Tree Frog Forestry News

Monthly Archives: April 2012

Froggy Foibles

Tranquilised bear comically falls from tree

arbroath
April 28, 2012
Category: Froggy Foibles
Region: United States

Colorado – A large black bear who wandered up into a tree at the University of Colorado – Boulder, is again safe after wildlife department officials managed to get him out of a sticky situation. The 90kg male was seen ambling around a residence hall area before he attempted to scale a tree. The wildlife officers tranquilised the bear while he was up in the branches and, after a short wait, the bear safely landed on his back.


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Business & Politics

Tembec sees $14-million loss in quarter on weak prices

Montreal Gazette
April 26, 2012
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada

Quebec-based Tembec Inc., a producer of specialty and papermaking pulps, newsprint, lumber and coated bleached board for packaging, swung to a second-quarter loss of $14 million or 14 cents a share because of weak prices through most sectors. A stronger than expected Canadian dollar also affected Tembec’s overall results in the three months ended March 24. said CEO James Lopez Thursday. Sales were down 10 per cent to $407 million. A year ago it posted earnings of $6 million or 6 cents a share.

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Domtar reports drop in profits

Wisconsin Rapids Tribune
April 26, 2012
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, United States

MONTREAL — Low pulp prices and higher costs led to a 79 percent decrease in year-over-year profits for Domtar Corp. during the first quarter of 2012, leaders of the Canadian papermaker said Thursday.  Net earnings for the quarter were $28 million, compared to $133 million during pulp markets and higher costs affected results,” John Williams, president and CEO, said in a news release. The company also spent $50 million related to repurchasing debt during the quarter.  Company officials remained optimistic, however, noting the recent
acquisition of Attends Europe and a historic 15-year supply agreement
with Appleton Papers to provide the Wisconsin papermaker with base paper
to produce thermal, carbonless and other specialty products.

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Sawmill explosions bring added urgency to crisis in BC’s forests

Globe and Mail
April 29, 2012
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

Safety inspectors will be checking B.C. sawmills this week for dangerous levels of combustible dust after two deadly mill explosions, while the provincial government is poised to address the other crisis facing the forest industry – a dwindling supply of wood because of the mountain pine beetle. Tensions are mounting about the government’s proposal to free up protected forests to logging, a plan conceived to respond to the first explosion in Burns Lake three months ago. The unprecedented safety inspections were ordered based on suspicions that processing dry wood killed by pine beetles is creating a more combustible dust in sawmills, putting workers at risk across B.C.’s northern and Interior communities.

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Wood dust linked to at least five explosions in B.C. mills

Vancouver Sun
April 28, 2012
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

At least five explosions linked to wood dust have rocked B.C. wood manufacturing plants since 2009. None of the earlier explosions resulted in injuries, unlike the two fatal incidents that killed four workers at Lakeland Mills in Prince George and Babine Forest Products mill in Burns Lake this year. It is not known if Work-SafeBC investigated or issued any warnings over the smaller incidents. Those incidents should have sent a warning signal to safety regulators, industry leaders and the unions who advocate for worker safety, acknowledged United Steelworkers local 1-424 president Frank Everitt on Friday.

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The Tyee – Feds Muzzled Me on Free Trade Deal Minister Bell

The Tyee
April 27, 2012
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

The British Columbia government is barred from talking publicly about a proposed free trade agreement between Canada and the European Union, Jobs, Tourism and Innovation Minister Pat Bell told The Tyee this week. Asked about a recent meeting he attended on the Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement, Bell said, “Can’t make any comment on CETA. We are bound by a confidentiality agreement with the federal government.” He added, “Any provinces participating in those discussions are obligated not to reveal the ongoing communications. Love to do it, but you’d be talking to a new minister if I did.”

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Potential danger at other BC mills widely discussed in Burns Lake after explosion

Globe and Mail
April 28, 2012
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

Vinh Nguyen was … vacationing in Vietnam, when he learned B.C. had been hit by its second sawmill explosion in three months. Mr. Nguyen [a] 27-year-old was working as a security officer when the fiery explosion killed two workers. He suffered first- and second-degree burns to his face, hand and wrist. …Despite all the speculation, no preliminary findings or orders were issued before the Lakeland explosion, which killed two people and sent 24 to hospital in all. …[Bob Simpson] said his “gut reaction” is that sawdust buildup is the key, based on his own experience and information he has received from mill employees.

