressive 3% economic growth in 2011, but there has been a stuttering in recent months, and potential complications from the Greek bail-out remain a possibility on the horizon. Most of its growth in 2012 – forecast to fall to about 1% – will be on the German domestic market rather than exports, a trend which is mirrored in the company’s timber sector. A look at the UK Timber Trade Federation import statistics show a clear declining market share for German softwood, partly because German mills can make more money at home and because Nordic mills are proving more competitive in the UK.

Read More

Gunns finalises sale of first stage of Green Triangle forest estate

The Australian
March 19, 2012
Category: Business & Politics
Region: International

FORESTRY concern Gunns said that it completed the first stage of a sale of the Gunns Green Triangle forest estate, with funds managed by New Forests Pty Ltd taking a controlling interest. Gunns’ equity interest in the estate following the sale is valued around $120 million, the company said. The second stage will involve the sale of Gunns’ equity interest to new investors, subject to conditions including approval of the investment by new investors and the Foreign Investment Review Board, it said.

Read More

Wood, Paper & Green Building

LEED 2012 Proposal Fails Lumber Industry, says FSC

Woodworking Network
March 18, 2012
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: United States

MINNEAPOLIS, MN — The newest draft of the LEED 2012 standard, the sustainable building criteria managed by the U.S. Green Building Council, offers improvements but still falls short, says a critique issued by the Forest Stewardship Council. FSC’s major concern: LEED 2012 doesn’t do enough to encourage architects and builders to use more lumber from forests under sustainable chain of custody programs. LEED is the acronym for Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design.

Read More

Codes, Standards, Market Will Drive Disclosure of Product LCA

USGlass News Network (USGNN)
March 16, 2012
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: United States

There’s increasing pressure on manufacturers to disclose the environmental impact of a product from cradle to grave, from extraction of the raw material through disposal, says Jeff Inks, vice president of code and regulatory affairs for Window and Door Manufacturers Association (WDMA) in Washington, D.C… “The pressure for determining and reporting environmental impacts of products is coming from green building codes and standards, such as ASHRAE 189.1, International Green Construction Code (IgCC), the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) rating systems and the ICC 700 National Green Building Standard,” Inks says. 

Read More

The Way We Read Now

New York Times (blog)
March 17, 2012
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: US East, United States

THE case against electronic books has been made, and elegantly, by many people, including Nicholson Baker in The New Yorker a few years ago… I’ve been trying to become more of a grown-up, in terms of my commitment to reading across what media geeks call “platforms”, from smartphones to e-readers to tablets to laptops. It’s a battle I may lose. I still prefer to consume sentences the old-fashioned and nongreen way, on the pulped carcasses of trees that have had their throats slit. I can imagine my tweener kids, in a few years, beginning to picket me for my murderous habits: “No (tree) blood for (narrative) oil.”

Read More

VN aims for stable timber supply

Viet Nam News
March 16, 2012
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: International

HA NOI — Viet Nam has drawn up plans to sustainably grow its wood product processing industry by 2020, according to the Minister of Agriculture and Rural Development. The industry is to give priority to investing in and utilising domestic forests while reducing raw wood exports and better managing supply. Minister Cao Duc Phat said the modernised and market related processing and trade of wood products would be key to economic development.

Read More

Forestry

More to lose than just trees

Concerned residents form group to voice objection to logging plans for Valley
Alberni Valley Times
March 16, 2012
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Concern over the plan Island Timberlands has for a number of forested areas surrounding Port Alberni is starting to grow. Now a group of Alberni Valley residents are getting organized, determined to make sure proper thought is put into the future of this community’s forest. The issue was brought to the public when Valley resident and avid hiker Jane Morden organized a community hike on Feb. 19 to the Lookout to show how passionate people are about their forests and trails.

