Tree Frog Forestry News

Daily Archives: January 24, 2014

Froggy Foibles

The Tree So Deadly It Was Used As A Torture Instrument

KnowledgenNuts
January 24, 2014
Category: Froggy Foibles

The manchineel tree is one of the deadliest plants in the world. Even coming into contact with the bark or leaves will leave a person suffering from severe burns, and eating any of its sweet-smelling fruits is a potentially lethal choice. The tree has long been used for supplying sap for poison darts, and as a place to tie—and torture—Spanish conquistadors.

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Business & Politics

The ripple effect: How the slumping loonie affects businesses across Canada

The Globe and Mail
January 24, 2014
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada

Corporate Canada is beginning to feel the effects of a plunging Canadian dollar, with some businesses raising prices – or making plans to do so – to account for the higher cost of U.S. goods. The dollar slipped briefly below 90 cents (U.S.) on Thursday for the first time since 2009, closing the day at 90.10 cents… Forestry firms based in Canada, which report in Canadian dollars, are also welcoming the weakening loonie. “Lumber is largely denominated in U.S. dollars and as an export-oriented company, that has a net benefit to us as a Canadian-based manufacturer,” said Marty Juravsky, vice-president of corporate development and strategy at International Forest Products Ltd.

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Reaching Out to Aboriginal Youth

January 24, 2014
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada

At the Forest Products Association of Canada (FPAC), we recognize the importance of nurturing our relationship with First Nations and as part of our Vision2020 goals; we aim to increase the number of Aboriginal youth working in the forest industry. …At the Assembly of First Nations (AFN) 4th National Youth Summit, [Etienne Bélanger] had the pleasure of being a keynote speaker. The event took place in Saskatoon under the theme “Youth Leadership: Supporting the Way Forward”. …[He] also had the opportunity in early January to participate in the Environmental and Conservation Sciences Students Association and Forest Society Networking Event held at the University of Alberta, [where he presented] the Award to Shayna Mason.

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Premier keys on economic growth

Prince George Citizen
January 23, 2014
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

Premier Christy Clark called the annual industry summit going on in Prince George this week “the must-attend event in B.C., in Canada, for if you are involved in the resource industries.” She believed that so much that she put her name on it. The Premier’s Natural Resources Forum was organized and carried out for 10 previous years by local MLA Pat Bell, now retired from politics. His replacement MLA Mike Morris stepped into the organizational role for this 11th edition and Clark provided her influence directly.

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BC government’s forestry inspections target the little guy

West Coast Environmental Law
January 23, 2014
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

When the Ministry of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations (FLNRO) tries to detect violations of BC’s forest laws, do they put their efforts into detecting violations by large logging companies or small-scale operators? It turns out that small-scale operators and individuals get over half of the attention of government inspectors, while large-scale logging companies are only the target of about 20% of the government’s inspections, despite holding the logging rights to around 70% of the province’s forests.

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Cullen says government and WorkSafe should have done more to protect employees

HQ Prince George
January 23, 2014
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

In response to the investigation and lack of charges in the Burns Lake mill explosion, MP Nathan Cullen says the provincial government and WorkSafeBC failed to protect the workers. Babine Forest Products released a statement yesterday saying they didn’t know prior to the deadly blast how explosive pine beetle-killed wood dust was. Cullen says he doesn’t know if the company is to blame for the accident but says sawdust in mills has been a problem for years and the government should have done more to maintain safe workplaces.

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Multiple investigators in mill explosion create ‘confusion, ’ RCMP says

The Globe and Mail
January 24, 2014
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

When the Babine Forest Products sawmill exploded in Burns Lake two years ago, killing two workers and injuring another 20, the RCMP sent eight regional investigators to the scene. For two days, the police officers looked for possible criminal wrongdoing. When they concluded there was none, the RCMP handed jurisdiction over to the coroner’s service, though some police officers stayed to help in the search for and recovery of human remains. Days later, yet another set of investigators took over, from the agency responsible for workplace safety. The different roles of those three agencies have created “some confusion,” the force’s assistant commissioner, Wayne Rideout, acknowledged in a letter to the United Steelworkers union. And it’s still not clear what role law enforcement should have played.

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Justice denied by rules of evidence

Vancouver Sun
January 23, 2014
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

Tough questions will have to be answered before the integrity of B.C.’s system of ensuring safe workplaces can be restored. Carl Charlie and Robert Luggi Jr. died Jan. 20, 2012 while doing their jobs at the Babine Forest Products mill, 20 kilometres east of Burns Lake. … An exhaustive 10-month investigation into the tragedy was immediately begun by WorkSafe BC, assigned to prevent workplace injuries, illness and disease and investigate such occurrences. …And lest anyone imagine the WorkSafe BC investigators fumbled the ball, Dolan pointed out they had deployed in the Burns Lake accident the very same investigative methods as they had for at least the last decade.

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Hardwood plywood imports up again in US

IHB The Timber Network
January 23, 2014
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States

US imports of hardwood plywood grew to 347,359 cu.m in October, up 58% from the previous month. Almost all supplier countries gained from the higher import volume, with the exception of Russia. The largest increases were imports from from Indonesia (84,843 cu.m, +267% from September) and China (167,244 cu.m, +58% from September). While imports from China were higher than at any other time in the last six months, total imports in 2013 to October were still 15% lower than at the same time in 2012.

