Tree Frog Forestry News

Daily Archives: January 9, 2015

Business & Politics

Stories to watch in the new year

Prince George Citizen
January 8, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

The Lakeland/Babine coroner`s inquest: Despite repeated calls for an independent inquiry into the 2012 explosions at Burns Lake’s Babine Forest Products and Prince George’s Lakeland Mills, the B.C. Liberal government, including Shirley Bond, the minister responsible for WorkSafeBC and the MLA for Prince George-Valemount, has insisted a coroner’s inquest will be sufficient to determine the whys and wherefores of two of the most signficant workplace accidents to take place in this province in the last decade.

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Interfor enjoys benefits of letting market digest news

Financial Post
January 8, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

About six years back its shares traded at $1.25. Now the situation at Vancouver-based Interfor Corp. – the new name for the former International Forest Products Ltd. – has changed so much that when it announces a US$95 million acquisition, it lets the market assess the transaction before raising equity. And that far-from-the-norm strategy played out this week when the “growth-oriented lumber company,” priced a three million-share offering at $20.10 each. The proceeds will be used to help fund the purchase of four sawmills in two different areas of the U.S. That acquisition is expected to close in the first quarter.

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Canada Welcomes Market Access for Export of Canadian Ash Products to India

Foreign Affairs, Trade and Development Canada
Government of Canada
January 7, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada East, Canada

International Trade Minister Ed Fast, Minister of Natural Resources and Minister for the Federal Economic Development Initiative for Northern Ontario Greg Rickford and Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food Gerry Ritz welcome the opening of India’s market to Canadian ash wood and timber products. Access to the growing Indian market will greatly benefit Canadian ash lumber and wood producers. Indian manufacturers use ash for in-demand products such as flooring, cabinetry, doors and furniture. Canadian scientists played a critical role in addressing market access issues, informing the Indian government of Canadian protocols that allow for safe and responsible movement of Canada’s high-quality, sustainably produced wood products.

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Northern Pulp operating permit renewel up at end of month

Clean the Mill advocate says 5-year permit ‘just buying time until the next election’
CBC News
January 9, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada East, Canada

Northern Pulp will learn the conditions for renewal of its operating permit at the end of the month. The mill is seeking a new five-year operating permit from the province. The mill and the Department of Environment’s ability to regulate emissions that continue to exceed allowable limits have been the subject of much controversy. When the mill’s emissions were last tested in November, the particulate reading at that time was 78 per cent higher than acceptable standards, although the company says there has been a 25 per cent improvement in the levels since then.

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Boise Cascade taps new CEO

Idaho Statesman
January 8, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States, US West

Longtime Boise Cascade executive Tom Corrick will replace retiring CEO Tom Carlile starting March 6, the company announced on Thursday. Corrick climbed the ranks in his 31 years with the company and was promoted to chief operating officer in 2014. Previously, Corrick was senior vice president of the Wood Products Manufacturing division and held other management positions. Carlile became CEO in 2009 and worked for 42 years at Boise Cascade and its predecessor companies. Over the past six years, Carlile led acquisitions and invested in its manufacturing and distribution business, the release said.

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Editorial Agenda 2015: Help rural Oregon

The Oregonian
January 7, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States, US West

Ochoco Lumber Co. started the New Year by announcing that it would eliminate a shift at its Malheur Lumber plant in John Day. The announcement, reported Friday by the Blue Mountain Eagle, came just seven months after the rare Eastern Oregon sawmill had added the swing shift and less than two years after it almost closed. The plant’s plight also serves as an apt metaphor for rural Oregon’s struggles. Communities occasionally take a step forward. Then they take a step back. Little changes overall.

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Massive fire severely damages Mosheim business

WBIR
January 7, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: US East, United States

A massive fire severely damaged a business in Mosheim on Wednesday morning. After several hours, about 60 firefighters representing seven fire departments managed to get the fire under control at Appalachian Forest Products at 125 South Spring St., located just off Highway 11 East. The business caught fire after 6 a.m. Wednesday. Officials said fire spread quickly because of all the wood and the building’s contents. The fire was so large it could be seen from several miles away. Crews said battling the fire in the bitter cold temperatures was difficult, but no one was hurt. The fire, however, severely damaged the front of the property.

