Tree Frog Forestry News

Daily Archives: February 12, 2014

Business & Politics

Budget is welcome boost for forest industry transformation

Canada NewsWire
February 11, 2014
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada East, Canada

The Forest Products Association of Canada (FPAC) appreciates the additional support for innovation and sector transformation in today’s federal budget as a way to create jobs and solidify Canada’s reputation as a world leader in developing cutting-edge products from wood fibre. The “Creating Jobs and Opportunities” budget from the federal Minister of Finance, Jim Flaherty, includes an additional $90.4 million over four years for the Investments in Forest Industry Transformation (IFIT) program that has already helped Canadian forest product companies develop world-first innovations.

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NewPage mill state’s top polluter, according to 2012 data

River Valley Sun Journal
February 11, 2014
Category: Business & Politics
Region: US East, United States

RUMFORD — The NewPage paper mill in Rumford was the state’s largest producer of toxic waste in 2012, according to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. The agency’s Toxic Release Inventory analysis showed that 88 facilities in Maine released about about 11½ million pounds of toxic waste directly into the air, water and land in 2012, an increase from 2011 of almost 653,000 pounds. The NewPage mill released more than 3 million pounds of waste in 2012, the last year for which data is available, according to the report.

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Maine’s sole tissue producer faces threats from abroad and closer to home

Bangor Daily News
February 10, 2014
Category: Business & Politics
Region: US East, United States

Much has been written about the challenges facing the paper industry in Maine. In most cases, however, all paper manufacturers are lumped together without regard for the specific types of paper they produce. The majority of the paper produced in Maine is what’s known as coated paper, which is used to make magazines, catalogs and newspaper inserts. The market for coated paper has been in decline as digital media eats into demand for the printed page. However, there is a type of paper not under siege by digital technology: tissue.

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A close call for Australian Paper’s Maryvale mill

ABC News, Australia
February 12, 2014
Category: Business & Politics
Region: International

On Sunday afternoon fire swept through plantations to the north of Morwell and came to the boundaries of the Australian Paper Maryvale pulp mill. After a night long battle CFA crews managed to extinguish the blaze and now only smoldering piles of logs and woodchips remain. Fire inside the Maryvale mill was started by embers landing in some of the mill’s log and woodchip piles. “Really we went into emergency mode and it was more important to deal with the emergency than to deal with ongoing production issues, so we took some of the machines down at that time,” says Mark Nelson, manager of human resources for Australian Paper at the Maryvale mill.

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Brazil’s pulp and paper production up in 2013

Pulp and Paper News
February 12, 2014
Category: Business & Politics
Region: International

According to the Brazilian Pulp and Paper Association (Bracelpa), pulp and paper production in Brazil grew by 7.3% and 1.6% in 2013, respectively, in comparison with 2012. From January to December, 15 million tons of pulp and 10.4 million tons of paper were produced. Exports in the sector totaled US$ 7.1 billion in the year, representing an increase of 7.5% in relation to 2012. Pulp exports reached 9.4 million tons and paper totaled 1.8 million tons.

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Wood, Paper & Green Building

Modular construction and cross-laminated timber, together at last!

Treehugger
February 11, 2014
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: Canada, United States

Cross-laminated timber is a wonderful way of using up all those billions of board-feet of pine-beetle kill lumber that’s rotting away. Cut it, glue it and press it, and you have giant panels that can used for strong, earthquake resistant and yes, fire resistant construction. It already is a form of flat-pack prefabrication, but Seattle architects Weber Thompson take it one step further: They are proposing to go modular with it as well.

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UBC harnessing robot technology to up wood ante

by Gordon Hamilton – Hundegger drive could establish B.C. wood as a leading precision building material
Business in Vancouver
February 11, 2014
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: Canada, Canada West

University of British Columbia (UBC) researchers are taking engineered timber to new levels of construction performance through a computerized piece of technology that is a North American first. Called the Hundegger Robot Drive, it sits in its own sawdust-proof chamber at the Centre for Advanced Wood Processing, part of the university’s Forest Sciences Centre. It has been described as the world’s most advanced piece of wood joinery equipment. The complicated cuts it can perform are proving to researchers that wood can be a precision building material of the future.