Read More

Beetles, fungus endanger high mountain pines

Calgary Herald
March 19, 2012
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Called the jewels of the forest, Alberta’s iconic whitebark pines are on death watch. Often hundreds of years old, they prefer the cooler climate of the mountains – and are found at higher elevations throughout the Rocky Mountain national parks and beyond… Sadly, about 60 per cent of the spectacular trees are already either dead or infected with an exotic fungus called white pine blister rust, which arrived on eastern white pine seedlings imported from France into Vancouver in 1910. The resilient trees that have survived so far now face the voracious mountain pine beetle, which has discovered that they are just as tasty as the other species of pine ravaged throughout B.C. and Alberta.

Read More

University of Alberta research finds pine beetles, exotic fungus endanger iconic high mountain pines

Edmonton Journal
March 18, 2012
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

EDMONTON — Called the jewels of the forest, Alberta’s iconic whitebark pines are on death watch. Often hundreds of years old, they prefer the cooler climate of the mountains — and are found at higher elevations throughout the Rocky Mountain national parks and beyond. A keystone species in the high mountain ecosystems, their “pine nut” seeds are an important food for squirrels, bears and the Clark’s nutcracker bird. Sadly, about 60 per cent of the spectacular trees are already either dead or infected with an exotic fungus called white pine blister rust, which arrived on eastern white pine seedlings imported from France into Vancouver in 1910.  

Read More

Idle mills prompt BC to review log exports

Globe and Mail
March 18, 2012
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

The B.C. government, under attack for allowing the shipping of raw logs to China while local mills sometimes lack wood and sit idle, will complete a review into the timber exports by mid-April, Forests Minister Steve Thomson says. The Teal-Jones log mill in Surrey was shut down for five days late last week because logs were not available. “We’re starving for logs,” owner Dick Jones said in an interview. He said he could double capacity at the mill if more wood was available. For the past two years, the ministry’s Timber Export Advisory Committee decided that logs were surplus if the mills did not agree to buy the wood at a higher price that included the freight charge to bring the logs from the forests on the West Coast of Vancouver Island to the sawmills on the Fraser River. At the higher price, local mills didn’t bid for the wood.

Read More

Reducing log exports won’t solve problems

By Dave Lewis, Truck Loggers Association
Victoria Times Colonist
March 17, 2012
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Lack of investment in our lumber industry is hindering employment. We have restricted the export of logs from B.C. for decades and it has done nothing to solve our basic problems. The writer suggests we can reduce overall logging rates tomorrow by placing an escalating tax on the export of logs. Domestic buyers can only afford to pay $60 for a log that costs $78 to harvest. Placing a tax on logs to be exported does absolutely nothing to make them more economically viable. If you could not afford to buy a house but an American could, would charging the American a higher tax make the cost of it any cheaper? Of course not – all it would do is discourage competition.

Read More

Why USGBC Should Recognize SFI – Rigorous Independent Audits and Continuous Improvement

By Mike Ferrucci, Forestry Program Manager and Lead Auditor, NSF-ISR
Good for Forests (SFI) Blog
March 16, 2012
Category: Forestry
Region: United States

My job is to verify that SFI program participants seeking certification meet all the relevant requirements of the Sustainable Forestry Initiative® (SFI®) 2010-2014 Standard. I make sure operations are in compliance with all applicable laws in the United States and Canada, as well as unique SFI requirements such as logger training, landowner outreach and research. I confirm that wildlife habitat needs and water quality are protected, that workers are properly trained, that harvesting is sustainable, and that there have been opportunities for community involvement as required by the SFI 2010-2014 Standard.

Read More

Impact of wilderness plan on timber industry reignites jobs vs. trees debate

Peninsula Daily
March 19, 2012
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

QUILCENE — Has the timber industry’s time come and gone on the North Olympic Peninsula? A set-aside plan to take 21 percent of Olympic National Forest out of potential timber production and designate it as wilderness would simply feed into a trend away from logging and into a growing service economy that focuses more on recreation and tourism, according to a study by Headwaters Economics Associate Director Ben Alexander… But forest industry representative Carol Johnson of the North Olympic Timber Action Committee said the proposal — which is by U.S. Rep. Norm Dicks, a Belfair Democrat whose 6th Congressional District includes Clallam and Jefferson counties, and U.S. Sen. Patty Murray, D-Bothell — would cost valuable jobs by affecting 132,000 acres of the 633,600-acre federally managed forest.