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Canfor reports poor quarter in lumber market

Clearwater Times
April 29, 2012
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

It appears that Canfor isn’t out of the woods yet. On Thursday the corporation reported a net loss attributable to shareholders of $16.2 million, or $0.11 per share, for the first quarter of 2012… Canfor’s president and CEO Don Kayne said, “While it was encouraging to see improved lumber prices in North America in the first quarter, the effect of weak low grade prices in China offset some of these gains. With inventories in China returning to more normal levels, we are anticipating an improvement in low grade lumber prices to China in the second quarter.”

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BC forestry industry takes a hacking, but pain won’t last forever: experts

By Tamsyn Burgmann
The Canadian Press
April 29, 2012
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

VANCOUVER – A pair of deadly blasts that ripped apart two Britsh Columbia lumber mills have brought more pain to an industry already struggling with economic trouble that has been percolating for years… But despite all the hard chops, the industry and observers insist the pain will be short-lived — relatively speaking. They acknowledge there will be real pain that could last 20 to 50 years, but they say the people whose livelihoods depend on the slow growth of trees see that as short-term. “This downsizing of the industry is grim, there’s no way around it. It impacts on workers and communities,” said Assistant Prof. Harry Nelson, who specializes in forest economics and policy at the University of British Columbia’s forestry faculty.

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3rd Assembly District features two Republicans, one Democrat; all prioritize water rights, job creation

Record-Searchlight
April 28, 2012
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States, US West

Up and down California there’s a crop of competitive legislative races having as much to do with the new open primary as with last year’s redistricting process. Look no farther than Sacramento Valley’s newly drawn 3rd Assembly District… “I thought the governor was very fair,” said Logue after a discussion on timber harvesting in the state. “He supports a 20-year harvesting plan.” Logue thinks expediting the timber-harvesting permit, which currently takes three to five years, will give California a leg up in competing against Canada, which, he said, has 75 percent of the timber harvest.

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Fire guts lumber company complex

WZZM TV Michigan
April 29, 2012
Category: Business & Politics
Region: US East, United States

HAMILTON, Michigan – A fire that swept through an Allegan County lumber company caused an estimated $3 million in damage.The fire started Friday night at Post Hardwoods Inc. near Hamilton. By the time crews arrived, the flames were shooting through the top of the complex. The fire gutted four of the company’s six buildings. Hamilton’s fire chief says the blaze does not appear to be suspicious.  END

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Wood, Paper & Green Building

Establishing a Benchmark for Sustainable Design

By Kasian Architecture
Canada NewsWire
April 30, 2012
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: Canada

VANCOUVER – Kasian, a leading global architecture, design and planning firm, is pleased to announce that the Charles E. Fipke Centre for Innovative Research, and the adjacent Arts & Sciences Building, located at the Okanagan campus of the University of British Columbia, have both been awarded five Green Globes™. These are the first campus buildings in the world to each receive five Green Globes and are also the first paired buildings to attain this distinction. Both buildings are designed by Kasian Architecture Interior Design and Planning Ltd, in collaboration with the UBC Properties Trust. Green Globes is a revolutionary on-line auditing tool designed to acknowledge buildings that improve environmental performance with regard to management, site, energy, water, resources, emissions and indoor environment. 

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Green Bureaucrats Nix US Timber, Common Plastic in New Plan

By Don Polson
Polecat News and Views
April 29, 2012
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: United States

The U.S. Green Building Council has begun floating a series of progressive amendments to its building certification program, stirring controversy within the construction, forestry and chemical industries that warn the proposal is radical environmentalism masquerading as reasonable regulation. The proposed changes to the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) program… disallows the use of over 75 percent of America’s certified forests and the third most commonly produced plastic worldwide… Unlike other green building rating tools like Green Globes and the National Green Building standard that recognize all forest certification standards, LEED’s critics say the insistence on FSC-certified forests or the undefined “better” baseline has erected an artificial and ambiguous barrier to American timber.