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Higher log exports to boost Ta Ann’s prospects this year

Borneo Post
January 9, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: International

KUCHING: Higher log exports and stable demand for plywood are expected to enhance the prospects of Ta Ann Holdings Bhd (Ta Ann) this year. Besides, Ta Ann’s financial performance this year will also be supported by improving contribution from its plantation earnings attributed to rising matured plantation areas, higher fresh fruit bunch (FFB) and crude palm oil (CPO) production. Affin Hwang Investment Bank Bhd (Affin Hwang Capital) in a report said a rise in matured plantation areas has increased Ta Ann’s FFB production while strong demand for logs and improved log production have increased its exports.

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December log exports the largest of the year

Gisborne Herald
January 9, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: International

DECEMBER was a great month for Eastland Port with total export-import volumes of 221,778 tonnes and the biggest monthly log tally this financial year, says port services manager Deane Craw. The tonnage total was made up of 219,521 tonnes of export logs, 1457 tonnes of plywood from Juken New Zealand, and 800 tonnes of fertiliser discharged here. “The log volumes were the largest for any month this financial year,” Mr Craw says. “It was a great month. “It’s above forecast and budget and is not altogether unexpected as there is often a pre-Christmas flush of logs.”

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Two large-scale pulp and paper mills to be built in Russia in 2015-2016

Pulp and Paper News
January 9, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: International

The authorities of Vologda region, one of the largest regions in the Northwest of Russia, has officially confirmed that a new pulp paper mill, which is built by the Russian Sveza company will be established on the Rybinsk Reservoir, close to Cherepovets, a city in the west of Vologda Oblast, located on the banks of the Sheksna River, a tributary of the Volga River. It is planned that the volume of investments in the project will reach US$2 billion, of which about US$500 million will be provided by Russian banks in the form of loans.

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Wood, Paper & Green Building

Can Taller Buildings Make Toronto More Affordable?

NextCity.org
January 8, 2015
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: Canada East, Canada

A two-story-high change in Ontario’s building code could help to increase density and ease affordable housing strains in the city of Toronto. As of January 1st, developers can now construct wood-frame buildings up to six stories; the previous height limit was four stories. The booming Canadian city has been struggling to integrate its dual needs of housing and transit, and this change could certainly help with the first. In 2010, the planning department put forth its Avenues and Mid-Rise Buildings Plan, which called for the development of five- to 10-story multi-use buildings along arterial streets.

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$60 Million Forest Science Complex Underway for OSU Campus

Woodworking Network
January 8, 2015
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: United States, US West

PORTLAND, OR – An initiative is underway at Oregon State University to build a $60 million complex to supports its forestry education programs and advanced wood products research. OSU said the Oregon Forest Science Complex will “showcase innovative uses of wood in building design; and allow the College of Forestry to help meet the world’s growing demand for energy efficient, tall buildings made from sustainable building products.” The complex will also feature a 25,000-square-foot Advanced Wood Products Laboratory, with computer controlled and robotic manufacturing systems, plus a pilot plant.

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Forestry

Carihi forestry class gets new wheels

Campbell River Mirror
January 8, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

The Carihi Forestry class now has transportation to get in and out of the woods thanks to the Campbell River Forest Education Association. The Forest Education Association purchased the 24 passenger bus through a donation by the Truck Loggers Association. Logo space on the bus was offered to local companies and associations connected to forestry through a sponsorship donation. As many as 20 different groups contributed, showing their support for forest education: Truck Loggers Association, Blue Thunder Contracting, Interfor, Western Forest Products, Strategic, Holbrook Dyson Logging, TimberWest, Probyn, Boyley Auto Body, Finning, Carmac Diesel, the Association of BC Forest Professionals, Capacity Forest Management, Bailey Western Star, Dyer Logging, Wahkash Contracting, MNP Accounting, Campbell River Auto Center, and Newcastle Timber

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No hidden agendas, says Craigan

Coast Reporter
January 8, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

The area between Roberts Creek and Pender Harbour could be ground zero for the political fallout from last summer’s Supreme Court of Canada decision recognizing Aboriginal title to Crown lands in Chilcotin country.  That’s because it lies within Sechelt Nation traditional territory, and according to Chief Calvin Craigan, Sechelt is positioned to be the first Indian band in B.C. to ink a new deal with the province in the wake of the high court’s landmark ruling. …Last fall, the Sechelt announced they would protect the lower slopes of Mount Elphinstone within their territory from industrial development. Although the province initially said BC Timber Sales would continue with its harvesting plans in the area, Craigan said there was a subsequent meeting and the province is now “working collaboratively with us to find other systems that would protect Elphinstone.”

