Tree Frog Forestry News

Daily Archives: February 17, 2014

Business & Politics

Brookfield quarterly profit rises 9%, posts record annual results

Globe and Mail
February 14, 2014
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada

Brookfield Asset Management Inc., which has a history reaching back more than a century, says 2013 was its best financial year ever. The Toronto-based company, which manages investments in the real estate, power generation, infrastructure and forestry sectors through subsidiaries and partnerships, had US$3.8-billion in net income. That’s about a billion dollars more than in 2012. Brookfield’s assets under management increased to US$187-billion at the end of 2013, with fee-bearing capital rising 32 per cent to US$80-billion.

Brookfield Asset Management says 2013 was its best year in more than a centrury from The Canadian Press

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Wife of Burns Lake mill victim not satisfied by lack of inquiry

HQ Prince George
February 14, 2014
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

The wife of a man who was lost in the Burns Lake mill explosion says she’s disappointed that the provincial government will not hold a public inquiry into the blast and the following investigation. Maureen Luggi who lost her husband Robert when an explosion tore through the mill two years ago says she still wants an inquiry. “It would satisfy me to know how my husband died. What led up to this explosion, what the company could have done to prevent this and who is accountable. Somebody at Babine Forest Products on that night or that week is responsible for this explosion and to this day all of that information is going to be covered up.”

Wet’suwet’en Committed to Finding Closure for Burns Lake from 250 News

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Lumber production set to accelerate in 2014

Business in Vancouver
February 17, 2014
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

B.C’.s lumber sector recovery remained intact in 2013. Buoyed by high lumber prices and stronger demand, dollar-volume exports rose by a quarter, corporate revenue climbed and share prices for a number of major producers surged. However, as November production figures suggest, dollar-volume gains haven’t quite trickled down to gains in production, as short-term hiccups in demand have limited output growth. Momentum in B.C.’s lumber manufacturing sector eased in November as a temporary affordability-induced softening in the U.S. new housing market and a crest in exports to China restrained lumber demand.

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CILA looking forward to $90.4 million in federal skills traing funding

HQ Prince George
February 15, 2014
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada West

Support for a new trades program is getting the thumbs up from the Central Interior Logging Association. This week the federal government announced $90.4 million over four years to the Forest Industry Transformation program. CILA Executive Director MaryAnne Arcand says they plan partnering with licensees to get this funding for training. “A sort of bigger bang for the buck because it only pays 50%,” says Arcand, “to help pool our resources together and get new entries into the industry, it actually matches the skills needs.” Arcand says having this funding will address skills training in mills and also in the supply chain. END OF STORY

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West Fraser adjusted profit falls on reduced shipments

Reuters
February 13, 2014
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

West Fraser Timber Co Ltd reported a slight decline in adjusted fourth-quarter profit on Thursday as higher lumber prices were outweighed by reduced shipments. On an adjusted basis, earnings were C$50 million ($45.51 million), or 58 Canadian cents per share, in the quarter ended Dec. 31. That compared with C$51 million, or 60 Canadian cents per share, in the year-ago period.

West Fraser Timber Makes Gains from 250 News

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Report raises doubts about WorkSafeBC’s ability to protect workers

Globe and Mail
February 16, 2014
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

…Useful as that is, it papers over the structural problems in workplace safety that this case has exposed. But the larger part of WorkSafeBC’s mandate is to prevent accidents. And Mr. Dyble’s narrow focus did not consider whether the agency tasked with ensuring workplace safety should have done more before the catastrophic explosion. It also did not consider whether the results-based regulatory environment – where companies are supposed to take responsibility for safety – is working.

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UW helps protect $30 million to $40 million in U.S. wood exports to Japan

University of Washington
February 14, 2014
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States, US West

By showing the economic benefit to Japanese saw mills, a University of Washington researcher has helped protect U.S. exports of Douglas-fir logs and lumber worth $30 million to $40 million a year. A recently introduced homebuilding subsidy program in Japan put logs and lumber imported from the U.S. and other countries at a competitive disadvantage, according to Ivan Eastin, UW professor of environmental and forest sciences. Working with the U.S. embassy in Tokyo and the U.S. Softwood Export Council, Eastin led efforts to get Douglas-fir logs and lumber from the U.S. approved under the new program.

