Tree Frog Forestry News

Daily Archives: April 30, 2012

Froggy Foibles

Save frogs in NB bogs, biologist says

CBC News
April 27, 2012
Category: Froggy Foibles
Region: Canada East, Canada

New Brunswick should be doing more to protect frogs in bogs and wetlands, according to one biologist. “Most people don’t realize that frogs are facing an extinction crisis worldwide,” Greg Jongsma said. “Where one-third of amphibians are facing extinction.” Amphibians have been around for 350 million years, the first land vertebrate to come out of the water, and have managed to survive the last four extinction events. But now they’re disappearing, according to Jongsma.

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Log Truck Driver Rescues Bug Teetering On Bank

KTVZ
April 27, 2012
Category: Froggy Foibles

GRAND RONDE, Ore. — Oregon State Police say a log truck driver who came upon a Volkswagen Bug tilting precariously at the top of a 100-foot embankment above a river managed to secure the car to his truck with a cable. That allowed the car’s driver to scramble to safety. Lt. Gregg Hastings says 62-year-old Connie Weygandt of McMinnville indicated she was looking at the scenery Friday afternoon along Oregon Highway 22 north of Grand Ronde when her car traveled off the shoulder and came to a stop at the top of an embankment above the South Yamhill River. 

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Business & Politics

Weyerhaeuser 1st-quarter adjusted results beat Wall Street’s view; revenue climbs

Associated Press
April 27, 2012
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, United States

FEDERAL WAY, Wash. – Weyerhaeuser Co.’s first-quarter net income dropped 59 per cent from year-ago period that included a large gain from the sale of some timberlands, but its adjusted results beat Wall Street’s expectations. The lumber and real estate company reported on Friday that it earned $41 million, or 8 cents per share, for the period ended March 31. That’s down from $99 million, or 18 cents per share, a year earlier.

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EACOM Timber Corporation announces its fourth quarter and year end results

Canada NewsWire (press release)
April 27, 2012
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada

MONTREAL and VANCOUVER, – EACOM Timber Corporation announces its fourth quarter and year end results for the three and twelve-month periods ended December 31, 2011. On June 30, 2010, EACOM completed the acquisition of the Domtar forest products business, which transformed the Company from a lumber trading to a lumber manufacturing, marketing and distribution business capable of producing approximately 900 million board feet annually. The Company began operating these newly acquired assets on July 1, 2010.

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Domtar says $3 billion contract will help offset decline in paper demand

By: Ross Marowits
Canadian Press
April 26, 2012
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, United States

MONTREAL – Domtar Corp. says a long-term $3 billion agreement with a maker of specialty paper products will help it to offset annual demand declines for office paper. Under the 15-year deal announced earlier this year, Domtar will increase its supply of uncoated base paper that Wisconsin-based Appleton Papers needs to produce thermal, carbonless, and other specialty paper products. “This is an opportunity to immediately repurpose high volume communication paper capacity to specialty paper grades while securing a growing business for the long-term,” CEO John Williams said Thursday during a quarterly conference call.

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China log and lumber imports drop

But Canada, U.S. gain market share
(author unknown)
April 28, 2012
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, United States

SEATTLE, WA – Over the past decade, China’s fast expanding economy and boom in housing starts lifted the country to being the world’s largest importer of sawlogs and the second largest importer of softwood lumber, after the U.S. China has increased the importation of logs and lumber practically every year for over 10 years, with lumber imports in 2011 being 15 times higher than in 2001 and log imports being up three-fold from 10 years ago.


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Domtar reports drop in profits

Wisconsin Rapids Tribune
April 26, 2012
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, United States

MONTREAL — Low pulp prices and higher costs led to a 79 percent decrease in year-over-year profits for Domtar Corp. during the first quarter of 2012, leaders of the Canadian papermaker said Thursday.  Net earnings for the quarter were $28 million, compared to $133 million during pulp markets and higher costs affected results,” John Williams, president and CEO, said in a news release. The company also spent $50 million related to repurchasing debt during the quarter.  Company officials remained optimistic, however, noting the recent
acquisition of Attends Europe and a historic 15-year supply agreement
with Appleton Papers to provide the Wisconsin papermaker with base paper
to produce thermal, carbonless and other specialty products.

