Tree Frog Forestry News

Daily Archives: October 8, 2014

Business & Politics

Raw logs vs. lumber key topic for East Asian trade mission

B.C. government-industry group will focus on growing trade with South Korea
Vancouver Sun
October 7, 2014
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

As British Columbia Forest Minister Steve Thomson heads to East Asia on a mission to strengthen ties with key trade partners, the thorny topic of raw log exports is an underlying issue. Thomson left for China, Japan and South Korea for a 12-day business trip, with a particular eye to making greater inroads into Korea, with whom Canada reached a free-trade agreement earlier this year that will see tariffs on imported lumber eliminated by 2017. “We see some real opportunities in Korea,” Thomson said, with “a goal of expanding trade into Korea by 10 per cent a year over the next number of years.”

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Stephen Hume: Sechelt First Nation calls in forest firms to discuss relationship in new legal environment

October 8, 2014
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

Fallout from the Supreme Court’s affirmation of underlying aboriginal rights in British Columbia has reached the Sunshine Coast. The Sechelt First Nation, praised by everyone from premiers to bed and breakfast operators for its progressiveness, has just informed the forest industry that it can no longer be business as usual. The band has invited major forestry companies operating on the Sunshine Coast and the province’s assistant deputy minister for timber sales to discuss how relationships must change. “This is a dialogue we need to have together,” said a letter from the band council obtained by The Vancouver Sun.

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Downtown Nanaimo mill set to be closed by WFP

by Robert Barron – Company to sink $10M into Duke Point facility
Nanaimo Daily News
October 7, 2014
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

The Western Forest Products sawmill in downtown Nanaimo is scheduled to be permanently closed by the end of the year, the forest company announced Monday. The company also plans to invest $10 million to “modernize” its Duke Point sawmill and will add another shift to coincide with the closure of the downtown facility. Company spokeswoman Amy Spencer said the 62 employees working at the Nanaimo mill will be offered jobs at other WFP sites, including Duke Point, once a second shift is added. But Spencer couldn’t say Monday how many workers the second shift will entail.

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Stephen Hume: Sechelt First Nation calls in forest firms to discuss relationship in new legal environment

October 8, 2014
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

Fallout from the Supreme Court’s affirmation of underlying aboriginal rights in British Columbia has reached the Sunshine Coast. The Sechelt First Nation, praised by everyone from premiers to bed and breakfast operators for its progressiveness, has just informed the forest industry that it can no longer be business as usual. The band has invited major forestry companies operating on the Sunshine Coast and the province’s assistant deputy minister for timber sales to discuss how relationships must change. “This is a dialogue we need to have together,” said a letter from the band council obtained by The Vancouver Sun.

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Royce Hefler, 92, was major figure in lumber industry

The Chronicle Herald
October 7, 2014
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada East, Canada

Lower Sackville businessman Royce Hefler is being remembered for his decades of contributions to the lumber industry, as well as the active role he played in community projects. Hefler, former owner and president of Hefler Forest Products Ltd., died suddenly on Sunday, according to his obituary. He was 92. David Barrett, co-owner of Barrett Lumber in Beaver Bank, said Tuesday he regarded Hefler as a mentor. “He was a very capable businessman,” Barrett said in an interview. 

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Northern Pulp air quality monitors years behind schedule

Province knew of Northern Pulp problems before approving operating licence, CBC has learned
CBC News
October 7, 2014
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada East, Canada

Emissions from the Northern Pulp mill not only exceed government regulations but the company is nearly two years late in meeting a condition in its operating permit from the province, CBC News has learned. Randy Delorey, Nova Scotia’s Environment Minister, said the fact the scrubber wasn’t working properly did delay collecting the data. But he told reporter Jean Laroche the province didn’t know about the problem before issuing the mill its approval. …However, that contradicts a document sent to the Clean the Mill group led by Matt Gunning in September of last year, which states the provincial government knew about the problem in 2008, years before it gave the mill an approval in May 2011.

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Brian Gallant’s smaller cabinet faces long list of demands

Premier-designate Brian Gallant will swear in his 13-person cabinet at 2 p.m. on Tuesday
CBC News
October 7, 2014
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada East, Canada

Premier-designate Brian Gallant and his Liberal cabinet ministers will be sworn in at 2 p.m. today, but already interest groups are lining up to lobby them on a variety of issues. Gallant will name a 13-person cabinet, which is the smallest executive council since Louis J. Robichaud’s government in 1965. The leaner cabinet will not stop the long line of special interests, who will be pushing their own policy demands… Lois Corbett, the executive director of the Conservation Council of New Brunswick, said she is looking for the Gallant government to act quickly on getting the details of the new forestry deal released publicly.

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Irving Forest Products marks official opening of the new Ashland Sawmill in Nashville Plantation, Maine

Lesprom
October 3, 2014
Category: Business & Politics
Region: US East, United States

Irving Forest Products marked the official opening of the new state-of-the-art Ashland Sawmill in Nashville Plantation, Maine. During the construction phase, over 84 Maine businesses provided in excess of $17 million in goods and services to the project, employing over 50 people on site during peak construction, as the company said in the press release received by Lesprom Network. The $30 million sawmill started operating in June and today employs 60 people, producing over 100 million board feet of quality, environmentally certified softwood lumber per year. Ashland Sawmill is one of the most modern sawmills in North America and operates the fastest trim line on the continent.

