Tree Frog Forestry News

Daily Archives: March 13, 2013

Business & Politics

Fortress Paper says Thurso conversion ramping up after recent problems

Canadian Press
March 12, 2013
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada

Fortress Paper says it’s making progress in ramping up production at its new dissolving cellulose pulp mill in Thurso, Que., but problems and low prices early in the first quarter could negatively affect its next quarterly results. “Higher cost structure and lower revenues, obviously are not ideal but more importantl, I think is the trend which has transpired over the last two to three weeks, maybe even a month,” CEO Chadwick Wasilenkoff said Tuesday during a conference call to discuss fourth-quarter and 2012 results.

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Despite market volatility, B.C. lumber still big in Japan

Province’s wood producers find innovation pays dividends in quality-conscious country
Business in Vancouver
March 12, 2013
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

One of B.C.’s most stable and lucrative lumber export markets is gathering steam again. Housing starts in Japan this year edged closer to 2008 levels, thanks in part to a post-tsunami building boom. “It’s always been a strong market,” Shawn Lawlor, Japan director for the Council of Forest Industries (COFI), told Business in Vancouver from his Tokyo office. “China and other markets have come on stream in recent times, and Japan’s sort of been under the radar.”

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Terrace, B.C. area industrial site back on the market

Terrace Standard
March 11, 2013
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

ONE of the largest fully-serviced industrial locations in the area is back on the market. NSD Development Corp. has listed 40 acres of what was the former Skeena Cellulose/Terrace Lumber Company site which stretches along the 4900 Block of Keith from the old Shell bulk plant location west to Kenney. The ReMax listing places the cost of the property at $5.5 million. Garry Roth of NSD said it is prepared to sell the property as a whole or in whatever size may be wanted by a customer.

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Bowater paper mill in Calhoun, Tenn., idles its last newsprint machine

Chattanooga Times Free Press
March 13, 2013
Category: Business & Politics
Region: US East, United States

A generation ago, Bowater’s paper mill in Calhoun, Tenn., was one of America’s biggest producers of newsprint and one of the biggest land owners in Southeast Tennessee. Next week, Bowater’s successor company, now known as Resolute Forest Products, will shut down its last newsprint machine in Calhoun after decades of shedding forest lands and mill jobs in response to the shrinking size and circulation of its newspaper customers.

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Gunns directors face scrutiny

Sydney Morning Herald
March 6, 2013
Category: Business & Politics
Region: International

Gunns’ liquidator will widen an investigation into the Tasmanian timber company’s collapse to decide whether former directors should be pursued. Creditors voted on Tuesday to liquidate the company and appointed administrator PPB Advisory as liquidator. The administrator’s report, released last week, raised concerns about how the company was trading before its collapse in September last year, suggesting Gunns could have been insolvent six months earlier.

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Wood, Paper & Green Building

Northern trust CEO breaks silence on loan scandal

Globe and Mail
March 13, 2013
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: Canada, Canada West

A stipulation that a loan to a Prince George businessman by a public money trust would be made only if the government Treasury Board approved the funds for a centre to promote B.C. wood products “subsequently changed,” according to the head of the trust. Janine North, the CEO of the Northern Development Initiative Trust, gave The Globe and Mail a brief interview that broke more than a week of silence amid a growing scandal surrounding a government scheme to build the world’s tallest wooden building.

Rotten in the core from The Prince George Citizen
Christy Clark brushes off criticism from Kevin Falcon about wood building from CBC News

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Wood wants bigger bite of global construction market

Business in Vancouver
March 12, 2013
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: Canada, Canada West

It’s as strong as steel. It takes less energy to make and has a lower carbon footprint. In the future, our skyscrapers might be made of it. The material is none other than good old wood – but not two-by-fours. High-tech wood, known as engineered wood, has advanced to the point where it can compete with steel and concrete. “Wood is more flexible, and with more engineered products that have come out in recent years, wood can handle larger spans,” Paul Lansbergen, vice-president of the Forest Products Association of Canada (FPAC), told Business in Vancouver.

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Forestry

B.C. backs off on plan critics said would give away Crown forest land

Canadian Press
March 12, 2013
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

VICTORIA — The B.C. government has backed off on a plan that critics said would have sold out public control over Crown forest land. Forests Minister Steve Thomson says he’s withdrawn proposed changes to the Forest Act that would have allowed volume-based forest licences to be converted to area-based forest licences, essentially giving private companies more power over government-owned land. Thomson says it’s become clear more public input is needed on the idea, so the government will conduct broad consultations this summer on the recommendations of a special committee that first proposed the change.

Tree farm section of bill removed from The Globe and Mail
Government backs down on controversial forestry bill from The Tyee
BC Forest minister shelves area-based tenure change from the Revelstoke Times Review
Opponents relieved as controversial forest bill shelved from the Kamloops Daily News

Click here for press release from the BC Government

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Old growth near Cathedral Grove set for imminent logging: activists

Victoria Times Colonist
March 12, 2013
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

An old-growth forest, close to Cathedral Grove and formerly protected as a critical wildlife corridor, is ringed with logging tape and conservation groups fear harvesting is imminent. The marked 40-hectare cutblock, part of Island Timberlands private lands that government agreed could be removed from a tree farm licence in 2004, is about 300 metres from the boundary of MacMillan Provincial Park on the Alberni Highway. It is one of Vancouver Island’s most popular tourist attractions because of giant Douglas firs.

