Tree Frog Forestry News

Daily Archives: June 2, 2014

Froggy Foibles

Can You Taste An Old Growth Forest In This Beer?

Jefferson Public Radio
June 2, 2014
Category: Froggy Foibles
Region: United States, US West

“One of the things that really defines old growth forests is biodiversity,” Wagoner says. Wagoner and brewer Dan Hynes of Thunder Island Brewing in Cascade Locks, Oregon, want to know if that diversity carries over into the wild yeast that you can’t see. Yeast is a fungus, as well as a fundamental building block of beer. To test the diversity of wild yeast in an old growth forest, they decided to try tasting it. They collected wild yeast from sites within an old growth and a logged forest and used it to brew several different beers.

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‘The Scream’ appears in tree stump

Arbroath Blog
June 1, 2014
Category: Froggy Foibles
Region: International

“I was just having a walk along the river (Mesna) and I just happened to stumble over this stump,” Kjell Marius Mathisen, who works with cultural heritage for Oppland county council in Lillehammer, Norway, said. 

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Business & Politics

Three Canadian Plywood Mills Approved for APA Membership

Woodworking Network
May 30, 2014
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, United States

APA-The Engineered Wood Association approved three Canadian plywood mills for membership during the Association’s Board of Trustees meeting earlier this month in Nashville, Tennessee. Richmond Plywood Corporation Ltd., Richmond, British Columbia; LP, Golden, British Columbia; and Canoe Forest Products Limited, Canoe, British Columbia, were accepted into membership, effective August 1, 2014. “We are pleased that these producers have given APA a vote of confidence, and we look forward to bringing them the full value of APA services,” said Ed Elias, APA President. He noted that with the addition of these mills, APA membership will represent about 60 percent of Canada’s plywood production.

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Work begins on converting Triabunna mill into tourism venture

ABC News, Australia
June 1, 2014
Category: Business & Politics
Region: International

Work has begun on converting the former Gunns Triabunna woodchip mill into a tourism venture. The mill was sold three years ago to millionaire environmentalists Graeme Wood and Jan Cameron, who plan to turn it into a tourism development. Detailed plans of the development have been released and include gardens, an art gallery, a culinary school and accommodation.  Wotif founder Graeme Wood has told ABC Local Radio construction of the accommodation is set to start next year

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Wood, Paper & Green Building

RAIC BLOG: When Sustainability Meets Resilience. Concrete as the “No Regrets” Building Material

Journal of Commerce
May 30, 2014
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: Canada

Richard McGrath,the director of codes and standards / engineered structures for the Cement Association of Canada is presenting When Sustainability Meets Resilience. Concrete as the “No Regrets” Building Material at the RAIC’s 2014 Festival of Architecture in Winnipeg, Man. Extreme weather is redefining the concept of sustainability to encompass resilience as a key value. While concrete has long been known for its strength, durability and longevity, McGrath will discuss its role in supporting world-class energy efficiency in the built environment and how it is bringing concrete’s full sustainability value into sharper focus.

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Three Steps To Make Green Globes Part of the Solution

June 2, 2014
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: United States

TurboTax gets audited. Now, so does Green Globes. The green building rating system run by the Green Building Initiative (GBI), would-be rival to the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC) and its LEED rating system, has been likened to the popular income tax software because it takes a complex problem and breaks it down into a user-friendly online questionnaire. And just as someone needs to check that TurboTax actually reflects the U.S. tax code, we at BuildingGreen felt that it was time to take a deep look at Green Globes to see how well it reflects the needs and values of the green building community. The result? By nearly every measure, Green Globes and GBI come up lacking. …Even with Jerry Yudelson, a LEED Fellow, at its helm, GBI has so far chosen to saw away at the tent poles.

