Tree Frog Forestry News

Daily Archives: July 2, 2014

Business & Politics

Sawmills and Wood Production in Canada Industry Market Research Report from IBISWorld Has Been Updated

PRWEB
June 30, 2014
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada

The Sawmills and Wood Production industry in Canada has experienced challenging demand conditions over the past five years due to a cooling Canadian housing market and slowly recovering US housing market. In addition, the mountain pine beetle infestation in British Columbia, which is home to a third of industry establishments, is damaging a significant share of the province’s timber. Despite ongoing obstacles, industry revenue has improved as a result of record-high demand for lumber in China over the period, and the resurgence of the US single-family homebuilding market in 2012. 

Read More

WorkSafeBC has little recent experience preparing cases for court

by Gordon Hoekstra – Agency has been under criticism for bungled sawmill explosion investigations
Vancouver Sun
July 1, 2014
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

WorkSafeBC has successfully laid regulatory charges in court in only three workplace safety cases since 1999, The Vancouver Sun has learned. It is a marked departure from a five-year period in the late 90s when the province’s chief workplace safety agency aggressively pursued court action to specifically bring an element of public censure to convicted companies. Instead, in a policy shift in 1999, WorkSafeBC began to rely almost entirely on administrative penalties, which hit employers in the pocket book, but don’t necessarily carry the same public reprobation.

Read More

U.S. exports more hardwood lumber to Europe

IHB/MK/HRGE
June 30, 2014
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States

U.S. exports of hardwood lumber to Europe rose in value by 12% in March, as compared to the same month of 2013. The export volume increased during the same period by 9%. March exports were as high as they weren’t in many months, reports the Hardwood Review eGlobal Europe. Thus, shipments to the United Kingdom weren’t so high since 86 months, to Sweden since 79 months, and to Germany at least 22 months. For February and March, exports of U.S. hardwood lumber to Spain were at their best value in several years. 

Read More

For paper mills and cogeneration, everything old is new again

Midwest Energy News
June 30, 2014
Category: Business & Politics
Region: US East, United States

The hulking pulp and paper mills built many decades ago in Wisconsin, Michigan and other Midwestern states have had their share of environmental impacts. But the mills were decades ahead of the game in adopting technology now seen as an effective tool to fight greenhouse gas emissions and environmental impacts. That would be the use of combined heat and power (CHP, also known as cogeneration), promoted by President Obama with a 2012 executive order and lauded by environmental and energy efficiency advocates.

Read More

Coillte announces profit after tax of €25.8m in 2013

Pulp and Paper News
July 1, 2014
Category: Business & Politics
Region: International


Coillte, Ireland’s leading natural resources company, recently announced its annual results for 2013. …In overall terms, the volume of logs sold to Irish sawmills increased 3% year on year while sales of panel products increased by 5%. The increased demand for logs reflected increased demand for sawn timber in
the UK market whereas the increase in demand for panel products occurred mainly in Ireland and continental Europe.

Read More

Wood, Paper & Green Building

Timber-Frame Architect Wins Competition With Wooden Sky-Scraper Column

New Hampshire Public Radio
June 30, 2014
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: US East, United States

Architect Tim Olson, from Bensonwood homes in Walpole, has a problem. He and a friend have screwed together the first few pieces of a design project, called the Coopered Column, backwards. “We’re looking at the plan upside down and assembling it, so we swapped the pieces,” he says laughing. It’s understandable: there are 118 pieces – each one a big, meaty timber – and 250 screws to hold it all together. The coopered column is one of four striking installations in an exhibit that opens today in the Boston Society of Architects’ gallery.

Read More

Forestry

Sasquatch park near Harrison Hot Springs among protected areas eyed for boundary changes

Vancouver Sun
July 1, 2014
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

The Ministry of Environment is considering five formal applications for boundary amendments to nine B.C. parks and protected areas, largely to make it easier for industrial developments to proceed. “It took 100 years to get 14 per cent of the land base protected,” Gwen Barlee of the Wilderness Committee said in an interview Tuesday. “This just rolls back that certainty. It rolls back the assurance that we won’t have logging roads and transmission lines and pipelines through our parks.” 

