Tree Frog Forestry News

Daily Archives: January 5, 2015

Froggy Foibles

Sydney Festival’s Timber! Beards, flying axes and death-defying acrobatics

SMH.com.au
January 4, 2015
Category: Froggy Foibles
Region: Canada

Beards, flying axes and razor-sharp acrobatics converge in death-defying circus marking the beginning of Sydney Festival. Timber!, by Canadian circus troupe Cirque Alfonse, features axe-juggling, tight-rope walking, whip-cracking and balancing stunts on lumberjack saws. Created deep in a Quebec forest by three generations of a farm-living family, the show is set in a lumber-camp, and uses real axes, knives and saws.

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Business & Politics

Canfor Completes Purchase of Beadles and Balfour Lumber Cos.

Woodworking Network
January 4, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

VANCOUVER – Canfor announced today that, further to its news release issued August 1, 2014, the Company has completed the purchase agreement for the operating assets of Beadles and Balfour Lumber Companies. The transaction includes two sawmills located in Thomasville and Moultrie, Georgia and is structured with 55% being acquired upon completion of the agreement and the balance after a two year period. “The Beadles and Balfour sawmills are strong performing assets located in an area with a high-quality and sustainable supply of fibre,” said Canfor President and CEO Don Kayne. 

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Oil slump causes barrel-load of uncertainty for Canadian economy

TimesColonist
January 4, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

… B.C., which is a net importer of oil, will be one of the biggest provincial winners in a period of low-oil prices, economists say. That’s because a low Canadian buck makes the province’s exports become more competitive in a growing U.S. economy.The cheap loonie also helps B.C.’s forest companies…Rick Jeffery, president of Coast Forest Products Association, says cheaper fuel and lower dollar have the potential to stabilize employment along the coast. After years of downsizing, the coast currently has 12,000-15,000 direct jobs. But the industry would prefer to see strong global demand for wood products than cheap oil and a weak loonie, Jeffery says. “We’re not sitting on the sidelines cheering for a weak currency,” Jeffery says. “We’d like to see a strong U.S. economy and strong global economy that stimulates demand.”

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Resolute to give up forest rights, says Iroquois Falls mayor

Timmins Press
January 4, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada East, Canada

IROQUOIS FALLS – Resolute Forest Products is willing to give up its forest rights in the Iroquois Falls area, says the town’s mayor. The news that Resolute was closing the mill in the small Northern town last month came as a shock to many in the region. The mill, which had been operating for more than a century, was one of the town’s major employers. The final work day for the roughly 180 workers was on Dec. 22. That same day, Iroquois Falls Mayor Michael Shea and Coun. Colin Kennedy headed to Montreal to speak to Resolute. Shea told The Daily Press that the meeting went well and said they have to keep a good relationship with Resolute as they move forward. He added the company appeared open to working with them.

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Solidifying pulp and paper industry key for Granter

The Western Star
December 30, 2014
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada East, Canada

With the volatility of the oil and gas industry, especially, helping another major western Newfoundland industry solidify its future still has immeasurable ramifications. Vaughn Granter, the former parliamentary secretary of Natural Resources and current minister of Fisheries and Aquaculture, believes Corner Brook Pulp and Paper is poised for the long haul with the $110 million loan agreement signed earlier this year. Granter says he was proud to have worked on getting that agreement in place, alongside three ministers for that department throughout negotiations.

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Our View: Meeting in the middle keeps a mill open

The Mail Tribune
January 2, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States, US West

Just when it seems the decades-long feud between environmentalists and the timber industry will never end, a glimmer of light appears through the trees. It was shared concern for the risk of catastrophic wildfire that brought the two sides together in northeastern Oregon. Lawsuits filed by environmental groups had stymied timber sales on the Malheur National Forest and, by 2012, the Malheur Lumber Co. sawmill in John Day was preparing to close for lack of logs. But years of meetings and forest tours organized by a group called Blue Mountain Forest Partners helped build trust between timber executives and conservationists.

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Idled Goshen mill may be sold

The Register-Guard
January 3, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States, US West

An ownership change could be imminent for one of Lane County’s oldest lumber mills. Zip-O-Log Mills Inc., a Eugene-based wood products company, is nearing a deal to buy the 180-acre Cone Lumber mill property in Goshen, according to U.S. Bankruptcy Court documents and state environmental cleanup records. Zip-O-Log has been in business since 1944, producing timber frames, posts and beams out of Douglas fir from its West Sixth Avenue mill. The company has operated a planing mill at the Cone Goshen site since 2006, according to its website.

