Tree Frog Forestry News

Daily Archives: February 3, 2015

Business & Politics

Hundreds of Port Metro Vancouver truckers losing jobs today

Truckers say port’s new licensing system has cut port access to 600 truckers
CBC News
February 1, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

Hundreds of truckers say they’re without work on Sunday after Port Metro Vancouver granted access to just 68 companies under a new licensing system finalized on Jan. 20. Port Metro Vancouver promised to create a new system after drivers, complaining of long wait times and low rates, conducted a bitter work stoppage for nearly a month last year. On Saturday, hundreds of container truck drivers and their families rallied at Surrey’s Holland Park. Michelle Mann says her husband is a truck driver and she works as a dispatcher. Both have been told they don’t qualify for port access. Mann says their companies were notified of the port’s decision just days ago.

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Burns Lake Able to Accommodate Inquest Says Mayor

250 News
February 2, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

Burns Lake, B.C. – The mayor of Burns Lake says his community of roughly 3,000 people is well positioned to accommodate the recently announced inquest into the Babine Forest Products sawmill explosion this summer. “We do believe we have the accommodation necessary to facilitate those that will be here for the inquest,” says Luke Strimbold. “There’s a least four hotels, there’s also a bed and breakfast and there are other lodging facilities as well.” He adds it’s important to note Burns Lake has hosted other sizeable events before, including last year’s Lake Babine Nation annual general assembly, and the Minerals North Conference in 2012

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Painful trucker cull no guarantee of better port productivity

Not enough attention is being paid to terminal inefficiency issue, says logistics consultant
Business in Vancouver
February 2, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

While drivers, dispatchers and mechanics are reeling from the potential loss of 600 jobs due to Port Metro Vancouver’s new truck licensing system, one supply chain observer is questioning whether the move will improve productivity at Canada’s biggest port. “Last year when they thought they were going to strike, the question was long truck [waiting] times due to the issues at the marine container terminals,” said Darryl Anderson, managing director of Wave Point Consulting, referring to a March 2014 truck strike that stalled Port Metro Vancouver container traffic for a month.

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Tembec : looking to government to resolve dispute with China

4-traders.com
February 2, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada East, Canada

Tembec is requesting that International Trade Minister of Canada,The Honourable Ed Fast, enter into World Trade Organization discussions with China to resolve the trade dispute related to dissolving pulp. China imposed duties on shipments of viscose staple fibre pulp from selected countries including Canada. These duties negatively impact the company’s operations and customers as it relies on market access to China for sale of viscose staple fibre. Rayon viscose, the first manmade natural filament yarn and staple fibre, is used in apparel, domestic textiles, and automotive applications.

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Wood Pellet Opportunities and Risks Abound: Pallet Companies Share Insights to a Successful Program

Pallet Enterprise
February 2, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States

Biomass energy has been “buildng a head of steam” for the last several years, yet to the general public, and perhaps to many in the pallet industry as well, biomass is still an emerging giant. The title of a recent article from National Geographic, The Energy Boom You Haven’t Heard About: Wood Pellets, emphasizes the state of low public awareness about the biomass industry, particularly wood pellets. To be certain, biomass is on the uptick. How it translates into opportunities or threats for the pallet industry, however, remains a work in progress. A small number of wooden pallet companies have ventured into wood pellet production, while other operators have reported increasing their fiber sales into the boiler fuel market.

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Rayonier AM disappoints Wall Street again

Jacksonville Daily Record
February 2, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: US East, United States

Rayonier Advanced Materials Inc.’s quarterly reports have been disappointing Wall Street since it was spun off from Rayonier Inc. seven months ago, and the company did it again last week. The performance fibers company reported fourth-quarter earnings that met analysts’ predictions, but it forecast 2015 earnings below expectations. Rayonier AM’s adjusted earnings of 61 cents a share matched the average forecast of analysts surveyed by Thomson Financial.

Weak demand, environmental costs batter Rayonier Advanced Materials results from Jacksonville Business Journal

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Georgia-Pacific to invest $70 million to upgrade its Palatka pulp mill in Florida

Lesprom
February 2, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: US East, United States

Georgia-Pacific’s Palatka Pulp and Paper Operations will invest approximately $70 million to modernize the evaporation system and related equipment in the mill’s power generation area. This investment brings total current investments at the mill to nearly $100 million to make the mill safer, more efficient and more competitive, as the company said in the press release received by Lesprom Network. The new evaporation system investment is designed to make the mill more energy efficient and reduce water use by more than 30%.