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Tourism in the Discovery Islands feels the force of logging

Globe and Mail
March 12, 2013
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Images of narrow sea channels backed by towering, thickly forested mountains have long been featured in government ads promoting tourism under the slogan: Super, Natural British Columbia.  While the government maintains that branding is being protected through careful forest management, ecotourism businesses in the Discovery Islands say a prime part of the pristine landscape on which Beautiful B.C.’s image rests is rapidly being ruined by logging. “It’s heart-wrenching,” …

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Forester predicts a good year for trees

Sault This Week
March 12, 2013
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

It’s just one week until spring and forest health coordinator at the Ministry of Natural Resources Dan Rowlinson is going out on a limb, with a prediction that 2013 is going to be a “fairly good year for trees,” in the Sault area. “We’ve had a really good winter in the Sault, so if our moisture maintains throughout the springtime, we should have a fairly good year for trees. “We really, really needed this snow, particularly along the north shore, because we haven’t had the snow cover for the last number of years, and it doesn’t give the watersheds time to charge up.

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Forest Service Predicts Another Bad Fire Year

Associated Press
March 12, 2013
Category: Forestry
Region: United States

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M.— Despite the slowest start to a wildfire season in a decade, the head of the U.S. Forest Service said Tuesday his agency is preparing for another busy year, but with fewer firefighters. Late winter storms have helped bring more snow and rain to some parts of the country, but Chief Tom Tidwell told The Associated Press in a telephone interview that much of the South and Southwest are expected to dry out by May and June as drought conditions persist. 

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Oregon shouldn’t tolerate forest thuggery

Coos Bay World
March 12, 2013
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

A fine line separates civil disobedience from hooliganism. But when anti-logging radicals tear up culverts and form human blockades to block timber harvests, they’re definitely on the wrong side. Rep. Wayne Krieger, R-Gold Beach, delighted a lot of rural Oregonians last week, when he proposed felony penalties for tree sitters.. …The 2011 protests were less about speech than about a sanctimonious form of thuggery. Perched precariously in trees, the protesters dared loggers and authorities to dislodge them. They tore up a culvert to protect their protest site.

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Blue Mountain timber: Top forester backs ambitious program of tree thinning and restoration

The Oregonian
March 12, 2013
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

A staggering 800 million board feet of wood fiber annually reaches maturity in the nearby Wallowa-Whitman, Umatilla and Malheur national forests. Only 11 percent gets to sawmills, while 400 million board feet succumb to insects, disease, fire and age, said industry spokesman Tom Partin. He likened the mills’ situation to “starving to death when you are standing beside the refrigerator.” That may soon change. The top U.S. Forest Service official for Oregon and Washington, Kent Connaughton , has asked his foresters to plot out an ambitious, multiyear program of tree thinning and forest restoration in the Blue Mountains.

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Logging debris gives newly planted Douglas-fir forests a leg-up

USFS Pacific Northwest Research Station
March 11, 2013
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

OLYMPIA, Wash. The downed limbs and other woody debris that are inevitable byproducts of timber harvest could be among the most important components of post-harvest landscapes, according to a new study led by the U.S. Forest Service’s Pacific Northwest Research Station. Researchers found that retaining moderate levels of logging debris, also known as “slash,” helped to both directly and indirectly increase the growth rate of Douglas-fir seedlings replanted after harvest. The findings, which are among the first to speak to the benefits of second-growth logging debris, are published online in the journal Forest Ecology and Management.

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Sale of Coillte harvesting rights will cost State dear

Forestry policy is one of the few things that are actually working here. Why change it?
Irish Times
March 12, 2013
Category: Forestry
Region: International

How long, the American farmer-poet Wendell Berry asked, does it take to make the woods? As long, he answered himself, as it takes to make the world. But Berry warned that woodlands can be unmade overnight, and that it then takes generations to remake them. The Government should remember this, before it proceeds to sell off the harvesting rights in our national forests, currently vested in Coillte. There are many reasons – economic, cultural and environmental – for valuing our woodlands. Until recently, however, we have not been very good at exploiting them intelligently and enjoying them fully.

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Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy

Carbon offsets: B.C.’s looniest green scheme yet?

Globe and Mail
March 12, 2013
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: Canada, Canada West

Here’s a neat idea. Declare that you’ll help solve the climate crisis by making all your public institutions carbon-neutral. Schools, hospitals, the works. Now that’s leadership.  There’ll be some challenges, of course. Unfortunately, no matter how hard they try, your schools and hospitals can’t possibly eliminate all their greenhouse-gas emissions – they’re too old and drafty, the ambulances and buses still run on fossil fuel, and solar panels are still too darned expensive. But you can fix that. Just force them to buy carbon offsets.

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