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John Day mill laying off 2nd shift

Company president Bruce Daucsavage says the main goal now is to keep the main shift going and then work to restore the other jobs.
Blue Mountain Eagle
January 2, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States, US West

JOHN DAY – Ochoco Lumber Co. is laying off the second shift at its Malheur Lumber plant, just six months after the swing crew was hired. Bruce Daucsavage, Ochoco president, cited a lack of logs for the mill as the reason for the decision. He said the supply issues have been building over the past five months, as anticipated log deliveries didn’t materialize. The mill did not receive “the contracted and expected volumes of timber,” Daucsavage said. He called the current situation “beyond disappointing,” but also termed the layoffs temporary. He said Ochoco will work to restore those jobs.

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Lumber company bringing jobs to Jackson County, OH

WOWKTV.com
January 2, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: US East, United States

JACKSON, OH – An estimated 25 to 75 jobs are coming to Jackson, Ohio according to Mayor Randy Heath. Heath told 13News the old Merillat building has been empty since last spring and was recently bought by Sherwood 23 Holdings, LLC. Heath says the business going into the facility is Taylor Lumber Worldwide, Inc., a lumber company out of Scioto County. Taylor Lumber makes wood flooring and and has been in business for 125 years. The mayor says operation should begin in 2015 but no official date has been set.

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Wood, Paper & Green Building

Whitehorse builders vie for energy efficient supremacy

CBC News
January 4, 2015
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: Canada, Canada West

A Whitehorse man who’s hobby is building homes is aiming to build the most energy efficient house in the Yukon… “A few years ago a friend of mine and I built a home that at the time was the most energy efficient home in Whitehorse and then a couple of other friends raised the bar a little bit and so now we’re just trying to nibble away at the last little bits of crumbs of energy wastage in the homes,” he says… A lifelong carpenter, Hanberg says he became interested in energy efficient construction about a decade ago. That culminated in a timber frame house in the Takhini North neighbourhood.

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Forestry

Logging threatens tourism values, kayaking company says

January 5, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

While some British Columbians are busy wringing their hands over oil pipelines and tankers, tourism operators complain that clearcut logging is quietly denuding B.C.’s renowned Inside Passage — in Johnstone Strait and the Discovery Islands, north of Campbell River. The latest battleground is Boat Bay off West Cracroft Island where a commercial kayaking company fears that imminent logging by TimberWest will “change the overall appeal of this world-class ecotourism area.” Breanne Quesnel, owner of Spirit of the West Adventures Ltd., said she fears “very negative consequences for our business as we would be surrounded by clearcuts at our most popular campsite and prime tourism corridor.”

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Editorial: Forestry sets example for the future

Vancouver Sun
January 2, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Given all the talk about LNG, Site C, pipelines and tankers, public attention has largely been diverted from developments in British Columbia’s historic forest industry. But with major projects in the energy sector temporarily in abeyance — awaiting the outcome of lawsuits, regulatory processes and capital investment decisions — forestry is where the action is. Or rather the wood-products laboratory is where the action is. Scientists have been working for years on genetically modified trees that grow faster, resist insect pests and disease and break down more easily to make wood pulp and other products.

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B.C. can realize forests’ potential

Letter by Ray Travers, RFP (Ret.) Ray Travers, RPF (Ret.)
Victoria Times Colonist
January 4, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

It’s encouraging to see the Pulp, Paper and Woodworkers of Canada and Wilderness Committee speaking with one voice. In our large province, a great deal can be accomplished by diverse users seeking common ground. Forests do different things better at different ages and conditions, especially with extended rotations (more than 100 years). For example, young forests change rapidly and are occupied by generalist species such as deer, coyotes and rabbits adapted to these habitats. Old-growth forests are relatively stable, with specialist species such as mountain caribou, marten and spotted owls, which need old forests to survive.