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Greens warn of native forest pulp mill

Australia 7 News
January 24, 2014
Category: Business & Politics
Region: International

Greens leader Christine Milne is warning a wind-back of Tasmania’s World Heritage areas could mean native forests feeding a controversial pulp mill. Senator Milne has attacked the Abbott government after it said it would ask the World Heritage Committee to reconsider the listing of 170,000 hectares of forests under a peace deal between Tasmanian environmentalists and the timber industry. It comes as the Tamar Valley pulp mill re-emerges as an election issue ahead of the March 15 state poll.

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Pulp Mills and Sawmills in Latin America had Among the Lowest Wood Costs in the World in 2013

Wood Resources International
January 23, 2014
Category: Business & Politics
Region: International

Declining costs for sawlogs and pulplogs in Brazil and Chile over the past few years have made the forest industry in the two countries quite competitive. Seattle, WA, January 21, 2014 — The wood costs for pulp and lumber manufacturers in the two largest producing countries in Latin America, Brazil and Chile, have fallen during much of 2012 and 2013, and were in the 2Q/13 at the lowest levels in over two years, according to the Wood Resource Quarterly.

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Wood, Paper & Green Building

Hardwood Plywood Group Goes to Court on ITC China Dumping

Woodworking Network
January 23, 2014
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: United States

A U.S. hardwood plywood manufacturers group filed an appeal of the U.S. Court of International Trade’s ruling that dismissed their antidumping petition against imported Chinese hardwood plywood. The Coalition for Fair Trade of Hardwood Plywood filed a a summons with the U.S. Court of International Trade in New York to appeal the ITC’s decision. The ITC ruled 5-0 on Nov. 5 that hardwood plywood imported from China does not injure the U.S. industry and thus will not be subjected to antidumping duties, A hot debate, pitting U.S. hardwood plywood makers versus hardwood plywood importers, has raged since the trade case was first filed in September 2012 by the CFTHP.

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Is Bamboo Flooring Better for the Planet Than Traditional Hardwood?

Scientific American
December 16, 2013
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: International

Bamboo’s environmental benefits arise largely out of its ability to grow quickly—in some cases three to four feet per day—without the need for fertilizers, pesticides or much water. Bamboo also spreads easily with little or no care. In addition, a bamboo grove releases some 35 percent more oxygen into the air than a similar-sized stand of trees, and it matures (and can be replanted) within seven years (compared to 30-50 years for a stand of trees), helping to improve soil conditions and prevent erosion along the way. Bamboo is so fast-growing that it can yield 20 times more timber than trees on the same area.

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Forestry

How Many Old Growth Trees Make a Forest?

It’s a life or death question for ancient trees TimberWest wants to cut on Sonora Island.
TheTyee.ca
January 24, 2014
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

When is a grove of 600 to 800-year-old Douglas Fir trees not an old growth forest? That’s the question the Campbell family and other residents on Sonora Island will ask TimberWest Forest Corporation, western Canada’s largest timber and land management company, at a meeting today in Campbell River. TimberWest, owned by two pension funds, bills itself as “a leader in sustainable forest management and is committed to Vancouver Island communities.” It also says it practices “stewardship that maintains biodiversity.”

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Not cold enough to kill EAB: Town

Inside Halton
January 24, 2014
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

The Town of Oakville says it’s not cold enough to kill off the emerald ash borers (EAB). Despite freezing temperatures, including a cold weather alert this week, the invasive insect population is expected to survive largely unharmed. “Unfortunately, the temperatures forecasted for Oakville this week are insufficient to have any significant impact on EAB,” said John McNeil, Oakville forestry services manager. McNeil pointed to research by Western University’s Brent Sinclair, which found temperatures have to drop to -30 C for just half the EAB population to die.

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Wood: Dead trees do build soil

Letter to the Editor by Keith J. Hammer, Swan View Coalition
The Missoulian
January 24, 2014
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Professor Peter Kolb’s opinion of Jan. 10 deserves a response, especially where he claims “the myth that wood builds soils has been around about as long as the ‘Lord of the Rings’ story.” Contrary to Kolb’s assertion that this is a myth, the European Union’s “Atlas of Soil Biodiversity,” U.S. Forest Service and other research find otherwise… Beware those like Kolb who call dead trees “carbon waste” and then argue they are of limited value to the forest ecosystem. We expect to hear this from industries that want the dead wood for their own financial gain, regardless of the public subsidies needed to turn their private profit. We expect university staff to be a bit more objective.

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A functional forest ecosystem is more than just trees

University of Jyväskylä, Finland
January 24, 2014
Category: Forestry
Region: International

In 2011, the University of Jyväskylä held an academic conference on the ecological restoration of forests. The conference was visited by 53 researchers from 10 European countries. Now the researchers’ ideas and discussions have been published in the appreciated Biological Conservation publication series. The researchers discussed the state of forests and how the situation of endangered forest species could be improved by restoring natural forest functions and structures that have disappeared from forests.

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General

Reaching Out to Aboriginal Youth

January 24, 2014
Category: Uncategorised

At the Forest Products Association of Canada (FPAC), we recognize the importance of nurturing our relationship with First Nations and as part of our Vision2020 goals; we aim to increase the number of Aboriginal youth working in the forest industry. …At the Assembly of First Nations (AFN) 4th National Youth Summit, [Etienne Bélanger] had the pleasure of being a keynote speaker. The event took place in Saskatoon under the theme “Youth Leadership: Supporting the Way Forward”. …[He] also had the opportunity in early January to participate in the Environmental and Conservation Sciences Students Association and Forest Society Networking Event held at the University of Alberta, [where he presented] the Award to Shayna Mason.

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