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Forestry

Comment: We need a new vision for our public forests

By Bob Simpson, natural resource consultant, political commentator and former MLA.
Victoria Times Colonist
May 31, 2014
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Then there’s B.C.’s single largest publicly owned renewable resource: our forests. In 2012, the auditor general stated as clearly as possible that the government has no vision for this major resource. The Liberals dismissed his findings outright. …Under the B.C. Liberals, the once reasonably independent office of the chief forester has been diminished to a part-time function of an assistant deputy minister who has to set annual allowable cuts with information that the Association of B.C. Forest Professionals, the Forest Practices Board and the auditor general have all said is highly suspect. But the government continually refuses to address the sorry state of B.C.’s forest inventory. Clearly, all is not well in B.C.’s forests. Yet the government’s only response is to attempt to give some companies more exclusive rights over our public forests through new tree farm licences.

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Co-op model a winner for Edson foresters

By banding together, co-op members have achieved the holy grail of a guaranteed wood supply
Alberta Farm Express
May 30, 2014
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Logging and sawmilling to supplement either a grain or cattle farm income has deep roots in Alberta. A group of Edson-area farmers has taken that model to a new level with the formation of a timber-based co-operative that provides them with what is often described as the holy grail of a supplemental farm income — a guaranteed ?wood supply. What’s particularly intriguing about what the EDFOR Cooperative has accomplished is that the province of Alberta, which has control over the provincial Crown wood fibre supply, is often reluctant to make long-term commitments. But it has actually agreed to help the Edson farmers out.

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Local author details history, role of beehive burners

Prince George Citizen
May 30, 2014
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

The smoke has cleared from the Prince George air. The pungent sawmill clouds have almost dispersed into the mists of time, but local historical archaeologist Trelle Morrow has bottled some of the last foggy memories in a book explaining the significance of that icon of the industry – the beehive burner. The Big Smoke was the none-too-affectionate nickname for Prince George in the heyday of the sawmilling industry. From the early to mid 20th century, hundreds of sawmills dotted the local landscape, and every one of them had a mega-fire in the iconic furnaces known as beehive burners. “…They are redundant today, but still an icon and marker in our lives. That struck a chord with me. I saw it as a story about our community that was in danger of being lost.” 

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Pains and gains of tree planters: Five months of repetitive work in harsh terrain can pay up to $500-a-day

The Province
June 2, 2014
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Tree planter Brian Beaudry can tell you a few things about ­grindingly hard work. He pokes thousands of seedlings into the ground each day, fighting heat, rain, injuries, bloodthirsty bugs, crushing monotony and irritated bears. Beaudry, 29, likes his job enough to have done it for 11 years. But he knows nobody will believe him if he says he loves it. “It has physical hardships,” he admits during a day off from planting in the bush near 100 Mile House. “I’m usually wet, miserable and exhausted out here.” Beaudry claims to like being dirty and to enjoy the hormones that accompany physical exhaustion. But he could find easier ways to get ­grubby and exhausted in his hometown of Vancouver.

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Forest fires crews on standby in northeastern Ontario

CBC News
June 2, 2014
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

Ontario’s Ministry of Natural Resources says it’s dealt with 18 fires so far this year in the northeast, as forest fire season is starts to heat up. None of the fires are threatening people or buildings, said Robert Woodrich is a fire information officer for the MNR. “We had a wetter than normal start to the season, and so the number of starts was quite was quite low. However, the fires have been picking up, especially in the last week.” There are 29 crews standing by to deal with fires in the northeast and half a dozen water bombers are also now stationed in this region, the MNR reported.

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New Brunswick forestry plan promises jobs, but environmental concerns persist

CFRA Radio
June 1, 2014
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

FREDERICTON – New Brunswick’s forestry plan is intended to rejuvenate the province’s forestry sector, an industry clobbered by mill closures and job losses. But the strategy has set off criticism from conservationists who say it disregards the environment and threatens to decimate Crown forests… But the government says the critics are ignoring the crisis facing the forestry industry, which in the last decade has seen nearly 40 mills shut down and 6,000 jobs evaporate. That in a province that relies on forestry more than any other province, based on GDP. Natural Resources Minister Paul Robichaud puts it bluntly. “Anyone who doesn’t see that we have an emergency situation in the forestry industry doesn’t live in this province,” Robichaud said.

