Tree Frog Forestry News

Daily Archives: June 9, 2014

Business & Politics

Improvements needed at forestry company: report

Prince George Citizen
June 6, 2014
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

Forestry practices by the Mackenzie Fibre Management Corporation are going well, except for a couple of points, according to a routine audit of by the BC Forest Practices Board. The watchdog agency examined the corporation’s silviculture, fire protection, harvesting and road activities, which are all in compliance with forest practices legislation, but found two practices that could be improved, according to a report released Wednesday. “While the majority of Mackenzie Fibre Management’s forest practiceswere sound, auditors did find that some improvements were required related to soil disturbance and operational planning,” said board chair Tim Ryan. 

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Meadow Creek Forest Products pays off liabilities

Nelson Star
June 8, 2014
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

The district forest manager confirms Meadow Creek Forest Products has paid off $150,000 in liabilities incurred under a previous owner and “substantially met” a remediation order. Garth Wiggill said in an interview Friday that a cancellation notice on the license has been rescinded and a suspension order imposed in 2012 lifted. The Ministry of Forests has confirmed Dale Kooner transferred 100 per cent ownership of Meadow Creek Cedar to San Group of Surrey, which has renamed the operation Meadow Creek Forest Products.

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Babine Forest Products back to work after devestating loss

The Northern View
June 5, 2014
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

Like the proverbial phoenix, Babine Forest Products is rising from the ashes to once again be an economic driver for those in the Burns Lake area. …Hourly employees spent one month in the classroom and in mid-February began hands-on training with the new equipment. As of March, the mill was running a single shift with two operators at every station and supervisory assistance to help in the training and familiarization of the equipment.

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Sugars from hardwood: Port Hawkesbury Paper explores sweet opportunity

Cape Breton Post
June 6, 2014
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada East, Canada

SYDNEY — Extracting sugars from hardwood could help Port Hawkesbury Paper attract plant investment and new jobs and provide a new sustainable industry for rural Canada, a conference heard Friday. Tom Browne, program manager with FPInnovations, was speaking at the Atlantic Biorefinery Conference held at the Verschuren Centre at Cape Breton University. “There are lots of pathways from sugar to biochemical and certainly if you go talk to the chemical industry, particularly the European chemical industry, they have a very strong interest in identifying sustainably harvested non-food sources of sugars,” Browne said.

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US sawlog prices started falling in the 2Q/14 after a three-year upward trend

IHB/WRQ
June 9, 2014
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States

After a healthy 2013 and early 2014, lumber markets in the US started weakening in the spring with lumber prices falling over ten percent so far this year. The reduced lumber prices together with lower demand for US logs in Asia in the second quarter have put downward pressure on US sawlog prices so far this year, according to the Wood Resource Quarterly. The sawmilling sector in the US has been in a steady comeback mode ever since the global financial crisis struck in 2008. 

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Lumber, mortgage demand suggest trouble ahead for U.S. housing

Globe and Mail
June 6, 2014
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States

Commodity prices are more volatile and sensitive to change than equities, so it makes sense that lumber prices are a leading indicator for the U.S. housing industry. At this point, unfortunately, what they are indicating for U.S. homebuilder stocks is far from positive. The first chart compares lumber prices to the SPDR S&P Homebuilder index. From early 2011 to mid-2013 the lines move in tandem, as demand for new homes, and the price of lumber to frame their walls, both climbed. After that, home-building stocks remained stable while lumber prices cratered, and then attempted a recovery that failed in December of last year.

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Wisconsin’s paper industry braces for uncertainty

Milwaukee-Wisconsin Journal Sentinel
June 7, 2014
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States, US West

Invented 80 years ago in central Wisconsin, the coated paper that gave the world glossy magazines, catalogs and books with sharp, non-pulpy photos and graphics remains at the center of one of the state’s biggest industries. But today that industry, which has employed Wisconsin workers by the thousands for generations and continues to produce millions of tons of glossy paper every year, finds itself in renewed flux: Looming ownership changes pose a threat to the existence of at least some paper mills in and near Wisconsin.