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Pryor, Blunt Seek Parity for Domestic Wood Products in USDA BioPreferred Program

US Department of Agriculture
Press release
April 29, 2012
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: United States

WASHINGTON D.C. – U.S. Senator Mark Pryor (D-AR) and Roy Blunt (R-MO) introduced legislation that would open new opportunities for American forestry producers by allowing their products to qualify for the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s BioPreferred Program… The Forest Products Fairness Act would allow domestic forestry products to be labeled as biobased so they could receive increased consumer attention as well as federal government procurement preference. This designation levels the playing field between domestically-produced wood products and imported products such as Chinese bamboo, which is already eligible for the biobased label and used as a “green” alternative for hardwood flooring or lumber.

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Wood-sided cars have roots in horse-and-buggy times

The Republic
April 29, 2012
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: United States

Even if you have never lived in California, there’s a good chance you know what a woody is, thanks to the song “Surfin’ Safari” by The Beach Boys: “We’re loading up woody with boards inside / and heading out singing our song.” Simply put, a woody is a car with visible wood construction, and it dates to the birth of the automobile, when wood was used for both frame and bodywork — just like the carriages that preceded them. …In honor of this week’s Arbor Day, here’s a look at some classic woodies. —1940 Buick Super Estate Wagon—1941 Packard 120 Deluxe Station Wagon—1947 Chrysler Windsor Town & Country—1947 Ford Sportsman convertible

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Thonet: The secret of a good chair

Classic Driver
April 29, 2012
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: International

Michael Thonet bentwood furniture revolutionised 19th Century design. The Thonet ‘Vienna coffee house chair’, an archetype of modern seating, is arguably “the most successful mass-produced product in the world to date”. We visited the company to see how it has evolved today. …The story of the master carpenter Michael Thonet and his famous chairs was an example of the transition from craft to industrial production which typified the 19th Century. As early as the 1820s, Thonet was experimenting … with a new wood-bending technology, but it was in 1859, with ‘Chair No. 14’ (later to become known as the famous ‘Vienna coffee house chair’), that the Thonet name entered the history books. For the first time, chair production used the division of labour, with work proceeding in set stages, which reduced the price significantly and – most importantly of all – the chair was comfortable!

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Data seen as cost-saver

Construction industry, tagged as being particularly wasteful, could see billions in savings through analytics, engineer says
Montreal Gazette
April 28, 2012
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building

Construction industry leaders think the sector needs to cut waste, and that analytics will make it happen. “We are a wasteful industry,” said Darlene La Truce, executive vice-president of the Edmonton Construction Association, pointing to the amount of wood a typical framer throws away while building a house. “We’re not productive. We need all the help we can get.”... The solution, they say, lies in the nascent field of analytics: the large-scale collection and analysis of data made possible by the spread of digital technology. A panel of four construction professionals weighed in on the topic during a conference this week.

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Forestry

Trend: Tree hugging is good for you

(author unknown)
April 28, 2012
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada

“Children can now name more Pokéman than animal species,” noted Dr. Eva Selhub of the Benson-Henry Institute in Boston, on the Global News morning show. Scary thought isn’t it? Selhub was part of a guest panel called ‘Your brain on nature – heal the planet, heal the mind’ at the Green Living show in Toronto this past weekend. The panel discussed how important it is to stay connected with nature in our increasingly urbanized living and working environments. …MRI scans have shown that images of greenery stimulate parts of the brain associated with love, emotional stability and empathy. Skyscrapers and highways on the other hand, stimulate parts of the brain associated with stress and fear. …“Go hug a tree,” says Selhub.

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Wildfires ravage homes, buildings across southern Manitoba

Vancouver Sun
April 29, 2012
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

WINNIPEG — A scourge of wildfires ravaged homes and buildings across southern Manitoba again Sunday — destroying or badly damaging at least three homes, a century-old barn, and a well-known business. It was a red-hot weekend for wild fires in southern Manitoba, worried politicians and fire chiefs reported. “There were 30 departments out fighting grass and structure fires,” said Dick Vlaming, fire chief for the rural municipality of Springfield, Man. “People have to realize it is so dry, so dangerous, that the grass is like gas and every department is pleading with people not to light a fire,” Vlaming said.

