Tree Frog Forestry News

Daily Archives: April 1, 2013

Froggy Foibles

Local Flavour: Chai tea, spice is the key

South Delta Leader
March 28, 2013
Category: Froggy Foibles
Region: Canada, Canada West

When Sandy McKellar makes Chai tea, it’s a bigger process than simply dipping a tea bag into a cup of hot water. In fact, when the co-owner of Wood N Frog Coffee Company in Tsawwassen started her new business she was adamant about making her own Chai. She refused to serve commercially-made syrups used in many cafes. “It’s so much nicer when you’re roasting your own coffee or beverage,” she says while cradling a Chai Latte.

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Business & Politics

Lumber prices on upward swing as conference gets underway

Prince George Citizen
March 29, 2013
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

As the Council of Forest Industries sets up their first fully restored wood sector conference since the global economic crash, lumber prices are soaring to unprecedented values. When COFI opens the doors of the Prince George Civic Centre on Thursday and Friday, it will be packed with exhibitors (many hopeful exhibitors couldn’t get a spot) and an A-list of stage presenters, including both BC premier Christy Clark and NDP challenger Adrian Dix on the speakers’ list.

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Exports affect cedar supply

letter by David Gray Flavelle Sawmill Company Ltd.
Coquitlam Now
March 27, 2013
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

Re: “Cedar not exported,” letter to the editor, Friday, March 15. There is not enough red cedar to run Flavelle on one shift. To supplement that we have cut fir, hemlock and yellow cedar as it is available. There is very little yellow cedar. Fir and hemlock are being exported at record rates and as a result are not available to us. One of the main factors in the shortage of red cedar is the focus on exporting logs, which has diverted logging away from red cedar

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Roadblocks thrown in the pulp mill’s way

Prince Albert Daily Herald
March 29, 2013
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

Frank in sharing the challenges that impede the Prince Albert Pulp Mill’s re-opening, Dale Paterson provided a local audience with a combination of good and bad news. On the bad news front, although they’d initially planned on having the mill fully operational by this fall, the new projection is between 12 and 18 months away, minimum. “Can I give a date today? No, I can’t. Can I tell you we’re working as hard and fast as we can? Yes, we are,” the Paper Excellence vice president of operations told a local crowd during Thursday’s Prince Albert and District Chamber of Commerce luncheon.

Prince Albert, Sask. paper mill opening delayed from the CBC News

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Weyerhaeuser ordered to pay former mill worker

CBC News
March 28, 2013
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

Forestry giant Weyerhaeuser has been ordered to pay a Saskatchewan man money after cutting his health benefits. Former plywood mill employee Al Malfair recently won a partial victory — and $2,800 — after taking his case to small claims court in Melfort. This case hinges around a severance agreement that Malfair signed when he was laid off in 1997 from the Hudson Bay mill by the then-owner Saskfor. Malfair, a manager at the mill, had been working there for almost 23 years.

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Future of Mattawa mill depends on fibre

North Bay Nugget
March 28, 2013
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada East, Canada

MATTAWA – Papineau-Cameron Mayor Bob Corriveau wears on his face the frustration and disappointment of failing to get the former Tembec Mattawa site back up and running. Hopes of rejuvenating the former mill site with a new operator have fizzled. . …But Corriveau said each time the corporation has come close to securing an operator, the deal falls through because there are virtually no forest harvesting rights available in the area, making it impossible for businesses to secure financing.

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Mill unions still negotiating

The Western Star
March 28, 2013
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada East, Canada

CORNER BROOK At least two of three unions connected to Corner Brook Pulp and Paper Limited are still working on negotiating contracts with the mill. Lindy Vincent, president of the Local 60N of the Communications Energy and Paperworkers Union, said his local and the company are now working with a conciliation officer to try to reach an agreement. The union rejected a tentative agreement with the company in November, despite the executive recommending acceptance.

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Missoula mill manager fired, plant fined $130K for pollution

by Rob Chaney
The Missoulian
March 30, 2013
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States, US West

Roseburg Forest Products’ Missoula mill has paid $130,925 in fines after self-reporting several air quality violations dating back to 2006. …The six violations of the plant’s Montana Operating Permit included one incident in which sanding dust was stored outside in direct violation of the permit’s requirements. Sanding dust is the residue left after the Roseburg plant smoothes and shapes particleboard sheets, which are made of sawdust and resin.

