Tree Frog Forestry News

Daily Archives: September 29, 2014

Business & Politics

Forest Industry supports European trade deal

Canada Newswire press release
September 26, 2014
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada

OTTAWA – As a broad supporter of free trade, the Forest Products Association of Canada (FPAC) today welcomed the signing of the Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement (CETA) between Canada and the European Union. The sector will benefit from the eventual elimination of European tariffs on some wood panels such as particle board, oriented strand board and plywood of up to 10%. “The forest products industry has always relied on exports for its prosperity and growth and we certainly appreciate the federal government’s ongoing commitment to free trade,” says the President and CEO of FPAC, David Lindsay.

Read More

Canada: Strong lumber sales in the second quarter

IHB
September 29, 2014
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada

Forest products companies from Canada reported mixed earnings in the second quarter of this year, with integrated producers, especially those with a building products focus, reporting the strongest results, woodbusiness.ca outlines in a press release. Companies from Western Canada posted earnings of CA$180.4 million in Q2/2014, up from the CA$161.7 million in Q1/2014, but lower than CA $383.8 million in Q2/2013.

Read More

B.C. lumber companies still battling sluggish growth in U.S. housing market as profits plummet

Business in Vancouver
September 26, 2014
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

Second-quarter profits among Western Canadian lumber producers surveyed by PricewaterhouseCoopers (PwC) have dropped by more than half compared to last year, according to a new report from the accounting firm. The 10 companies surveyed, which include West Fraser, Canfor and Fortress Paper, reported total net earnings of $180 million. That’s a 53% drop compared to Q2 2013 when profits for those 10 companies were $383.8. PwC cited the sluggish U.S. housing market — one of the biggest customers for Canadian lumber — for declines at B.C. companies.

Read More

Forest Sector Boosted by Free Trade Agreement

Net News Ledger
September 27, 2014
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada East, Canada

TORONTO – There is optimism in Ontario’s forest sector. The Ontario Government’s change on building regulation to permit wood frame structures up to six stories has helped. As a broad supporter of free trade, today, the Forest Products Association of Canada (FPAC) is welcoming the signing of the Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement (CETA) between Canada and the European Union. The sector will benefit from the eventual elimination of European tariffs on some wood panels such as particle board, oriented strand board and plywood of up to 10%.

Read More

Northern Pulp mill still not meeting emission guidelines

More tests planned next month
CBC News
September 26, 2014
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada East, Canada

The latest test results from the Northern Pulp mill in Pictou County, N.S. show the plant is still not meeting emission guidelines. The PC MLA for the area says it shows the Liberal government is “incompetent” in handling the issue. The tests were done in August before the mill shutdown for maintenance, but the results were made public Friday. Particulate from the recovery boiler is lower than before, but still higher than what’s allowed according to the company’s industrial approval.

Latest test results show Nova Scotia pulp mill’s emissions still too high from The Canadian Press

Read More

Maibec to acquire Fraser Timber’s Masardis mill

St. John Valley Times
September 26, 2014
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada East, Canada

MASARDIS, Maine – A Quebec-based wood processing company will take ownership of Fraser Timber’s lumber mill in Masardis, south of Ashland. An agreement was signed on Sept. 17 between manufacturing company Maibec Inc. of Lévis, Quebec and Fraser Timber LLC for Maibec’s purchase of the assets of the Masardis mill, according to a press release from Maibec. “This acquisition gives Maibec its first place of business in the United States and represents an important milestone in our growth,” said François Tardif, president of Maibec, according to the company release. “Among other things, the mill’s geographic location will allow us to improve our access to key U.S. market.”

Read More

Turning Tongass waste timber into energy

KTVA Alaska
September 27, 2014
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States, US West

Having been in the timber industry on Prince of Wales Island for more than three decades, Mel Cook has worked with some of the most beautiful wood in the world. But he says the availability of timber isn’t what it used to be, and his business and his body is slowing down. “We supported five families [at the sawmill] for a lot of years,” said Cook. “But nowadays, it’s just getting too tough to deal with.” Now, the 65-year-old wants to enter a new business venture with other small sawmills on the island.