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Sen. Ron Johnson tours former Port Edwards Domtar mill

Daily Tribune Media
October 7, 2014
Category: Business & Politics
Region: US East, United States

PORT EDWARDS – Wisconsin’s Republican senator, Ron Johnson, stopped by the former Domtar paper mill in Port Edwards on Tuesday morning to tour what is now known as the Central Wisconsin Applied Research & Business Park. Six years ago, in 2008, the Port Edwards Domtar mill shuttered, eliminating 501 jobs, because of declining paper markets and growing expenses of operating the mill. At the time of its closing, Domtar was the largest employer in Port Edwards. Now, the Central Wisconsin Applied Research & Business Park is owned by DMI Acquisitions LLC, a Columbus, Ohio-based company that purchased the site in 2013, five years after Domtar shut down. 

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Purchasing sustainable timber to become more transparent

Architecture and Design
October 8, 2014
Category: Business & Politics
Region: International

A quest to develop Environmental Product Declarations (EPDs) for Australian timber products has begun, and those responsible believe it will make purchasing sustainable timber in Australia a more transparent and rewarding process. The Timber Development Association (TDA) and sustainability consultants PE International will lead the seemingly arduous task of obtaining EPDs for sawn hardwood and softwood, particleboard, MDF, plywood and veneered boards. 

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Wood, Paper & Green Building

Soon our cities will be full of plyscrapers

Treehugger
October 7, 2014
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: International

The Guardian has a new feature on Resilient Cities and looks at a subject dear to this TreeHugger’s heart, wooden buildings. They make so much sense right now, with square miles of pine-beetle infested wood that will rot where it stands if not turned into something. Now it can be turned into Cross-Laminated Timber (CLT) sort of plywood on steroids and used to build mid-rise to high-rise towers, nicknamed “plyscrapers.”

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Will Skyscrapers of the Future be Made of Wood?

Construction Global
October 7, 2014
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: International

The future of high-rise buildings may well be wooden if recent reports are to come to fruition, with many of the world’s leading engineers and construction experts anticipating that the concept of a ‘plyscraper’ is not as far off the mark as some may think. 130 years after the world’s first skyscraper was built in Chicago by American engineer, William Le Baron Jenney, the construction methods and by-products associated with such large scale infrastructure has inevitably led to companies exploring more sustainable and environmentally friendly options. And it seems that wood may well be the answer.

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Forestry

California pilot dies in crash fighting wildfire

Associated Press
October 8, 2014
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

YOSEMITE NATIONAL PARK, Calif. — An air tanker fighting a wildfire on the edge of Yosemite National Park in Northern California smashed into a steep canyon wall Tuesday, killing the pilot who was believed to be the only person aboard, officials said. Rescue crews hiking through extremely rugged terrain found the wreckage and confirmed the pilot’s death several hours after the plane crashed, said Alyssa Smith, spokeswoman for the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection. The pilot’s family has requested no name be released until all immediate family members can be notified, Smith said. The plane went down about 4:30 p.m. within a mile of the park’s west entrance, Yosemite spokesman Scott Gediman said.

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Four woodlots near Clearwater undergo audit

BC Forest Practices Board
October 7, 2014
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

VICTORIA – The Forest Practices Board will examine forest practices on four woodlots located east of Clearwater in the Thompson Rivers Resource District, during the week of Oct. 14, 2014. The audit will examine planning, timber harvesting, road construction and maintenance, silviculture and fire prevention practices carried out by the woodlot licence holders under the Forest and Range Practices Act and the Wildfire Act. Two of the woodlots are located south and east of Clearwater and two are located north of Adams Lake.

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Watchdog warns of bee decline, logging in Algonguin Park and “chemical valley” crisis

The Hamilton Spectator
October 7, 2014
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

… Environmental Commissioner Gord Miller says declines in honey bee populations may be a warning sign of a larger ecological problem, and says the pesticides are persistent in soil and water and highly mobile within ecosystems. In his annual report, Miller also calls on the government to ban logging in Algonquin Park, the only one of the 339 provincial parks where timber harvesting is allowed.

Commit to end logging in Algonquin Park says report from the BayToday.ca
Algonquin Park logging, bee-killing pesticides targets by environmental watchdog from the Toronto Star

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Fatal oak tree disease persists locally despite record drought

The Daily Californian
October 7, 2014
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Despite drought conditions, sudden oak death — a fatal oak tree disease — has seen a resurgence in North Berkeley and Tilden Regional Park, according to a report recently released by a UC Berkeley researcher. The report, known as the “Sudden Oak Death Blitz,” was produced with data from 500 citizen scientists and analyzed at the UC Berkeley Forest Pathology and Mycology Lab. The report surveyed more than 10,000 trees and collected 2,000 samples. The annual report seeks to produce a map of infected trees for use in management and prevention. 

