Tree Frog Forestry News

Daily Archives: February 11, 2014

Business & Politics

Welcome to 2014 and a forward agenda for the forest industry

FPAC Blog
February 7, 2014
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada

As 2014 gets underway, and the global economy continues to climb back out of the depths of the 2008 economic crash, things are looking up for the forest products industry… The Canadian forest sector, similar to the rest of the Canadian natural resource economy, depends on a strong global economy. The more the global economy grows the more demand there will be for all types of resources…. So as we begin 2014, the agenda of the Forest Products Association of Canada continues to focus on Vision2020. We need new people to enter the forest industry, we need to continue to innovate in our products and in our processes and we need to continue to grow our markets.

Read More

Domtar handily beats analyst estimates as Q4 profit more than triples to US$65M

Canadian Press
February 7, 2014
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada

MONTREAL – Pulp and paper producer Domtar handily beat expectations Friday as its net income more than tripled to US$65 million in the fourth quarter, due to less scheduled maintenance and improved pulp markets. The Montreal-based company, which reports in U.S. dollars, earned $2 per dilute share for the period ended Dec. 31. That compared to 54 cents per share or $19 million a year earlier. On an adjusted basis, Domtar earned $68 million or $2.09 per share – well above analyst estimates of $1.53 per share. In the prior year, adjusted profits were $46 million or $1.31, including $41 million in closure and impairment costs.

Read More

Interfor Grows in the US Southeast

MarketWatch
February 9, 2014
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

VANCOUVER  — Interfor announced today that it has reached an agreement with Ilim Timber Continental, S.A. to acquire Tolleson Ilim Lumber Company of Perry, Georgia, USA. The Tolleson operations include two sawmills in Perry and Preston, Georgia, with a combined annual lumber capacity of more than 400 million board feet plus a remanufacturing facility in Perry, Georgia. The Tolleson mills were recently ranked as the two lowest cost mills in a survey of US southern pine sawmills. In 2013, Tolleson generated adjusted EBITDA of US$37 million on sales of US$134 million.

Read More

Canfor Corp Has Strong Year

Canfor Corporation closed out 2013 on a strong note
250 News
February 8, 2014
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

In releasing financial results for last year, the company’s adjusted shareholder net income for 2013 was $233-million dollars, or $1.64 per share, compared to just $19-million dollars for 2012. The final three months of the year saw adjusted net income climb to $48.8-million, up from $26.6-million in the third quarter of 2013, and more than double the $20.3-million for the same period in 2012.

Read More

Chetwynd pulp mill to re-open in 2014

Canadian News Wire
February 9, 2014
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

VANCOUVER – Unifor Local 448 is celebrating the planned activation of the pulp mill in northern British Columbia town of Chetwynd. “We’re proud to have been a part of the negotiations to get people back to work,” said Scott Doherty, Unifor Western Director. “Resource industry jobs are good jobs.” The sale of the Tembec mill to Paper Excellence Canada Holding Corporation (PE) is expected to be complete in the spring of 2014. Following the sale the mill will start up again, creating 110 good jobs in the community. 

Read More

Brinks blaze extinguished

Prince George Citizen
February 9, 2014
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

Firefighters were called to a fire at Brink Forest Products shortly before 4 p.m. on Saturday.
RCMP and fire crews blocked River Road just east of the Cameron Street bridge while firefighters extinguished the fire. Prince George Fire Rescue deployed 11 firefighters from two halls and the blaze was brought under control quickly. The fire appeared limited to the
western exterior side of Brinks’ facility and firefighters only needed two hours to complete the call. There was no damage to the building’s structure.

Fire at Brink Forest Products from The Prince George Citizen

Read More

Meadow Creek Cedar issued cancellation notice

BC Local News
February 10, 2014
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

Plans to rehabilitate a local forest company’s suspended license appear to be falling apart. In 2012, Blue Ridge Timber signed a management agreement with Meadow Creek Cedar for access to wood under its license. They hoped to meet a long list of outstanding obligations and eventually buy the quota. However, last month the Ministry of Forests served Meadow Creek Cedar with a three-month notice of license cancellation. A ministry spokesman confirmed Blue Ridge Timber is in the process of ending the deal “due to challenges in successfully meeting all the requirements to manage both the backlog of liabilities and current obligations associated with the license.”