Oregon Timber company to pay $130,000 alleged Montana air violations from the Associated Press

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Sawlog prices in North and Central Europe trended downward the past two years

Troy Media
March 31, 2013
Category: Business & Politics
Region: International

SEATTLE, WA – Sawlog prices have trended downward in most major markets in Western Europe the past two years in U.S. dollar terms, but this trend was broken in the 4Q/12 when prices increased slightly mainly as a result of a weakening U.S. dollar. In the local currencies, log prices were practically unchanged in the 4Q/12. …Sawlog prices fell during 2012 because sawmills were cutting back
production in response to the weaker demand for lumber throughout
Europe.

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Wood, Paper & Green Building

Going with the grain, and building with wood

Globe and Mail
March 29, 2013
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: Canada

…Send me to the gallows, but I’m in love with trees, and the potential for poetic, resilient architecture built from them. In British Columbia, a series of award-winning projects reveal that Vancouver-based architects and engineers are making strides in leading the world with their all-wood designs. And so they should: Canada is a nation rich in sustainably managed forests; 40 per cent of the world’s certified supply of wood is Canadian.

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Forest sector’s latest push: high-tech lumber for tall towers

Globe and Mail
March 31, 2013
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: Canada

Canada’s forestry sector is touting a new generation of high-tech lumber as a way to gain a foothold in a part of the construction industry from which it has long been shut out: condominiums. Officials at the Forest Products Association of Canada are pushing to have building codes changed to allow for taller wood structures. Such buildings are made possible, they say, by massive wood beams made from reinforced timber that could become the main ingredient in many new condo towers.

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Prince George Wood Centre Is An ‘Affront To Citizens’

Huffington Post Canada
March 28, 2013
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: Canada, Canada West

The unfolding debacle of the Prince George Wood Innovation and Design Centre is not an isolated event involving B.C. minister Pat Bell and forest industry lobbyists. It cuts to the very core of the premium placed on politics over sound policy by this B.C. Liberal government. From the first announcement of this proposed centre, the B.C. government ministers, premiers and wood works industry lobbyists have been advocating a 10-storey, wood building. It mattered not that the B.C. Building Code only permitted six-storey wood buildings.

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Forestry

Red-faced Greenpeace

Financial Post
March 30, 2013
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada

Corporations are invariably subjected to the most minute scrutiny. Any example of, for example, false advertising is leapt upon and trumpeted. And yet last week, when environmental NGO attack dog Greenpeace admitted to issuing falsehoods about Montreal-based Resolute Forest Products, and even apologized, there was hardly a media ripple. Perhaps the media regard ENGOs’ loose regard for the truth as merely overenthusiastic “messaging” in a good cause.

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Pine beetle is a problem, but not ‘invasive’

Letter by Babita Bains
Vancouver Sun
March 29, 2013
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Re: Mothzilla: Super-pest threatening Metro crops, March 13 The article implies the mountain pine beetle is an invasive species. The mountain pine beetle is native to B.C. and has been considered a “pest” since populations have been at epidemic levels since the 1990s, making it the most economically important bark beetle/forest health factor in B.C.

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Consultation needed on tenures

Letter by RUSS CAMERON, President, Independent Wood Processors Association
Kamloops Daily News
March 29, 2013
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

The Independent Wood Processors Association (IWPA) has represented British Columbia’s non-tenured family owned wood processing businesses since 1971. At a meeting of our membership on February 27, the members voted to offer the following advice to the B.C. government concerning the proposal to invite the conversion of Volume Based Tenures to Area Based Tenures. Our advice is for the legislation to be set aside until the consequences are fully investigated. The logic is as follows.

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Kanata residents preparing for emerald ash borers

Nearly 100 people attend Wednesday night meeting about the beetles and how to identify and protect ash trees
CBC.ca
March 28, 2013
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

The emerald ash borers devastating ash trees in eastern Ottawa haven’t yet made big inroads into Kanata, but that isn’t stopping the community from preparing. For weeks, Kanata resident Mario Poirier has been distributing ash borer pamphlets to hundreds of homes, only to discover that most people can’t identify the ash trees in their own yards.

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Kitchener joins battle against tree-killing beetle

Waterloo Record
March 29, 2013
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

KITCHENER — Nearly 600 trees lining several streets in the city’s Doon South neighbourhood are gone as the local battle against a tiny Asian pest gets started in a big way. City workers cut down and hauled away ash trees along Pioneer Drive, Pathfinder Crescent, Vintage Crescent, Windrush Trail and Doon South Drive, among others, last month. The only ones left standing were injected with a pesticide last year.

