Tree Frog Forestry News

Daily Archives: January 26, 2015

Business & Politics

B.C. forestry contractors optimistic about future

Victoria Times Colonist
January 23, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

B.C.’s coastal forest industry may be feeling optimistic after a few years of improving sales and economic conditions, but the organization that represents industry contractors warns there are still major challenges on the horizon. David Elstone, executive director of the Truck Loggers Association, said the overriding theme of this year’s annual convention, which wrapped Friday in Victoria, was the long-term health of the industry and the TLA’s membership. “The health and sustainability of contractors is reflected in the sustainability of the communities in which they work. They are the backbone of those communities,” he said.

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Women denied equal pay and promotions at Castlegar mill: human rights complaint

Canadian Press
January 25, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

CASTLEGAR – The B.C. Human Rights Tribunal will hear a complaint made by a former Castlegar pulp mill employee who says she and other female supervisors were denied equal pay and promotions. Adrienne McKellar said she rose to a senior position as human resources advisor in a job previously held by a man though his title was human resources superintendent. Despite performing identical duties as the man who retired, McKellar said she was paid $35,000 less per year at the mill operated by Zellstoff Celgar Ltd. McKellar said she complained to her supervisor and to the mill’s parent company, Mercer International Inc., which agreed to launch an investigation.

Celgar mill discrimination claim by Castlegar woman to be heard in BC from CBC News
Tribunal set to hear complaint from former Celgar employee from The Castlegar News

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BC Conservative Leader Talks Natural Resource Development

250 News
January 24, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

Prince George, B.C. – BC Conservative leader Dan Brooks will be in Prince George tonight to speak about natural resources and development. The Vanderhoof native says it’s been timed to follow-up on the Premier’s Natural Resource Forum this week. “There’s a desperate problem in the way our natural resources are managed here in British Columbia. As northerners we understand this is the primary driver of our economy and when those resources are mismanaged it has a huge economic impact on us.” He says the premier’s preoccupation with LNG development is part of the problem.

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The Government of Québec retains the services of Me Lucien Bouchard to act as mediator in the Resolute Forest Products forest certification file in Lac-Saint-Jean

Canada Newswire press release
January 23, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada East, Canada

The Government of Québec announces that it is retaining the services of Me Lucien Bouchard to act as mediator for issues raised within the context of Resolute Forest Products’ forestry certification in Lac-Saint-Jean. As such, Me Bouchard’s mandate is to propose solutions to resolve issues arising from the Baril-Moses letter, signed by the Crees and the Government of Québec in 2002. These solutions shall also take into account the needs of the Innu community of Mashteuiatsh (signatory of the Agreement-in-Principle of General Nature – 2004 and member of Regroupement Petapan).

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Newsprint makers brace for less production, more job cuts as demand slips

Canadian Press
January 23, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada East, Canada

MONTREAL — North American newsprint manufacturers will continue to pare production and jobs in 2015, mainly as they complete cuts announced last year, according to industry officials and observers. After this year’s reduction of about 350,000 tonnes, capacity will have been cut by almost 700,000 tonnes in Canada over the past 13 months and by about 550,000 tonnes in the United States. An analyst with forest products trade publication RISI said he doesn’t foresee large additional capacity cuts in 2015 beyond what has been announced.

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Ex-Nackawic mill parent company CEO admits hiding $8.4M from IRS

George Landegger pleaded guilty in U.S. to failing to declare funds held in secret Swiss bank accounts
CBC News
January 25, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada East, Canada

The head of the company that used to own the St. Anne-Nackawic mill has admitted to hiding more than $8.4 million in secret Swiss bank accounts. George Landegger, 77, CEO and chairman of the international pulp mill company Parsons & Whittemore, pleaded guilty last week in Manhattan federal court to wilfully failing to file reports of foreign bank and financial accounts with the IRS. Landegger maintained undeclared accounts at a private bank headquartered in Zurich from at least the early 2000s, up until 2010, and attempted to conceal his ownership through a sham trust named Onicuppac, which is cappuccino spelled backwards, the court heard.