Read More

Interfor: A bullish bet despite its strong runup

The Globe and Mail
February 10, 2014
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

Investors hoping to build their portfolios by playing the U.S. housing recovery are snapping up shares of International Forest Products Ltd. as its production expands south of the border. The stock hit a 20-year high on Monday and already bullish analysts hiked their target prices after the Vancouver-based company said it was buying two Georgia sawmills for $180-million (U.S.) from Ilim Timber Continental SA.

Read More

Domtar says direct mail advertising will survive end of home delivery

Yahoo.com
February 7, 2014
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada East, Canada

MONTREAL – North America’s largest producer of paper used for letters, envelopes and office equipment says the end of Canada Post home delivery won’t mean the death of direct mail from advertisers. Direct mail advertising remains effective and should withstand the challenges from Canada Post’s decision to move to community boxes, Domtar chief executive John Williams said Friday. Williams acknowledged that interest in direct mail could “soften” if deliveries are less frequent or more difficult for consumers but told analysts that “I still think it has a pretty good future.”

Read More

Tembec tax appeal unresolved

Kapuskasing Times
February 9, 2014
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada East, Canada

Although Kapuskasing’s administration is preparing to present council with 2014 budget proposals, the actual impact of a property tax cut on the town’s largest contributor is not yet known. According to Chantal Boyer-Brochu, general manager finance and recreation, no final understanding has yet been reached between the municipality and Tembec. In a meantime, she is using an estimate in order to move forward with the budget preparation… This is the third time Tembec has successfully appealed what the newsprint maker pays in property taxes, with the outcome representing millions in fewer dollars for the town.

Read More

Northern Pulp’s Breen retires as GM of mill

February 11, 2014
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada East, Canada

After nearly 35 years with the company, Don Breen has retired from Northern Pulp. The mill’s former general manager officially retired on Feb. 1 and said he applied for retirement about six months ago, long before a dispute with the province over access to fibre on Crown lands. “It had nothing to do with it,” Breen said in a telephone interview. Last week, Premier Stephen McNeil turned down a bailout request from Northern Pulp that would have included a $10-million forgivable loan.

Read More

Unifor chooses Resolute Forest Products to lead sector negotiations

Unifor Canada
February 7, 2014
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada East, Canada

Unifor, Canada’s largest union in the forestry sector, kicked off preparations for the 2014 pulp and paper pattern bargaining in Eastern Canada at its Industry Bargaining Conference this week in Montreal. “This round of bargaining is about making progress for workers after the recession that battered the forestry and the entire manufacturing sector,” said Unifor National President Jerry Dias. “The industry has returned to profitability – we’ll be asking employers to acknowledge the sacrifices and contributions of workers during the crisis, including helping to take some companies out of CCAA protection.”

Read More

Northern Pulp’s Breen retires as GM of mill

February 11, 2014
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada East, Canada

After nearly 35 years with the company, Don Breen has retired from Northern Pulp. The mill’s former general manager officially retired on Feb. 1 and said he applied for retirement about six months ago, long before a dispute with the province over access to fibre on Crown lands. “It had nothing to do with it,” Breen said in a telephone interview. Last week, Premier Stephen McNeil turned down a bailout request from Northern Pulp that would have included a $10-million forgivable loan.

Read More

Students propose making chopsticks for China

Capital Press
February 10, 2014
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States, US West

ANDERSON, Calif. — A quartet of college students from Quincy, Calif., have an idea for how to create jobs by using the wood waste at lumber mills. They want to turn the wood into chopsticks to sell to China, where they say a shortage exist. “One-third of the world uses chopsticks as utensils,” said Kambel Kenaston, 20, as he and his fellow Feather River College students prepared to make a presentation at the Sierra Cascade Logging conference here. “We’re here to get feedback from people” in the industry, he said. “We think adding in a chopstick factory at our mill would add 100 jobs, and we only have a population of 5,000 people.”

Read More

Timber company hopes ruling will deter regulators

Capital Press
February 7, 2014
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States, US West

ANDERSON, Calif. — A top resource official for timber giant Sierra Pacific Industries says he hopes a judge’s scathing ruling in the company’s favor will deter overzealous state regulators. Retired Superior Court Judge Leslie C. Nichols found the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection guilty of “egregious and reprehensible” actions while investigating the 2007 Moonlight Fire and ordered the agency to pay more than $30 million in penalties and legal fees, The Associated Press reported. Nichols, who was appointed to the case by the state Supreme Court, said Feb. 4 that Cal Fire’s efforts to blame SPI and other landowners were corrupt and tainted, according to the wire service.

