Tree Frog Forestry News

Daily Archives: February 4, 2014

Business & Politics

Hard Maple Price Gains to Bolster Soft Maple Demand

Woodworking Network
February 3, 2014
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, United States

Sawmills are delaying hard maple cuts in favor of red oak due to the cold weather across the northern U.S. and Canada, which is prompting a faster price escalation for red oak. Moreover, prohibitively expensive hard maple timber prices are also impacting lumber production, particularly in the Upper Midwest. Meanwhile, hard maple demand is gradually increasing from cabinet, wood component and residential flooring plants. Mills will easily move all the common-grade hard maple they can produce and prices will continue to firm throughout the winter.

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Sawmill was closed to clean up sawdust

Terrace Standard
February 3, 2014
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

Skeena Sawmills was temporarily shut down late last year after a WorkSafe BC safety audit found high levels of combustible sawdust at the location. The stop work order, issued Dec. 19, 2013, was lifted the following day after a clean up took place. WorkSafe BC inspectors visited the mill as part of a province-wide review of mill safety following explosions at sawmills in Burns Lake and in Prince George in 2012. Two workers were killed at each location and both facilities were destroyed by fire.

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Maritime Paper, Norampac wrap up deal

Dartmouth, Quebec companies launch joint venture in Atlantic Canada
Chronicle Herald
February 3, 2014
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada East, Canada

Two paper product heavyweights have joined forces to launch an Atlantic Canadian corrugated packaging operation. The joint venture between Maritime Paper Products Ltd. and Norampac, a division of Quebec boxboard, containerboard and tissue maker Cascades Canada ULC, will meet changing marketplace demands in the region. “This joint venture recognizes the changing marketplace and the need to have strong competitive options for our customers,” Maritime Paper president Gary Johnson said in an email Monday.

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Resolute Forest Products to mobilize for construction in March

Atikokan Progress
February 4, 2014
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada East, Canada

“You’ll see things start happening fast in April,” Resolute Forest Products’ Michael Martel told Council Monday. Martel, Resolute’s vice-president of forest products operations, is in charge of the construction of the company’s new mill at Sapawe. He met with Council Monday to update them on the project. So far, Resolute has committed about $25 million of the expected $62 million cost; most of the rest is being tendered now. Rainy Lake Tribal Contracting has been working to prepare the site since last summer.

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Report : Vermont forest industry worth $3.4 billion

Associated Press
February 3, 2014
Category: Business & Politics
Region: US East, United States

MONTPELIER – The Vermont Department of Forest, Parks and Recreation says the state’s forestry industry contributed about $3.4 billion to the state’s economy in 2012 and sustains about 20,600 jobs. On Monday, the department released a report it produced with the North East State Foresters Association. State Forester Steven Sinclair lists some of the products produced by the industry: firewood, lumber, furniture, maple syrup and Christmas trees. The forests also help provide clean water, carbon storage, and wildlife habitat and the forests are the vital backdrop to recreation and tourism in the state.

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Government needs to lead on increasing forestry value

Press Release: Green Party
February 4, 2014
Category: Business & Politics
Region: International

The Government needs to provide leadership in the forestry sector so that more value is added to our exports and more jobs are created for New Zealanders, Green Party forestry spokesperson Steffan Browning said today. The New Zealand Timber Industry Federation today warned that “New Zealand sawmillers are being strangled by continuing log shortages” because raw logs are being sent overseas, rather than processed here. “The National Government has failed to create value and jobs in the forestry industry,” Mr Browning said. 

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Log Shortages Will Strangle Local Sawmilling

Press Release: NZ Timber Industry
February 4, 2014
Category: Business & Politics
Region: International

New Zealand sawmillers are being strangled by continuing log shortages. High export demand for logs in China and other Asian markets is creating a widespread shortage of logs for processing here says the New Zealand Timber Industry Federation, and there’s every reason to believe these shortages will continue over the next few years. Since 2008 New Zealand log exports have increased by 240% and international forestry commentators are saying that the level of demand for logs in China (which accounts for 70% of our log trade) will continue for the foreseeable future. 

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TasPorts buys woodchip loader amid Greens criticism

ABC News
February 3, 2014
Category: Business & Politics
Region: International

Tasmanian state-owned company TasPorts has bought the Gunns woodchip loading facility at the Burnie port from the company’s receivers KordaMentha. It was de-commissioned in 2010 when Gunns stopped native logging, and since then the Federal Government has been subsidising north-west sawmillers who have to cart their chips from the Bell Bay port in the south-east. Deputy Premier Bryan Green says the sale will mean the loading facility will no longer only be available to Gunns, but to all sawmillers.

