Tree Frog Forestry News

Daily Archives: December 1, 2014

Froggy Foibles

Pulp Panties: This Underwear Is Made from Beech

Woodworking Network
November 25, 2014
Category: Froggy Foibles
Region: International

Just in time for holiday gift giving, lovers of wood and wood products will enjoy MeUndies, underwear made from Lenzing Modal, a material extracted from the European beech tree. According to the Lenzing, the material is CO2 neutral and made using Edelweiss technology, which is based on oxygen-based chemistry. More than half of the beech wood used by Lenzing is from Austrian forests.

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Business & Politics

Canada’s unfinished business with First Nations is an economic failure

December 1, 2014
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada

Ferguson’s acerbic quote also summarizes the great unfinished business of Canada which is to reconcile the rights and create a role for the country’s 614 First Nations and their 700,000 members. The failure to have done this after centuries not only impedes national economic development, but is at the root of much of the misery and squalor on and off reserves. The United States did not make deals, but conquered its Native Americans and, under international law, has only been required to compensate them. But here, Britain signed sovereign deals with aboriginals, catapulting them under international law to the rights and privileges of nation-states.

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WorkSafe to cover families’ travel costs

Prince George Citizen
November 29, 2014
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

WorkSafe B.C. will help cover the costs of victims families who want to travel to Prince George for the coroner’s inquest into the 2012 fires and explosions that leveled Babine Forest Products near Burns Lake and Lakeland Mills. “For those injured workers interested to attend or certainly the family members of the fatally injured workers, we’ll certainly assist with those costs,” WorkSafe B.C. said Friday. It’s a more than two-hour drive from Burns Lake to Prince George, where the inquest into the two incidents will be held in March. The distance and whether separate inquests should be held became an issue in the provincial legislature on Thursday.

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U.S. firm investigated for clean-up at old Canadian mill site

Company acquired millions of dollars in scrap metal, but came up short on jobs promised
CBC News
November 27, 2014
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada East, Canada

A U.S. company that bought three abandoned paper mills in Canada with the promise of attracting hundreds of green-based jobs is under investigation for failing to properly clean up one of the sites and owes nearly a million dollars in taxes at another, a CBC News investigation has revealed. “It seems to me that the intention is to simply cannibalize the sites rather than to turn them into attractive businesses,” says environmental lawyer Michael Hebert. “The track record, I think, speaks for itself.”

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Resolute clears air on mill matters

Fort Frances Times
November 26, 2014
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada East, Canada

With the future of its Fort Frances mill and wood rights making headlines of late, Resolute Forest Products is speaking out about its role in ongoing efforts to sell the mill here and related matters.  In an e-mail to the Times, Seth Kursman, vice-president of Corporate Communications, Sustainability & Government Affairs for Resolute, said “the efforts undertaken by Resolute to find a new owner were significant.”  The company spoke to parties from China, Asia, Europe, Canada, and the U.S., and four companies visited the site, he noted.

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Resolute to heat ‘critical areas’ of idled Fort Frances mill

Unifor thanks company, province for protecting mill while new buyer is sought
CBC News
November 30, 2014
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada East, Canada

Resolute Forest Products says “critical areas’ of its idled pulp and paper mill in Fort Frances will be heated this winter. The mill was shut down in January and a recent attempt to sell it fell through. On Saturday, Unifor (the union representing laid-off workers), issued a news release saying arrangements had been made for Resolute to heat the mill this winter. “We’re very pleased that a short-term solution has been found,” said Jerry Dias, Unifor National President. “Protecting this mill while we determine its future was an essential first step.”

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GLV Completes the Sale of its Pulp & Paper Division

Canada Newswire press release
November 28, 2014
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada East, Canada

MONTRÉAL, – GLV Inc. (“GLV” or the “Corporation”) announced today that it has completed the sale of its Pulp & Paper Division (the “Division”) to 9027173 Canada Inc., a corporation owned by Richard Verreault and Laurent Verreault, the Executive Chairman of the Board of GLV, under the previously announced terms. As previously disclosed, the total consideration received by GLV for the sale of the Division is $67 million and remains subject to certain post-closing adjustments.