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Plum Creek cuts workers’ hours at Columbia Falls, Evergreen

Associated Press
February 15, 2014
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States, US West

KALISPELL — Plum Creek Timber Co. officials say they will cut worker hours from 40 to 30 per week at plywood plants in Columbia Falls and Evergreen starting Monday. Tom Ray says the reduction is being caused by a shortage of Douglas fir and larch logs. Ray says harsh weather has been hindering logging operations and causing fewer logs to be delivered to the plants. He says cold weather last week caused three log delivery days to be missed. He also says that logging operations will soon cease to prevent heavy trucks from damaging forest roads as they thaw out.

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Klausner hopes to break ground on lumber mill by end of year

TheTandD.com
February 17, 2014
Category: Business & Politics
Region: US East, United States

Plans for a large lumber mill north of Rowesville are still moving forward. “We are still working with the county to finalize all the development agreements,” said Thomas Mende, Klausner Holding USA president of international business development. “There are a number of agreements that need to be executed and, hopefully, we will have this done by the end of the month,” Mende said. The agreements are related to development and other issues, he said. “All that is subject to county approval,” Mende said. “I am very excited about it.” Klausner plans to construct a lumber mill that would create more than 300 jobs and produce upward of 700 million board feet annually of dried lumber and by-products, such as bark, wood chips, sawdust and dry shavings.

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Wood, Paper & Green Building

Gibson guitars made with government-seized wood are sold out

The Sydney Morning Herald
February 16, 2014
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: International

What does a company do when it retrieves government-confiscated building materials? If that company is Gibson Guitar Corp, it makes guitars from it. Late last year, the 120-year-old Nashville music company released a limited series of Les Paul, Explorer, SG and Flying V six-string guitars with fingerboards made from wood that federal agents had seized in factory raids. …Authorities raided Gibson’s Tennessee factories in 2011, taking ebony and rosewood they suspected were illegally imported from India. …The National Association of Music Merchants supported Gibson, but not everyone was on the guitar maker’s side during the controversy. Guitar maker CF Martin & Co and wood distributor North American Wood Products spoke in support of the Lacey Act amendments, saying they help the environment and American companies.

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NZ’s eco label toughens stance on paper and forestry

Voxy New Zealand
February 16, 2014
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: International

The country’s environmental labelling programme is proposing a raft of changes to standards for paper which are certain to attract industry and environmental interest group comment. Overall, says general manager Robin Taylor, the proposed changes will clarify and firm up the exacting position of Environmental Choice regarding the harvesting, milling and further processing of paper pulp, in order to safeguard the environment. …Drafts of the revised paper and related specifications have been posted on the website of Environmental Choice New Zealand, and the Ecolabelling Trust is seeking public, expert and industry comment. The revisions cover packaging, cardboard, newsprint, hygiene and office papers and stationery.

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Forestry

New Woodlot Licence Available In Peace Region

250 News
February 17, 2014
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Prince George, BC – The provincial government is accepting bids on a new 1100-hectare woodlot licence northwest of Dawson Creek. The Ministry of Forest, Lands, and Natural Resource Operations says the initial allowable annual cut on the Crown land, approximately 95-kilometres northwest of Dawson Creek, will be 1763 cubic metres. The rent will be just just over one-thousand dollars annually. There are 860 woodlot licences in the province, and the ministry says that number is being increased as part of a strategy to help ‘grow’ forest sector sustainability.

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New council for foresters

Victoria Times Colonist
February 14, 2014
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Dan Graham of North Cowichan is the new president of the 67th council of the Association of British Columbia Forest Professionals, succeeding Christine Gelowitz of Victoria. The council also includes vice-president Jonathan Lok of Port McNeill; Michael Sandvoss and Christopher Stagg of Prince George, Summerland’s Doug Campbell; Mauro Calabrese and Tom Hoffman of Williams Lake; Robin Modesto and Rod Visser of Campbell River; and Duncan’s Tom Walker. The Association is responsible for registering and regulating B.C.’s professional foresters and technologists. It is the largest professional forestry association in Canada.

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Shelley Fralic: Surrey arborist sees the forest for the trees

Carolina Arango hopes to get more women interested in arboriculture
Vancouver Sun
February 16, 2014
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

One of her favourite trees is the beech. If you have ever seen a beech in the bloom of spring, you’ll know why Carolina Arango has a fondness for them, and it’s not just because she’s a certified arborist and therefore has a thing for trees. …Arango may love the beech, especially the ones she discovered on the lush grounds of Riverview Hospital in Coquitlam, but she isn’t so much a tree hugger, though that is a residency requirement here in B.C., as she is a tree guardian for the city of Surrey.