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Georgia-Pacific announces final planning for $55-million in proposed investments at Gurdon plant

Georgia-Pacific is studying plans to invest an estimated $55 million at its Gurdon, Ark., lumber and plywood operations, a move that positions the company for continued growth.
The Daily Siftings Herald
June 5, 2014
Category: Business & Politics
Region: US East, United States

Georgia-Pacific is studying plans to invest an estimated $55 million at its Gurdon, Ark., lumber and plywood operations, a move that positions the company for continued growth. Steps required to complete the plans are in the final stages, which include an engineering analysis, infrastructure estimations, permitting requirements and internal approvals.The proposed investments would expand the production capacity of the lumber mill by approximately 60 percent. Planned improvements at the lumber mill would include the installation of a new continuous dry kiln, the installation of a state-of-the-art planer mill, and upgrades of site infrastructure such as roads and buildings.

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Union concerns reflected in initial forest review

ONE News
June 7, 2014
Category: Business & Politics
Region: International

Unions say they feel vindicated that their concerns have been reflected in an independent review into forest safety. Harsh working conditions, a lack of training and an inconsistency towards safety have been highlighted in the Independent Forestry Safety Review’s first public consultation document. Thirty two bushmen have been killed working in forests since 2008 and thousands more injured. FIRST Union and the NZ Council of Trade Unions have been raising concerns about the industry for two years and hope the document will provide a solid foundation for forest owners, contractors and workers to collectively address some of the problems.

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Forestry

Invasive Species Week proclaimed in B.C.

Kelowna Capital News
June 6, 2014
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

The provincial government has proclaimed June 9 to15 Invasive Species Week in B.C. in a bid to to help raise awareness of the economic and environmental damage invasive plants and animals can cause if allowed to spread in the province. And, in a call in Kelowna Friday to all British Columbians to be on the lookout for, and to report, invasive species, Forest, Lands and Natural Resources Minister Steve Thomson and the chairman of the Invasive Species Council of British Columbia, Barry Gibbs, said the public can, and already does, do its part. 

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Big Lonely Doug: Canada’s loneliest tree still waiting on help

The Globe and Mail
June 8, 2014
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Big Lonely Doug, perhaps the loneliest tree in Canada, stands in the middle of a clear-cut on the west coast of Vancouver Island, surrounded by a field of huge stumps. The giant red cedars and Douglas firs that once surrounded it were cut down and hauled away by loggers two years ago. Big Lonely Doug was left standing alone, Ken Wu of the Forest Alliance says, because it was either designated as a wildlife tree, or it was left to provide cones for the reseeding of the forest.

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New Radio Channels Will Improve Communications and Safety on Rural and Remote Roads in British Columbia

Industry Canada
Market Wired
June 5, 2014
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

On remote and isolated backcountry resource roads in British Columbia, reliable and quick communication can mean the difference between life and death. Today, Industry Minister James Moore, in partnership with the Province of British Columbia, announced a new client-focused approach to managing radio communications on the province’s resource roads. Industry Canada will dedicate 40 new exclusive radio channels to improve the effectiveness of communications and increase the safety on resource roads.

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Alberta continues to sell caribou habitat despite federal recovery plan

Canadian Press
June 5, 2014
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West


Alberta plans to keep leasing undisturbed remnants of endangered mountain caribou habitat to energy developers, even though Ottawa has just released a plan saying the land must be restored, not exploited. Another 500 hectares in northwestern Alberta is to go on the auction block Wednesday from the range of a herd federal scientists consider in imminent danger of disappearing. Environment Canada issued a proposed recovery plan on Monday that states at least two-thirds of the herd’s range should remain undisturbed or be restored.

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Forests not overcut: minister

Prince George Citizen
June 6, 2014
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

I’m writing in response to the May 26 op-ed “Ignoring the signs.” I want to reassure your readers that our forests are not being overcut. The Chief Forester independently sets maximum harvest limits for 72 distinct areas following a comprehensive timber supply review that considers social, economic and environmental values. Over the past several years, the amount harvested on annual basis has been consistently well-below the maximums set. Timber companies also have to submit detailed forest stewardship plans to ensure minimal impact from activities such as road-building and logging.