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Tembec sees $14-million loss in quarter on weak prices

Montreal Gazette
April 26, 2012
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada

Quebec-based Tembec Inc., a producer of specialty and papermaking pulps, newsprint, lumber and coated bleached board for packaging, swung to a second-quarter loss of $14 million or 14 cents a share because of weak prices through most sectors. A stronger than expected Canadian dollar also affected Tembec’s overall results in the three months ended March 24. said CEO James Lopez Thursday. Sales were down 10 per cent to $407 million. A year ago it posted earnings of $6 million or 6 cents a share.

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Forest worker union loses bid for severance

Nanaimo News Bulletin
April 27, 2012
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

The local forest workers’ union has lost its bid to get severance pay for roughly 40 employees who ran the planer at Western Forest Products’s downtown Nanaimo sawmill. Brian Butler, first vice-president of the United Steelworkers local 1-1937, said the planer operation at the downtown sawmill shut down in December 2008 and never reopened, even after the sawmill reopened in 2010. The union argued the workers were entitled to severance pay, totalling roughly $1 million, because the union’s new contract stipulates severance must be paid after a “major operating component” of a mill has been shut down for two years. While the sawmill resumed operation before the 24-month time frame expired, the planer mill remained down.

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BC forestry industry takes a hacking, but pain won’t last forever: experts

By Tamsyn Burgmann
The Canadian Press
April 29, 2012
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

VANCOUVER – A pair of deadly blasts that ripped apart two Britsh Columbia lumber mills have brought more pain to an industry already struggling with economic trouble that has been percolating for years… But despite all the hard chops, the industry and observers insist the pain will be short-lived — relatively speaking. They acknowledge there will be real pain that could last 20 to 50 years, but they say the people whose livelihoods depend on the slow growth of trees see that as short-term. “This downsizing of the industry is grim, there’s no way around it. It impacts on workers and communities,” said Assistant Prof. Harry Nelson, who specializes in forest economics and policy at the University of British Columbia’s forestry faculty.

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Canfor reports poor quarter in lumber market

Clearwater Times
April 29, 2012
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

It appears that Canfor isn’t out of the woods yet. On Thursday the corporation reported a net loss attributable to shareholders of $16.2 million, or $0.11 per share, for the first quarter of 2012… Canfor’s president and CEO Don Kayne said, “While it was encouraging to see improved lumber prices in North America in the first quarter, the effect of weak low grade prices in China offset some of these gains. With inventories in China returning to more normal levels, we are anticipating an improvement in low grade lumber prices to China in the second quarter.”

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Potential danger at other BC mills widely discussed in Burns Lake after explosion

Globe and Mail
April 28, 2012
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

Vinh Nguyen was … vacationing in Vietnam, when he learned B.C. had been hit by its second sawmill explosion in three months. Mr. Nguyen [a] 27-year-old was working as a security officer when the fiery explosion killed two workers. He suffered first- and second-degree burns to his face, hand and wrist. …Despite all the speculation, no preliminary findings or orders were issued before the Lakeland explosion, which killed two people and sent 24 to hospital in all. …[Bob Simpson] said his “gut reaction” is that sawdust buildup is the key, based on his own experience and information he has received from mill employees.

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The Tyee – Feds Muzzled Me on Free Trade Deal Minister Bell

The Tyee
April 27, 2012
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

The British Columbia government is barred from talking publicly about a proposed free trade agreement between Canada and the European Union, Jobs, Tourism and Innovation Minister Pat Bell told The Tyee this week. Asked about a recent meeting he attended on the Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement, Bell said, “Can’t make any comment on CETA. We are bound by a confidentiality agreement with the federal government.” He added, “Any provinces participating in those discussions are obligated not to reveal the ongoing communications. Love to do it, but you’d be talking to a new minister if I did.”