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Resolute Mill in Fort Frances Protected for Winter

Net News Ledger
November 29, 2014
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada East, Canada

FORT FRANCES – BUSINESS – After discussion between Resolute, the Wynne government and Unifor, Resolute has announced that it will be heating the closed mill over the winter in order to protect the equipment in the mill. “We’re very pleased that a short-term solution has been found,” said Jerry Dias Unifor National President. “Protecting this mill while we determine its future was an essential first step.” The pulp mill in Fort Frances has been closed for more than a year. However, the union, community and government are exploring options for the mill’s future.

Resolute to heat Fort Frances Mill through the winter: Unifor from The TB News Watch

Press Release from Unifor

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Rural Oregon juniper mill operates on hopes and dreams

The Capital Press
November 28, 2014
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States, US West

If only the pieces ever come together, removing Western juniper could help Greater sage-grouse, aid cattle ranchers and soothe the stricken economy of rural Eastern Oregon. If only. Kendall Derby rolls into Portland in a tan GM Sierra pickup truck, pulling a flatbed trailer full of hope and bother. It’s a load of landscape timbers Derby cut from gnarly western juniper trees, and he drove 170 miles from Fossil, the emptiest spot in rural Oregon’s bare economy, to sell them in the city of hipsters.

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Family-owned sawmill destroyed by fire near Duchesne

Deseret News
November 26, 2014
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States, US West

DUCHESNE — An early morning fire destroyed a family-owned sawmill Wednesday, but the owner says it won’t put his company out of business. Firefighters from Duchesne, Altamont and Myton were called to the Knotty Wood Products sawmill, 5464 N. state Route 87, about 5 a.m. By the time they arrived, the building and several pieces of heavy equipment were engulfed in flames, according to Duchesne County Fire and Emergency Management Director Mike Lefler. Sam Fabrizio, who bought the 28-year-old company from his father in 2011, said he has no intention of shutting down the business.

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Klausner sawmill coming together

Suwannee Democrat
November 28, 2014
Category: Business & Politics
Region: US East, United States

Log trucks were coming in loaded with pine trees and leaving empty during the Suwannee Democrat’s Klausner sawmill tour Wednesday, Nov. 19. Klausner’s Thomas Mende, president of International Business Development for Klausner Trading USA, was beaming with excitement as he led Democrat Editor Jeff Waters and Reporter Amber Vann through his new state-of-the-art project, located in Western Suwannee County. He pointed out that while the sawmill part of the operation may not be running yet, there was still plenty of action going on elsewhere.

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Timber exports scheme cuts greenhouse gases

By The New Zealand Government
Scoop Independent News
December 1, 2014
Category: Business & Politics
Region: International

Associate Minister for Primary Industries Jo Goodhew has welcomed the implementation of a programme that allows timber products to be exported to Australia without chemical treatment. “After a successful trial last summer, the Secure Pathway Programme has been opened up to industry in a bid to reduce the use of methyl bromide during the flight season of the burnt pine longhorn beetle,” Mrs Goodhew says. “All exporters now have a new option for treating products such as sawn timber, timber mouldings, panel products and veneer sheets. “The alternative process creates a physical barrier between the wood product and this wood boring beetle, preventing infestation and reducing the usage of methyl bromide.”

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RusForest generated $16.8 million of revenue in 3Q

Pulp and Paper News
December 1, 2014
Category: Business & Politics
Region: International

RusForest AB, a Swedish forestry company with operations in Russia, released its 3Q 2014 report. RusForest generated $16.8 million of revenue (2013: $16.6 million) for the three months ended 30 September 2014, as the company said in the press release received by Lesprom Network. RusForest recorded a net loss of $2.5 million (2013: net loss of $7.1 million) for the three months ended 30 September 2014. RusForest adjusted EBITDA was $0.7 million (2013: $1.2 million) for the three months ended 30 September 2014.

