Tree Frog Forestry News

Daily Archives: July 8, 2014

Business & Politics

Long-term job growth needed

Prince George Citizen
July 7, 2014
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

In 2013, our region experienced a relatively challenging year after two consecutive years of economic growth. The Cariboo had widespread job losses in various industries, an outmigration of labour, and a decline in capital investment. However, despite the difficulties we faced last year our economy, employment opportunities are expected to improve this year as several major projects move forward and an upsurge expected in forestry and other natural resource sectors.

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Vancouver’s port authority responds to union truckers’ strike threat

Canadian Press
July 6, 2014
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

VANCOUVER — The authority in charge of Vancouver-area ports is responding to unionized truckers’ threat of a second strike, saying it is already taking steps to enforce minimum pay rates. Port Metro Vancouver said it has created a complaint phone line allowing truckers to report companies allegedly underpaying their workers. John Parker-Jervis of the authority said the province investigates the complaints, and then makes recommendations on penalties, which can be as severe as banning companies from the ports.

Trucker’s strike threatened for Port Metro Vancouver from CBC News

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Biggest forestry companies in B.C. in 2014

Business in Vancouver
July 8, 2014
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

Ranked by number of employees.  Click read more to see the list…..

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Christy Clark schedules ‘all chiefs’ meeting with First Nations leaders, provincial cabinet

Vancouver Sun
July 4, 2014
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

VICTORIA — Premier Christy Clark is inviting First Nations leaders across the province to attend an “all chiefs” meeting with her cabinet in September. The gathering is the first of its kind since Clark became premier, and will give aboriginal leaders and provincial cabinet ministers an opportunity for face-to-face discussions. “We’re working with the (First Nations) Leadership Council, and invitations are going to be going to all the chiefs in the province for Sept. 11 to be held in Vancouver,” said Aboriginal Relations and Reconciliation Minister John Rustad.

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Sawmill back in operation following fire

Timmins Press
July 7, 2014
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada East, Canada

TIMMINS – Eacom Timber Corporation continues to be one of the vital resource-based industries in Timmins, according to Isabelle Des Chênes, Eacom’s corporate director of communications. In response to an inquiry from The Daily Press, she revealed what she said was “terrific news” — there are no layoffs and the Eacom sawmill is back in operation. “I was advised this morning (Monday) that the team in Timmins was able to execute repairs over the weekend and that the mill is up and running as of this morning. 

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Reopened Point Tupper paper mill significant economic contributor: report

July 8, 2014
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada East, Canada

POINT TUPPER — Port Hawkesbury Paper is making significant contributions to the Nova Scotia economy, according to an economic impact assessment contracted by the company. The company that reopened the shuttered former NewPage Point Tupper mill in October 2012 following a year-long closure and sales process hired Gardner Pinfold to look at its impact on the provincial economy.

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Reopened Point Tupper paper mill significant economic contributor: report

July 8, 2014
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada East, Canada

POINT TUPPER — Port Hawkesbury Paper is making significant contributions to the Nova Scotia economy, according to an economic impact assessment contracted by the company. The company that reopened the shuttered former NewPage Point Tupper mill in October 2012 following a year-long closure and sales process hired Gardner Pinfold to look at its impact on the provincial economy.

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Slow lumber recovery could last 4 years

Oregon Natural Resource Report
July 7, 2014
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States, US West

Seasonal changes in the stud and log price relationship are accompanied by lower Housing Starts and Building Permits. This slow recovery could last 4 more years. Statistics from recent years for lumber manufacturing, home construction, and housing markets are compared. …Lumber prices went up April to May, and log prices dropped, making a more favorable business climate for mills in May.

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Sierra Pacific To Acquire Hurd Windows, Superseal Windows & Doors

Woodworking Network
July 8, 2014
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States, US West


ANDERSON, CA- Forest products giant Sierra Pacific Industries announced it will purchase two Wisconsin-based millwork firms, Hurd Windows, and Superseal Windows and Doors, from Longroad Asset Management. Based in Anderson, CA, Sierra Pacific is the largest U.S. millwork company and second largest lumber firm. George Emmerson, Sierra Pacific President, says the acquisition will add to the lumber and millwork firm’s manufacturing capacity.

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Forestry

The Supreme Court’s B.C. land-title decision? It’s more important than you think

Globe and Mail
July 4, 2014
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada

Some of the reactions to the Supreme Court’s decision in the Tsilhqot’in First Nation case, which requires pipeline projects and similar developments to seek aboriginal approval, are so over the top they cannot go without comment. ….The policy path is clear. Aboriginal people and their political entities have a valuable part to play in the federation as governments alongside provincial and federal governments. This was agreed to by first ministers in the 1992 Charlottetown Accord.