Read More

Fatal Accident at Boise Cascade Plywood Plant

Woodworking Network
September 29, 2014
Category: Business & Politics
Region: US East, United States

MONCURE, NC – A 29-year-old worker died Friday in an industrial accident at Boise Cascade’s plywood plant in Moncure, NC. The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) is investigating the accident. Local news sources report William Belk was killed when a piece of log yard equipment struck him. John Sahlberg, senior vice president of Human Resources at Boise Cascade, told The Sanford Herald “The equipment had a C-clamp, and somehow or another, the C-clamp was up and came down on him. We don’t have details as to what he was doing or why the C-clamp was up.”

Read More

Wet summer, gas prices affect firewood supply

Associated Press
September 24, 2014
Category: Business & Politics
Region: US East, United States

BEMIDJI — Wet weather this year and soaring propane prices last winter have tightened supplies of seasoned firewood in northern Minnesota. Not only are homeowners struggling to find sources of dry wood, but paper and saw mill inventories are lower than usual. Minnesota Timber Producers Association Vice President Wayne Brandt said the wet summer prevented logging on many sites. Loggers who might have supplied homeowners are instead taking their wood to mills, which pay a higher price.

Read More

Triabunna woodchip mill: Government refuses to deny rumours of compulsory acquisition

ABC News, Australia
September 29, 2014
Category: Business & Politics
Region: International

The Tasmanian Government has again refused to rule out compulsorily acquiring the Triabunna woodchip mill on the state’s east coast. The mill is currently the subject of a parliamentary inquiry which was commissioned to investigate the sale of the woodchip facility in 2011. Owners Jan Cameron and Graeme Wood initially said they hoped to reopen the mill but later unveiled plans for a tourism development. “The Government’s not going to be thinking aloud on this subject,” government front bencher Michael Ferguson said.

Concerns about compulsory purchase of the Triabunna mill (video) from ABC News, Australia

Read More

Russia: Logging industry in Karelia suffers losses

IHB
September 29, 2014
Category: Business & Politics
Region: International

Unedged timber production in the Republic of Karelia in the first half of 2014 was 3.422 million m3 which is a 9.5% increase against the same period in 2013, the Russian Forestry Review reports data compiled from the Karelian Federal State Statistics Service. The most optimistic growth (40%) was shown by fuel wood production; in physical terms, however, the output remained small: 423.7 thousand m3.

Read More

Wood, Paper & Green Building

Smithers Wins Wood Use Award

250 News
September 28, 2014
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: Canada, Canada West

Smithers, B.C. – Bovill Square has netted the Town of Smithers a 2014 Community Recognition Award. The Wood Works! BC prizes are presented annually to communities that have been exemplary advocates for wood use in public structures. Smithers was one of five winners announced Friday at the Union of B.C. Municipalities Convention in Whistler. “We congratulate these local governments for their vision and leadership by choosing wood for design and construction of their civic projects,” stated Lynn Embury-Williams, Executive Director of Wood Works! BC.

Read More

Green light for taller wood construction a game changer

Home buyers, builders benefit as wood-frame limit raised to 6 storeys
The Toronto Star
September 26, 2014
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: Canada East, Canada


….There are three reasons that this will be a game changer for the province’s building and land development industry. First, this building code amendment gives new-home buyers more options in choosing a home. Adding to the housing mix will also add vibrancy and character to our new neighbourhoods, which is great news for consumers. Some buyers will like this option because wood is aesthetically pleasing, while others will appreciate that their carbon footprint is being reduced. Still others may prefer it because the construction of their new home will be fast, efficient and can occur year-round.

Read More

Why architects are now using wood to construct big buildings

There is a growing movement to use the ancient building material instead of concrete or steel for large and tall structures
The Financial Times
September 26, 2014
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: United States, US West

Skyscrapers made of wood, one of our oldest building materials, are no longer a fantasy thanks to the recent development of highly engineered wood products, collectively known as “massive timber”. Cross-laminated timber (CLT) – layers of softwood, the grain crosswise in each successive layer, glued and pressed together until the panels are up to 50cm thick – has enabled the construction of multistorey residential all-timber buildings.