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3rd Assembly District features two Republicans, one Democrat; all prioritize water rights, job creation

Record-Searchlight
April 28, 2012
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States, US West

Up and down California there’s a crop of competitive legislative races having as much to do with the new open primary as with last year’s redistricting process. Look no farther than Sacramento Valley’s newly drawn 3rd Assembly District… “I thought the governor was very fair,” said Logue after a discussion on timber harvesting in the state. “He supports a 20-year harvesting plan.” Logue thinks expediting the timber-harvesting permit, which currently takes three to five years, will give California a leg up in competing against Canada, which, he said, has 75 percent of the timber harvest.

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Fire guts lumber company complex

WZZM TV Michigan
April 29, 2012
Category: Business & Politics
Region: US East, United States

HAMILTON, Michigan – A fire that swept through an Allegan County lumber company caused an estimated $3 million in damage.The fire started Friday night at Post Hardwoods Inc. near Hamilton. By the time crews arrived, the flames were shooting through the top of the complex. The fire gutted four of the company’s six buildings. Hamilton’s fire chief says the blaze does not appear to be suspicious.  END

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China Log and Lumber Imports Down in 1Q/12, with Russia and New Zealand Suppliers Hit the Hardest, While North America Gained Market Share

Wood Resources International
April 28, 2012
Category: Business & Politics
Region: International

Seattle, WA — Over the past decade, China’s fast expanding economy and boom in housing starts lifted the country to being the world’s largest importer of sawlogs and the second largest importer of softwood lumber, after the US, as reported in the Wood Resource Quarterly (www.woodprices.com). China has increased the importation of logs and lumber practically every year for over ten years, with lumber imports in 2011 being 15 times higher than in 2001 and log imports being up three-fold from ten years ago. The total value of imported logs and lumber increased from 630 million dollars in 2001 to almost eight billion dollars last year.

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Wood, Paper & Green Building

Wood-sided cars have roots in horse-and-buggy times

The Republic
April 29, 2012
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: United States

Even if you have never lived in California, there’s a good chance you know what a woody is, thanks to the song “Surfin’ Safari” by The Beach Boys: “We’re loading up woody with boards inside / and heading out singing our song.” Simply put, a woody is a car with visible wood construction, and it dates to the birth of the automobile, when wood was used for both frame and bodywork — just like the carriages that preceded them. …In honor of this week’s Arbor Day, here’s a look at some classic woodies. —1940 Buick Super Estate Wagon—1941 Packard 120 Deluxe Station Wagon—1947 Chrysler Windsor Town & Country—1947 Ford Sportsman convertible

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Thonet: The secret of a good chair

Classic Driver
April 29, 2012
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: International

Michael Thonet bentwood furniture revolutionised 19th Century design. The Thonet ‘Vienna coffee house chair’, an archetype of modern seating, is arguably “the most successful mass-produced product in the world to date”. We visited the company to see how it has evolved today. …The story of the master carpenter Michael Thonet and his famous chairs was an example of the transition from craft to industrial production which typified the 19th Century. As early as the 1820s, Thonet was experimenting … with a new wood-bending technology, but it was in 1859, with ‘Chair No. 14’ (later to become known as the famous ‘Vienna coffee house chair’), that the Thonet name entered the history books. For the first time, chair production used the division of labour, with work proceeding in set stages, which reduced the price significantly and – most importantly of all – the chair was comfortable!

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Data seen as cost-saver

Construction industry, tagged as being particularly wasteful, could see billions in savings through analytics, engineer says
Montreal Gazette
April 28, 2012
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building

Construction industry leaders think the sector needs to cut waste, and that analytics will make it happen. “We are a wasteful industry,” said Darlene La Truce, executive vice-president of the Edmonton Construction Association, pointing to the amount of wood a typical framer throws away while building a house. “We’re not productive. We need all the help we can get.”... The solution, they say, lies in the nascent field of analytics: the large-scale collection and analysis of data made possible by the spread of digital technology. A panel of four construction professionals weighed in on the topic during a conference this week.

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Forestry

Resource development a rocky road for feds

Government on collision course with environmental groups and First Nations
CBC News
April 28, 2012
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada

If the road to hell is paved with good intentions, then the government’s plan for “responsible resource development” (RRD) is shaping up to be one infernal construction project. The goal of the plan is laudable: simplify the maze of regulatory impediments that slow down the start of major industrial projects… At the time, I thought: OK, this is a government that is declaring war on not only environmental charities but on any citizen who doesn’t support their oil agenda,” Tzeporah Berman said… The parallels between what was called “the war in the woods” and the current pipeline battles are hard to miss.