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Bond & Morris Talk LNG & Forestry

250 News
January 3, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Prince George, B.C. – Liquefied natural gas has been a top priority for the provincial government since its campaign for re-election in 2013 and that focus won’t change heading into 2015. …“We remain focused on tourism, forestry, and mining. All of those things but the most pressing issue at the moment is to bring an LNG project to B.C.” … “The central interior’s been hit very hard with the pine beetle epidemic so our AAC (annual allowable cut) went up significantly and now we’re going to see that reduced and that’s going to have an impact on our forest industry.”

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Logging threatens tourism values, kayaking company says

January 5, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

While some British Columbians are busy wringing their hands over oil pipelines and tankers, tourism operators complain that clearcut logging is quietly denuding B.C.’s renowned Inside Passage — in Johnstone Strait and the Discovery Islands, north of Campbell River. The latest battleground is Boat Bay off West Cracroft Island where a commercial kayaking company fears that imminent logging by TimberWest will “change the overall appeal of this world-class ecotourism area.” Breanne Quesnel, owner of Spirit of the West Adventures Ltd., said she fears “very negative consequences for our business as we would be surrounded by clearcuts at our most popular campsite and prime tourism corridor.”

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Stumptown no more

City code finally takes hold to help preserve big trees
Portland Tribune
January 1, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Starting Friday, Portlanders need to think twice before chopping down trees on their property or pruning street trees in their parking strip. A new city tree code that’s been years in the making finally takes effect on Jan. 2. It brings new protections to trees on both public and private property, along with stricter, but easier-to-use regulations — and tough penalties for those who don’t heed them. It takes away a lot of the confusion about what you can do with trees, says Portland landscape contractor Greg Schifsky. “It also sends a message that we treasure our trees.” Schifsky was part of a core group of neighborhood activists who started lobbying the city back in 2005 to 2006 to improve its jumbled tree-cutting regulations.

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Climate Change is Leaving Loggers Stuck in the Mud

Nature World News
January 4, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

You’ve likely heard all about how climate change is impacting our forests, changing how fast they grow, and which species grow fastest. However, new research has revealed that foresters, not just forests, are having to adapt in the wake of these changing climes, and their entire industry might still suffer. A study recently published in the Journal of Environmental Management has revealed that the period that ground remains frozen in northern forests has significantly decreased over the last six decades, shortening harvest seasons and causing difficulty for loggers.”We found a significant decline in the duration of frozen ground over the past 65 years, and at the same time, a significant change in the species being harvested.” Adena Rissman, a forest ecologist at the University of Wisconsin-Madison said in a statement.

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Officials want to spend more on thinning forests

Associated Press
January 4, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

TACOMA, Wash. — Some Washington officials want to spend more money on thinning forests in hopes of preventing another devastating fire season. The state Department of Natural Resources is asking the Legislature to quintuple the amount spent on forest hazard reduction — to $20 million — in the next two years, The News Tribune reported. “We think it’s warranted in light of the fire season we just had,” said state forester Aaron Everett. About $17 million would go toward thinning forests, while the rest would be spent on repl.

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Senator Murkowski’s misdirected priorities

Letter by Rebecca Knight
Juneau Empire
January 5, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

…Her priority was passing the highly unpopular Sealaska bill, as payback to one of the major financial supporters of her reelection campaign, even though without the bill, Sealaska would have received the amount of land it is due. ….What Murkowski now offers as an excuse for her non performance is an unrealistic dream, which is a return to the unsustainable logging of hundreds of millions of board feet of timber per year on the Tongass National Forest. She claims that would be “sustainable,” but clearly it isn’t.

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4fri Thinning Project Makes Substantial Gains

Payson Roundup
January 2, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West


After years of frustrating delay, the U.S. Forest Service this year made solid progress in launching an effort to thin dangerously overgrown forests — at no cost to taxpayers. In a major step forward for the best hope of protecting Northern Arizona communities from wildfire, Good Earth Power AZ, LLC (GEPAZ) has finally signed a lease to build a small-tree lumber mill on a 37-acre parcel in Williams. In addition, the U.S. Forest Service has shifted to a thinning and forest health approach in allocating money for thinning and controlled burns.