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BC Refuses Calls to Compensate African Tree-planters

Workers awarded nearly $1 million for abuse suffered in a Golden camp may never receive it because their boss is bankrupt.
The Tyee
June 5, 2014
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Dozens of African refugees awarded $700,000 for “racial harassment” suffered at the hands of a B.C. tree-planting company — on top of an estimated $130,000 still owing for unpaid wages — may never see their compensation because the firm is now defunct. The reported closing of Khaira Enterprises Ltd. will make it very hard to collect on either amount, says a lawyer for the complainants, even though the B.C. Human Rights Tribunal ordered the Surrey company to pay workers for the racism and loss of dignity they experienced in a camp near Golden. The tree-planters described conditions in the camp as “slave-like.”

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Opposition grows to Sasquatch boundary adjustment

Agassiz Harrison Observer
June 5, 2014
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

There’s an 800 hectare parcel of land sitting just on the edge of Sasquatch Park that could put an extra $300,000 into Seabird Island’s economic base, annually — if the land could be harvested. But the logging of that parcel will have to wait, at least for now. The only usable roads leading to it run right through the Class A Provincial Park, which means no industrial activity is allowed within its borders. However, Seabird Island has partnered with Tamihi Logging to apply for a boundary adjustment to the park, which will be reviewed by the ministry of environment.

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Canada urgently needs national forestry policy

The Chronicle Journal
June 8, 2014
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

With new collective agreements covering 2,000 workers at Resolute Forestry Products’ 11 locations across Ontario and Quebec — a deal that will set the pattern for negotiations with 8,000 other workers east of the Manitoba border — this vital industry is on a renewed footing and ready for a long-overdue national dialogue on the future of forestry. Canada is a nation rich in natural resources, which provide immense opportunities, but also bring serious responsibilities. 

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Labrador forest fire doused as cabin owners stand by

CBC News
June 9, 2014
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

Ground crews and a helicopter continued to tackle a forest fire in western Labrador Monday, a day after a fire ripped through an area popular with cabin owners, and brought an echo of a devastating fire 12 months ago. Two water bombers dropped loads of water through Sunday evening on the fire in the Ashuanipi River cabin area, which is roughly about 50 km from Labrador City and Wabush. On Monday, the fire was still classified as being out of control, although the water bombers were on standby as of Monday morning.

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Toronto’s urban forest worth $7-billion, report says

Globe and Mail
June 9, 2014
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

Toronto’s 10 million trees are worth an estimated $7-billion or about $700 per tree and the benefits of maintaining an urban forest outweight the costs, says a new report. “The replacement value (what it would cost to remove a tree and replant a similar one) of the 10 million trees that make up Toronto’s urban forest is valued at over $7 billion,” TD Economics chief economist Craig Alexander said in an analysis published Monday. The city’s urban forest provides residents with over $80-million — about $8 per tree — in environmental and cost savings every year, the report found.

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By nature’s design: Forest stewardship in action

USGBC
June 6, 2014
Category: Forestry
Region: United States

Throughout the world, ancient cultures have demonstrated a reverence for trees as part of their core belief. Have we lost our way in the midst of progress and growth? On any typical weekend, American consumers plan home projects and purchase lumber. But very few take the time to consider the harvesting practices of the wood product they’re about to purchase or the long-term effects of that selection. 

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‘Forestry sector cannot afford to stand still’ says Minister Hayes

AgriLand
June 8, 2014
Category: Forestry
Region: United States

The forestry sector cannot afford to stand still, according of State at the Department of Agriculture, Food and the Marine, Tom Hayes. Innovation and the development of new markets and products are the lifeblood of every sector, he told delegates at the National Forestry Conference, and said that at national level there are three main issues for the sector: the formulation of the new forestry programme to bring us up to 2020, the updating of the legislative framework within which the forestry sector operates and the outcome of the review of forest policy.