Read More

Guitars, mandolins, ukuleles: Tongass tonewood grows business

KTVA.com
September 26, 2014
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: United States, US West

There’s a beautiful view of Port St. Nicholas from Brent Cole’s workshop. Located in the town of Craig on Prince of Wales Island, Cole, his wife Annette and two sons run Alaska Specialty Woods. Cole works six days a week making soundboards and tonewood that he sells to some of the most renowned manufactures and craftsmen of musical instruments in 60 countries. Cole cut his first Sitka spruce tree on Prince of Wales Island to make soundboards in 1994. Sitka spruce ranges from Northern California to the Kenai Peninsula. “This region right here is the central part of it, and it’s the premier area for Sitka spruce,” Cole said.

Read More

Wood for Good calls on Policy Makers to Build with Carbon – don’t emit it

New build timber frame housing could bank 4 million tonnes of CO2 every year
Timber Trade Federation
September 27, 2014
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: International

Wood for Good, the timber industry’s sustainability and communications campaign, has launched a series of short animations to illustrate the potential to sequester and store millions of tonnes of carbon dioxide in UK homes every year. The videos, produced by data-visualisation experts Carbon Visuals, illustrate how trees capture CO2 from the atmosphere and store the carbon in wood, where it remains until timber products reach the end of their physical lives. Wood for Good is calling for an increased use of timber construction to help address two major issues: the need for more housing and the need to reduce emissions.

Read More

Forestry

Old photos taken by tree planters provide snapshot of B.C.’s history

September 29, 2014
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

VANCOUVER — It took Nahanni Arntzen many years to appreciate her early childhood in the B.C. wilderness as the daughter of two young hippie tree planters. She was born 39 years ago in a teepee on a sandbar nine miles up the Kingcome River on the west coast of B.C. Her father, Daniel James, caught her in his dirty hands. Her mother, Jenny Arntzen, was back planting within a few days. He was 20; she was 19. Nahanni Arntzen has warm memories from those early years in makeshift camps of dogs, riding in the back of trucks, sleeping in tree boxes, stealing mouthfuls of icing while the cooks weren’t looking, late night fires and early morning rain.

Read More

Mighty Planes will feature Coulson’s Hercules C-130

Alberni Valley Times
September 26, 2014
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

The Discovery Channel will feature the Hercules C-130 on its show Mighty Planes. The season premiere of Heroic Hercules will be aired Sunday at 6 and 10 p.m. The show, which is a spinoff from the previously well-received show Mighty Ships, featured the bombers back in 2012.

Read More

Big trees bring out our inner tree hugger

The Faculty of Forestry now runs the BC Big Tree Registry, a database of the biggest specimens in the province. 
Vancouver Observer
September 28, 2014
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

The BC Big Tree Registry, which aims to chronicle B.C.’s most majestic forest giants, has found a new home in the Faculty of Forestry. We go searching for them, we hug them, we’re often speechless in their presence, but what makes big trees so special? Sally Aitken, a professor of forest and conservation sciences, explains the connection we feel to these majestic giants of the forest. The Faculty of Forestry now runs the BC Big Tree Registry, a database of the biggest specimens in the province.

Read More

We must lobby for watershed

Letter by Bill Randles
Alberni Valley News
September 25, 2014
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Like many in our community, I am concerned about protecting our water supply. …The Watershed Forest Alliance has been lobbying for a number of years now to protect McLaughlin Ridge in the watershed. The sticking point here is that the watershed is presently in privately held lands. …The other better option is the one put forward by the late Glenn Wong and that is to lobby the provincial government to make a swap of Crown lands for the watershed and put the watershed under the direct control and protection of local government.

Read More

Agency stands by Cherry Ridge plan

Vernon Morning Star
September 26, 2014
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

A government agency insists it won’t abandon logging plans despite protests in Cherryville. Road construction contractors backed off initiating work Thursday after they were met by about 55 people opposed to the project on Cherry Ridge. “Flat-out no,” said Colin Johnston, B.C. Timber Sales woodlands supervisor, when asked if the agency may completely scrap logging because of the protesters who claim logging could cause landslides. “It’s not in the interest of BCTS to do that.” However, the prospect of further public demonstrations has BCTS reviewing its next steps.