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Timber industry’s role uncertain, even with Western bark beetle epidemics

Standard Examiner
October 7, 2014
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

John Blazzard moseyed over to a pile of stacked spruce logs. They still smelled woody and green, with a hint of sharp citrus. They’d all once grown for a hundred years or more near the Bear River in the Uinta Mountains. The logs still had their blue marks, hand-painted by U.S. Forest Service staff indicating they were suitable for harvest. Blazzard pulled back the bark and pointed to several small black dots scurrying around. A close look showed opaque, writhing grubs — the brood of the season’s spruce beetles.

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Only we can prevent costly forest fires. So why don’t we?

Bad management and climate change have turned our forests into tinderboxes and exhausted firefighting budgets. But we keep on building homes in the woods.
CrossCut
October 8, 2014
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

…Thanks to generations of selectively removing big, fire-resistant, commercially-valuable Ponderosa pines — a process known as “high grading” — and suppressing — or discouraging Native Americans from setting — the small fires that would have cleared out saplings and underbrush, we have lots of kindling on the forest floor, lots of small trees crowded together, lots of dead and bug-weakened trees drying in the summer sun. And now, in many places, we also have lots of houses standing among the dessicated pines, right in harm’s way.

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Contact WIU Forestry Club to Protect Ash Trees in Macomb Area from Emerald Ash Borer

Western Illinois University
October 7, 2014
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

MACOMB, IL – According to Western Illinois University School of Agriculture’s Paul Blome, since the discovery of Emerald ash borer (EAB) beetles in Detroit Michigan in 2002, the beetles have killed more than 45 million ash trees in the Great Lakes Region. Blome, an arboriculture and urban forestry instructor in the School of Ag, said EAB beetles are now closing in on western Illinois. As a service to the Macomb area community and to raise funds for activities, the WIU Forestry Club will begin treating ash trees this fall to protect them from EAB.

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Garlic injection could tackle tree diseases

BBC News
October 7, 2014
Category: Forestry
Region: International

Injecting trees with a concentrated form of garlic might help save trees in the UK from deadly diseases. Operating under an experimental government licence, a prototype piece of technology to administer the solution is being trialled on a woodland estate in Northamptonshire. Widespread use of the injection process is impractical and expensive. But it could potentially help save trees of historic or sentimental value. Garlic is one of nature’s most powerful antibacterial and antifungal agents. It contains a compound called allicin, which scientists are interested in harnessing.

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Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy

USDA Report Outlines Opportunities in the Emerging Bioeconomy

USDA
October 7, 2014
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: United States

WASHINGTON — Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack today announced that the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) has released a comprehensive report synthesizing current literature that explores opportunities in the emerging bioeconomy. The report, entitled Why Biobased?, was created as a precursor for a more comprehensive economic study to be released in the coming months by the USDA BioPreferred program on the economic impacts of the biobased products industry.

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Gloomy Days Ahead

October 8, 2014
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: US East, United States

What thrives in urban areas, sports an armored shell, and can cut through tree bark like a samurai’s sword? Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles? No way, dude. Allow me to introduce to you the gloomy scale insect. This mutant-like sap sipper is native to the American Southeast, but it could become more common and deadly as the climate warms. And city trees could suffer mightily for it. Recent research published in the journal Ecological Applications shows that in areas of Raleigh, North Carolina, experiencing an urban heat island effect, gloomy scale insects can produce 300 percent more offspring than their counterparts in cooler parts of town.

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Gloomy Days Ahead

October 8, 2014
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: US East, United States

What thrives in urban areas, sports an armored shell, and can cut through tree bark like a samurai’s sword? Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles? No way, dude. Allow me to introduce to you the gloomy scale insect. This mutant-like sap sipper is native to the American Southeast, but it could become more common and deadly as the climate warms. And city trees could suffer mightily for it. Recent research published in the journal Ecological Applications shows that in areas of Raleigh, North Carolina, experiencing an urban heat island effect, gloomy scale insects can produce 300 percent more offspring than their counterparts in cooler parts of town.

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Is burning wood for energy worse for the climate than coal?

The Carbon Brief
October 7, 2014
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: International

An article in today’s Daily Mail says it is “lunacy” to run Drax power station on biomass instead of coal. Converting the plant to burn wood destroys forests and emits more carbon, it says. The paper calls this a “living, humming, forest-destroying symbol of the shameful absurdity of European energy policies”. Drax and the Department of Energy and Climate Change (DECC) do not agree. DECC is giving money to conversions at Drax and other power plants because they are helping the UK meet an EU target to get 15 per cent of its energy from renewable sources by 2020. 

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General

Wiring the Woods

CAS researchers heat a forest floor to study climate change
BU Today
October 7, 2014
Category: Uncategorised

…It sounds like a home-improvement crew taking a wrong turn en route to a job, but the students’ gymnastic exertions and woodsy cable-laying were vital to Templer’s study of climate change. Since April, when researchers turned on the power (they waited so long to let the forest recover from the assault, she says) the cables have been warming the soil by 5 degrees Celsius. It’s a crystal ball of sorts: that temperature rise is what’s projected for soils in the Northern Forest (the region of northern Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, and New York) over the next century.

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