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Teanaway Community Forest – A Year in Review

WDNR Blog Ear to the Ground
January 3, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West


Just over a year ago the Washington departments of Natural Resources (DNR) and Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) began an exciting endeavor to jointly manage the state’s first community forest. Since then, we believe we’ve made good progress toward preserving the more than 50,200 acres located in the Teanaway Valley near Cle Elum. In February, our agencies selected a diverse and committed group of advisory committee members to provide input on a management plan for the Teanaway Community Forest. The 20-member group includes representatives from the Yakama Nation, local community, conservation organizations, and several recreation groups.

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Take action to preserve whitebark pine

The Wenatchee World
January 2, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

The sharp scent of fresh-cut pine is a signature of the holidays and reminds us of our deep human connection to conifer trees. Our Eastside Cascade forests are home to four native pines: ponderosa, lodgepole, western white and whitebark. Pines grow signature cones, each containing seeds. Most commonly when ripe, the woody cone scales open and spread apart, exposing a seed surrounded by a papery wing that is easily carried away by the wind. However, whitebark pinecones never open on their own so their large wingless seeds remain encased inside resin-coated thick scales.

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Forest-thinning could help prevent another year of destructive fires, state officials say

Bellingham Herald
January 4, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Ann Stanton credits a state program with saving her home from the worst wildfire in Washington’s history. Despite her property being in the path of the Carlton Complex fire, which scorched about 256,000 acres in Okanogan and Chelan counties last summer, Stanton’s home and the trees around it survived with minimal damage… DNR officials think thinning and restoring more forests on public and private lands throughout the state could help prevent another wildfire season like 2014, which was the most destructive in state history.

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Forest Unlimited’s volunteer tree planting projects seek to heal woodland properties

Press Democrat
January 4, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Nature lovers looking to kick off 2015 with a good deed might consider volunteering next weekend to plant redwood seedlings for Forest Unlimited’s annual reforestation project. The Forestville-based nonprofit organization is dedicated to protecting and enhancing forests and watersheds in Sonoma County. In addition to acting as a sort of watchdog for local logging operations, its members have been organizing tree plantings at select locations around Sonoma County for the past 17 years.

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Forest plan comment deadline looms

Asheville Citizen-Times
January 3, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

The two forests comprise some one million acres of Western North Carolina. The scenery and the recreation they provide is an important part of the mountains’ lure. Few tourists visit to look at tree stumps. Nevertheless, the Forest Service could allow logging on some 700,000 acres. National forests are managed for a number of purposes, including recreation, air and water quality, and habitat management to protect animals and plants. Other possible uses include grazing and mining, which are minimal in Nantahala or Pisgah, and logging. Logging has been a big issue ever since the Forest Service was created a century ago and environmentalists lost their bid to have it placed in the Department of the Interior rather than in Agriculture. Clearly, the fight will continue.

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Private forest owners aging, parcels shrinking

Fosters.com
January 4, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

MONTPELIER, Vt. — The age of forest landowners across the country is increasing and the size of parcels they own is shrinking — and that has state, federal and private experts fearing for the long-term health of millions of acres of American woodlands. The concerns of forestry professionals are more subtle than the typical worries over large-scale development: as the parcels of land get smaller the people who own them might not have the same commitment to the forests as the previous landowners… Brett Butler, the coordinator of the U.S. Forest Service’s National Woodland Survey, says there’s a common misconception that the majority of forest land is owned by the government. 

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Loggers demand access to more land as costs of harvesting timber soar

Wisconsin Public Radio
January 2, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

Fourth-generation logger Max Ericson has been in the industry for more than 50 years, and has made it through both good times and bad. Lately, however, Ericson has been worried. He’s concerned, he says, because demand for wood in Wisconsin has increased, and stumpage prices — the price a land owner or manager charges for the right to harvest wood on their property — have risen to around $25 a cord. When Ericson recently paid to cut trees on a plot of land in Douglas County, it ended up costing him roughly a quarter-million dollars. Like many other Wisconsin loggers, Ericson now says there needs to be more trees available to harvest in order to keep the forest products industry above water.

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Plant-chomping deer having dramatic impact on forest change, study says

La Crosse Tribune
January 2, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

MADISON — The eating habits of the white-tailed deer are changing the look of the northern Wisconsin and Michigan forests, according to a new study. The study, from a research group led by UW-Madison botany professor Donald Waller, says deer account for at least 40 percent of the change seen in the forests over the past half-century or so. The conclusions came from two fronts: comparing 62 sites in northern Wisconsin and Michigan 50 years apart, and comparing the plants both inside and outside 17 fenced “exclosures” meant to keep deer out but to allow smaller creatures in.