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Hardwood Flooring store announces support for sustainable forestry

Online PR News
February 14, 2014
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

Nearly one million hectares of forest in north-western Ontario was recently certified to the Sustainable Forestry Initiative (SFI) standard.This is particularly encouraging as more and more homeowners, architects, and builders are seeking green products for their projects… The certification of the Lake Nipigon Forest, which is managed by Lake Nipigon Forest Management, brings the total amount of land in North America certified to the SFI Standard to more than 240 million acres. This is particularly encouraging as more and more homeowners, architects, and builders are seeking green products for their projects.

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Aerial Survey Shows Mountain Pine Beetle Epidemic Declining in most of Wyoming

CBS 5
February 13, 2014
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

DENVER – The U.S. Forest Service and Wyoming State Forestry Division today released the results of the annual aerial forest health survey in Wyoming, which indicates that the spread of the mountain pine beetle epidemic has slowed dramatically, while the spruce beetle outbreak continues at low levels. Each summer the agencies work together to aerially monitor insect and disease caused tree mortality or damage across Wyoming forestland. As noted in the 2012 survey results, the mountain pine beetle epidemic continues to slow in 2013. 

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Oregon Department of Forestry paid $391,000 to settle marbled murrelet lawsuit

The Oregonian
February 14, 2014
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

The Oregon Department of Forestry, which struck a confidential settlement to a lawsuit over logging in marbled murrelet habitat, has revealed the suit’s financial terms. The state agreed to pay $391,000 to an attorney, Daniel R. Kruse, who represented three environmental groups that sued: Cascadia Wildlands, the Audubon Society of Portland and the Center for Biological Diversity. The lawsuit led to the cancelation of 28 timber sales on 1,956 acres in the Elliott, Clatsop and Tillamook state forests. The groups had sought to protect the murrelet, a threatened seabird that nests in coastal forests in Oregon, Washington and California.

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Survey: Colo. spruce beetle outbreak accelerating

Las Vegas Sun
February 14, 2014
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

CHEYENNE, Wyo. — An outbreak of spruce beetles continues to accelerate across hundreds of square miles of new forest in Colorado, although a much larger outbreak of the similar mountain pine beetle continues to slow across Wyoming, Colorado and the Black Hills, according to a new survey by the U.S. Forest Service. Every year, the Forest Service conducts an aerial survey of forests in Colorado, Wyoming and South Dakota. The 2013 survey shows spruce beetles spreading to ever-larger expanses of new forest in Colorado for a fifth consecutive year. Spruce beetles infested 338 square miles of previously unaffected Colorado forest last year. The beetles laid claim to 286 square miles of new forest in 2012.

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Can Idaho’s elk herds recover?

Billings Gazette
February 14, 2014
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

What’s ailing elk in Idaho’s upper Clearwater River basin isn’t a mystery. The habitat that was once ideal for elk has aged and led to a dramatic drop in numbers. Predators like gray wolves and, to a lesser extent, black bears and mountain lions, are holding them down. Fix those two things — reduce predator populations and convert the habitat to include more young forests and brush fields — and elk are likely to rebound…  Backcountry fires and front country logging have been tagged as the best way to fix habitat in the Lolo Zone, and treating noxious weeds is one of the main habitat treatments prescribed for the Selway Zone.

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Foresters urge lawmakers not to place Act 250 burden on forest development

Vermont Business Magazine
February 14, 2014
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

Lawmakers are considering a bill to curb forest fragmentation by requiring a permit for development within contiguous forests. Thursday, foresters urged lawmakers to strengthen the state’s current land conservation program instead. The Senate Natural Resources and Energy Committee is drafting a bill designed to protect Vermont’s aesthetic beauty and wildlife habitat by requiring an Act 250 permit to develop forestland under certain conditions. Several foresters testified before the committee Thursday that the bill could have unintended consequences that could be avoided if the state strengthened the Current Use program, a policy designed to preserve land as working farms and forests through tax breaks.

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Passionate Couple, USDA, Team up for ‘Miracle:’ Bringing Back the American Chestnut

USDA Blog
February 14, 2014
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

It was on a hilltop in eastern Kentucky where I first met James and Gail Cope, looking at the 27 newly planted American chestnut seedlings on their land. It was our common love for this rare tree that brought us together. American chestnut trees once dominated the Appalachian landscape, but during the early 1900s a fungus struck the trees causing them nearly to vanish. The American Chestnut Blight, an Asian fungus, first struck in 1904 in New York City and quickly spread, leaving in its wake a trail of dead and dying stems. By the 1950s, the keystone species of some nine million acres of forests had disappeared.