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Universal Forest names furniture exec to board

Grand Rapids Business Journal
February 2, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: US East, United States

Universal Forest Products has named a top furniture executive with a finance background to its board. Universal Forest said last week that Brian Walker, president and CEO of Herman Miller in Zeeland, has been appointed to fill the 10th seat on its board of directors, effective immediately. “Brian’s financial acumen, his global business perspective and his years of strong leadership at Herman Miller provide him with the background and skills we need to lead Universal into the future,” said William Currie, chairman, Universal Forest Products.

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China’s slower growth stalling price recovery for B.C. commodities

Business in Vancouver
February 2, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: International

…China had double-digit gross domestic product growth between 2005 and 2007, and its economy doubled from 2007 and 2013, driving a commodity super-cycle. …China’s growth also helped save B.C. forestry companies, some of which might otherwise have suffered a potentially fatal blow during the financial crisis and collapse of the American housing market in 2009. In just a few short years, China eclipsed Japan to become the second-largest market for B.C. lumber. Fortunately for B.C. producers, wood products are not caught in the same cycle as other commodities such as coal and copper. If anything, a growing scarcity of timber in B.C., thanks to the mountain pine beetle infestation, is expected to buoy lumber prices.

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Wood, Paper & Green Building

Where the wood meets the water

February 3, 2015
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: Canada, Canada West

Bill Weber is no stranger to creating unique spaces — mega mansions, upscale restaurants and glamorous hotel lobbies… Fitzpatrick, former owner and president of Coastal Pacific Forest Products, spent most of his career in the lumber business and had clear-cut ideas about what he and his wife, Cheryle, wanted. Weber, who runs Artwood Design, has been a customer of Fitzpatrick’s for years, so they clicked… He had never designed a stilt house before, although he designed a tree house when he was six — and that’s just how this project felt. “It had that same wonderfulness about it and I thought: ‘Let’s draw a house and see how interesting we can make it inside and out.’ ”

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Government must encourage innovation in housing

Regina Leader Post
February 2, 2015
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: Canada, Canada West

We also need the Government of Saskatchewan to step up and provide a regulatory environment that supports innovation. For example, B.C., Alberta and Ontario are supporting six-storey wood-frame multi-unit housing, a change that allows for mid-rise buildings to be more affordable, while still ensuring a high standard of safety. At the 23rd annual Master Awards Gala, Deveraux Homes was named …Our association is doing what it can to promote our vision of creating an innovative, sustainable and diverse community.

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Where the wood meets the water

February 3, 2015
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: Canada, Canada West

Bill Weber is no stranger to creating unique spaces — mega mansions, upscale restaurants and glamorous hotel lobbies… Fitzpatrick, former owner and president of Coastal Pacific Forest Products, spent most of his career in the lumber business and had clear-cut ideas about what he and his wife, Cheryle, wanted. Weber, who runs Artwood Design, has been a customer of Fitzpatrick’s for years, so they clicked… He had never designed a stilt house before, although he designed a tree house when he was six — and that’s just how this project felt. “It had that same wonderfulness about it and I thought: ‘Let’s draw a house and see how interesting we can make it inside and out.’ ”

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US contractors would consider LEED alternatives

Construction Week Online
February 3, 2015
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: United States

According to a report released by Turner Construction, an increasing number of industry leaders are interested in alternatives to the traditional LEED rating system for sustainable building ratings.  It its 2014 Green Building Market Barometer report, Turner Construction says that interest in other systems, like the Green Globes, EnergyStar and a number of others, had shot up 250 percent in two years. …“The market for green building certification is clearly changing,” said Jerry Yudelson, president of the Green Building Initiative, a nonprofit organisation dedicated to accelerating the adoption of green building practices.