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With state putting in $400,000 Springfield mill to rebuild

Associated Press
January 23, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States, US West

SPRINGFIELD, Ore.  — Steve Swanson, the president and chief executive officer of Swanson Group Inc., picked up his ringing phone the day after a massive fire destroyed his company’s plywood and veneer mill in Springfield. On the other end was Gov. John Kitzhaber, offering his help. On Thursday, more than six months after the July 17 fire, Kitzhaber and state and local officials made good on that pledge, announcing an offer of a forgivable loan of up to $400,000, tax breaks and other assistance to help the company rebuild at its South F Street location and hire 190 workers.

State offers $400k to help rebuild mill destroyed by fire from KVAL.com
Swanson mill gets boost to rebuild from the Register-Guard
Swanson Group Plans to Rebuild Plywood Mill by Mid 2016 from KLCC.org

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Layoffs At Weyerhaeuser Could Start Next Week

Oregon Public Broadcasting
January 23, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States, US West

Temporary layoffs at Washington-based Weyerhaeuser could start next week. According to union officials, the timber company plans to lay off workers at one of its four Longview mills. More than 500 people work there. The company declined to comment, but earlier this month a spokesperson for Weyerhaeuser said layoffs were coming. He blamed the labor dispute at West Coast ports. The International Longshore and Warehouse Union and the Pacific Maritime Association are negotiating a new contract. Both sides have blamed one another for shipping delays at the ports.

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Union: Potentially short-term Weyerhaeuser layoffs to begin Tuesday

TDN.com
January 25, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States, US West

Weyerhaeuser Co. will start laying off about 160 liquid packaging workers Tuesday, but everyone may be back on the job within a few weeks, the Association of Western Pulp and Paperworkers said Thursday. Company officials told the union of its plans this week. The extruders, which are used to make laminate paper packaging, will be down from Tuesday through Feb. 9. The paper machine and lab will be down from Jan. 31 through Feb. 11, according to a letter to AWPPW members from Local 633 secretary Lowell Lovgren.

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Madison mill’s temporary layoffs set to begin

Associated Press
January 24, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: US East, United States

MADISON — A Maine paper mill is set to begin a temporary layoff of many of its employees as it cuts production. Company officials say Madison Paper Industries will close from Saturday until about Feb. 9. The company employs about 220 people and company representatives have declined to say exactly how many will be out of work. Madison President Russ Drechsel says market conditions and increased energy costs necessitate the cut in production. He also says the mill has struggled since the government of Nova Scotia provided more than $125 million in subsidies to restart a Canadian paper mill in Port Hawkesbury. Maine lawmakers are calling for the federal government to investigate the subsidies.

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Madison mill shutdown critics focus on Port Hawkesbury subsidies

Central Maine
January 24, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: US East, United States

One industry expert says criticism of government assistance for Canadian mill belies the real issues: a decline in the demand for paper and a difference in government priorities. With more than 100 employees now temporarily laid off at Madison Paper Industries, mill officials point to a rival mill in Canada they say is flooding the market with cheaper paper sold at a price bolstered by “unfair” subsidies from the provincial government of Nova Scotia. But some industry experts say the criticism of government assistance belies the real issues: a decline in the demand for paper and a difference in government priorities.

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Wood, Paper & Green Building

Art school moving into WIDC

Prince George Citizen
January 23, 2015
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: Canada, Canada West

The Wood Innovation and Design Centre filled its last available rooms Friday. Famed creative thinking school Emily Carr University of Art + Design announced it was moving to Prince George with a set of programs specifically invented to dovetail with the UNBC wood engineering endeavors already happening there. “There are few institutions that carry the reputation of Emily Carr,” said Shirley Bond, Minister of Labour, Jobs, Tourism and Skills Training during the introduction ceremonies held at the WIDC building. “Many of you will think of the art side, but Emily Carr is also the home of excellent applied research.”

Emily Carr brings art to the Wood Innovation and Design Centre in Prince George from the Vancouver Sun

Press Release from BC Government

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Someone has finally realized the 20,000 trees Toronto cut down last year could have a better fate than mulch

National Post
January 24, 2015
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: Canada East, Canada

… This month, for the first time in perhaps a century, a sawmill once again started up in city limits to mill Toronto trees into lumber, at the City of Toronto Nashdene Public Works yard, near Finch Avenue East and Markham Road in the far northeast reaches of Scarborough. Hills of felled ash logs cover this yard. Peel off their bark and you see why: fine squiggles cover the wood, tracks from the emerald ash borer, an invasive insect devastating our ash trees. Crews contracted by the city cut down 20,000 city trees last year, including 13,000 ash trees. Once the logs get here, contractors grind them into woodchips, which costs $8 a tonne… Surely this is madness. Trees are a resource. And now someone has figured that out.