Read More

Adapting to climate change: Forests will try, but they can’t do it on their own

Article reviewed: Forest responses to climate change in the northwestern United States
The forest steward
March 16, 2012
Category: Forestry, Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: United States, US West

This is a review of the likely and potential effects that climate change will have on the physiology of trees in the western US. The authors discuss how these effects might influence forests at larger scales and also discuss the degree to which forests might be able to adapt to a changing climate… They conclude that forests will not be able to adapt without management intervention. The recommended management actions that may help vulnerable forests adapt to climate change include density management, planting, and assisted migration.  

Read More

Increased Wildfire Frequency Threatening Black Spruce Forest Survival

Alaska Public
March 16, 2012
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Increased wild fire frequency threatens the survival of northern black spruce forests. That’s the finding of recently published research from the Yukon Territory. Sherbrook University biologist Carissa Brown’s doctoral project looked at black spruce regeneration in burn areas. The trees depend on wild fire to stimulate seed release, a cycle based on 80 to 100 year wild fire intervals. Brown says as fire frequency increases closer to 15 year intervals, there’s not enough time for new trees to mature and produce seed cones.

Read More

‘High-paying’ timber jobs prompt questions

Letter to the editor
Billings Gazette
March 17, 2012
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Exactly how many local “high-paying jobs” will be created from this timber harvest and exactly how long they will last? I would like that number compared to the impacts of adding eight miles of road to remove a mature and stable forest from a critical east-west wildlife corridor and migratory refuge for the Luther elk heard as well as a myriad of game and non-game species. She threatens that this forest, while healthy now, will surely become victim to the scourge of the Bark Beetle. Could it be that because this forest is healthy and relatively undisturbed, it is exhibiting natural resistance to this pathogen? Indeed, the areas of outbreak here appear to be localized and contained.

Read More

Tree line moving north very slowly, researchers say

Anchorage Daily News
March 16, 2012
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

The northward advance of the northern tree line, driven by global warming, isn’t as rapid as previously reported, say Cambridge University researchers. And activity varies widely around the Arctic rim, reports The Arctic Sounder. The study, which was released March 17 by Gareth Rees, a researcher with the university’s Scott Polar Research Institute, says the relationship between climate change and tree growth is more complicated than initially thought. “To generalize our results, the tree line is definitely moving north on average but we do not see any evidence for rates as big as 2 kilometers per year anywhere along the Arctic rim,” he said in a release.

Read More

Report defies conventional wisdom on pine beetles and wildfire

The Missoulian
March 18, 2012
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

Steve Gage used to worry about his firefighters getting burned. Now the Type I incident commander wonders if they’ll be clubbed to death before they ever reach a forest fire. The threat comes from the tiny mountain pine beetle, only not in the way most people think. Beetle-killed trees have undermined decades of fire behavior research – because before they burn, dead trees may silently topple. And an unburned falling tree will kill you just as surely as a burning one… “How do we get people into a fire that’s in the middle of beetle-kill safely?

Read More

NC takes a bath on Super Scooper

News & Observer
March 18, 2012
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

Fourteen years ago, a giant yellow airplane with distinctive red trim made a big splash in North Carolina – a coveted wildfire-fighting machine that could scoop 1,400 gallons of water from a lake in 10 seconds and then dash hard-to-reach flames nearby. At $4 million, it was considered a steal. But last year the state sold it for $445,009 – about 10 percent of the original purchase price. Now the buyer has it back on the market for $3.5 million… “It was a workhorse and we miss that resource, to tell you the truth,” said State Forester Wib Owen with the N.C. Forest Service. “It did some wonderful things in North Carolina.”