Judge rules CalFire owes $30M in 2007 fire suit from The Capital Press
Judge orders Cal Fire to pay $30 million for ‘reprehensible conduct’ in Moonlight fire case from The Sacramento Bee

Read More

New Finland Forest Policy Launched

Finnbay
February 10, 2014
Category: Business & Politics
Region: International

The Ministry of Agriculture and Forestry has submitted the new forest policy to the Parliament last Friday. The policy aims to diversify Finland’s forestry industry as well as to support the growth of the bioeconomy. Finnish Forest Industries Federation believes that the key message of the policy is to increase the competitiveness of the Finnish forest sector. The bioeconomy, which encompasses the production of renewable biological resources and their conversion into food, feed, bio-based products and bioenergy via innovative and efficient technologies provided by industrial biotechnology, is a central pillar to the Finnish forest policy.

Read More

Proposed Tasmanian Tamar Valley pulp mill lacks interested investors, according to campaigner Geoff Cousins

ABC News
February 11, 2014
Category: Business & Politics
Region: International

The Tasmanian Tamar Valley pulp mill has no investors interested in developing the controversial project, anti-mill campaigner and businessman Geoff Cousins says. The multi-billion dollar mill was first proposed a decade ago but has been plagued by some of the largest protests in Tasmanian history over environmental concerns and the collapse of the original proponent, former timber giant Gunns. Administrator Korda Mentha is trying to sell the permit and the Tasmanian Government recently passed special legislation designed to shore it up.

Read More

Wood, Paper & Green Building

Building on British Columbia’s Wood Culture

A new web site featuring the latest news on building with wood 
Forestry Innovation Investment
February 5, 2014
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: Canada

Cost-effectiveness, design flexibility and a commitment to more environmentally responsible buildings are generating increased demand across B.C. for the use of wood in building construction. Many innovative wood buildings, such as the Wood Innovation and Design Centre currently under construction in Prince George, are showcasing British Columbia’s expertise in wood design and construction. A new web site featuring the latest news on building with wood in B.C. is now available to architects, engineers, builders, officials and consumers.

Read More

More hybrid wood structures being built in British Columbia

Journal of Commerce
February 12, 2014
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: Canada, Canada West

British Columbia builders are using wood in conjunction with other materials on a larger scale than ever before. John Paone, director and senior vice president of Alfred Horie Construction Co. Ltd. recently presented Delivering Efficient Engineered Wood and Hybrid Structures at the 2014 International Wood Symposium in Vancouver. He discussed some of the work his firm has been doing with wood and how it’s combined with other materials. Paone said he looks at wood products from a builder’s perspective.

Read More

Paper mills find new ways to survive

An old-line industry hangs on in the digital era by finding specialized uses for its products
Boston Globe
February 9, 2014
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: US East, United States

Last month, a five-alarm fire ripped through the shuttered buildings of Merrimac Paper Co. in Lawrence, consuming the once mighty riverfront mill that produced high quality papers for customers such as National Geographic magazine. The destruction of the 19th-century mill complex seemed to symbolize the fate of one of New England’s traditional industries, one that like textiles and shoes succumbed to the forces of technology and globalization. At one time, hundreds of paper and pulp mills, employing tens of thousands of people, dotted New England rivers and communities. Today, in the face of foreign competition and a digital society demanding less and less paper, fewer than 50 paper mills still operate in the region.

Read More

Forestry

COFI convention to look at forest industry future

HQ Prince George
February 10, 2014
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Preparations are underway for an annual conference on the forest industry. The Council of Forest Industries is set to host its conference in Kelowna in early April this year. COFI Vice-President Doug Routledge says the conference is aimed at forest companies senior management. “What we try to do is look at what’s coming at us, over the next 5-10 even 15 years out” says Routledge, “so its not a conference so much about what’s happening right in front of us today but more out in the future.”