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Community Forest continues to benefit community

Clearwater Times
April 29, 2012
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Wells Gray Community Forest Corporation has a healthy bank balance and is in a position to continue helping worthy causes… A follow-up on a hydrological assessment done for Clearwater’s watershed will be completed soon. The report will highlight actions taken by the community forest during the development of pine beetle killed stands. WGCFC plans to provide support to Wells Gray Outdoor Club in adding a network of mountain bike trails within the existing Candle Creek ski trail network.

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Hundreds Attend Day of Mourning in Prince George

Opinion 250 News
April 29, 2012
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Prince George, B.C. – The mood was very solemn and there was a definite undercurrent of anger in some of the speeches given at the National Day of Mourning ceremony at the Workers Memorial Statue in Prince George today. Hundreds of people, including local, provincial and federal politicians, union leaders and members, Prince George Fire Rescue officials, a B.C. Corrections honour guard and citizens gathered to remember the 142 people killed on the job or by job-related illnesses in BC last year. But they were also there to remember the two men killed in the Lakeland Mills fire last Monday, and the two who died in the Babine Forest Products fire in January.

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Northern mayors warn Burns Lake timber solution may harm their communities

The Tyee
April 27, 2012
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Mayors of five northern communities have written to Premier Christy Clark expressing concern that finding enough timber for a new mill in Burns Lake may harm the sustainability of the places they represent. “We appreciate the challenges the Government of BC and the community of Burns Lake are facing at this time and want to do anything we can to support initiatives that will address these challenges,” said the April 16 letter from mayors Gerry Thiessen of Vanderhoof, Rob MacDougall of Fort St. James, Dwayne Lindstrom of Fraser Lake, Bill Holmberg of Houston and Taylor Bachrach of Smithers.

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Forests burn, beetles feast

Montreal Gazette
April 28, 2012
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

Walking in ankle-deep ash through forests of charred TREES that were burned just days earlier is a surreal experience, says Sébastien Bélanger… Three summers ago, with the help of the province’s forest fire protection agency – SOPFEU – Bélanger led teams of up to a dozen students on several trips to the sites of three freshly extinguished forest fires near Chibougamau, Lac St. Jean and La Tuque. The visits were part of a project Bélanger was working on to document the arrival of the white-spotted sawyer beetle, a bug that’s beneficial to the boreal forest but seen as a destructive pest by Quebec loggers.

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Beetles, forests and climate change: Exchanging old mistakes for new?

rabble.ca (blog)
April 27, 2012
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

However, the CBC has recently learned, from representatives of the Agriculture Union of the Public Service Alliance of Canada, of another cut that will affect Nova Scotia… Is this a threat to Nova Scotia forests or a smart cost-saving measure? Let’s take a step back. The BSLB hit the national stage in 2000 with its discovery in Point Pleasant Park in Halifax. Amid massive controversy the CFIA planned to cut down much of the park until public outcry and a court injunction by the Friends of Point Pleasant Park forced them to moderate their stance and limit the cut.

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Effort begins to restore whitebark pine in Montana, neighboring states

The Missoulian
April 30, 2012
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

BILLINGS – The U.S. Forest Service is attempting to grow whitebark pine that are resistant to blister rust as part of an effort to prevent the high-elevation tree from dying out in Montana, Idaho and Wyoming. Workers have created a 15-acre nursery in the mountains south of Bozeman where seedlings resistant to blister rust are being grown, and limbs from older trees will be grafted onto the young trees to speed up seed production. “Hopefully, they will be producing cones in four years,” Jay Frederick, a wildlife biologist in the Beaverhead-Deerlodge National Forest, told the Billings Gazette.

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Pat Farr: Thinks the board is bogged down in antipathy

By Greg Bolt
The Register-Guard
April 29, 2012
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

.. But Farr still believes that providing private sector jobs is the best way to generate revenue for public services. That’s a big reason he said he supports a proposal by U.S. Rep. Peter DeFazio to designate a portion of BLM timber lands for extensive logging while protecting land with old growth trees or important wildlife habitat. The plan, which is opposed by Handy, would open up a stream of revenue by making more trees available for logging… Many environmentalists oppose the plan. They say it doesn’t have strong-enough protections for old growth, would allow clear-cutting and other harmful logging practices, and opens to logging land that still has some old growth and sensitive habitat.