Read More

Ash borer moving ever closer to area

Owen Sound Sun Times
March 16, 2012
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

Walkerton — The emerald ash borer is on Bruce County’s doorstep and forestry technician Ken Goldsmith says now is the time to plan for its arrival. The insect, which has been making its way north from Michigan where it was discovered 10 years ago, has already killed millions of trees in southwestern Ontario. It was recently spotted at sawmills 5.2 kilometres southeast of Lucknow in Huron County. “The bug is coming our way. It has wings. It’s going to be extremely destructive. Except for mountain ash, which is not a true ash, everything is destroyed,” Goldsmith told Bruce County councillors Thursday.

Read More

Forests face the furnace

The Australian
March 20, 2012
Category: Forestry
Region: International

WHEN Neil Bartholomaeus headed south from the Perth suburb of Nedlands to chase trout in the clear mountain streams near Manjimup, he could not have imagined the decades he would spend fighting the destruction of his new-found home. Just as fashion designer Prue Acton could not have foreseen the battle she has been forced to wage for the forests of southeast NSW. Bartholomaeus and Acton both timed their escape to the bush as the native forest industry made its transition from selective logging to broadscale clear-felling to feed a global demand for woodchips. “Every time I drive around the forest it has changed,” Bartholomaeus says. “They take everything. Hundreds of thousands of tonnes of old-growth marri and karri has ended up in the chip mill.

Read More

Brazil tries to balance farming and forests

CNN
March 18, 2012
Category: Forestry
Region: International

(CNN) — It’s harvest time in the heart of Brazil. Top-of-the-line John Deere tractors carve up vast soybean fields, sucking in dry pods and leaving a trail of dust.  Farmers predict a record crop here in Mato Grosso, the country’s new agricultural frontier. Brazil is the world’s second largest soybean producer after the United States and Mato Grosso accounts for a third of all output.  But that is only half of the picture.  Mato Grosso is also home to a vast stretch of virgin rain forest, swaths of semi-arid savannah and Xingu National Park.

Read More

APP affiliates in US, Australia, pledge to drop controversial pulp supplier linked to deforestation

Mongabay
March 17, 2012
Category: Forestry
Region: International

Two affiliates of Asia Pulp & Paper (APP) have announced they are severing at least some ties with the beleaguered paper giant, according to the Northern Virginia Daily and Greenpeace, an environmental group whose recent undercover investigation found ramin, a protected species, at APP’s pulp mill in Sumatra. Oasis Brands, a firm that handles sales, marketing, and contracting for Virginia-based Mercury Paper Inc., said it will “dissolve” ties to APP “in response to company goals and customer demand for sustainability assurance”. Mercury Paper had been under fire for sourcing fiber from APP, which environmentalists have shown continues to produce pulp and paper from endangered natural forests in Indonesia.

Read More

Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy

Ex-Port Townsend mayor warns of biomass hazards

Peninsula Daily
March 17, 2012
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: United States, US West

PORT ANGELES — It’s the smallest particles that come out of biomass power plants that cause the greatest problems, said Kees Kolff, former mayor of Port Townsend and retired pediatrician, and he is worried they aren’t getting enough attention. Kolff spoke to about 100 people concerned about health risks of biomass burning as a form of power generation at a Clallam County Healthy Air Coalition open house last Sunday in Port Angeles. Expansions of biomass cogeneration are occurring at Nippon Paper Industries USA in Port Angeles and at Port Townsend Paper Corp. in Port Townsend. Both will burn wood waste to generate electricity, for which the mills can sell renewable-energy credits.

Read More

Adapting to climate change: Forests will try, but they can’t do it on their own

Article reviewed: Forest responses to climate change in the northwestern United States
The forest steward
March 16, 2012
Category: Forestry, Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: United States, US West

This is a review of the likely and potential effects that climate change will have on the physiology of trees in the western US. The authors discuss how these effects might influence forests at larger scales and also discuss the degree to which forests might be able to adapt to a changing climate… They conclude that forests will not be able to adapt without management intervention. The recommended management actions that may help vulnerable forests adapt to climate change include density management, planting, and assisted migration.  