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State plans for hemlock protection

Republican Herald
January 4, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: US East

HARRISBURG — An insect with the ungainly name of hemlock woolly adelgid poses a grave threat to the eastern hemlock tree and state forestry officials are mounting an effort to combat it. The state Department of Conservation and Natural Resources is honing a conservation plan to save the eastern hemlock, the official state tree since 1931. It will rely on cooperation from private landowners who own a considerable amount of forest acreage in Pennsylvania… If nothing is done, forestry officials predict most hemlocks in natural settings will die.

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Quarantine to stop pine beetles

Quarantine aims to keep destructive mountain pine beetle out of state
Morning Ag Clips
January 4, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

ST. PAUL, Minn. — Minnesota has imposed to new quarantine aimed at keeping the destructive mountain pine beetle out of the state. The quarantine goes into effect Jan. 1. Minnesota Public Radio News reports the Minnesota Department of Agriculture’s quarantine limits the import of freshly cut pine wood with the bark still on from the 13 states with mountain pine beetle. Although the beetles are about the size of a grain of sand, they have devoured 45 million acres of pine trees in western North America over the past couple of decades. [END]

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Northwest Arkansans Plan To Maintain Forests

NWAOnline.com
January 1, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

The estimated 750,000 people living in Northwest Arkansas by 2040 will need more roads and buildings, and that development will affect the area’s forests and water quality, planning and environmental experts say. “It’s simply a matter of choices,” said Michele Halsell, managing director of the Applied Sustainability Center at the Sam M. Walton College of Business at the University of Arkansas. “We’re at a decision point here in this region and in Northwest Arkansas about the kind of place we want to be in the future.”

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Opportunity missed over forest land sales?

NewsTalkZB
January 3, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: International

Labour’s worried the country is missing an opportunity, as foreign companies buy forest land and send unprocessed wood overseas. Forestry spokesman Stuart Nash says more than 500,000 hectares of forestry have gone to overseas interests since 2012. He says while foreign investment is vital to the growth of the timber processing industry, at the moment only minimal cash is going into processing wood here. “It just seems to me if we are selling all this land to foreigners, what we need to see is some value added in a way over and above that could be added by Kiwis.”

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Pope Francis May Have To Walk on Water to Solve the Nagging Climate Change Problem

Empire States Tribune
January 4, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: International

Another pronouncement from the most popular pope, Pope Francis, will definitely make everyone listen. But despite his popularity, there will always be people on the opposite side of the spectrum. While the speech has still to be made, predictions of entanglement with the conservatives is expected to take center stage in an important meeting in Paris this year. The topic: man’s responsibility for climate change… Pope Francis said that love of money has caused forest denudation, land monopoly, and many other disastrous effects on the ecology, not to mention climate change. He continued that loss of forest cover and disappearing biodiversity is “already showing their devastating effects.”

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Protected areas: biodiversity troves and carbon sinks under one canopy?

Cifor.org
January 4, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: International

BOGOR, Indonesia—When biologists see a forest, they may think of the number of species it could support. When climatologists see a forest, they may think of how much carbon it could store. Rarely, alas, do those points of view meet in a policy context. But recent research conducted in the Kom-Mengamé forest of southern Cameroon shows that the two disciplines should converge on national parks, nature reserves and other protected areas, where they are likely to find both biodiversity and carbon storage in one place. On the scale of the complex, the higher the number of tree species, the higher the environment’s ability to store carbon.

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Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy

The idea ‘caught us all by surprise’: Proposed wood chip project in Prospect aims to employ former Verso Paper workers

Bangor Daily News
January 3, 2015
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: US East, United States

PROSPECT, Maine — Usually, plans for multimillion-dollar investments in small Maine towns are unveiled with fanfare. This one was posted on a bulletin board at a corner store. The letter, posted around Dec. 11 at Maddie’s Place, a pizza and convenience store in Prospect, said both wood and workers were wanted for a major new heat-treated wood chip operation to be built in a former gravel pit near Route 1A. The plan as detailed in the note was ambitious: Logs would come in to Prospect on “enhanced” rail lines from as far away as Millinocket, Jackman, Greenville and Brownville.

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