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Morris to Examine Wildlife Habitat

250 News
January 9, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Prince George, B.C.- Prince George-Mackenzie MLA Mike Morris has a new project. In what may be a case of ‘be careful what you wish for’, Morris has been given the task of looking into how the resource sector is honouring various statutes and policies as they apply to wildlife habitat. Morris, who has long been a hunter and a trapper, says his interest was first sparked as he watched the forests turn red, then gray in the wake of the Mountain Pine Beetle “I don’t think a lot of people understand the magnitude of the natural disaster associated with the Mountain Pine Beetle and the impact it has had on wildlife habitat.” He has been expressing his concerns to the Ministry of the Environment since he was elected to office.

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Science and logic: not the same

Letter by Janet Oxley
Coast Reporter
January 8, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

In response to the letter, “ELF: stick to scientific logic” (Coast Reporter, Dec. 19), the points David Kipling makes beg these questions: Science and logic are not the same thing. Science strives to reveal facts or knowledge through empirical research and requires that the results be tested and reproduced. Modern science acknowledges its own evolution, and logic is by no means absolute either. It is a human cultural construct. Still, it’s easy to see what he’s trying to get at. However, the leap from his examples of “scientific logic” to refute ELF’s claim that “clear-cut logging destroys biodiversity” is preposterous. The most obvious flaw in his argument is that the ecosystems he mentions didn’t evolve overnight. They took many decades to evolve.

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Wilderness Committee lobbies for more logging (radio)

CBC Radio
January 11, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

British Columbia’s so-called “War in the Woods” was a high-profile protest against logging, and helped to define the environmental movement in Canada in the 1990’s. In recent years, however, the province’s green protests have focused primarily on oil and gas projects, like the construction or expansion of pipelines like the Northern Gateway or the Trans Mountain. As 2015 begins, the Wilderness Committee is asking the province of B.C. to think once more about its trees—specifically, about cutting more of them down.

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Congress tries again to fix wildfire budgeting

by Rob Chaney
The Missoulian
January 8, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States

Congress is taking another stab at fixing how to pay for forest fires. After failing last year to pass a measure allowing the U.S. Forest Service to fund wildfire defense the same way the federal government pays for other natural disasters, U.S. Reps. Mike Simpson, R-Idaho, and Kurt Schrader, D-Oregon, have introduced a new version of the Wildfire Disaster Funding Act. The move would end the Forest Service’s practice of “fire borrowing,” in which it diverts annual budget money from regular activities to pay for firefighting.

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Plum Creek’s Timber Sustainability Challenged by Watchdog Group

Woodworking Network
January 8, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

OREGON – Plum Creek’s logging practices are under fire by the Center for Sustainable Economy for what it claims is a “pattern of willful non-compliance with the law and clearcuts that have left extensive resource damage on the ground.” The Portland, OR-based watchdog group has filed a complaint with the Sustainable Forestry Initiative challenging the SFI certification granted to Plum Creek’s operations in Oregon. One of the largest private landowners, Plum Creek owns approximately 6.8 million acres of timberlands throughout the United States.

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Timber group updates green label forestry standards

Associated Press
January 8, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

GRANTS PASS, Ore. An organization that certifies lumber and paper products as environmentally sustainable has upgraded its standards, but critics say the Sustainable Forestry Initiative standards and enforcement remain weak. SFI President and CEO Kathy Abusow says the upgrade released Wednesday came out of a regular five-year reassessment, and tightens standards on clearing large areas of forest, damaging wetlands, and using pesticides.

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Forest Service closing Whitehall office, moving to smaller quarters

Helena Independent Record
January 8, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

The Forest Service’s Jefferson Ranger District office in Whitehall is closing Jan. 30 because of budget cuts. Three full-time employees will be moved into smaller quarters on Legion Street in downtown Whitehall. No one is losing their jobs, said Forest Service spokeswoman Leona Roderick, but others who work in that building will be transferred to the Butte district office. District Ranger Dave Sabo blamed federal budgets cuts for the closure. “For this reason the BDNF has made a decision to no longer operate the office in Whitehall,” said Sabo, who is located in Butte.