Read More

Why is MNR intent on closing the bush?

Letter by Dan Hurd
Chronicle Journal
September 29, 2014
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

‘Plenty of wood out there” (CJ, Sept. 25)? Here we are, in the Great White North, and not a birch tree to be bought.  My family and I have been harvesting our own wood for years. In the Nipigon District, there is only one approved fuel wood access area. The road was impassable in the summer, so we cut in the winter. We have to plow approximately 14 km of road, fill in trenches with snow and pack it to make the road useable. This comes at a significant cost. In years past, wood lots were accessible year-round and the roads were maintained.

Read More

GEORGE OCHENSKI: Right on cue – Forest Service abuses fee authority in wilderness

The Missoulian
September 28, 2014
Category: Forestry
Region: United States

hey say “timing is everything” and that’s certainly the case with last week’s column about federal land management agencies abusing fee authority granted to them by a complacent – and somewhat clueless – Congress. Only days later, the issue blew up nationally when the U.S. Forest Service decided to make permanent an agency rule that requires journalists and others who take pictures in wilderness areas to first receive permission from the agency and then pay fees for a permit to do so or face significant fines and penalties. …In an unbelievable response, Liz Close, the Forest Service’s acting wilderness director, defended the rule, saying the Wilderness Act of 1964 prohibits commercial enterprise in wilderness.

Read More

Forest Service Chief Says No, You Won’t Be Charged To Take Photos

Oregon Public Broadcasting
September 26, 2014
Category: Forestry
Region: United States

Under fire from free speech advocates and nature enthusiasts, the U.S. Forest Service, said Thursday it has absolutely no intention of charging people to take pictures on public land. Forest Service chief Tom Tidwell wanted to make one thing perfectly clear. “There’s no way that our proposal will infringe on anyone’s First Amendment rights,” he said. Tidwell said journalists and the public will NOT be required to get a permit or pay a $1,500 fee to bring their cameras into wilderness areas.

Read More

Wolf numbers in Tongass unknown, but logging project approved

KTVA.com
September 24, 2014
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

The U.S. Forest Service says it doesn’t know how many wolves are on Prince of Wales Island, but it will proceed with the Big Thorne timber sale regardless, provided it overcomes several lawsuits. There is also no requirement for the Forest Service to delay logging while the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service determines whether to list the Alexander Archipelago wolf under the Endangered Species Act. Biologists and conservationists say old-growth forest provides crucial winter habitat for the Sitka black-tailed deer because the canopy prevents large amounts of snow from building up below. The deer on Prince of Wales Island are essential to the wolf population and important to subsistence and sport hunters.

Read More

Court rulings let 1 Seeley-Swan logging project go forward, halt 1 other

by Rob Chaney
The Missoulian
September 27, 2014
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

A pair of contrary court decisions let one Seeley-Swan logging project go forward while holding up another a few miles away. The Lolo National Forest released contracts for the Colt-Summit project 10 miles north of Seeley Lake last week, after several years of court challenges. Then on Thursday, U.S. District Judge Donald Molloy blocked work on the Glacier-Loon project southwest of Condon, and held up future logging on lands the U.S. Forest Service acquired from the Nature Conservancy as part of the Montana Legacy Project.

Read More

Increased timber sales won’t save rural Oregon: Guest opinion

The Oregonian
September 26, 2014
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Oregon’s rural counties are indeed struggling, and I agree with The Oregonian that timber alone is not going to solve the problem. I also agree with guest columnist Tony Hyde that the stakes are very high. I understand that at stake are Oregonians’ livelihoods, economic opportunity and public health and safety. That is why I, a business owner in Southwest Oregon, feel so strongly that the best way forward is to protect Oregon’s public lands and waters. Public lands and clean, healthy rivers are the backbone of a healthy economy. They support the quality of life Oregonians enjoy, and they support the growth of a diversified rural economy.