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UNBC CNC host panel discussing landmark First Nation ruling

Prince George Citizen
July 8, 2014
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

The two higher learning houses of Prince George are opening the floor to discuss the landmark court case that has all of Canada wondering. The Supreme Court of Canada ruled last week on the so-called William Case, otherwise known as the Tsilhqot’in case. The Tsilhqot’in is the First Nation (there are several collected under one governance body) directly to the south of Prince George and west of Williams Lake. Leading the initial interpretation (there are differing opinions) of the Supreme Court decision is, specifically, the Tsilhqot’in people had to consent to a planned logging operation on their greater traditional territory (not confined to their reserves), not be merely consulted on the tree harvest proposal.

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Letter: A new forestry council should include scientists and environmentalists

Montreal Gazette
July 7, 2014
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

Re: “It’s about time Canada established a national forestry policy” (Opinion, July 4) The article by Jerry Dias of Unifor was interesting, though surprisingly weak when it comes to the health of the forests as compared to the short term prospects for the forest industry. After brief references to meeting “the highest standards for environmental stewardship” and “the highest environmental standards,” he goes on to recommend that the National Forestry Council be reinstated along lines that would have it include everyone except scientists and environmental experts.

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Insect pests tracked as P.E.I. ramps up monitoring

So far, officials say tent caterpillars not a problem
CBC News
July 8, 2014
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

Prince Edward Island is stepping up efforts to monitor forest insect pests this summer and so far, officials say, they haven’t noticed many tent caterpillars. Crews from the provincial forestry division are now setting up dozens of monitoring stations across the Island, mostly on public forest land. They’re looking for half a dozen types of insect pests, including gypsy moths, spruce bark beetles and forest tent caterpillars. Gypsy moth caterpillars and tent caterpillars can defoliate trees as they chomp their way through forests.

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Invasive beetles devastating Mississauga’s tree canopy

Global BC
July 7, 2014
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

TORONTO – Mississauga’s tree canopy has been spoiled by the attack of both December’s ice storm and the increasing threat of the Asian Long-Horned Beetle. “We had a glorious tree canopy and the effect of the ice storm and Asian Long-horned Beetle have been devastating,” Bonnie Crombie, the councillor for Ward 5 in Mississauga said. Wildwood Park in Malton has been hit hard as 5,000 trees had to be cleared from the park between February to May. In total, 7,500 trees have been removed in Mississauga between February and May.

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Top court to rule on case over logging rights

The Canadian Press
July 7, 2014
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

OTTAWA – The Supreme Court of Canada is set to deliver its decision Friday on a challenge of the Ontario government’s right to permit industrial logging on the traditional lands of the Grassy Narrows First Nation. An outcome in the First Nation’s favour — coupled with the top court’s recent landmark decision to grant land title to the Tsilhqot’in people of British Columbia — could have major consequences on the Conservative government’s resource agenda. Either way, the decision will further clarify the roles of the federal and provincial governments when it comes to resource development on treaty land.

Supreme Court to rule Friday on logging rights in Grassy Narrows case from CBC News

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Teepee burner will be centerpiece of new Lincoln sculpture park

Helena Independent Record
July 7, 2014
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

There are 10 tons of iron and a significant amount of irony in Rick Dunkerley’s plans for the old teepee burner that stands abandoned at the Delaney Lumber Mill in Lincoln. The mill closed some 40 years ago and the only reminder of its existence is the teepee burner — 90 feet tall and 45 feet in diameter. The burner, framed with angle iron and skinned with sheet metal, weighs 20,000 pounds Teepee burners were used to burn the wood scrap from lumber mills. They were eventually deemed to be too dirty, generating too much air pollution, and were no longer used after the late 1960s.

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Forest health crisis ends with a whimper

Colorado Indpendent
July 7, 2014
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

…Showing their natural resilience, Colorado forests are bouncing back from the pine beetle outbreak that peaked between 2007 and 2009, when the bugs spread across a mind-boggling 1 million acres of forest each year. But by last year, bug numbers dropped back to natural levels — just enough to take out a stand of sick, old trees now and then. …But there are a lot of dead forests out there. And so Congress — partially at the urging of Colorado’s two Democratic senators, Mark Udall and Michael Bennet — ordered the U.S. Forest Service to designate about 9.6 million acres of National Forest lands across Colorado for expedited logging to battle insects and disease.