Read More

Activists scale Mount Kaaïkop to raise funds for environmental defence

CBC News
February 8, 2014
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

A group of activists snowshoed up Mount Kaaïkop Saturday afternoon in an effort to raise money and awareness for the defence of the Quebec mountain against logging. Members of the Coalition For the Preservation of Mount Kaaïkop are fighting the Quebec government over its bid to raze part of the forested area on the mountain, which is the second-highest peak in the Laurentians. “We are against the woodcuts because it would basically disfigure the mountain and the government didn’t want to hear anything about that. For them Mount Kaaïkop is just another forest and they wanted the wood for logging,” says group spokesman Claude Alexandre Carpentier.

Read More

Digital database will pay vital role in ash borer management

WCF Courier
February 9, 2014
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

WATERLOO — Todd Derifield has a virtual dining guide for emerald ash borers at his fingertips. A computerized tree inventory lets the city forester pinpoint the location of every ash in city parks and roadsides, find out the trunk size and health and determine the last time his crews trimmed its branches. “This has really organized our day-to-day operations … (replacing) piles and piles of paper,” Derifield said. “It’s going to be difficult to deal with the emerald ash borer the way it is, but it would be more difficult without this inventory.”

Read More

Chiefs want to take over Whiskey Jack

Kenora Online
February 11, 2014
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

First Nation chiefs made a declaration yesterday, saying they want to take over management of the Whiskey Jack Fobister. Chief Simon Fobister of Grassy Narrows explains their position. “We three communities want to work together to take over the Whiskey Jack SFL, Sustainable Forestry Licence. We made it clear to the Minister of Natural Resources that was our intention. That’s our goal. He’s going to give us his response before April 1, I hope,” he said Monday. Grassy Narrows is the site of the country’s longest running blockade. It was set up to block logging trucks from entering the Whiskey Jack in December of 2002.

Read More

US government to spend $30M on forest restoration

One of first projects will be a restoration of the watershed that provides drinking water for Montana’s capital city
Sandusky Register
February 15, 2014
Category: Forestry
Region: United States

The U.S. Department of Agriculture said Thursday it will spend $30 million this year on forest restoration projects in 12 states to reduce the threat of wildfires, protect water quality and improve wildlife habitat for at-risk species. Those first 13 projects will be the start of a multi-year initiative to improve the health of forests and watersheds on public and private lands, Agriculture Undersecretary Robert Bonnie said. With longer fire seasons in recent years burning more areas, and beetle outbreaks devastating more than 40 million acres of forests in the West, the pace and scale of restoration need to be increased, he said.

Read More

Taking an ax to traditional forest management

The Western News
February 9, 2014
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Wildfires destroyed an estimated 6,500 square miles of U.S. forest lands in 2013, an area larger than the state of Connecticut. One reason fires blaze through so much land is poor wildfire management from the U.S. Forest Service. But instead of continuing to try to tweak the ossified bureaucracy, we should borrow an idea from public-education reformers: Create “charter forests,” like charter schools. Washington has known about the mismanagement of the Forest Service—whose 35,000 employees are responsible for approximately 10% of land in the U.S.—for years. In 1998, for example, the Government Accountability Office reported that “catastrophic wildfires threaten resources and communities” throughout the West.

Read More

Wyden Gets Pushback On His O&C Timber Bill

Jefferson Public Radio
February 9, 2014
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Oregon Senator Ron Wyden pledges to do everything he can to get his proposed timber plan passed by Congress and signed into law by President Obama this year. He’s gathered support from key players in both the timber industry and the environmental community, and he’s painting opponents as uncompromising extremists. But, hold-outs on both sides say splitting the baby in half isn’t the wisest choice. …. Ron Wyden: “The conversation about managing these lands has now been monopolized by the ideological extremes who seem allergic to the idea of a compromise.”

Read More

Tim Lillebo, Eastern Oregon forests advocate, dies at 61

The Oregonian
February 10, 2014
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

In 1983, when the environmental group now known as Oregon Wild was a fledgling operation, it sent a young man named Tim Lillebo to lobby for key legislation in Washington, D.C. Congress was considering a bill to designate nearly 1 million acres of wilderness in Oregon. The group gave Lillebo all it could afford to cover his meals and lodging: $10 a day.  …Lillebo was an environmental advocate known for his quiet persistence and trademark brown crushed felt hat. The Lewis and Clark College graduate’s career focused on protecting Ponderosa forests in Eastern Oregon, where he was born and raised.