Read More

Oregon wildfires: Progress continues in fights against 36 Pit, Deception and Onion Mountain fires

The Oregonian
September 28, 2014
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Progress continued Sunday in the fight against Oregon’s remaining significant wildfires, with the possibility of rain on Monday and Tuesday offering potential further relief. In Estacada, the 36 Pit Fire was 69 percent contained by Sunday evening, though several roads, including Highway 224 remained closed to the general public, but open to residents and workers escorted by pilot cars. The 5,520-acre blaze began Sept. 13, and investigators have since determined the fire was started by target shooters’ hot bullet fragments igniting dry tinder near the out-of-use rock quarry.

Read More

Vegetation education: Ex-forester dedicated to teaching the next generation

Independent Record
September 28, 2014
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

When Sam Gilbert asked students more than a decade ago what conifers were in the forests around Helena, no one had an answer. So Gilbert set out to change that. Since 2002, Gilbert, a retired forester who spent about 35 years working for the U.S. Forest Service in northern Idaho and Montana, has been volunteering his time to organize a day during which seventh grade students from C.R. Anderson middle school get to collect data on the vegetation in plots set up on Mount Helena.

Read More

In Alaska, a Battle to Keep Trees, or an Industry, Standing

The New York Times
September 27, 2014
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

THORNE BAY, Alaska — The Tongass National Forest, a panoply of snow-dusted peaks and braided rivers, slender fjords and more than 5,000 islands draped over a stretch of Pacific coastline, is widely viewed as one of America’s great natural treasures. Under pressure from environmentalists, the Obama administration pledged four years ago to phase out logging of virgin woodlands here. Yet the Forest Service is now preparing its largest auction of it in a decade: 9.7 square miles of hemlock, spruce and cedar near this island hamlet. 

Read More

Outfitters-guides group supports Healthy Forests act

Billings Gazette
September 28, 2014
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Montana Outfitters and Guides Association supports House Resolution 1526, Restoring Healthy Forests for Healthy Communities Act, a bill introduced by Rep. Steve Daines, R-Mont. Consider these trends: Since 2000, mountain pine beetle has killed trees on more than 5 million acres in Montana and has infested 500,000 acres of National Forest in Montana. Last year acres of timber lost to wildfire exceeded timber harvested by a ratio of 44-to-1, causing the Forest Service to now spend $2 for every $1 it produces. A massive number of Forest Service projects in Montana are appealed or litigated, leading Forest Service leaders to admit “litigation has virtually shut things down on the National Forest.”

Read More

Idaho wildfire season is tame in 2014, especially when compared with western neighbors

Associated Press
September 28, 2014
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

BOISE, Idaho — Idaho’s typically active wildfire season is closing with a slow fizzle after short bursts of rain and cooler temperatures dampened the state’s tinderbox of fuel. About 271 square miles in Idaho have burned after 1,090 fires ignited between May and September, according to officials with the Boise-based National Interagency Fire Center. The numbers are the lowest since 2009. “This year in Idaho was a weird year,” said Jennifer Myslivy, wildfire mitigation specialist with the U.S. Bureau of Land Management. “We had fires early on, but then the rain would come. It kept the fire season from going crazy.”

Read More

100 Missoula icons: UM’s School of Forestry houses traditions that endure

The Missoulian
September 28, 2014
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

The College of Forestry and Conservation serves not only as an enduring icon of the University of Montana, but of all Missoula. The college has its roots at UM in 1908 as a school to train rangers for the newly christened U.S. Forest Service. The School of Forestry didn’t open until 1914; the ranger courses ended in 1927. The current three-story building on campus opened in 1922 and was named after Gifford Pinchot, the first chief of the Forest Service. Originally, the school was housed in a two-story building behind Main Hall that was referred to as “The Shack.”

Read More

Judge rules for environmentalists in Swan Valley

Associated Press
September 27, 2014
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

HELENA, Mont. — A judge has ruled the U.S. government must better analyze how protected species would be affected before any more logging is done on about 111,000 acres The Nature Conservancy handed over to The U.S. Forest Service. The land in the Swan Valley acquired in 2009 came with an agreement between the conservancy and the former owner, Plum Creek Timber Co., that allowed timber harvests through 2018. Four environmental groups sued the Forest Service, saying the agency did not properly study the effects on protected animals, fish and plants in the area.