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Forestry

B.C.’s Oldest Forest Conservationist Reminds Us How Much The Wild Has Changed

Huffington Post
November 28, 2014
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West


Earlier this week, B.C.’s oldest forest conservationist, 104-year-old Dr. Al Carder — who is older than most of B.C.’s second-growth trees — received the 2015 Forest Sustainability Award from the Ancient Forest Alliance. The award honours his decades of service to document, research, and promote the conservation of B.C.’s old-growth trees. (As Dr. Carder is currently ill with pneumonia, his children, Judith, Mary-Clare, and Andrew, received the award on his behalf.) Al Carder was researching and raising awareness about B.C.’s biggest trees years before old-growth forests became an issue of popular concern.

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EDITORIAL: BCTS must avoid convict

Vernon Morning Star
November 30, 2014
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

One has to wonder if B.C. Timber Sales has been watching the ongoing protests faced by Kinder Morgan in Burnaby? If it has, then the government agency should clearly recognize the negative publicity that can occur when residents upset over a project are willing to have themselves arrested. It makes for great headlines. Given what is happening in Burnaby, you would think BCTS would want to avoid a similar conflict over its proposed road and logging on Cherry Ridge in Cherryville. “It’s certainly been discussed and some people are keen to do that,” said Hank Cameron, Cherryville’s new regional district director, of residents possibly blocking construction crews.

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Aldergrove residents make last-ditch attempt to save urban forest (& video)

Global News
November 30, 2014
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

A seven and a half hectare parcel of forest in Aldergrove set to be developed will be debated one final time by the Township of Langley on Monday. Called Creekside Forest by some residents, the property on the Township-Abbotsford border was rezoned for a 61-lot development earlier this year. Twenty of those homes are in a cul-de-sac that will be built in the middle of the forest. On December 1 the Township of Langley is in a legal position to sell the land to developers, but the only councillor who voted against the rezoning has put a motion to council in hopes of changing their mind.

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B.C. government investigates endangered caves

Vancouver Sun
November 29, 2014
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

The B.C. government has launched an investigation into complaints that Western Forest Products’ logging practices damaged caves and other sensitive limestone karst landscapes near Gold River on Vancouver Island. The logging represents a violation of an order prohibiting logging activities that “damage or render ineffective” karst features, the Canadian Cave Conservancy asserts in a letter to the compliance and enforcement section of the Ministry of Forests, Lands, and Natural Resource Operations.

Forest fire on Vancouver Island clearcut damages limestone karst landscape from The Vancouver Sun

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Cherryville road action gears up

Vernon Morning Star
November 30, 2014
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Action is being stepped up to protest a logging road in the hills above Cherryville. On Wednesday, community representatives consulted with Vancouver-based West Coast Environmental Law to discuss B.C. Timber Sales’ construction of a logging road on Cherry Ridge. “He is going to write letters to the Ministry of Forests to have the geotechnical and the compliance and enforcement reports on the slide of April 25, 2012,” said Hank Cameron, who is the new regional district director for Cherryville. “We’ve been asking for that information and it’s been refused.”

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Wood-eating budworm puzzles B.C. coastal forestry scientists

Saanich News
November 30, 2014
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Forestry scientists are working to find out why a devastating tree predator from the B.C. Interior and Alberta is relatively harmless on the South Island. The Western spruce budworm is capable of great defoliation and has a lengthy criminal record that should make Douglas fir trees itch uncomfortably in their presence. “One thing we are looking at is why the budworm, which loves Douglas fir trees, is relatively dormant in our climate,” said forestry centre research scientist Brian Van Hezewijk. “We know they were quite prominent here in the early part of the century.”