Read More

Research survey does not support logging as beetle outbreak remedy

Bozeman Daily Chronicle
February 4, 2014
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Logging does not appear to prevent pine-beetle outbreaks, so policy makers should stop making such claims, according to a University of Montana researcher. Diana Six, a University of Montana pine-beetle biologist, and two University of California-Berkeley policy experts published a review of the scientific evidence to date on whether forest manipulation is effective at preventing pine-beetle outbreaks. The answer is generally “No.”

Read More

Freed from state clear-cut restrictions, Maine’s largest landowner says it’s doing better forestry

Bangor Daily News
February 9, 2014
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

ASHLAND, Maine —… “Mr. [James D.] Irving is a very hands-on type of manager,” said Irving Chief Forester Blake Brunsdon. “He’s on the ground [in Maine] at least once a month.”…“This used to all be [Great Northern Paper Co.] land,” Coffin said, pointing to a stand of trees during a recent tour of Irving holdings near Ashland. “We bought it in 1999, brought in [a contractor] and put him to work thinning things out and opening it up.”… For its part, according to James D. Irving, co-chair of J.D. Irving Ltd., his company and its foresters are now actually held to a higher standard of woodland management with greater, outside third-party scrutiny on non-clearcut harvesting, preserving forest biology and economic support, among others.


Read More

NASA study points to infrared-herring in apparent Amazon green-up

e! Science News
February 7, 2014
Category: Forestry
Region: International

For the past eight years, scientists have been working to make sense of why some satellite data seemed to show the Amazon rain forest “greening-up” during the region’s dry season each year from June to October. The green-up indicated productive, thriving vegetation in spite of limited rainfall. Now, a new NASA study published today in the journal Nature shows that the appearance of canopy greening is not caused by a biophysical change in Amazon forests, but instead by a combination of shadowing within the canopy and the way that satellite sensors observe the Amazon during the dry season

Read More

World heritage expert warns of ‘worrying’ signs over status of Tasmanian forests

The Sydney Morning Herald
February 8, 2014
Category: Forestry
Region: International

A leading world heritage expert says Australia is sending a worrying signal to the world by seeking to delist Tasmanian forests. Peter Shadie, a member of the world heritage panel of the International Union for Conservation of Nature for the past 10 years, said an Australian proposal to wind back protection of 74,000 hectares was at odds with being a country others looked to for leadership on world heritage. ”It is concerning that a country such as Australia should be taking a more expedient approach,” Mr Shadie told Fairfax Media.

Read More

Narco-Deforestation: Linking Drug Policy and Forest Conservation

Drug routes affect deforestation rates
ScienceBlog.com
February 8, 2014
Category: Forestry
Region: International

The forests stretching from Mexico through Central America have some of the richest species diversity on the planet. But despite expansive conservation efforts, this region continues to face staggering rates of forest destruction. While many of the overlapping forces driving this plight are well-documented — such as agribusiness expansion, weak governance and conflicting property regimes — there has been much less attention devoted to the environmental impacts from the region’s drug trafficking

Read More

Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy

WSU scientists making poplars with rose scent

Idaho Statesman
February 10, 2014
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy

SEATTLE — Sniff the air around Norman Lewis’ experimental poplars, and you won’t pick up the scent of roses. But inside the saplings’ leaves and stems, cells are hard at work producing the chemical called 2-phenylethanol — which by any other name would smell as sweet. Sweeter still is the fact that perfume and cosmetics companies will pay as much as $30 an ounce for the compound that gives roses their characteristic aroma… The potential market for specialty chemicals — many of which are now synthesized from petroleum — is big, said Lewis, director of WSU’s Institute of Biological Chemistry. He’s already patented some of the technology, which relies on genetic engineering, and created a spinoff company called Elasid.

Read More

General

Market Recap: RISI Crow’s Construction Materials Cost Index

Crow’s Weekly Market Report
February 10, 2014
Category: Uncategorised

Lumber: While eastern Canadian SPF producers lowered prices in search of sales, western producers held onto price levels for yet another week. Heavy snows and frigid temperatures restricted consumption throughout much of the northern tier of the U.S. A slower trading pace in the Southern Pine lumber market forced producers to seek sales from a weaker position. That weakness prompted buyers to reevaluate their positions, which often involved a strategy of reducing their inventories. 

Read More