UBC gets $640k wood-joinery robot (video) from Business in Vancouver

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Sprinklers key for building safety: study

Daily Commercial News
February 12, 2014
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: Canada, Canada West

A recent study showing that the type of building construction material used did not affect the increased likelihood of a fire spreading, injuries and death — as long as the buildings were equipped with sprinklers, was well-received by the Forest Products Association of Canada (FPAC). The “Fire Outcomes in Residential Fires by General Consturction Type” report was authored by Surrey, B.C. fire chief Len Garis and adjunct professor at the University of Fraser Valley Dr. Joseph Clare and studied almost 12,000 fires.

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Forestry

Conservation and industry reach agreement on protecting old growth in the Great Bear

Coast Mountain News
February 11, 2014
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

The B.C. government announced last week that environmental groups and forestry companies have jointly submitted recommendations to ‘increase conservation while maintaining economic activity in the Great Bear Rainforest.’ The agreement — which will preserve another 500,000 hectares of old growth — increases forest protection to nearly 70 per cent in the mid-coast region from the 50 per cent level already protected by 2009. The addition pushes the amount of old-growth forest preserved to more than three million hectares, an area larger than Metro Vancouver.

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Hamilton furniture maker wants to use ash borer wood, city says NO

CBC News
February 12, 2014
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

Over the next decade, the city will chop down thousands of healthy ash trees because of the deadly emerald ash borer. Nick Hamilton Holmes wants to make furniture with some of them, but the city says no. The Kirkendall neighbourhood furniture maker wants to make the most of a bad situation and not see the wood go to waste. He envisions hearty frames for art and pictures, or solid chairs made with the ash wood. So far, his attempts have led to bureaucratic roadblocks. While cities across North American are finding creative ways to use the felled trees, Hamilton is not one of them.

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‘They’re pretty tough’: Cold likely not enough to kill many mountain pine beetles

Missoulian
February 11, 2014
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Montana and Wyoming have recorded arctic temperatures during the past week that would seem to make a polar bear shiver, but the cold may have come too late and not stayed long enough to have much of an effect on mountain pine beetle populations that have proven destructive to Rocky Mountain forests. “It probably is not going to have a significant impact on the mountain pine beetle, which is the major mortality element we are having now,” said Gregg DeNitto, forest health protection group leader for the U.S. Forest Service in Missoula. 

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Hundreds of woodland owners expected at OSU’s ‘Tree Schools’

Oregon State University
February 11, 2014
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Organizers with the Oregon State University Extension Service expect more than 800 woodland owners to attend its three Tree Schools around the state this spring as the forestry sector emerges from a challenging recession. Woodland owners, arborists, forestry advocates and students will network and gain new skills at Tree School Clackamas on March 22 in Oregon City. Tree School Umpqua will take place March 27 in Roseburg and Tree School East will return to Baker City on April 26. “Word has gotten out – it’s one of the few opportunities of its kind in the region, and forestry is big in Clackamas County,” said Extension forester Glenn Ahrens, who coordinates the event in Oregon City.

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Forest management for wildlife habitat

Metro News
February 11, 2014
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

… But what is often overlooked is deer numbers are only the most conspicuous evidence of a much larger problem. Numerous critters which depend on early regenerated forest have struggled. The problem hasn’t been noticed by the general public as much because it has been a very gradual change. The change is in the forest itself. During the 1970?s and early 80?s West Virginia’s forest lands were alive with activity. 

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Oklahoma Forestry Services plans series of prescribed burns in southeastern corner of state

Associated Press
February 12, 2014
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

OKLAHOMA CITY — Oklahoma Forestry Services plans a series of prescribed burns in the McGee Creek Natural Scenic Recreation Area near Antlers in southeastern Oklahoma. Officials said Tuesday that burns will occur in early spring in two McGee Creek units, including the wildlife management area and Rocky Point. Officials say the controlled burns in the backcountry recreation area will help restore the forest ecosystem by improving conditions for both plants and wildlife.