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Crews race to mulch forest slopes laid bare by King fire

The Sacramento Bee
November 29, 2014
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Contractors working for the U.S. Forest Service are racing against Mother Nature to spread straw mulch over 1,200 acres of fire-scorched mountainside exposed by the King fire. As several storms arrive in the next week, forest officials fear a big, wet one will hit. Without the underbrush and plant material that normally cover the forest, massive erosion will wash away roads, fill reservoirs and harm other critical infrastructure. The September wildfire burned 97,717 acres.

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More Logging Needed to Combat Wildfires, California Official Says

Heartland.org
November 28, 2014
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

…Some officials are advocating allowing logging to thin forests in order to reduce the number of fires. In California, in the aftermath of the Rim Fire, which blackened 400 square miles of the Stanislaus National Forest, Susan Skalski, supervisor of the Stanislaus National Forest, proposed logging trees destroyed by the fire. Her proposal, finalized on August 28, has environmental groups upset about the approval of 24 square miles of burned mountain range for logging. In addition, logging would be permitted on 28 square miles along roads over which trees are expected to fall and threaten safety.

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Infrared trail counters help monitor use in Olympic National Forest

Associated Press
December 1, 2014
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

OLYMPIA — Tucked amid moss and decaying branches in Olympic National Forest, infrared trail counters are helping forest managers better understand when and where people hike. The U.S. Forest Service is experimenting with the pupil-sized lens that uses infrared scopes to register the heat signature from warm, moving objects. The data gathered will help the agency better manage human impacts on wilderness areas, as well as know where and when to deploy staff, the Kitsap Sun reported. “We always had to guess at the numbers,” Olympic’s wilderness manager Alex Weinberg said. “Now we have a concrete way of telling how much use we’re getting.”

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Letter: O&C lands bill is not the answer

Letter by Rachel Reddick
Statesman Journal
November 30, 2014
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

I’m really disappointed by the Statesman Journal’s Nov. 19 editorial, “Only politics could shackle growth.” I agree that unemployment is a problem in Oregon and that natural resource jobs are one option for those in Southern and Eastern Oregon, but the O&C lands bill is a huge mistake. In fact, it goes against the very idea of “finding common ground” between industry and environmental stewardship. That bill would allow reckless logging of hundreds of thousands of acres of forests. Yes, we do need jobs in southern and eastern Oregon, but deforestation is not the answer. Outdoor recreation has rivaled the timber industry in job creation in recent years.

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How One Complaint Reveals The Flaws In Oregon’s Pesticide Regulation

Oregon Public Broadcasting
December 1, 2014
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

TILLER, Ore. — The laws meant to prevent pesticides drifting across Oregon forests don’t always work. Lori Valuch knows it. Her husband Joe knows it. And so do their neighbors, whose properties tested positive for stray weed killer last April after Valuch complained to the state Department of Agriculture. “I realize they need to do spraying to control things on their land for the growth of their trees. But at the same time, I don’t want to be poisoned by it,” Valuch said. Complaints and theories about helicopters spraying chemicals are nothing new in Tiller.

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Travis Graves: The future of our forests

New Bern Sun Journal
November 29, 2014
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

Recent dealings regarding two properties lead me to fear for the forests of the Lower Neuse River basin. The Atlas Tract, 4,600 acres of forest and wetland in Pamlico County and the Hofmann Forest. The Atlas Tract is an integral component to recharging the drinking water aquifer for residents. The Hofmann Forest is the largest educational and research forest in the world, the crown jewel of North Carolina State University’s forestry program, and home to the headwaters of the Trent River are both on a fast track to similar fates. Having timber clear cut and sold and the land developed for growing grain crops by large scale agri-business, most likely corn for livestock production.

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A 300-year-old horse chestnut tree named UK’s largest

December 1, 2014
Category: Forestry
Region: International

A 300-year-old horse chestnut tree in the grounds of the country estate where prime minister Benjamin Disraeli lived has been declared the largest in the country. The veteran tree on the National Trust’s Hughenden estate in Buckinghamshire has a girth of 7.33 metres (24ft) – 13cm (five inches) bigger than the previous title holder – clinching its status as the UK’s largest horse chestnut tree on the National Tree Register. The Hughenden tree stands in 275 hectares (680 acres) of parkland on the estate.