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Plantations more valuable if they are not pulped: Greens

ABC News, Australia
February 4, 2014
Category: Business & Politics
Region: International

The Greens believe Tasmania’s sprawling hardwood plantation estate would be worth more if the trees were not used to feed a pulp mill. The party is calling for the wood to be turned into manufactured timber, which currently has to be imported from Europe, potentially creating thousands of jobs. They also want another review of Tasmania’s 236,000 hectare hardwood plantation estate looking at alternative uses for the timber, other than feeding a proposed pulp mill in the Tamar Valley.

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Wood, Paper & Green Building

Enter the Australian Timber Design Awards 2014

Infolink.com.au
February 3, 2014
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: International

Entries for the 15th annual Australian Timber Design Awards will open on 10 February and close on 27 June 2014. Submissions are open to architects, builders, designers, engineers and students, and must be based on projects that make significant use of timber. Suitable projects are new buildings, renovations, interior fitouts and outdoor timber structures such as bridges or foreshore developments. All projects must be built in Australia.

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1,500 Unit Retiree Town Project Breaks Ground Jungnamjin LOHAS Town, the largest wood frame construction project in Korea, breaks ground in Jeonnam Province

Canada Wood Group Blog
February 3, 2014
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: International

One of the most important demographic group in the Korean population is baby boomers. There are about 7 million baby boomers, born between 1955 and 1963, representing 14% of 50 million total population of South Korea. About half of them live in Seoul Capital Area including the surrounding Incheon Metropolis and Gyeonggi Province according to the 2010 Census, and they have worked hard to see their per capita Gross Domestic Product (GDP) to grow more than 300 times from mere $65 in 1960 to $20,759 in 2010.

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Forestry

99-year-old Abbotsford trucker publishes first book

Abby News
February 2, 2014
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Modern Abbotsford is the busiest city in the region with concrete multi-lane highways snaking endlessly through the landscape….Frank White recounts the story of a changing Abbotsford and his place in it in his memoir, Milk Spills & One-Log Loads: Memories of a Pioneer Truck Driver. This marks White’s debut into publishing at the age of 99. …Later on, Frank started driving one of the first logging trucks in the Valley. The old rebuilt delivery van barely crawled up Sumas Mountain and struggled under the weight of tree logs. Back then, some old growth logs were eight-feet thick and only one log would fit on the back of the truck.

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Grassy Narrows First Nation on alert for logging

Longest running First Nations blockade effectively stopped logging since December 2002
CBC News
February 3, 2014
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

The Asubpeeschoseewagong First Nation (Grassy Narrows) is on alert for logging trucks to come in April 2014. Grassy Narrows is the home of the longest running First Nations blockade in Canada. Its original Slant Lake blockade site, about 100 km north of Kenora, Ontario, started on December 2, 2002. Judy DaSilva is a member of Grassy Narrows First Nation and has been on the forefront right from the start. …Logging halted for over 11 years, but in the past few months things are picking up once again.

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House Republicans call for changes to Endangered Species Act

Associated Press
February 4, 2014
Category: Forestry
Region: United States

BILLINGS, Mont. – Republicans in Congress are calling for an overhaul to the Endangered Species Act, but experts say broad changes to one of the nation’s cornerstone environmental laws are unlikely given the pervasive partisan divide in Washington, D.C. A group of 13 GOP lawmakers representing states across the U.S. planned to release a report Tuesday proposing alterations to the 40-year-old law, which protects imperiled plants and animals. Proponents of the federal law credit it with staving off extinction for hundreds of species — from the bald eagle and American alligator to the grey whale.

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Teanaway Community Forest advisory panel members sought

Yakima Herald-Republic
February 4, 2014
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

CLE ELUM, Wash. — Want to have a voice in how the state’s first community forest, located in the Teanaway watershed, will be managed? The 50,000 acre forest was purchased by the state last year as part of the Yakima River Basin integrated plan for water management to protect the watershed. The lands will be managed in a partnership between the state departments of Natural Resources and Fish and Wildlife, working with a committee of citizens and representatives of local groups, including ranchers with grazing allotments, hikers, backcountry horsemen and sportsmen.

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Senator who cried ‘wolf’ sets bad precedent with mandated logging

The Missoulian
February 3, 2014
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Electoral-year politics have a tendency to produce the worst possible policies. Why? Because the real business of governance, which should be good policies that benefit our citizenry without regard to political affiliation, take a back seat to bashing opponents and overreacting to whatever hot-button political issue du jour will garner votes. In that regard, Montana’s U.S. Sen. Jon Tester, a Democrat, has unfortunately led the pack – and now, sadly, we are seeing the outcomes of his electoral-year machinations and poor policy judgment.