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Did dry pine-beetle-kill sawdust cause Prince George sawmill explosion?

Province orders mills to clean up latent sawdust, but not everyone’s convinced that’s the answer
The Province
April 28, 2012
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Another deadly sawmill explosion will occur in B.C. unless wood dust is scooped up with specially designed equipment, says an engineer familiar with the problem. “An explosion will happen again. Maybe tomorrow or six months from now,” said Wayne Winkler on Thursday. “The game has changed. Now the magic word is dust. It’s not wet sawdust anymore, it’s dust coming from beetle-killed pine,’ Winkler said. “The dust has lost most of its moisture because it has been dead for years. It is very flammable,” he said. …“People don’t know that dust with a low moisture content and high surface area is highly combustible. Workers don’t have time to react. It’s not like a smouldering fire that gets bigger,” he said.

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Logging traffic takes its toll

Letter by Brian Nimeroski,
Victoria Times Colonist
April 28, 2012
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Re: “The oily truth, strait up: 800 tankers a year,” April 26. Jack Knox reminds us not to forget “what’s already sailing past our front porch.” Indeed. For each of the past three years, some 4,000 logging trucks have been rolling down the Sooke Road annually, some five times the 2010 marine traffic provided by American statistics. While one can appreciate the implications of an oil tanker foundering anywhere, most ships do in fact reach port “without incident.” For the past century, by contrast, the environmental impacts of logging have been immediate and cumulative.

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Vancouver mourns for workers killed on the job

Vancouver Sun
April 27, 2012
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

VANCOUVER — Robert Luggi Jr., Carl Charlie., Glenn Roche., Alan Little… The names of four men killed on the job in sawmill explosions this year in Burns Lake and Prince George were among many mentioned at a sombre memorial service on the Burrard Inlet waterfront Friday morning. A larger crowd than usual, about 400 people, gathered this year for Metro Vancouver’s annual Day of Mourning for those killed or injured on the job — in accidents every speaker said were ultimately preventable. The audience members’ sympathy and, in some cases, anger had been heightened by the two high-profile sawmill disasters that this year killed the four men and injured dozens of others, mostly with severe burns.

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Northern mayors warn Burns Lake timber solution may harm their communities

The Tyee
April 27, 2012
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Mayors of five northern communities have written to Premier Christy Clark expressing concern that finding enough timber for a new mill in Burns Lake may harm the sustainability of the places they represent. “We appreciate the challenges the Government of BC and the community of Burns Lake are facing at this time and want to do anything we can to support initiatives that will address these challenges,” said the April 16 letter from mayors Gerry Thiessen of Vanderhoof, Rob MacDougall of Fort St. James, Dwayne Lindstrom of Fraser Lake, Bill Holmberg of Houston and Taylor Bachrach of Smithers.

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Beetles, forests and climate change: Exchanging old mistakes for new?

rabble.ca (blog)
April 27, 2012
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

However, the CBC has recently learned, from representatives of the Agriculture Union of the Public Service Alliance of Canada, of another cut that will affect Nova Scotia… Is this a threat to Nova Scotia forests or a smart cost-saving measure? Let’s take a step back. The BSLB hit the national stage in 2000 with its discovery in Point Pleasant Park in Halifax. Amid massive controversy the CFIA planned to cut down much of the park until public outcry and a court injunction by the Friends of Point Pleasant Park forced them to moderate their stance and limit the cut.

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Why Planting Trees Is Historically Important

Huffington Post
April 28, 2012
Category: Forestry
Region: United States

..Over the past four hundred years, attitudes towards tree planting have changed radically… The first English settlers in North America were far more interested in chopping down trees than in growing new ones… new waves of settlers were forced to enter the forests, ax in hand, to confront the trees that stood between them and a homestead. …Pinchot helped to build a massive network of national forests and he also argued that timber was a crop that could be planted and grown like any other… Franklin Delano Roosevelt, a man so obsessed with tree planting that he sometimes listed his occupation as “tree grower” during his tenure as president.