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Wyden staffers huddle with DeFazio, BLM to fine-tune O&C bill

Environment & Energy Daily
June 6, 2014
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

A proposal to more than double logging levels in western Oregon while protecting old-growth trees, wilderness and rivers is moving closer to markup, according to bill sponsor Sen. Ron Wyden (D-Ore.). Wyden’s staff met yesterday in Portland with Rep. Peter DeFazio (D-Ore.) and representatives of the Bureau of Land Management, Fish and Wildlife Service, Forest Service and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration to discuss Wyden’s S. 1784, a bill to resolve decades of conflicts on the O&C lands. “We feel very strongly about making sure we can have this effort, this joint product, ready for markup when [Energy and Natural Resources Chairwoman Mary] Landrieu (D-La.) holds the next markup,” Wyden told reporters yesterday. “I think it will be soon, but we will be ready.”

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Wildfire season expected early in valley

Statesman Journal
June 6, 2014
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Persistent drought conditions throughout the state have caused the Oregon Department of Forestry to declare the start of the wildfire season in Central Oregon early this year. And as Central Oregon goes, so, too, will the Willamette Valley. Beginning Monday morning, June 9, ODF offices will begin imposing restrictions on the public and on private interests who work in the state’s forests in the Central Oregon District, which includes Prineville and parts of Eastern Oregon. The ODF prohibitions come one week earlier this year, and about three weeks earlier than what is considered normal.

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Beetles ravaging forests around Mount Rushmore, drain budgets as West tries to fight back

Bloomberg
June 8, 2014
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

DENVER, Colorado — Beetles are obliterating forests throughout Colorado and the West, draining budgets as property values decline and threatening tourism at national parks, including the home of Mount Rushmore. Voters in Colorado communities raised taxes to protect ski resorts that bring in $3 billion annually to the economy. The pine beetles, each the size of a rice grain, have devoured 25 percent of the woods in South Dakota’s Black Hills, where the mountain with massive carvings of Presidents George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, Abraham Lincoln and Theodore Roosevelt is the linchpin of a $2 billion-a-year tourism industry. 

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Firefighters hold the line on the Two Bulls fire outside Bend, but strong winds in forecast

The Oregonian
June 8, 2014
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

BEND — Firefighters attacked the Two Bulls fire from the air and from the ground Sunday, concentrating first on keeping the flames from threatening people and property and secondly on keeping fire out of Bend’s watershed. Bill Queen, a U.S. Forest Service spokesman, said crews spent much of the day focusing on containment lines carved into the dusty ground by nearly a dozen bulldozers late Saturday and early Sunday. The fire exploded from 300 acres Saturday afternoon to more than 6,200 acres Sunday afternoon and remains at 0 percent containment; the cause remains under investigation.

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Climate change and the Northwest’s trees

Can we predict how future climatic changes will affect the growth of important Northwest tree species?
WDNR Blog Ear to the Ground
June 9, 2014
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Mathematical models developed by area researchers show great promise in predicting how future climate changes will affect the timing of the budding and flowering of coniferous trees here. That’s important knowledge because conifers, such as Douglas fir, are important to Washington State’s economy and environment. DNR’s Meridian Seed Orchard, southeast of Olympia, is a major source of tree seeds for state forestlands and small family forestland owners. Owned and operated by DNR, the orchard produces seed for western red cedar, noble fir, Douglas fir, ponderosa pine, western larch, western white pine, and other coniferous tree species used to replant after timber harvests around the state.

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Emerald ash borer threatens Seacoast

Seacoast Online
June 7, 2014
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

Emerald ash borer, the invasive beetle that is killing ash trees in the U.S. at an alarming rate, has been detected in North Andover, Mass., just 3 miles from the New Hampshire border, and 30 miles from Portsmouth. As a result, Essex County, Mass., has placed a quarantine on the transportation of firewood and untreated lumber. EAB was detected in Concord in 2013 and a similar quarantine is in effect for Merrimack County. If we want to save our ash trees, it’s time to start treating them on the Seacoast.

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Scientists explore using trees to clean pollution

The Washington Post
June 9, 2014
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

FREEPORT, Texas — Before Houston and its suburbs were built, a dense forest naturally purified the coastal air along a stretch of the Texas Gulf Coast that grew thick with pecan, ash, live oak and hackberry trees.It was the kind of pristine woodland that was mostly wiped out by settlers in their rush to clear land and build communities. Now one of the nation’s largest chemical companies and one of its oldest conservation groups have forged an unlikely partnership that seeks to recreate some of that forest to curb pollution. The plan drafted by Dow Chemical and the Nature Conservancy is only in its infancy and faces many hurdles.