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GLENN CORBETT ON HUGE EDGEWATER (NJ) FIRE

Fire Engineering
February 2, 2015
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: United States, US West

Fire Engineering Technical Editor Glenn Corbett recently wrote an editorial on the massive fire that destroyed the Avalon at Edgewater apartment complex in New Jersey and the dangers posed by lightweight wood-frame construction. “Well over four decades ago, the wood-products industry developed a cost-effective, engineered structural beams, specifically lightweight wood floor and roof trusses,” Corbett wrote. “Under non-fire conditions, these trusses generally have proved to a reliable structural building element. However, under fire conditions, the opposite is true.” Corbett discussed some of the aspects of this type of construction, the dangers of which are known to the firefighting community. 

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Red wood bringing green rebirth to Shore communities

Asbury Park Press
February 2, 2015
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: US East, United States

The reddish-pink wooden frames of the new homes sprouting up along Monmouth Beach, Sea Bright and Rumson look more like something Barbie would live in. However, that pink wood could mean a lot of green for not just local contractors and home owners, but the environment as well. The wood is protected by a chemical treatment called Eco-shield, which is produced by Eco Building Products, which is based in California. “The red is a coloring that is just for marketing,” Frank Dicopoulos, a spokesman for Eco, said while touring one of the homes being made from the wood in Monmouth Beach. “The actual technology is clear.”

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Forestry

Tree species influence boreal forest fire behavior and subsequent effects on climate

Phys.Org
February 2, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, United States

For a better understanding of how forest fires behave and interact with climate, scientists are turning to the trees. A new study out of UC Irvine shows that differences in individual tree species between Eurasia and North America alter the continental patterns of fire – and that blazes burning the hottest actually cool the climate. “High-intensity canopy fires are prevalent in boreal North America, whereas lower-intensity surface fires are common in Eurasia,” said Brendan Rogers, a UCI doctoral student now at Woods Hole Research Center in Massachusetts. “These differences have large-scale implications for fire ecology, climate modeling and forest management. Yet their patterns, consequences and underlying causes were not well understood.”

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Ravaged by pine beetles, fire hazards loom large in B.C. forests

Globe and Mail
February 2, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

When the China Nose fire raced across the Interior Plateau south of Houston and Burns Lake last summer, it was a reminder – not that one was needed – of just how dangerous a forest is after it’s been killed by pine beetles. The insect infestation has spread over 18 million hectares in British Columbia, leaving a dry, fire-prone forest behind. Some of the most intense damage is in the area where the China Nose blaze consumed more than 3,000 hectares, and logging companies in that region are acutely aware of the fire hazard. Or they should be. But when the Forest Practices Board (FPB) sent a team to the Burns Lake area to do a random audit, it got a surprise. Checking the clear-cuts created by a numbered company owned by the Wet’suwet’en First Nation, the team found piles of slash that had been left unattended for years.

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NCC won’t replace most diseased ash trees it cuts until 2018 or later, report says (with video)

Ottawa Citizen
February 1, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

About 90 per cent of the trees the National Capital Commission intends to plant to replace the thousands infected by the emerald ash borer won’t be in the ground until 2018 or later, says a report released to the Citizen — a strategy a local environmental group is calling misguided. …Though the NCC says it will plant a new tree for every ash it cuts down — 14,680 in total, including trees felled under regular maintenance programs, according to the report — relatively few will be planted until all the cutting has ended. In fact, 13,230 of the replacement trees will be planted between 2018-19 and 2021-22. That’s in stark contrast to the City of Ottawa’s approach. As part of its emerald ash borer strategy, the city is planting approximately two trees for every one it removes.

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Sealaska to log parcels on POW Island, Cleveland Peninsula

Myrtle Beach Online
February 2, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

SITKA, ALASKA — The regional Native corporation for southeast Alaska will log 3,400 acres of land this year that it received in December through federal legislation. The federal government turned over a total of 70,000 acres of Tongass National Forest to Sealaska Corp., KCAW-radio reported. Most of acreage is on or near Prince of Wales Island. Older forests make up more than half the acreage. Another third is growing back from previous cuts under Forest Service management. The parcels picked for logging this year are near north Election Creek on Prince of Wales Island and on the Cleveland Peninsula north of Ketchikan. Both are near land previously logged.