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Ontario forest fire season has ‘normal start’ covered in snow

Last year by this time, Northern Ontario had experienced 16 forest fires
CBC News
April 1, 2013
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

The forest fire season officially starts Monday in Northern Ontario, even though snow remains in much of the region. Still, work is already being done at the Fire Management Headquarters in Thunder Bay to get equipment like pumps ready for the fire lines. Fire crew leaders, like Dean Johnson, are also back to begin annual training. Johnson said it’s not as rushed as last year, when the dry spring led to several fires before the end of March.

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Wildfires: Forest Service contracts for ‘legacy’ airtankers

Summit County Citizens Voice
March 29, 2013
Category: Forestry
Region: United States

FRISCO — The U.S. Forest Service has finalized contracts for several large legacy airtankers, ensuring that the agency will have at least eight large airtankers to support wildland fire suppression through the 2013 fire season. Legacy aircraft are those that have been used as part of the Forest Service aviation program for years, and in some cases, decades. The agency is transitioning to the next generation of airtankers that can fly farther and faster with a bigger payload.

US Forest Service Issues Legacy Large Airtanker Contracts from the Fire Engineering

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Engraver beetle adds hungry mouth to bug battle in Black Hills

Rapid City Journal
March 26, 2013
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

The mountain pine beetle isn’t the only pest bugging tree lovers these days in the Black Hills. The pine engraver beetle, also known as the ips beetle, is chewing its way up the ladder of concern in federal, state and private forests. And unlike mountain pine beetles, which spread in late summer, this season’s generation of engraver beetles will be flying soon. So private landowners should be prepared now to fight an infestation on their property, experts say.

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Guest opinion: Public input shaping Palisades timber sale

Billings Gazette
March 30, 2013
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Concerns have surfaced in recent weeks about the actions and intentions of the Montana Department of Natural Resources and Conservation in relation to the proposed Palisades Timber Sale. I’d like to clarify our public process to date, as well as our objectives for the project. DNRC has and continues to provide public-involvement opportunities well beyond our mandated requirements for the Palisades project.

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Colorado foresters say no need to spray for pine beetles

Summit County Citizens Voice
March 26, 2013
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

SUMMIT COUNTY — While some local property owners report that they’re getting advertisements from local tree spraying companies about protecting lodgepole pines from mountain pine beetles, state officials say there’s no need to apply pesticides this year. “Mountain pine beetle numbers are the lowest they’ve been in 30 years,” said Ron Cousineau, district state forester for the area covering Summit and Grand counties.

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Forest economics presents challenges

Subcommittees tackle issues Oregon faces in managing state, federal forests
La Grande Observer
March 27, 2013
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

WALLOWA — Better managing Oregon’s state and national forests are not only a concern for Gov. John Kitzhaber, but of his Board of Forestry. This winter, the board split into two subcommittees to address the challenges of forest health and economic concerns on federally managed land. Nils Christoffersen, executive director of Wallowa Resources in Enterprise, was appointed to the board of forestry last summer and heads the federal forests subcommittee. Tom Insko of Boise Cascade also serves on the committee along with Cindy Williams, a fisheries biologist from Medford.

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Can They Save The Forest?

Payson Roundup
March 29, 2013
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

The U.S. Forest Service has released an “unprecedented” draft environmental assessment on plans to use mechanical thinning and controlled burns to restore a million acres of dense, overcrowded forest to more healthy conditions. #“It’s unprecedented in terms of the size,” said Henry Provencio, project team leader for the Four Forest Restoration Initiative (4FRI). “We looked at a million acres. And we’re proposing mechanical treatments on up to 400,000 and nearly 600,000 acres of burning.

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A Tale of Alaskan Winter Weather Explains Current, Changing Landscapes

USDA Blog
March 29, 2013
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Yellow-cedar is an ecologically, culturally, and economically important tree species in the coastal temperate rainforests of Alaska and British Columbia. This slow-growing tree has few natural insect and disease agents and is capable of living more than 1000 years. But less snow in Alaska’s winters is leading to the demise of yellow cedar trees at and just above sea level. During hard freezes when little or no snow is on the ground to insulate the yellow cedar’s shallow roots, the roots freeze. Ultimately this leads to the tree’s death.