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Saint John man’s reclaimed wood business a success

CBC News
January 24, 2015
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: Canada East, Canada

A Saint John man has started an online business of making furniture and decor out of reclaimed wood from old buildings and barns. Mike Cosman’s business, East Coast Rustic, makes everything from shelves, wall art, headboards to coffee tables. …The feedback has been impressive. “Everybody loves it. They love the craftsmanship, the uniqueness. They like the story. You’re not just going to a furniture store and buying a piece where you don’t know where it was made,” said Rob. Now 63-years-old and semi-retired, Cosman hopes East Coast Rustic will grow, and keep him busy for the years to come.

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Smackdown furniture design: New sport? Naw, new TV show

Oregon Live
January 23, 2015
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: United States

Singers have TV competition shows. So do chefs. Furniture designers, it’s your turn. “Framework,” Spike TV’s new competitive furniture design series, has builders facing a challenge each week to try to win a $100,000 grand prize. The series airs at 10 p.m. on Tuesdays on Spike TV. Curtis Rew, a carpenter and furniture builder in Spokane, Wash., successfully made it through Week Three’s test on adaptability. Each competitor was assigned a material to make into a finished piece of furniture. …He is also the lead carpenter on a full restoration of a 120-year-old building in downtown Spokane and teaches furniture building on the weekends at a woodworking shop.

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P&Z chairman: Large housing projects may pose dangers in Westport

Westport News
January 24, 2015
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: US East, United States

Avoiding direct comment on two controversial multi-unit housing plans in town, Planning and Zoning Commission Chairman Chip Stephens warned the community about potential dangers he said are posed by large residential structures, citing as evidence the inferno that destroyed an apartment complex in northern New Jersey this week. …”These type of buildings — light wood construction, heated with gas,” he said, are vulnerable to fires. Noting that developers contend that such buildings are designed to get residents out safely in the event of fire — and, that in New Jersey, there were no injuries — Stephens said “the sprinklers wouldn’t help, they didn’t help.”

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Forestry

Kalesnikoff Lumber shares forestry information about Duhamel Creek

Nelson Star
January 23, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

The North Shore Hall was filled with approximately 100 people as Kalesnikoff Lumber Company held a public meeting on Wednesday evening to share information regarding their forest management within the Duhamel Creek watershed. Tyler Hodgkinson, a register professional forester and woodlands manager for Kalesnikoff, led the meeting and presented a historical review of previous logging up to the present day in the Duhamel Creek drainage to which the company now holds the license to log. The meeting was an information session, said Hodgkinson. “It’s not to debate whether we should be logging in a watershed,” he said, adding that the government made that decision already. “I want people to know we’re not a bunch of barbarians, we are professionals.”

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Wanted: 200 new forest wildfire firefighters this summer in B.C. (radio)

B.C.’s Wildfire Management Branch says applicants should be fit, motivated and willing to travel
CBC News
January 23, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

B.C.’s Wildfire Management Branch is looking for new firefighters to travel the province this summer putting out forest wildfires. The province employs more than 1000 firefighters each summer, and with a turnover rate of about 20 per cent, it is looking for around 200 new recruits. Chief Fire Information Officer Kevin Skrepnek told Daybreak Kamloops’ Shelley Joyce what the branch is looking for in new hires.

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Why our water is too turbid to drink

Letter to the Editor
Comox Valley Record
January 31, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Bravo to City of Courtenay CAO David Allen for taking it upon himself and his staff to go take a look for themselves as to what may have caused the recent catastrophic flood and what exactly was contributing to our ongoing water turbidity. In essence, as they soon discovered, it leads back to all the drainages flowing into Comox Lake that have been stripped bare of timber allowing for massive sediment and mud flows into the lake, the source of our community’s drinking water. Still, how is it that the forest lands above us have been allowed to undergo full bore liquidation over the past 18 years; especially throughout TimberWest’s Oyster River Division, the old Comox Logging and Railway Co. claim? Well, in essence, it has been a perfect storm of two incredibly toxic public policies; one provincial and one federal.