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Mountain nursery will help restore threatened whitebark pine

Billings Gazette
April 29, 2012
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

In the mountains south of Bozeman the U.S. Forest Service has fenced off a small plot of land designed to help restore whitebark pine to the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem. At the 15-acre nursery site, seedling whitebark pine that has been identified as resistant to blister rust will be grown. In addition, limbs from older pines will be grafted onto the trees to speed up seed production in what is a slow-to-mature tree species… The venture is one portion of a many-pronged attempt to keep whitebark pine from dying out in the high mountains of Montana, Wyoming and Idaho. 

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In lieu of taxes, Congress should pay real value to fund rural timber counties

By James Huffman
The Oregonian
April 29, 2012
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Several rural Oregon counties are on the brink. Two solutions have been proposed — one new, one old. The old idea is to get another extension of direct federal payments under the Secure Rural Schools Act. This may yet happen, though it is currently derailed somewhere between the Senate and the House in negotiations over the transportation bill. The new idea is a bipartisan proposal from Reps. Kurt Schrader, Peter DeFazio and Greg Walden to subdivide O&C lands and create a trust fund for counties from the revenues generated from those acres devoted to timber. 

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Ravalli Co. group delivers natural resources doc to commissioners

KPAX-TV
April 27, 2012
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

HAMILTON- A Ravalli County citizens group is finished with months of work developing a “natural resources policy” they hope will give the county more of a say in management issues. The policy was authored by the Bitterroot Natural Resources Recovery Committee and forms the basis of triggering a process in federal law known as “coordination”…  The seeds for the policy were sown in the Bitterroot with a meeting in Darby last fall when the core of the group met for the first time. Much of the initial concerns were directed at the U.S. Forest Service after another year of big fires on the West Fork of the Bitterroot.

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Big logging machine catches fire near Clancy

Helena Independent Record
April 27, 2012
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

A $250,000 piece of logging equipment, known as a feller/buncher, caught fire while cutting and stacking trees off of Tizer Lake Road Friday morning, setting off a small blaze. Pat McKelvey, assistant chief for the Clancy Volunteer Fire Department, said the equipment operator desperately tried to put out the flames on the equipment and emptied three or four extinguishers before realizing they were no match for the combination of hydraulic fluids, gas, oil, pine needles and wood chips on the feller/buncher.

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Caribou that wandered into Montana from BC treated, returned

Billings Gazette
April 28, 2012
Category: Forestry
Region: US West, Canada West

We finally get a new caribou in Montana, and we have to give it back. Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks biologists thought they were recovering the satellite collar of a British Columbia caribou that apparently wandered into the mountains near Eureka and died. But when they reached it on Thursday morning, the recovery mission turned into a rescue. The mountain caribou cow was bigger than a mule deer but smaller than an elk. It was one of 19 transplanted into the Purcell Mountains of British Columbia on March 3. 

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Managing our forests right

AS I SEE IT
Worcester Telegram
April 27, 2012
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

… Forest benefits like these are at the heart of the Massachusetts Department of Conservation and Recreation’s recent adoption of what are known as landscape designations for 311,000 acres of public lands statewide for which the department is responsible.  These designations will help maximize the benefits provided by Massachusetts’ forests by placing the department’s lands in three categories: woodlands, where forests will be sustainably managed to provide local forest products; parklands, where forests will develop without commercial harvest and recreational values will predominate; and forest reserves, where timber harvest will be excluded and natural processes will be allowed to flourish.

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Forester presents plan for harvest on town woodlot in Canton

Lewiston Sun Journal
April 28, 2012
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

CANTON — Professional forester Stephen Gettle says the town’s 179-acre woodlot is ready for selective cutting and perhaps $50,000 could be realized from the harvest. In an effort to cut taxes, the Board of Selectmen has been looking at opportunities to make money, and harvesting the woodlot is one area they have been exploring. Selectman Donald Hutchins explained to the large crowd at the meeting that seven years ago they cut a 79-acre woodlot and it’s not ready to be cut again.