Read More

Virginia gives OK for three biomass fuel plants

McClatchy-Tribune Regional News
March 17, 2012
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: US East, United States

Dominion Virginia Power has received state approval to convert three coal-fired power plants to biomass fuel. The State Corporation Commission also approved a charge to Dominion customer bills starting April 1 to cover the estimated $165.8 million cost to switch over the plants in Altavista, Hopewell and Southampton County. In its filing for the conversion, the company projected that the charge would add 14 cents to the bills of residential customers who use 1,000 kilowatt hours of electricity per month. The amount will differ based on individual household usage.

Read More

How best to monitor biodiversity in REDD+ projects?

Mongabay.com
March 19, 2012
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: International

If done well, REDD+ projects (Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation) may not only save carbon rich forests, but also protect embattled biodiversity. But what’s the best way to ensure both and carbon and species are preserved under REDD+, a program that proposes to pay nations to keep forests standing? A new study in mongabay.com’s open access journal Tropical Conservation Society (TCS) argues that a one-size-fits-all approach to monitoring biodiversity in REDD+ projects would not only be difficult to develop, but would likely fail given vast differences in forest ecology and threats worldwide. Instead local sites should develop monitoring programs based on a generally approved roadmap.

Read More

Dust-up over biomass plant

Sheffield Telegraph
March 18, 2012
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: International

A PRESSURE group is urging local MPs to step in to halt plans for a biomass plant in Sheffield on the grounds that it would be a “health hazard”. Emissions from the burning of waste wood “contain a range of toxic chemicals and very fine particulate matter that can cause ill health”, says the Breathe Clean Air Group… But power company E.ON, which has started construction of a £120m plant, said the burning of biomass fuel was “a tried and tested” method of producing electricity and heat, and will be subject to strict safety and environmental regulations… Mr Kilvert also says that burning biomass produces 50% more carbon dioxide than coal and 330% more than natural gas.

Read More

Carbon War erupts in Europe

A battle of world significance has started quietly in Europe. Like all battles it is about energy, resources and ideology.
Canada Free Press
March 17, 2012
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: International

In the red corner, with a coercive utopian green ideology, is Germany, strongly supported by Denmark and UK. This group wants to forcibly wean Europe off carbon fuels by replacing them with sunbeams, sea breezes and fermented food crops. They get self-serving support from places like nuclear powered France, hydro-powered Scandinavia and geothermal Iceland. They are now proposing more drastic cuts in Europe’s usage of carbon fuels after 2020. In the blue corner is Poland, with quiet support from the Czech Republic, Hungary, Slovakia and Romania.

Read More

General

Encyclopaedia Britannica halts print edition, goes digital only

Los Angeles Times
March 13, 2012
Category: Uncategorized
Region: Canada, United States

The Encyclopaedia Britannica, maker of the 32-volume reference set school children turned to before there was Google, will no longer publish a print publication. Instead, it will focus all its efforts on continuing to grow its digital product, the company announced Tuesday… But for those who have a deep nostalgic fondness for those stately tomes, the news comes as an unwelcome reminder of how obsolete the printed word has become in our digital world.

Read More

Former minister decries tinkering with Fisheries Act

Vancouver Sun
March 16, 2012
Category: Uncategorized
Region: Canada, Canada West

OTTAWA — A former Progressive Conservative fisheries minister urged the Harper government Friday to reject private sector appeals, which are particularly loud in Western Canada, to water down the federal Fisheries Act. Tom Siddon, who introduced the policy in 1986 under then-prime minister Brian Mulroney, said there’s “no justifiable excuse” for removing provisions ensuring the protection of fisheries habitat. The government, according to information leaked to retired federal fisheries biologist Otto Langer earlier this week, plans to drop any references to habitat… Some Alberta and B.C. firms and associations have registered to lobby on the Fisheries Act, including the Business Council of B.C., the Council of Forest Industries and the Canadian Association of Petroleum Producers.

Read More