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Deputies find logger’s body

Coquille Valley Courant
January 8, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

POWERS — Coos County Sheriff’s Office deputies found a man who appeared to have died of natural causes on Jan. 5. John M. Martin, 55, of Coquille, was found dead in Eden Valley near Powers according to a press release from the sheriff’s office. Deputies found the body at about 4 p.m. about 200 yards down into the logging unit. According to the press statement, coworkers found the body at about 2:30 that day when he did not arrive at the crummy.

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DNR proposes salvage logging in 1,285 acres of Carlton Complex Fire’s burn area

Methow Valley News
January 8, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

In light of severe erosion and landslides after thunderstorms last summer, conservation organizations have raised questions about plans to log dead trees in areas burned by the Carlton Complex Fire. The Methow Valley Citizens Council (MVCC) and Conservation Northwest have asked the state Department of Natural Resources (DNR) to re-evaluate its conclusion that a proposed salvage logging project would not increase the potential for slope failures and erosion.

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Environmentalists, Portland-area lawmakers take aim at timber industry in 2015 legislative session

The Oregonian
January 9, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

A handful of Portland-area Democrats and environmental groups have their eyes on the 2015 legislative session, where they hope to win timber reforms. Their first goal is putting new limits on aerial spraying of pesticides on forest land near public drinking water. The conservation groups eventually want to increase state authority over cutting, among other things, but officials are throwing their weight for now behind proposals to increase buffer zones between spraying areas and drinking water and to increase the notification requirements for nearby residents.

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Nursery to replenish Waco’s ‘urban forest’ with park trees

Waco Tribune
January 7, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

Trees in Waco’s parks and public spaces have taken a beating in recent years from wind, drought and disease, but a project is afoot to replenish the “urban forest.” The city of Waco is preparing to plant 700 saplings at a new city tree nursery near Waco Regional Airport, with plans to begin transplanting them in about five years. Ultimately, the city nursery could have as many as 7,000 young trees and produce about 500 trees a year, city park Superintendent Burck Tollett said.

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Forest Research Farm Seeks Experimental Forest Designation

WXPR
January 8, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

A U.S. Forest Service research farm near Rhinelander is hoping to join a national network of experimental forests. The Harshaw Forestry Research Farm is a 500-acre parcel in the town of Cassian that’s used for research and development for the Forest Service’s Northern Research Station. Most recently, the land hosted a project called Aspen FACE that looked at how higher levels of carbon dioxide and ozone impact tree health.

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Museum accepts gifts from first state forester’s family

UpMatters.com
January 8, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

The Michigan Historical Museum has accepted a valuable collection of objects belonging to Marcus Schaaf (1879-1959), a leading figure in the development and management of the state’s reforestation program. Former Department of Natural Resources Director Michael Moore facilitated the donation on behalf of Schaaf’s granddaughter, Suzan Schaaf. The artifacts were presented at a special ceremony held in association with the annual meeting of the Michigan Forest Association at Hartwick Pines State Park in November. The son of German immigrants, Schaaf graduated in 1904 from the Biltmore School of Forestry in North Carolina. After working for the U.S. Forest Service in New Mexico, Schaaf was hired in 1910 as the first forester of the Michigan Public Domain Commission.

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Kalimantan community maps forest to thwart timber companies

Mongabay.com
January 8, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: International

The small village of Tumbang Bahanei is inhabited by 139 indigenous families that tend to 2,859 hectares of customary forest, 132 hectares of rice fields, 5,841 hectares of rubber forest, and 43 hectares of forest designated for “indigenous tourism.” In total, this amounts to just over 8,880 hectares. The residents know these numbers precisely, because they have been diligently mapping every corner of their territory in a desperate attempt to prevent it from being snatched up by timber companies.

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Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy

Nova Scotia Power biomass project in Cape Breton raising green concerns

Chronicle Herald
January 9, 2015
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: Canada East, Canada

About 2,790 hectares. That’s a rough estimate of how much woodland will need to be cut annually to feed Nova Scotia Power’s biomass boiler at Point Tupper. “It seems that more of the fears are coming true than the benefits we had envisioned from that facility,” said Kari Easthouse, manager of the Cape Breton Private Land Partnership. Foresters in northern Nova Scotia are warning that the wood being burned at Nova Scotia Power’s new biomass boiler may be green, but the electricity coming out of it isn’t. T… Running at peak capacity, which it is a bit shy of now, it burns 670,000 green tonnes of wood fibre annually to produce 60 megawatts of electricity.

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