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Forestry union accuses Liberals of undermining jobs with heritage delisting bid

ABC News, Australia
February 4, 2014
Category: Forestry
Region: International

The Tasmanian Liberals have been accused by the forestry union of putting the party ahead of the industry, as part of its bid to win next month’s election. The state Liberals are backing the Federal Coalition’s bid to delist 74,000 hectares of forest added to the World Heritage Area last year as part of the forest peace deal. The party has said it will rip up the deal if it wins the March election. The union representing forestry workers says the delisting move could undermine renewed confidence in the industry.

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Next big idea in forest conservation? Connecting forest fragments

Mongabay.com
January 31, 2014
Category: Forestry
Region: International

Dr. Stuart Pimm is an expert in extinctions: why they happen, how fast they happen, and how they can be prevented. Reconnecting forest fragments and avoiding fragmentation, according to Pimm, are among the most crucial things we can do to conserve global biodiversity. His organization SavingSpecies identifies areas at-risk for extinctions and helps local organizations fundraise so they can protect and restore habitats and safeguard biodiversity.

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Peter Mitchell on Greens claim wood chipping in native forests costing public (radio)

ABC News, Australia
February 4, 2014
Category: Forestry
Region: International

Mill manager Peter Rutherford says the money he pays to the Forestry Corporation of NSW is paying for fire breaks and pest control. The Greens say that logging native growth forests is costing tax payers close to $500 a hectare.

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Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy

Great Bear Rainforest carbon credits offer economic lifeline to First Nations

Georgia Straight
January 31, 2014
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: Canada, Canada West

First Nations along the north and central coast could reap a financial windfall if they and the government agree on recommendations from industry and environmental groups to protect an additional 500,000 hectares of the Great Bear Rainforest. According to UBC Sauder School of Business professor James Tansey, protecting 70 percent of the Great Bear Rainforest from logging—which would result from the recommendations—would yield about 1.2 million tonnes of carbon credits per year. These credits could be sold for $15 to $25 per tonne, generating $18 million to $30 million annually for First Nations communities in the region.

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N.S. wood pellets bound for Europe

Herald Business
February 3, 2014
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: Canada East, Canada

Scotia Atlantic Biomass Company Ltd. is cashing in on its wood chips. The Upper Musquodoboit company, which makes high energy wood pellets from chips and other wood biomass, is loading its first shipment of pellets for Europe in Halifax Harbour. “We’ve been loading since Saturday,” said Michele Rebiere, chief financial officer with Viridis Energy Inc. of Vancouver in an interview Monday. Rebiere said the bulk cargo vessel Irma is being loaded with 25,000 tonnes of wood pellets that are bound for Ghent, Belgium.

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Corridors to Survival: Charting a Path to Combat Climate Change in the Tropics

National Geographic
February 3, 2014
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: International

The concept of habitat corridors in conservation has been around for a while. It’s a topic at global climate talks and an issue for NGOs eager to create pathways for survival between protected areas. For all the talk, there hasn’t been much research to help execute a plan. A team of scientists at Woods Hole Research Center in Falmouth, Mass., has stepped into this scientific vacuum in the tropics. Using newly available, high-resolution data sets of vegetation carbon stocks gleaned from satellite sensors, they mapped more than 16,000 corridors through areas of highest carbon-catching biomass between 5,600 protected areas in the tropics.

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General

Could maple syrup plantations be a way of the future?

New discovery could mean alternatives to traditional sugar bush
Toronto Star
February 3, 2014
Category: Uncategorised

To many a sentimental Canadian, maple syrup evokes scenes of towering maple trees in quiet forests, the drip-drip of sap into metal buckets and steamy sugar shacks where sap is boiled into the golden nectar we drizzle on everything from pancakes to salmon. But that notion of the iconic sugar bush could soon be joined by a radically different landscape, thanks to a discovery by Vermont researchers. Picture this: plantations featuring row upon row of saplings, tops cut off and fitted with caps to suction sap from their stems.

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Market Recap: RISI Crow’s Construction Materials Cost Index

Home Channel News
February 3, 2014
Category: Uncategorised

Lumber: Rumors circling the SPF lumber market on Thursday regarding sales to China awakened what was, earlier in the week, a quiet marketplace. Neither the early slowness nor increase in sales activity later in the week persuaded producers to do much in the way of altering quotes. The swath of snow and ice enveloping much of the Southeast early in the week brought Southern Pine lumber production to a standstill at many mills. Unable to get to offices, many buyers could not participate in the market.

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