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Wolf cull is the provincial government’s fault

Letter from Ross Peterson
Parksville Qualicum Beach News
January 22, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Wolves are not to blame for B.C.’s caribou crisis, yet they are about to be killed in an attempt to keep the caribou from disappearing from our landscape. Once again, the province has found a convenient scape-goat to deflect blame away from the real cause of the problem — long term mismanagement of B.C.’s lands and forests. Government biologists have been warning politicians for years that forestry practices, roads, recreational uses and other intrusions into caribou habitat would eventually result in this situation; but not surprisingly, there were higher priorities of government that took precedence. So, it has come to this.

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Bridge project threatens old growth forest, critics say

Edmonton Journal
January 25, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

EDMONTON – It’s potatoes versus refineries — a shortcut for wide loads on their way to Fort McMurray versus one of the last remaining old growth forests in Edmonton. A development plan for the second neighbourhood in Horse Hill is going before city council Monday. Landowners worry than if it passes unchanged, one more option for moving a proposed heavy haul bridge connection to Highway 63 south of Fort Saskatchewan will have disappeared. They’re getting boxed in. The proposed road is slated to run through Doug Visser’s land — 93 hectares used for a market garden, a community garden for new Canadians and Edmonton’s homeless, and an old growth forest used by First Nations elders working with aboriginal youth.

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Logging in watershed is inviting disaster

Letter by Keith Bruner
Alberni Valley Times
January 26, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Port Alberni – Re: “Council votes 6-1 against request to halt logging,” (Alberni Valley Times, Jan. 15) Shame on council, and kudos to Chris Alemany. Allowing logging in the watershed is inviting disaster. It is similar to installing an outhouse beside your well. I sure would not do that and I believe most people would not. It is funny I do not hear anybody talking about the oxygen that these old growth trees put into our air and the filtering of carbons done by those trees. It seems to me that this Island Timberlands company is a bit arrogant, which is proven by their non-compliance in the requests from the city to halt logging.

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Column: Wolf cull raises questions

Chilliwack Progress
January 23, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Yes, evidence points to wolf predation on these endangered herds. They are predators. That’s what they do. But habitat fragmentation and multi-use by industry (logging and road-building) and recreation (snowmobiling and backcountry ski-ing) have also contributed to stresses on the vulnerable herds. Now the Ministry of Forestry, Lands, and Natural Resource Operations plans to shoot 120 to 160 wolves from a helicopter in the South Peace and 24 wolves in the South Selkirk regions before snow melt. The humane optics have many people cringing. But do culls actually work?

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Illegal tree cutting in Vancouver nothing new

A look at nearly a decade of fights over trees
CBC News
January 22, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Vancouver police and park board are investigating after 17 maple trees were chopped down along Cambie St. and West 29 Ave. earlier this month. And it’s not the first time trees have been mysteriously damaged or removed in the city. When several large trees were cut down on a Point Grey lot in May 2014, neighbours lamented that local eagles had now lost their place to roost. A year earlier, in May 2013, a trio of men were accused of chopping down nearly three dozen trees in an effort to improve the view from a North Vancouver home. And technology caused problems for three people in Jan. 2010, when they appeared to be caught in the act by Google and one of its Street View cameras.

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Photographing the Ancient Forest

Prince George Citizen
January 23, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Prof. Darwyn Coxson likened the array of Ancient Forest-inspired photographs to forgotten family photographs, pulled from the dust. “Let’s shine them up and put them in the front hallway and put a light on them and let the world know about it,” said Coxson of the the rare inland rainforest images that now line a hallway at the University of Northern B.C.’s Rotunda Gallery. Rare plant species, students strung high in branches and the massive ancient red cedars that make the trail unique – all photographed by him and Nowell Senior of the Caledonia Ramblers, a group that has advocated for making the trail a world heritage site.

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READER’S CORNER: Nova Scotia Power’s boiler spoils forests

Chronicle Herald
January 23, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

Congratulations on your excellent Jan. 9 article, “NSP biomass project raising green concerns.” In the interest of adding fuel to the fire, I’d like to point out that the 2,790 hectares that will be cut each and every year to feed the biomass boiler at Point Tupper translates into 6,894 acres for us old guys, which is 10.77 square miles, or all the forest in a three-and-one-quarter mile by three-and-one-quarter mile square. I say “all the forest” because, contrary to the Department of Natural Resources’ statements, Nova Scotia still clearcuts as an industrial forestry method. DNR changed the definition of clear-cutting to make it look as if things were changing, but an aerial view of Nova Scotia illustrates that nothing has changed in this regard.