Read More

Relationship-building with B.C. First Nations start small, but can lead to big results, says minister

Canadian Press
July 1, 2014
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

VICTORIA – Attempts by the B.C. government to build long-lasting relationships with First Nations across the province have taken on even greater importance with the historic Supreme Court of Canada ruling that makes it easier for aboriginals to establish title over their traditional territories. Aboriginal Relations Minister John Rustad said B.C. will continue negotiating hundreds of side deals with First Nations and holding land-claims treaty talks, despite the court ruling granting the Williams Lake-area Tsilhqot’in Nation title to more than 1,750 square kilometres of lands.

Read More

Gambier woodlots put on hold

Ministry of Forests delays logging decision for consultation
North Shore News
July 2, 2014
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

North Shore cottage owners who are hoping to save a swath of Gambier Island from logging have won a temporary reprieve. Members of the Gambier Island Conservancy, which opposes the logging plans, is applauding news the Ministry of Forests will hold off awarding two new woodlots on the island until after the public has been consulted. In a letter sent to conservancy director and North Vancouver resident Peter Snell, Craig Sutherland, the assistant deputy minister of forests, told the group the ministry has decided to delay awarding the woodlots for “a few weeks” in order to help people with concerns “better understand the woodlot process.”

Read More

Vaughn Palmer: First Nations title decision makes B.C. forest policy a balancing act

July 2, 2014
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

VICTORIA — While last week’s Supreme Court of Canada decision on aboriginal title raised doubts about the plan to pipe Alberta bitumen through B.C., the more immediate impact is likely to be on the management of provincial forests. The landmark title case originated three decades ago with a challenge by the Tsilhqot’in people to provincially approved commercial logging within their traditional territory in the central Interior. The high court resolved the case by 1) confirming aboriginal ownership over much of the affected territory and 2) finding that the province breached its duty to consult the Tsilhqot’in and accommodate their interests over the use of their land and resources.

Read More

Letters to Smokey Bear Reveal Promise of Hope for the Future

USDA Blog
July 1, 2014
Category: Forestry
Region: United States

Smokey Bear, the iconic symbol of wildfire prevention for 70 years, is for many people a comforting symbol of a promise that everything will be okay. As long as we all work together, as one of Smokey’s young pen pals wrote recently. “Dear Smokey: I would like to be a Junior Forest Ranger and help the big rangers. I promise to look after the forest and watch out for baddies making fires and damaging trees. Love Adam.”

Read More

Judge blocks logging project in grizzly bear area

Associated Press
July 1, 2014
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

HELENA, Mont. — A federal judge has blocked a logging project in the Kootenai National Forest over concerns that roads built for the project may harm a threatened population of grizzly bears. In approving the 36,600-acre Pilgrim project, the U.S. Forest Service called for installing gates on some of the planned roads that would allow future access. U.S. District Judge Dana Christensen ruled Monday the forest’s management plan requires officials to permanently close the roads once the logging project is completed, or else close other roads in the area.

Read More

After the Trees Disappear

Ash Forests After Emerald Ash Borers Destroy Them
New York Times
June 30, 2014
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

This past winter was the coldest Detroit had experienced in 36 years. Across the upper Midwest, cities shivered, and more than 90 percent of the surface area of the Great Lakes froze solid. It seemed like ideal weather to kill an unwanted insect. But it did little to stop the emerald ash borer, an invasive Asian beetle that is devastating ash trees from Minnesota to New York. “We didn’t find a single dead larva,” said Deborah G. McCullough, a professor of entomology and forestry at Michigan State, who led a study of ash trees in Lower Michigan over the winter.