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Caribou that wandered into Montana from BC treated, returned

Billings Gazette
April 28, 2012
Category: Forestry
Region: US West, Canada West

We finally get a new caribou in Montana, and we have to give it back. Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks biologists thought they were recovering the satellite collar of a British Columbia caribou that apparently wandered into the mountains near Eureka and died. But when they reached it on Thursday morning, the recovery mission turned into a rescue. The mountain caribou cow was bigger than a mule deer but smaller than an elk. It was one of 19 transplanted into the Purcell Mountains of British Columbia on March 3. 

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Big logging machine catches fire near Clancy

Helena Independent Record
April 27, 2012
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

A $250,000 piece of logging equipment, known as a feller/buncher, caught fire while cutting and stacking trees off of Tizer Lake Road Friday morning, setting off a small blaze. Pat McKelvey, assistant chief for the Clancy Volunteer Fire Department, said the equipment operator desperately tried to put out the flames on the equipment and emptied three or four extinguishers before realizing they were no match for the combination of hydraulic fluids, gas, oil, pine needles and wood chips on the feller/buncher.

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Ravalli Co. group delivers natural resources doc to commissioners

KPAX-TV
April 27, 2012
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

HAMILTON- A Ravalli County citizens group is finished with months of work developing a “natural resources policy” they hope will give the county more of a say in management issues. The policy was authored by the Bitterroot Natural Resources Recovery Committee and forms the basis of triggering a process in federal law known as “coordination”…  The seeds for the policy were sown in the Bitterroot with a meeting in Darby last fall when the core of the group met for the first time. Much of the initial concerns were directed at the U.S. Forest Service after another year of big fires on the West Fork of the Bitterroot.

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In lieu of taxes, Congress should pay real value to fund rural timber counties

By James Huffman
The Oregonian
April 29, 2012
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Several rural Oregon counties are on the brink. Two solutions have been proposed — one new, one old. The old idea is to get another extension of direct federal payments under the Secure Rural Schools Act. This may yet happen, though it is currently derailed somewhere between the Senate and the House in negotiations over the transportation bill. The new idea is a bipartisan proposal from Reps. Kurt Schrader, Peter DeFazio and Greg Walden to subdivide O&C lands and create a trust fund for counties from the revenues generated from those acres devoted to timber. 

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Mountain nursery will help restore threatened whitebark pine

Billings Gazette
April 29, 2012
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

In the mountains south of Bozeman the U.S. Forest Service has fenced off a small plot of land designed to help restore whitebark pine to the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem. At the 15-acre nursery site, seedling whitebark pine that has been identified as resistant to blister rust will be grown. In addition, limbs from older pines will be grafted onto the trees to speed up seed production in what is a slow-to-mature tree species… The venture is one portion of a many-pronged attempt to keep whitebark pine from dying out in the high mountains of Montana, Wyoming and Idaho. 

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SC coast awaits next wildfire

Charleston Post Courier
April 29, 2012
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

NORTH MYRTLE BEACH — Pat Henry will long remember that April night when the western horizon glowed an eerie red, smoking embers cascaded from the sky, and she and her husband escaped their home driving through their subdivision of flaming palmettos and burning roofs…Forestry officials say it’s not a matter of if such a fire will happen again, but simply a matter of when. “In the last 50 years, every few years there has been a fairly good-sized fire in this area,” said Mike Bozzo of the S.C. Forestry Commission, who was the incident commander for the 2009 blaze, sometimes called the Highway 31 fire.

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Penn State nursing and forestry students practice trauma scenario

The Herald-Mail
April 28, 2012
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

MONT ALTO, Pa.— “Help, I’m hurt,” screamed Jason Owings, who laid in the woods reeling in pain from a wound to his left arm. The scene looked and sounded real, but it wasn’t. It was part of trauma-scenario training on Friday at Penn State Mont Alto. Now in its third year, the drill gives Penn State nursing and forestry students a chance to team with local agencies to put into practice what they learn in the classroom. Campus coordinator for nursing programs Carranda Barkdoll said this year’s event added a little more to the activity by having two injured forestry students instead of one.

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Koala listing offers no protection from logging

ABC News Australia
April 30, 2012
Category: Forestry
Region: International

The newly announced listing by the Australian Government of koalas as a vulnerable species in NSW will not provide additional protections in areas logged by Forests NSW. The Federal listing will offer substantial protection otherwise but where logging operations are conducted under Regional Forest Agreements (RFAs) the Federal listing will have no effect.
The listing has been welcomed as a significant benefit in protecting koala populations from threats ranging from urban development to mining, predation, and habitat loss.