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Independent Forestry Safety Review commences

Scoop Independent News
February 15, 2014
Category: Forestry
Region: International

New Zealand — The Independent Forestry Safety Review was initiated because the frequency of serious injuries and fatalities in the forestry sector is unacceptably high. Its announcement has been widely supported by the sector and Government… The initial meeting provided the Panel members with an opportunity to come together and discuss their approach to delivering the Review. In summary, the Panel will work to identify the factors that lead to injury and fatalities in the forestry sector and recommend a package of practical measures that could reduce injuries and fatalities.

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Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy

LNG plant plan questioned

North Shore News
February 16, 2014
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: Canada West

At least a few North Shore residents are voicing environmental concerns about a Liquefied Natural Gas facility proposed for the site of a former pulp mill near Squamish. Woodfibre Natural Gas Limited – part of the Pacific Oil and Gas group of companies owned by an Indonesian tycoon – is seeking to liquefy, load and export 2.1 million tonnes of LNG per year, beginning as early as 2017. Under the proposal, natural gas would be sent to the facility to be liquefied through existing gas pipelines to Squamish.

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BC Forests to Fuel China’s Energy Needs?

Company with influential ex-Tories sees big opportunity in BC wood pellets.
TheTyee
February 17, 2014
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: Canada, Canada West

John Park sees gold in wood pellets.The CEO of Vancouver-based RCI Capital Group boasts that his Beijing office brokered a memorandum of understanding between a Chinese industry group and the British Columbia government that was inked during Premier Christy Clark’s November trade mission. He said he is planning to host a Chinese delegation in B.C. in a bid to develop a deal. “We think there is ample economics, commercial reasons of how a Chinese investment in B.C.’s forestry sector would be accretive in every sense of the word,” Park said in an interview with The Tyee.

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Landowners cash in on timber they don’t cut

Two Maine groups are being paid to manage their forests for carbon dioxide reduction that will offset pollution by industry.
Kennebec Journal
February 16, 2014
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: United States

Polluters are paying two conservation organizations to manage forestlands the groups own in Maine in a way that increases the amount of carbon dioxide the trees remove from the atmosphere. The money the Downeast Lakes Land Trust and the Appalachian Mountain Club earn by selling so-called “carbon offsets” will be spent on managing forests they already own and buying additional forestland. …It’s a formula that could hold real investment potential, not just for nonprofits but also for other landowners, for-profit enterprises and even the state of Maine.

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State’s largest native tribe registers California’s first Carbon Offset Project

By Cara Hallam
Turlock Journal
February 14, 2014
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: United States, US West

Setting a major milestone in California’s cap-and-trade program, the state’s first forest carbon offset project under the California Compliance Offset Protocol developed for US Forest Projects has been registered. Verified by SCS Global Services, the Yurok Tribe and Forest Carbon Partners improved forest management project avoided more than 800,000 metric tons of carbon dioxide equivalent emissions from 2012 to 2013, marking the first forestry offset credits from a native compliance project… Under the California Cap-and-Trade system, companies can meet up to eight percent of their mandated greenhouse gas emissions reduction obligations through purchasing compliance offsets. 

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Durham becomes climate change central

Foster’s Daily News
February 16, 2014
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: US East, United States

On Feb. 5, Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack announced the creation of seven Regional Hubs for Risk Adaptation and Mitigation to Climate Change. The hubs will provide support for land managers as they respond to the threats presented by climate change, “Which impacts both our nation’s forests and our farmers’ bottom lines,” Vilsack said. …David Hollinger will serve as director, working with Assistant Director Lindsay Rustad, also in Durham, as well as five other assistant directors located in New York, Pennsylvania, and North Carolina. Each Hub will address “a global and national problem from a regional perspective,” said Rustad.

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Madagascar sells first forest carbon credits to Microsoft

Phys.org
February 14, 2014
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: International

The Wildlife Conservation Society announced today that the Government of Madagascar has approved carbon sales with Microsoft and its carbon offset partner, The CarbonNeutral Company, and Zoo Zurich. The carbon credit sales will support the Government of Madagascar’s REDD+ Project in the Makira Natural Park and mark the first sale of government-owned REDD+ credits in Africa.Through carbon credit sales from avoided deforestation, the Makira REDD+ Project will finance the long-term conservation of one of Madagascar’s most pristine remaining rainforest ecosystems harboring rare and threatened plants and animals while improving community land stewardship and supporting the livelihoods of the local people.

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