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Tech study questions whether forestry standards are followed

The Daily Mining Gazette
May 31, 2014
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

Sugar maple forests are one of the Upper Peninsula’s most abundant – and potentially most sustainable – natural resources, providing jobs for loggers and high-quality timber that’s exported around the world, as well as recreation spaces. …According to the [recently-released Michigan Technological University] study, which included both privately held, corporate and state-owned forests, only 23 percent of forests conformed to the Arbogast method, which for decades has defined how many trees of various sizes should be cut to maintain the optimal productivity of a stand. …Dr. Robert Froese, one of the authors of the study along with Nan C. Pond and Linda M. Nagel, said reasons for varying from Arbogast may be valid, but foresters and landowners should recognize the effects of those decisions.

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Wallow Fire case study suggests there may be multiple paths to fuel reduction in the wildland-urban interface

Alternative fuel treatments both reduced fire behavior, allowed for protection of homes
USDA Forest Service
May 30, 2014
Category: Forestry
Region: United States

PORTLAND, Ore., —Conservative fuel treatments designed to reduce fire severity while still providing forest cover and wildlife habitat worked equally as well as more intensive treatments in allowing for the protection of homes during the 2011 Wallow Fire, a study published in the journal Forest Ecology and Management has found. The distance into the treated area where fire severity was reduced varied, however, between these different thinning approaches where fuels were reduced. The findings suggest that there may be multiple paths to fuel treatment design around the wildland-urban interface (WUI).

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In the land of the giants

Old-growth coastal redwoods are the tallest trees on Earth
Mail Tribune
June 1, 2014
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

… California’s old-growth coastal redwoods are the tallest trees on Earth, and the old-timers thrive in the foggy, rainy territory between Mendocino and the Oregon line. For many locals, these trees don’t just dominate the landscape; they connect with matters of life and death — even now, years past the timber industry’s glory days. If you’re visiting, as Los Angeles Times photographer Mark Boster and I were in early spring, you can’t count on hearing true tree confessions from everybody. But if you take a minute to step away from your car, you’ll feel belittled in the best possible way.

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Invasive pests threaten to reshape forests

USA Today
June 1, 2014
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

NASHVILLE — Groves of ash trees lost to beetles. Stately alders under assault by moths. And fungus-like organisms attacking oaks. In the battle to halt the march of tree-killing pests across the country, it’s easy to get discouraged. Even so, researchers at the University of Tennessee and an environmental group warned in a recent report that without action, forests during the next few decades will fundamentally change as species die and take with them entire ecosystems. “The principal message is this is a disaster that we can counter if we choose to,” said Faith Campbell, a co-author of the report and researcher with The Nature Conservancy. “The biggest threat to our forests, in our view, is willful neglect.”

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Timber counties are negligent in today’s budgetary woes

Statesman Journal
June 1, 2014
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Protection of mature forests in the Pacific Northwest is not really about spotted owls. Spotted owls are a sentinel, or keystone, species that provide an indicator of the health of forest ecosystems. It’s kind of like the proverbial canary in the coal mine; if the canary dies, it’s not healthy for humans either. Timber harvest on public lands in the Pacific Northwest increased dramatically in the 1970s and ’80s, resulting in detrimental effects on plant and animal species dependent on mature forest habitats. Legal battles between environmental advocates and logging interests intensified, limiting the amount of logging on public lands. At the same time, logging on private lands increased, mechanization improved the efficiency of timber harvest, and increased numbers of logs were exported to Asia.

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Lumber harvest dispute over West End units centers on threatened bird species

Peninsula Daily News
June 1, 2014
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Three conservation groups intend to ask Jefferson County Superior Court Judge Keith Harper to stop a state-approved harvest of 234 acres of timber on the West End adjacent to habitat of the threatened marbled murrelet. Meanwhile, 10 people are out of work and the jobs of another 88 are threatened as logging companies await permission to proceed. Having bid well over the estimated value of the timber in April, lumber company Interfor is scheduled to begin logging from the Department of Natural Resources’ Goodmint and Rainbow Rock harvest units June 13. The units in west Clallam and Jefferson counties are surrounded by old-growth forests.