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Court considers forestry worker death

Radio New Zealand News
November 29, 2014
Category: Forestry
Region: International

A coroner’s court has been told a very experienced forestry worker failed to follow safety instructions right before he died. David Beamsley, who was 63, died a year ago in Kaingaroa Forest in the Bay of Plenty after the top of a tree fell on him. His inquest is one of eight in an industry wide inquiry being held by Coroner Wallace Bain. Worksafe Health and Safety Inspector Dipak Makan said Mr Beamsley failed to call for help after using a particular tree felling technique too many times.

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‘Forest patrols doubled to prevent illegal logging’

The Jordan Times
November 30, 2014
Category: Forestry
Region: International

AMMAN — The Agriculture Ministry has doubled the number of its forest patrols to prevent illegal logging, which increases with the onset of winter, a government official said on Sunday. The forestry department and the Rangers are carrying out intensive campaigns in areas with dense green cover to prevent illegal logging, Agriculture Ministry Spokesperson Nimer Haddadin told The Jordan Times. “Since the cold weather started, the ministry and the Rangers increased the number of inspection patrols in forests and also stationed several patrols at entrances and exits of forest areas to apprehend perpetrators,”

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Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy

Oregon proposes tax credit rollback for biomass

Oregon Public Broadcasting
November 30, 2014
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: United States, US West

The Oregon Department of Energy is proposing a change that would reduce tax incentives for biomass facilities. Matt Krumenauer, a senior policy analyst with the agency, said the tax program was intended to offset the costs of producing, collecting and transporting biomass. “We’ve analyzed the program and found that those costs for animal manure are much less than similar production or collection costs for other types of biomass,” he said. Krumenauer said the tax credit provides incentives that are sometimes 10-times higher for animal manure than for other types of biomass, such as wood.

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General

Burned, toppled Tok timber up for sale, but getting to it is a challenge

Alaska Dispatch News
November 30, 2014
Category: Uncategorised
Region: United States, US West

In the course of two years, a natural apocalypse descended on the spruce forests near Tok. First, the Eagle Trail Fire blazed through in 2010, scorching 18,000 acres in just a few days.Then, hurricane-force winds of a freakishly strong storm in September 2012 blew down more trees, many already so weakened by the fire they toppled like dominoes. Now, the Alaska Division of Forestry is offering a large salvage timber sale on state land 8 to 20 miles from Tok, covering about 5,800 acres. The agency earlier this month issued a preliminary best-interest finding for several sales totaling 10.7 million board feet of timber — all of it burned in the fire and blown down in the storm.

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Canada’s unfinished business with First Nations is an economic failure

December 1, 2014
Category: Uncategorised

Ferguson’s acerbic quote also summarizes the great unfinished business of Canada which is to reconcile the rights and create a role for the country’s 614 First Nations and their 700,000 members. The failure to have done this after centuries not only impedes national economic development, but is at the root of much of the misery and squalor on and off reserves. The United States did not make deals, but conquered its Native Americans and, under international law, has only been required to compensate them. But here, Britain signed sovereign deals with aboriginals, catapulting them under international law to the rights and privileges of nation-states.

Read More

A 300-year-old horse chestnut tree named UK’s largest

December 1, 2014
Category: Uncategorised

A 300-year-old horse chestnut tree in the grounds of the country estate where prime minister Benjamin Disraeli lived has been declared the largest in the country. The veteran tree on the National Trust’s Hughenden estate in Buckinghamshire has a girth of 7.33 metres (24ft) – 13cm (five inches) bigger than the previous title holder – clinching its status as the UK’s largest horse chestnut tree on the National Tree Register. The Hughenden tree stands in 275 hectares (680 acres) of parkland on the estate.

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