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Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy

Fungi pull carbon into northern forest soils

April 1, 2013
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: Canada, United States

Sequestration may be questionable fiscal policy, but it means good news in the context of carbon cycles. Vast underground networks of fungi may sequester heaps of carbon in boreal forest soil, a study suggests. By holding onto the element, the fungi do the environment a favor by preventing carbon dioxide from escaping into the atmosphere and warming the planet. Mycorrhizal fungi, which grow underground in and on tree roots, hold 50 to 70 percent of the total carbon stored in leaf litter and soil on forested islands in Sweden, researchers report March 28 in Science.

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Fungi pull carbon into northern forest soils

April 1, 2013
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: Canada, United States

Sequestration may be questionable fiscal policy, but it means good news in the context of carbon cycles. Vast underground networks of fungi may sequester heaps of carbon in boreal forest soil, a study suggests. By holding onto the element, the fungi do the environment a favor by preventing carbon dioxide from escaping into the atmosphere and warming the planet. Mycorrhizal fungi, which grow underground in and on tree roots, hold 50 to 70 percent of the total carbon stored in leaf litter and soil on forested islands in Sweden, researchers report March 28 in Science.

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Questions remain about carbon offsets

by Les Leyne
Victoria Times Colonist
March 30, 2013
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: Canada, Canada West

At the heart of auditor general John Doyle’s report on carbon neutrality are two completely different projects that at first glance have nothing to do with each other. The one thing they have in common is that they were the final destination for public money that flowed through a transaction that’s supposed to make the public sector carbon-neutral. …But Doyle found the whole premise flawed. The “liquidation logging” was
never a realistic prospect.

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What are your views on the provincial government’s carbon-trading program?

The Province
March 29, 2013
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: Canada, Canada West

WE ASKED READERS: What are your views on the provincial government’s carbon-trading program run through the Pacific Carbon Trust?  I believe that the whole carbon mess is nothing but a ridiculous scam. Whether it is carbon trading or carbon tax, none of this nonsense will make one shred of difference. …

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John Doyle blasts Pacific Carbon Trust over ‘orchestrated’ opposition to audit

By Jonathan Fowlie
Vancouver Sun
March 28, 2013
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: Canada, Canada West


VICTORIA — Auditor general John Doyle blasted the management of the Pacific Carbon Trust Wednesday, saying the public organization at the centre of his damning audit on carbon neutrality actively worked to undermine his efforts. “Of all the reports I have issued, never has one been targeted in such an overt manner by vested interests, nor has an audited organization ever broken my confidence, as did the senior managers at PCT by disclosing confidential information to carbon market developers and brokers,” Doyle wrote in a scathing introduction to his report.

Pacific Carbon Trust slammed in a hotly anticipated Auditor General report from the Business in Vancouver

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Wasteful program deserves to be shut down

By Michael Smyth
The Province
March 28, 2013
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: Canada, Canada West

In some ways, I think everyone should be grateful to Bill Barisoff for suppressing the release of a bombshell report into the dubious workings of the government’s “carbon offset” program. Although Barisoff, the Speaker of the legislature, finally released the report Wednesday, his attempt to keep it under wraps only whetted the public’s appetite to see its contents. And all B.C. taxpayers should know the results of Auditor General John Doyle’s probe of a program that funnels millions of their tax dollars into the pockets of wealthy corporations — all in the name of saving the planet from climate change.

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Dead forests release less carbon into atmosphere than expected

Phys.Org
March 25, 2013
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: United States

Massive tree die-offs release less carbon into the atmosphere than previously thought, new research led by the University of Arizona suggests. Across the world, trees are dying in increasing numbers, most likely in the wake of a climate changing toward drier and warmer conditions, scientists suspect. In western North America, outbreaks of mountain pine beetles (Dendroctonus ponderosae) have killed billions of trees from Mexico to Alaska over the last decade.

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Oregon’s “forest to boiler” movement is picking up steam

Sustainable Northwest
March 27, 2013
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: United States, US West

In areas of Oregon not served by natural gas, there is a “new” fuel in town that is replacing heating oil: wood. And it’s saving money for schools and restoring forest lands. Natural gas is the preferred fuel for heating homes and businesses in Oregon due to its relatively low cost. However, the majority of the state does not have access to natural gas and instead must rely on much more expensive petroleum heating oil.

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