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New York is a hotbed for damaging forest pests

Pough Keepsie Journal
June 1, 2014
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

When it comes to harboring non-native damaging forest pests, Ulster County is one of the most infested counties in New York, which also just happens to be one of the most infested states in the nation. Data provided to the Poughkeepsie Journal by the U.S. Forest Service shows Ulster is beset with 41 distinct invasive bugs and blights. Ulster ranks second only to Suffolk County, which has 42. Dutchess is tied for third with 40. By comparison, some counties in the southwest have fewer than five invasive species.

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A tree-destroying pest makes its entry into N.J.

Philly.com
May 31, 2014
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

A landscaper found the first signs of the destructive pest last week. He was checking the health of ash trees at a strip shopping center in Bridgewater, Somerset County, when he spotted the telltale damage. He alerted state officials, who shared specimens with a federal lab, which confirmed everyone’s suspicions: The emerald ash borer had come to New Jersey. An invasive beetle that has killed tens of millions of ash trees across the country, the insect had already been detected in nearby Pennsylvania and New York counties.

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Emerald ash borer puts urban forest under siege

What’s in your firewood? If you don’t know, don’t move it
Denver Post
May 30, 2014
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

FORT COLLINS — At an old metal desk in a crowded basement room on the Colorado State University campus, Weld County’s future is under the microscope. Tiny, glittering bronze shards, all that remains of a single winter-killed beetle, float in a vial of alcohol. Patrick McPherren, Colorado’s state plant health director for the U.S. Department of Agriculture, picked them up from the owner of a woodlot in Greeley and brought them to entomology professor Boris Kondratieff’s lab at the C.P. Gillette Museum of Arthropod Diversity.

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Forest Wars In Tasmania, Birthplace Of Green Parties

WorldCrunch.com
June 1, 2014
Category: Forestry
Region: International

MAYDENA — This thick forest in the southern part of this Australian island was added last year to the Tasmanian Wilderness World Heritage Area. Its protection however is still being fought for, as can be seen by several clearings in the forest, like scars of exploitation in the natural beauty of Tasmania, some 150 miles off the southeastern coast of the Australian mainland. This is where some 2,000 ecologists from Tasmania gathered on April 27, threatening Australia’s Conservative party — which holds both the federal and local government — of a new “forest war.” “We’ll resume the fight if we have to,” assures Phill Pullinger, head of the NGO Environment Tasmania.

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Claims forestry bill will not “tear up” peace deal

ABC News Australia
June 1, 2014
Category: Forestry
Region: International

There are claims the Tasmanian Government’s signature forestry bill will not deliver on the Liberals’ key election promise to tear up the forest peace deal. The Government’s Rebuilding the Forest Industry bill is before the Lower House and will be considered by the Legislative Council next week. Resources Minister Paul Harriss has told Parliament his bill would destroy the peace deal brokered by loggers, environmentalists and unions. “It is time to step back from the brink, reassess the events of the last four years, and plot a new course for the native forest industry,” he said.

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Myanmar reduces teak production

Bangkok Post
May 31, 2014
Category: Forestry
Region: International

YANGON – Myanmar will cut its output of processed teak by around a third this fiscal year, a senior official said Friday, to preserve its dwindling forests.  “We have decided to reduce the rate of teak production year by year,” Aye Myint Maung, deputy minister of environmental conservation and forestry, told Parliament. A maximum of 60,000 tonnes of sawn teak is to be produced in the year to March 2105, he said, down from 93,178 tonnes the previous year. The country produced 610,000 tonnes of other hardwoods in the year to March 31, according to ministry figures.