Read More

Should Norway be paying Liberia to stop cutting down forests?

The Conversation
September 29, 2014
Category: Forestry
Region: International

Despite all the treaties, pledges, export bans and labelling schemes, the world’s forests are still disappearing at an alarming rate. In poorer countries a forest may simply be worth less as a living, thriving ecosystem than it is as timber and farmland. So if money is a key factor, why not get rich countries to pay poor countries to stop chopping trees? The UN Climate Summit in New York saw major new agreements along these lines. Norway in particular has pledged to pay Peru and Liberia hundreds of millions of dollars if they protect their forests more effectively. Such so-called REDD+ schemes hope to save millions of tons of carbon emissions while at the same time protecting indigenous people’s rights.

Read More

Ballinderry man in ‘National Tree Huggers’ contest

The Nenagh Guardian
September 29, 2014
Category: Forestry
Region: International

The search for Ireland’s most loveable tree starts this Wednesday, October 1st, with Ballinderry man Matt Fogarty entering the ‘National Tree Huggers’ 2014 contest. The inaugural National Tree Huggers Contest will be launched on the John Murray Show on RTE Radio 1 on Wednesday 1st October at 9am. Fifteen people (high-profilers in their own career/sectors) will vie for the votes of the nation. The contest is not about the tallest, broadest, oldest or most beautiful tree.

You
can vote for your favourite tree/story at www.lovemytree.ie from
Wednesday 1st October, 2014. – See more at:
http://www.nenaghguardian.ie/news/roundup/articles/2014/09/29/4032788-ballinderry-man-in-national-tree-huggers-contest/#sthash.obv69ltZ.dpuf

Read More

Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy

How much carbon does that tree store? There’s a tool for that

WDNR Blog Ear to the Ground
September 26, 2014
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: United States, US West

That maple tree in the backyard that seems to produce twice its weight in leaves every fall is more than just good lookin’. In addition to a home for wildlife, summer cooling, rain run-off control and more, that tree – if you live in the city – is part of the urban forest. Trees in urban areas also have a measurable role to play in absorbing carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gasses from the atmosphere.  How measurable? See for yourself, and try out the National Tree Carbon Calculator. The calculator allows anyone to estimate benefits from an individual street tree in their yard.

Read More

Study examines carbon storage in trees

A University study found that trees store carbon in their roots differently, depending on the climate.
Minnesota Daily
September 29, 2014
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: United States, US West

A University of Minnesota study published earlier this month provides a better understanding of how trees store carbon in their roots, researchers say. The study, partly funded by the University’s Institute on the Environment, found that carbon storage in trees’ roots differs with climate. Researchers say this information will allow for more accurate predictions of climate change’s future effects. Estimates of aboveground biomass and carbon percentage are already fairly accurate, said forest ecology professor Peter Reich, leader of the study.

Read More

Climate impact of black carbon severely overestimated, says study

Global warming efforts should focus on CO2, not soot particles known as black carbon, say Norwegian team
The Guardian
September 26, 2014
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: International

The global warming effect of ‘black carbon’, or soot, has been greatly exaggerated due to mistaken assumptions about the atmospheric altitude at which its particles are concentrated, according to a new study. Soot plumes belch from chimneys, stoves and forest fires, causing numerous health ailments and, it was thought, a contribution to climate change second only to carbon dioxide. But when recent observations about the atmospheric height of soot particles were used, a model simulation by the Centre for International Climate and Environmental Research-Oslo (Cicero), published in the journal Nature Communications, found that its warming impacts were roughly halved.

Read More

EU support for wood-based ‘bioenergy’ fuels forest destruction and land-grabbing

World Rainforest Movement
September 26, 2014
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: International

Back in 2009, the European Union agreed on a 20% renewable energy target by 2020. Most of the target is expected to be met from burning biomass, primarily wood (1). Across much of Europe, wood burning is being promoted for heating and for electricity. As a result, the EU’s demand for wood – already unsustainably high – has started to grow substantially. 

Read More