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No new cases of killer tree disease in Forest of Dean

BBC News
June 8, 2014
Category: Forestry
Region: International

A killer tree disease appears to have been eradicated in the Forest of Dean after work to fell some 100,000 trees. The Forestry Commission is working to stop the spread of the Phytophthora ramorum fungus which is destroying trees across Britain. Some 120 hectares (296 acres) of larch and sweet chestnut trees have been felled in Gloucestershire since 2012 without new reports of the disease. However, the commission said it remained vigilant to further outbreaks.

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Ash dieback is now ‘unstoppable’, ecologists warn

June 9, 2014
Category: Forestry
Region: International

Ash dieback is now unstoppable and could wipe out 45 native species and endanger the habitats of nearly 1,000 others, ecologists have warned. Britain’s ash trees are now ‘doomed,’ tree experts claim, and their demise threatens hundreds of insects, mosses, lichens and birds. Speaking at the Cheltenham Science Festival, Dr Ruth Mitchell, warned that the loss of ash coverage will have a huge impact on the ecology of the UK’s forests. “It really will matter if we start to lose one of our dominant tree species,” said Dr Mitchell of the James Hutton institute in Aberdeen.

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Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy

Extension granted for La Pine biomass project

Company president says construction still several years out
The Bend Bulletin
June 7, 2014
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: United States, US West

Deschutes County has granted a fourth extension to an energy company hoping to build a 25-megawatt biomass plant in La Pine, potentially generating enough electricity to power 10,000 to 25,000 homes. For more than five years, St. Helens-based Biogreen Sustainable Energy Co. has looked at land in the La Pine Industrial Park east of U.S. Highway 97 as a location for its $75 million biomass project, taking advantage of the region’s vast forestlands to harvest scrap wood and convert it to electricity. But the economic downturn, labor issues and an uncertain energy market have pushed the project further and further back.

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Termites, climate change investigated

Florida Today
June 6, 2014
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: US East, United States

What termites and fungus eat locally may play a bigger role in global warming than scientists think, according to a new study. How quickly dead trees rot strongly influences how much carbon stays in forests to offset the carbon released to the atmosphere from fossil fuels and other sources. That makes wood-rot rates crucial in detecting potential climate changes. But those rates are a big uncertainty in climate models because of scant data.

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Reducing Tropical Forest Destruction Could Cut CO2 Emissions by One-Fifth

Science World Report
June 6, 2014
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: International

Want to help cut carbon emissions and prevent climate change? Then try saving some trees. Scientists have found that reducing deforestation in the tropics would significantly cut the amount of carbon dioxide entering the Earth’s atmosphere–by as much as one-fifth. Tropical forests play a large role in the Earth’s climate. They act as carbon storage, keeping our Earth cooler as they take away greenhouse gas emissions from the Earth’s atmosphere. 

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Study Looks Into Trends in Forest Biomass for Energy in EU

Daily Fusion
June 6, 2014
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: International

European Forest Institute (EFI) along with the International Institute for Sustainability Analysis and Strategy (IINAS) and Joanneum Research conducted a study on current trends in forest biomass for energy in Europe, carbon balance and the sustainable potential. The study analyzed the role of sustainable woody bioenergy in the future EU energy system for electricity, heat and transport fuels, taking into account the potentials for energy efficiency, and non-bioenergy renewables.

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General

Ash dieback is now ‘unstoppable’, ecologists warn

June 9, 2014
Category: Uncategorised

Ash dieback is now unstoppable and could wipe out 45 native species and endanger the habitats of nearly 1,000 others, ecologists have warned. Britain’s ash trees are now ‘doomed,’ tree experts claim, and their demise threatens hundreds of insects, mosses, lichens and birds. Speaking at the Cheltenham Science Festival, Dr Ruth Mitchell, warned that the loss of ash coverage will have a huge impact on the ecology of the UK’s forests. “It really will matter if we start to lose one of our dominant tree species,” said Dr Mitchell of the James Hutton institute in Aberdeen.

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