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Charlottetown to cut down half of city’s elm trees

Cost of cutting down the trees will be about $500,000
CBC News
January 23, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

Charlottetown city council voted Friday to cut down more than half of the city’s elm trees to stop the spread of Dutch elm disease. “These are all diseased trees and they are dying anyway,” said city councillor Kevin Ramsay. He says if the affected trees aren’t cut down, they will die in two three years. The city also says it’s a matter of safety because dead or diseased trees are more likely to come down during a storm. The cost of cutting down the more than 300 trees will be about $500,000. The money will come from the 2015 capital budget.

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Environmental group explains timber-project challenge: Guest opinion

The Oregonian
January 24, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

The Snow Basin timber project, …involves 44 square miles just south of the Eagle Cap Wilderness in the Wallowa Mountains of northeast Oregon. … Hells Canyon Preservation Council (HCPC) was involved with the project from the beginning. We supported much of it, including the removal of small and mid-sized trees that proliferated during decades of fire suppression. We believe careful restorative logging, when based in good science, can be a valuable forest management tool. We cannot, however, support logging of rare multistory old-growth forest habitat. Less than 3 percent of northeast Oregon’s historic old-growth forest remains; every bit is precious.

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Century old law returns to fund forest communities

January 26, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Alaska’s already tight budget is set to get a little snugger for some communities dependent on national forests. At the end of last year, Congress failed to renew Secure Rural Schools funding, which had provided states and territories roughly $330 million annually. SRS funding was intended to offset the lack of funds received by communities dependent on income from national forests. According the Forest Service, between 80-85 percent of the SRS money each community received was used to help fund rural schools and roads, while the remaining money could be used toward special projects on federal land and county funds.

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Sportsmen’s group has ties to ‘fringe environmentalists’

Letter by Will Coggin
The Missoulian
January 26, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

The Missoulian recently quoted Land Tawney, executive director of Backcountry Hunters and Anglers, as being concerned about Montana’s economy if the state were to become responsible for managing federal lands. The irony of his concern may have been lost on some Montanans (“State senator leads debate on federal lands in Montana.” Jan. 18). While Backcountry Hunters and Anglers may pose as an authentic voice of Montana sportsmen, it’s actually a camouflaged activist group that gets the majority of its money from a handful of out-of-state liberal foundations.

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Simpson unveils updated Central Idaho wilderness bill

Sen. Risch is working with him on an alternative to having the Boulder-White Clouds declared a national monument.
Idaho Statesman
January 25, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Air Force One had barely taken off from Boise on Wednesday when details about U.S. Rep. Mike Simpson’s new version of a Boulder-White Clouds wilderness bill began leaking out. The revised Central Idaho Economic Development and Recreation Act pleases motorized recreation groups, ranchers and local officials so far. But a coalition of conservation groups, hunters, anglers, outdoor businesses and mountain bikers still would rather have President Barack Obama proclaim a larger piece of the 700,000-acre roadless area a national monument, which offers more flexibility for protecting the range of wildlife, open space and recreation resources they prize in the wilds of Central Idaho.

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California Drought Decimating Most of Older, Larger Trees

Techtimes.com
January 25, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

California’s forests are losing their biggest trees, and researchers say warmer, drier climate is driving a change to forests of smaller trees more susceptible to wildfires. Using historical tree surveys done between 1929 and 1936 and comparing them to similar surveys from 2001 to 2010, researchers determined that large tree density fell everywhere in the state, with declines reaching as much as 50 percent in some areas… What is happening in California could be a harbinger of forest responses to climate change throughout western North America, they say, with large-scale changes resulting from rising temperatures and declining availability of water.

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Panther Passages: Connecting habitat to protect a federally endangered species

Treehugger
January 24, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

The heavily traveled State Road 80 bisects southwest Florida along the edge of Lake Okeechobee and across a fragmented landscape of small towns, ranches, farmland and, more recently, sprawling residential subdivisions. This area once made up a portion of Florida’s historic Everglades, also called the “River of Grass,” which spanned millions of acres between Lake Okeechobee and Florida Bay. Today the Everglades – including its headwaters region that extends north nearly to Orlando – have been whittled down through various land development projects, leaving behind a heavily altered landscape. Changes to the Everglades affect more than eight million people in South Florida, residents that depend on the health of this natural system for their livelihoods. 