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Penn State nursing and forestry students practice trauma scenario

The Herald-Mail
April 28, 2012
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

MONT ALTO, Pa.— “Help, I’m hurt,” screamed Jason Owings, who laid in the woods reeling in pain from a wound to his left arm. The scene looked and sounded real, but it wasn’t. It was part of trauma-scenario training on Friday at Penn State Mont Alto. Now in its third year, the drill gives Penn State nursing and forestry students a chance to team with local agencies to put into practice what they learn in the classroom. Campus coordinator for nursing programs Carranda Barkdoll said this year’s event added a little more to the activity by having two injured forestry students instead of one.

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Activists return to defend Tasmania’s forests as logging resumes

The Ecologist
April 27, 2012
Category: Forestry
Region: International

An agreement that would end 30 years of verbal, and often physical, confrontation over the future of the forests in the Australian state of Tasmania is teetering on the edge of collapse. Ollie Milman reports The future of the state and federal government-brokered agreement aiming to balance the interests of conservationists and the timber is in doubt amid accusations of bad faith on both sides. Tasmania, at first glance, appears an unlikely spot for environmental activism. The rugged island state is viewed by ‘north island’ Australians as sleepy and somewhat parochial. But strident green activism is becoming an increasing force, precisely because of its untouched nature.

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Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy

Climate change will shape BC in 2035, one way or another

Vancouver Sun
April 28, 2012
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: Canada

We live on a different planet from the one our parents grew up on, says American environmentalist Bill McKibben. Climate change from our rampant combustion of fossil fuels has pushed the world into a new era of bizarre weather anomalies. In British Columbia, warming has been greater that the global average, with costly consequences, including the pine beetle epidemic, downtime for ferries and highways, raging forest fires and flooding. The big question is whether carbon emissions can be stabilized at some level by human collective action, or whether we will soon pass critical thresholds that will trigger a runaway climate change scenario.

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Mass. proposes regulations for wood burning plants

Boston.com
April 28, 2012
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: US East, United States

BOSTON—Massachusetts regulators are seeking public comment on proposed new rules governing the state’s biomass energy industry. The Massachusetts Department of Energy Resources said the new regulations followed more than two years of evaluation, public input, and careful consideration. Regulators said they were looking for the best rules to govern the use biomass resources for energy — including trees — in a manner that is consistent with the state’s commitments to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and protect forests. Environmental activists, many of whom had protested earlier versions of the regulations, said they support the new rules for wood-burning power plants in Massachusetts.

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REDD actors in Indonesia: Ten interviews

By Chris Lang
REDD Monitor
April 29, 2012
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: International

Over the past few weeks,? ?REDD-Monitor has posted a series of interviews with ten organisations involved in REDD in Indonesia.? ?This post is a brief overview with some of the highlights from the interviews… The interviews were only posted on REDD-Monitor when they were approved by the interviewee(s).

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The particle-emissions dilemma

eco-business.com (blog)
April 30, 2012
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: International

Particle emissions into Earth’s atmosphere affect both human health and the climate.  …The combustion of fossil fuels, wood, and other biomass increases the amount of airborne particles, which, in a somewhat simplified manner, we can describe as “white” or “black.” Both types can be found in varying amounts in all emissions. Most black particles stem from small-scale and inefficient burning of biofuels, and, in Asia and Africa, from the burning of agricultural waste. By contrast, white particles consist largely of sulfur from the burning of coal and oil. Because black particles contain soot and absorb sunlight, they are believed to increase global warming. White particles, however, reflect some of the incoming sunlight back into space, producing a cooling effect on Earth’s climate.

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General

U forestry class uses QR codes on trees to connect with public

Students attached the codes to trees on the St. Paul campus last week.
Minnesota Daily
April 29, 2012
Category: Uncategorised

A University of Minnesota forestry class is using QR codes to combine technology with nature. Students labeled trees around the St. Paul campus Thursday as part of a research project for their arboriculture course. Signs with QR codes were placed on 34 different species of trees, allowing smartphone users to access information about the specific tree by scanning the sign. …The project was created as a way for students to allow the public to find out about the trees on campus, said Eric North, a graduating senior and the teaching assistant for the class.

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