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State Dept. of Forestry offers firefighter training program

Fox23.com
July 6, 2014
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

BERRYHILL, Okla. — The Oklahoma Department of Forestry is on a mission to get local firefighters trained to fight wildfires. FOX23 talked with the director of the agency to find out how the new program will help in Oklahoma and across the nation. “It takes people who have received structural training and it gives them all of the same wild land training that our own firefighters of that U.S. Forest Service firefighters receive,” said George Geissler. FOX23 reported Saturday that a handful of firefighters in Berryhill have already graduated the program.

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Professional Foresters Award Their Achievers

By The New Zealand Institute of Forestry
Scoop Independent News
July 8, 2014
Category: Forestry
Region: International

Leaders in the forestry industry were recognised at the New Zealand Institute of Forestry’s annual awards dinner held in Napier last night. Forester of the Year was awarded to Paul Nicholls, managing director of Rayonier NZ,for outstanding service to the forestry industry. The award is one of the highest accolades in the industry, recognising contribution, leadership, excellence and integrity. After obtaining a forestry degree from the University of Canberra, Australia, Paul began as a graduate forester in Tasmania. During his more than 30 years in forestry across Australia and New Zealand Paul has generously given his time and expertise to the benefit of the industry.

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Greenpeace steps up campaign against PaperOne for logging Indonesian conservation forest

The Sydney Morning Herald
July 8, 2014
Category: Forestry
Region: International

Jakarta: Office supplies companies should stop stocking PaperOne copy paper, whose fibres come in part from high conservation tropical forests now being logged in Indonesia, Greenpeace says. The call, being made to Australian retailers including Office Choice, Office Brands, and Smart Supplies, represents an intensification of the green campaign against the paper brand owned by Asia Pacific Resources International Limited.

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How deforestation shares the blame for the Ebola epidemic

The Washington Post
July 8, 2014
Category: Forestry
Region: International

One outbreak in Ivory Coast was sparked when an ethologist touched an infected, dead chimpanzee. In Gabon and the Republic of Congo, scientists linked several outbreaks to extensive deaths of forest chimpanzees and gorillas. … The commonality between numerous outbreaks of Ebola, scientists say, is growing human activity and deforestation in previously untouched forests, bringing humans into closer contact with rare disease strains viral enough to precipitate an epidemic.

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NSW logging review a farce, green groups say

The Sydney Morning Herald
July 4, 2014
Category: Forestry
Region: International


A coalition of environment groups has quit a state government logging review in disgust, saying the process is “deeply flawed” and threatened species and streams are imperilled. Environment Minister Rob Stokes said he was “disappointed” by the move, which is likely to undermine public confidence in new logging rules for NSW coastal forests, covering thousands of hectares of sensitive bush. The government has invited Forestry Corporation of NSW, which profits from harvesting public forests, to help rewrite rules governing coastal logging, saying the present regime is too complex.

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Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy

TimberWest considers pellet facility on Vancouver Island BC

Biomass Magazine
July 7, 2014
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: Canada, Canada West

TimberWest Forest Corp. is considering a $60 million pellet plant at Duke Point in Nanaimo, British Columbia. Planning is in preliminary stages, however, with several steps to go before the project gets final approval and a formal announcement with project details is made. “It’s a complex project and we’re in the process of doing our due diligence,” CEO Brian Frank said in a company statement. “We’ve commenced our engineering and design, but we have not gone to a final investment decision yet. So it’s not a certainty, but we’re working very hard to make it a reality.”

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Activists lock themselves to equipment at Eugene biomass plant

KVAL
July 7, 2014
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: United States, US West


EUGENE, Ore. – Earth First! activists locked themselves to equipment at the Seneca Jones biomass plant in north Eugene on Monday while other protesters deployed a banner on one of the plant’s towers. Other people stood outside with an assortment of signs.Workers at the plant reported the situation to law enforcement shortly before 11 a.m. A reporter at the scene counted over 30 police and fire department vehicles. The reporter counted over 70 protesters. Law enforcement estimated the crowd at 100. Several people managed to gain access to the sawmill.

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How measuring trees in Panama is benefitting indigenous groups, forests and the climate

Environmental Defense Fund
July 7, 2014
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: International

Indigenous peoples have relied on the rainforests for their survival for thousands of years. Their knowledge of the forests and dependence on the lands make them effective protectors of the forests — and particularly vulnerable to the effects of climate change. The indigenous group Organization of Embera and Wounaan Youth of Panama (OJEWP) formed teams that recently started measuring and recording the size of trees in the territories of five indigenous communities, with technical guidance from academics from the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute (STRI) and McGill University. 

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