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Diver finds amazing 10,000-year-old FOREST hidden under the North Sea

Mail Online
January 25, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: International

A shocked diver has found an incredible 10,000-year-old pre-historic forest under the North Sea and experts believe it could have once stretched as far as Europe. Diver Dawn Watson, 45, discovered the remarkable ‘lost forest’ when she was diving just 300 metres off the coast of Cley next the Sea, Norfolk. She found complete oak trees with branches measuring eight metres long under the sea and experts believe they have been hidden off the coast of Norfolk since the Ice Age. The forest is believed to have become exposed following the stormy weather last winter.

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The Amazon Is Burning

Business Insider
January 24, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: International

“Save the rain forest” is a mantra we’ve all grown up with, and for good reason. …But another, less talked-about issue the rain forest faces, is the threat of wildfires. While fires are a natural part of many forest life cycles, drier years can lead to particularly severe fire seasons that can damage the forests and threaten the wildlife that lives there. Additionally, human activities related to deforestation and logging can also set destructive fires in the rain forest. A stunning data visualization from InfoAmazonia shows where forest fires have occurred in the Amazon rain forest between January 2012 and December 2014 using satellite data collected by NASA.

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NZ forests gain international visibility

Voxy.co.nz
January 25, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: International

With the acceptance of the NZ Forest Certification Association (NZFCA) as New Zealand’s PEFC Member, New Zealand forest growers gain visibility in the world’s leading forest certification system. “We are delighted to be accepted into membership of PEFC and to represent PEFC in New Zealand” says Dr Andrew McEwen, chair of NZFCA. With more than 260 million hectares of certified forests, PEFC (Programme for Endorsement of Forest Certification) is the world’s leading forest certification system, promoting Sustainable Forest Management through independent third party certification. 

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Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy

Make Forests Pay

A Carbon Offset Market for Trees
The New York Times
January 20, 2015
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: United States

IN the last 40 years, more than one billion acres of tropical forests have vanished, equivalent in size to over half of the continental United States. The rate of cutting, burning and clearing shows no signs of abating. Tropical forests store huge amounts of carbon. When their trees are cut or burned, the carbon is eventually released into the atmosphere, mixing with oxygen to form the long-lasting greenhouse gas carbon dioxide. The pace of deforestation is so great today that it accounts for an estimated 12 to 15 percent of global carbon dioxide emissions annually. Economic forces drive this destruction — for timber, rangeland, mining and development. But there is also a powerful economic argument for preservation

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Business leaders support market-based climate action

The Bellingham Herald
January 25, 2015
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: United States, US West

There is a growing consensus among business leaders across the state that addressing climate change needs to be a priority for Washington. Our forests are ravaged by increasingly frequent and severe fires, our waters and fisheries are being harmed by rising ocean acidification and our communities are threatened by increased flooding. Scientists are resolved that these impacts will worsen unless we act. The cause of the problem is carbon emissions from fossil fuels and we need to limit that pollution. Economies focused on clean energy also create new types of revenue for farmers… Expanded markets for biofuel crops and offset payments for soil and forest carbon preservation are exciting prospects opened up in a clean energy economy.

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Green groups question benefits of biomass

Savanah Now.com
January 25, 2015
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: US East, United States

Georgia’s biomass industry is booming, resulting in the shipment of more than a million tons annually of wood pellets to Europe where they’re burned as a greener alternative to coal in power plants. But a nonprofit new to Savannah, the Dogwood Alliance, is raising concerns here that the practice isn’t so environmentally friendly. Utility companies in Europe are expanding their use of biomass — plant matter that can be converted to fuel — despite growing scientific doubts about the practice, Dogwood Alliance organizer Rita Frost told an audience of two dozen mostly young Savannahians at a kick-off meeting Tuesday evening at the Coastal Georgia Center.

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Plans for a biomass power plant in Western Australia’s south west is creating uncertainty amongst growers about the effect on agriculture

ABC News, Australia
January 25, 2015
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: International

Manjimup farmers say they are concerned a planned biomass power plant may taint the region’s ‘clean, green’ agricultural image. The $150 million wood-fired plant has been approved by the Minister for Environment and construction is scheduled to begin within the next four years. The plant is set to be a source of renewable energy, fuelled by 380,000 tonnes of blue gum and pine plantation waste. WA Biomass is the Australian company behind the project.

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