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Activists return to defend Tasmania’s forests as logging resumes

The Ecologist
April 27, 2012
Category: Forestry
Region: International

An agreement that would end 30 years of verbal, and often physical, confrontation over the future of the forests in the Australian state of Tasmania is teetering on the edge of collapse. Ollie Milman reports The future of the state and federal government-brokered agreement aiming to balance the interests of conservationists and the timber is in doubt amid accusations of bad faith on both sides. Tasmania, at first glance, appears an unlikely spot for environmental activism. The rugged island state is viewed by ‘north island’ Australians as sleepy and somewhat parochial. But strident green activism is becoming an increasing force, precisely because of its untouched nature.

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Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy

Climate change will shape BC in 2035, one way or another

Vancouver Sun
April 28, 2012
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: Canada

We live on a different planet from the one our parents grew up on, says American environmentalist Bill McKibben. Climate change from our rampant combustion of fossil fuels has pushed the world into a new era of bizarre weather anomalies. In British Columbia, warming has been greater that the global average, with costly consequences, including the pine beetle epidemic, downtime for ferries and highways, raging forest fires and flooding. The big question is whether carbon emissions can be stabilized at some level by human collective action, or whether we will soon pass critical thresholds that will trigger a runaway climate change scenario.

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B.C.’s Carbon Trust scandal heats up debate on climate

Letters to the editor
Vancouver Sun
April 30, 2012
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: Canada, Canada West

The following four letters to the editor are in response to two Vancouver Sun stories:

By Robert McCroskey Surrey: These articles don’t come right out and say it, but this entire “carbon credit” situation is a gift that keeps on giving from Gordon Campbell to his business buddies. read more
By Joseph Pallant President & CEO, CPS Carbon Project Solutions Inc.: I commend The Vancouver Sun on its exploration of carbon offset-ting, one of the routes for our province to reduce greenhouse gases, protect ecosystems and implement clean technology. read more
By Paul Rhodes Sechelt: Congratulations to The Sun and journalist Gordon Hoekstra for revealing some of the weaknesses and failures of the carbon trading system set up by ex-premier Gordon Campbell. read more
By Robert Wilson Vancouver: Kudos to The Sun for daring to show the Carbon Trust emperor has no clothes. B.C.’s carbon tax is yet another example of our increasing reliance on stealth taxation. read more

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The particle-emissions dilemma

eco-business.com (blog)
April 30, 2012
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: International

Particle emissions into Earth’s atmosphere affect both human health and the climate.  …The combustion of fossil fuels, wood, and other biomass increases the amount of airborne particles, which, in a somewhat simplified manner, we can describe as “white” or “black.” Both types can be found in varying amounts in all emissions. Most black particles stem from small-scale and inefficient burning of biofuels, and, in Asia and Africa, from the burning of agricultural waste. By contrast, white particles consist largely of sulfur from the burning of coal and oil. Because black particles contain soot and absorb sunlight, they are believed to increase global warming. White particles, however, reflect some of the incoming sunlight back into space, producing a cooling effect on Earth’s climate.

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General

No budging on forestry peace deadline

ABC News Australia
April 28, 2012
Category: Uncategorized

The Federal Environment Minister, Tony Burke, is stepping up pressure on signatories to the forest peace deal to finalise the boundaries of new reserves.The deadline for the forests reserve bill to be tabled in State Parliament is June 30. The environmental and industry groups are trying to decide which of the 572,000 hectares of native forest nominated for protection under the peace deal should go into reserves.

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U forestry class uses QR codes on trees to connect with public

Students attached the codes to trees on the St. Paul campus last week.
Minnesota Daily
April 29, 2012
Category: Uncategorized

A University of Minnesota forestry class is using QR codes to combine technology with nature. Students labeled trees around the St. Paul campus Thursday as part of a research project for their arboriculture course. Signs with QR codes were placed on 34 different species of trees, allowing smartphone users to access information about the specific tree by scanning the sign. …The project was created as a way for students to allow the public to find out about the trees on campus, said Eric North, a graduating senior and the teaching assistant for the class.

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