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Stars align for NZ foresters as ‘wall of wood’ comes on

February 12, 2014
Category: Forestry
Region: International

New Zealand forest growers, long overshadowed by booming returns from the dairy industry, look set to cash in on record prices for logs as they prepare to harvest trees planted in a flurry of activity two decades ago. Forestry plantation activity in New Zealand jumped between 1992 and 1998, as a surge in Asian log prices lured investment syndicates to the sector. Radiata pine, which makes up about 90 percent of the nation’s plantations, are typically felled between 26 and 32 years, meaning the “wall of wood” will start being harvested from about 2018, according to government figures.

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Conference on need for mixed woodlands

Darlington and Stockton Times
February 11, 2014
Category: Forestry
Region: International

INTERNATIONAL forestry experts gathering in the Lake District will call for more mixed woodlands to help reduce flooding and combat climate change. The three-day conference has been organised by Ted Wilson, director of Penrithbased Silviculture Research International, and has attracted experts from Britain, Europe and America. Mr Wilson said: “There is no doubt that forests full of a vibrant mix of tree species of all ages – including saplings right through to mature timber- ready specimens and those naturally dying – are more resilient to climate change, less prone to disease, more resistant to high winds and better able to reduce flooding.

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Stars align for NZ foresters as ‘wall of wood’ comes on

February 12, 2014
Category: Forestry
Region: International

New Zealand forest growers, long overshadowed by booming returns from the dairy industry, look set to cash in on record prices for logs as they prepare to harvest trees planted in a flurry of activity two decades ago. Forestry plantation activity in New Zealand jumped between 1992 and 1998, as a surge in Asian log prices lured investment syndicates to the sector. Radiata pine, which makes up about 90 percent of the nation’s plantations, are typically felled between 26 and 32 years, meaning the “wall of wood” will start being harvested from about 2018, according to government figures.

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Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy

EIA revises wood, waste biomass forecasts in monthly report

Biomass Magazine
February 11, 2014
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: United States

The U.S. Energy Information Administration slightly revised its forecast for energy production from wood and waste biomass in the February issue of its Short-Term Energy Outlook. The EIA predicts that across all sectors, wood biomass will be used to generate 119,000 megawatt hours (MWh) of electricity per day in 2014, increasing to 122,000 MWh per day next year. These estimates are down slightly from the 120,000 MWh per day in 2014 and 123,000 MWh per day for 2015 forecast in the January STEO.

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Yurok Indigenous People Register First Compliance Forest Carbon Project Under California Air Resources Board

Ecosystem Marketplace
February 11, 2014
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: United States, US West

California’s Yurok people and Australian project developer New Forests today announced that they have successfully registered the first forest carbon project developed under the California Air Resources Board’s (ARB) protocol for US Forest Projects. The project will issue 704,520 offset credits from 7,660 acres of Douglas Fir and mixed hardwood forest near the Klamath River in Northern California. By registering the Improved Forest Management project and selling carbon offsets in the California cap and trade system, the Yurok Tribe has made a legal commitment to maintain current forest carbon stocks and to manage the forest for both increased carbon sequestration and sustainable timber production. 

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Biomass heating: Plants support local work

Letter from Jill Belsky and Stephen Siebert
The Missoulian
February 12, 2014
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: United States, US West

We are currently on faculty exchange at the University of Bern, Switzerland, and have had the opportunity learn about integrated land uses, forest management and energy issues in the Alps. We recently toured a biomass heating plant in Au, a small town in western Austria, which heats all municipal buildings and schools, five hotels and approximately 20 nearby residences. During the peak winter heating season, the plant burns approximately one semi-truck load of wood chips every three to four days. The wood chips are residues generated by two local sawmills and unmarketable forest thinning, waste material that would otherwise be burned on site or disposed of in some way, and all is sourced within 6 miles of town.

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