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Greens throw climate change into election

Daily Mail
June 1, 2014
Category: Forestry
Region: International

New Zealand — The Greens have thrown climate change into the election campaign with a policy to impose a carbon tax on industries, with the cost to consumers offset by a cut in income tax. Party co-leader Russel Norman says it means the Greens will go into the campaign as the only party offering tax cuts. The emissions trading scheme, which the Greens say is useless, would be phased out and replaced with a carbon tax at $25 a tonne..Forestry would be given tax credits worth $12.50 a tonne, because trees soak up carbon. Industries would be expected to pass on the tax to consumers, meaning food, petrol and power would cost more.

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Federal Government continues campaign to delist part of Tasmania’s wilderness with state government’s help

ABC News, Australia
June 1, 2014
Category: Forestry
Region: International

The Federal Government remains outwardly confident it can convince the World Heritage Committee to delist part of Tasmania’s World Heritage wilderness. It is giving committee members more information about past logging but conservation groups doubt it will be enough. The Parliamentary Secretary for Forestry, Richard Colbeck, is leading the campaign to have 74,000 hectares excised from the World Heritage listing. He argues it has been degraded by past logging. The Senator says the World Heritage Committee will be given new information, after concerns the Federal Government’s submission had no detailed justifications or explanations.

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Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy

Climate change and power plants: How Obama’s forthcoming carbon emission limits will work

BY JOSH LEDERMAN, THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Vancouver Sun
May 31, 2014
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: Canada, United States

WASHINGTON – The Obama administration on Monday plans to make public the first rules limiting carbon emissions from the thousands of power plants. The pollution controls form the cornerstone of President Barack Obama’s campaign to combat climate change and a key element of his legacy. Obama says the rules are essential to curb the heat-trapping greenhouse gases blamed for global warming. Critics contend the rules will kill jobs, drive up electricity prices and shutter plants across the country. Environmentalists and industry advocates alike are eagerly awaiting the specifics, which the Environmental Protection Agency will make public for the first time on Monday and Obama will champion from the White House.

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European scientists stabilize bio-oil for use as marine biofuel

Biomass Magazine
June 1, 2014
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: International

A sustainable biofuel made from Norwegian forest wood waste could help transform the shipping industry and reduce global greenhouse gas emissions. Alternative sustainable fuels are urgently needed in the marine transport sector due to stringent upcoming regulations demanding reduced sulphur and carbon content in diesels and oils from January 2015.  Aston University scientists are involved in the ReShip project, which will use low quality wood waste, chippings and unmerchantable wood left in forests after logging has occurred to produce new biofuels. Via the process of fast pyrolysis, where material is heated in the absence of oxygen, the wood will be converted into crude pyrolysis oil.

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New inventories show rising volumes of carbon and biomass tied up in trees

The amount of carbon and biomass stored in Britain’s woods and forests has been newly quantified by the Forestry Commission.
Horticulture Week
May 30, 2014
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: International

The two reports published today (30 May) present for the first time carbon and biomass estimates derived from direct measurements of living trees rather than from extrapolations from historical data. This has yielded figures “significantly higher” than previous estimates, though Britain also currently harvests less than its annual tree growth, leading to an upward trend, the reports point out. The commission’s head of inventory and forecasting Peter Weston said: “These reports are the most accurate and robust which have ever been produced for Britain, compiled using much more sophisticated technology and techniques than were available to researchers in the past.

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General

Three Steps To Make Green Globes Part of the Solution

June 2, 2014
Category: Uncategorised

TurboTax gets audited. Now, so does Green Globes. The green building rating system run by the Green Building Initiative (GBI), would-be rival to the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC) and its LEED rating system, has been likened to the popular income tax software because it takes a complex problem and breaks it down into a user-friendly online questionnaire. And just as someone needs to check that TurboTax actually reflects the U.S. tax code, we at BuildingGreen felt that it was time to take a deep look at Green Globes to see how well it reflects the needs and values of the green building community. The result? By nearly every measure, Green Globes and GBI come up lacking. …Even with Jerry Yudelson, a LEED Fellow, at its helm, GBI has so far chosen to saw away at the tent poles.

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