Read More

How Global Forest Watch is changing the way we fight deforestation

Treehugger
June 30, 2014
Category: Forestry
Region: International

Global Forest Watch, an online mapping tool for detecting forest change, launched less than six months ago. Since then, the site is already being put to use by a number of governments and environmental organizations to better protect their forests. The World Resource Institute built the partnership behind the site, which combines data from Google, NASA and other sources. “It’s something that any citizen in the world can use,” said Lalanabth de Sliva, of the World Resource Institute. 

Read More

Producer organizations key to better forest management: FAO

The Jakarta Post
July 1, 2014
Category: Forestry
Region: International

Indigenous people, local communities and private smallholders who own or manage a growing proportion of the world’s forests can play a significant role in tackling deforestation and reducing poverty; especially if they band together in producer organizations, say two publications recently released by the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) and a group of its partners. …An FAO forestry officer, Jeffrey Campbell, said coming together in
forest and farm producer organizations could help indigenous people,
local communities and private forest smallholders overcome their
isolation, as well as other very real constraints such as a lack of
secure forest tenure and financial and business development instruments.

Read More

Forestry industry renews safety partnership

Eden Magnet
July 1, 2014
Category: Forestry
Region: International

Forestry Corporation of NSW has renewed its safety partnership with WorkCover NSW, following a 35 per cent reduction in injury claims since the first partnership was signed in 2011. Under the renewed agreement, the organisations will conduct further industry-specific training programs, and have made a commitment to better information sharing. The Eden community has been a strong advocate for safety in the industry, and has paid tribute to more than 100 Australian workers killed on the job through the National Timber Workers Memorial, which has been funded and maintained by local residents since 2008.

Read More

Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy

Pellet plant proposed for Nanaimo

Nanaimo News Bulletin
July 1, 2014
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: Canada, Canada West

By 2016, Nanaimo could be home to a wood pellet plant supplying carbon-neutral fuel to industrial customers around the world. TimberWest is proposing a $60-million plant at Duke Point, which when complete will produce about 200,000 metric tonnes of wood pellets annually. “This proposed plant will be the first of its scale, or of any scale I think, on Vancouver Island,” said Domenico Iannidinardo, TimberWest vice-president and chief forester in charge of sustainability. 

Read More

Measuring a tree’s carbon footprint

The economic cost of the Forest Pansy’s lifecycle was calculated at roughly $98, while its carbon footprint was measured at negative 63 kg CO2e.
UPI
June 30, 2014
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: International

WASHINGTON–More and more people are aware of their daily carbon footprint. Humans have calculated the carbon footprint of train travel, transatlantic jets, TVs, washing machines, presidential campaigns and more. But what is the carbon footprint of a newly planted tree? Planting a tree is largely regarded as an environmentally friendly act. But when it comes to absorbing and emitting CO2, some landscaping trees are friendlier than others. 

Read More

Putting a price on forest carbon: How much will the World Bank’s Carbon Fund pay for REDD carbon credits?

REDD Monitor
July 1, 2014
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: International

There’s an interesting discussion taking place in the World Bank’s Forest Carbon Partnership Facility about the price of carbon: How much will the Carbon Fund pay for REDD carbon credits? Putting aside (for a moment) the long list of problems with REDD offsets, this discussion is crucial. Perhaps predictably though, much of the pricing discussion is taking place behind closed doors. This is the World Bank, after all. Put simply, the countries selling REDD credits want to be able to negotiate a high price to make standing forests worth more than, say, converting them to oil palm plantations. 

Read More

General

Vaughn Palmer: First Nations title decision makes B.C. forest policy a balancing act

July 2, 2014
Category: Uncategorised

VICTORIA — While last week’s Supreme Court of Canada decision on aboriginal title raised doubts about the plan to pipe Alberta bitumen through B.C., the more immediate impact is likely to be on the management of provincial forests. The landmark title case originated three decades ago with a challenge by the Tsilhqot’in people to provincially approved commercial logging within their traditional territory in the central Interior. The high court resolved the case by 1) confirming aboriginal ownership over much of the affected territory and 2) finding that the province breached its duty to consult the Tsilhqot’in and accommodate their interests over the use of their land and resources.

Read More