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Behind one of the Nature Conservancy’s largest ever forest purchases

Backing a $134m land acquisition is a financial institution which wants to raise money from investors who care about the environment
The Guardian
January 30, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Even for the Nature Conservancy, which attracts more money than any other US environmental nonprofit – revenues were $1.1bn last year – buying 165,000 acres of land in Washington’s Cascade Mountains and Montana’s Blackfoot River Valley for $134m is, quite literally, a very big deal. To raise the money in a timely manner and to negotiate the acquisition, which closed last week, the conservancy relied on NatureVest. Launched last spring, NatureVest is a division of the conservancy that functions much like a bank, albeit a bank whose purpose is to protect nature.

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New Cooperative Stewardship Agreement Between Montana And The U.S. Forest Service (radio)

Montana Public Radio
February 1, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Growing out of forest restoration efforts around Helena, Montana, in 2014, a cooperative stewardship agreement between the state of Montana and the U. S. Forest Service was developed, the first of its kind in the United States. Brian Kahn talks with three agency leaders who helped bring it about: Faye Krueger, Regional Forester for the Northern Region of the U.S. Forest Service; Bill Avey, Supervisor of the Helena and Lewis & Clark National Forests; and Bob Harrington, Montana’s state forester in the Department of Natural Resources and Conservation’s Forestry Division.

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Study: Small trees key to long-term forest survival

Study shows many treatments in western dry forests are misguided
Summit County Citizens Voice
February 2, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

FRISCO — Mid-elevation forests in the western U.S. have survived centuries of drought, wildfires and insect onslaughts by hedging their bets with a diversity of tree sizes, Wyoming researchers said after studying forest plots from the Pacific Northwest down to Arizona and New Mexico. The research showed that the biggest threat to those forests is from insects and not wildfires. Historically abundant small trees enable those forests to rebound after tree-killing bugs move through.

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Can Northwest Forests Be Protected From Future Mega-Fires?

Oregon Public Broadcasting
February 2, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

WINTHROP, Wash. — Snow blankets the landscape in north central Washington. What you can’t see is the scorched earth left from last summer’s Carlton Complex fire. Even through the snow, Susan Prichard, a fire ecologist for the University of Washington, can see the damage. She can also see signs of recovery in the bitterbrush and aspen trees. “Aspen, and cottonwood and willow species are all very fire adapted and disturbance adapted in that they’re sprouters,” Prichard said. “We’ve already seen, even in the fall following the Carlton Complex fire, just amazing sprouting by the aspen in particular.”

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Rocky Barker: Crapo’s collaborative reaps reward in the Clearwater

Idaho Statesman
February 2, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

The debate over whether to protect the Boulder-White Clouds as a national monument or as a wilderness or to keep the existing wilderness study areas has dominated land discussions in Idaho. But a group of conservationists, timber industry representatives, local officials, motorized recreationists and the Nez Perce Tribe have been working quietly for eight years on a wilderness bill for the Clearwater-Nez Perce National Forest. Just like Rep. Mike Simpson and his Central Idaho Economic Development and Recreation Act for the Boulder and White Clouds mountains, the Clearwater Basin Collaborative hasn’t called what it’s working on a wilderness bill.

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Burma puts the brakes on resource exports to China

Business in Vancouver
February 2, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: International

The seemingly endless nose-to-tail line of snorting trucks crossing the border from Burma into the far southwestern Chinese town of Ruili was mesmerizing. Just as transfixing as the volume of trucks was the sameness of their loads. All carried three or four massive hardwood tree trunks, destined for China’s booming furniture-making industry. That was 20 years ago, and the traffic, all technically illegal, has only accelerated since then. …Burma enacted a log export ban in April last year, but this has hardly dented the illegal trade. …Even so, the Burmese authorities appear to be making efforts to end illegal logging.

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Forest workers felling too close

Radio New Zealand News
February 2, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: International


A forestry foreman who felled a tree which killed a 23-year-old worker has told an inquest he wishes he could wind back the clock and change what happened. Robert Epapara, 23, died after he was crushed by a tree in the Waione Forest, near Rotorua, in March 2013. Forestry foreman Major Nelson said in a statement at Mr Epapara’s inquest that the man was his friend and colleague, and he wished he could turn back time. The court has been told there safety breaches in the forest that day, including vague communication between workers and no morning safety meeting.

Family gets text of forest death from Radio New Zealand News

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Safety still key for forestry sector

The forest industry is keeping the focus on safety after reversing the appalling run of deaths and injuries that rocked the industry in 2013.
Radio New Zealand News
February 2, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: International

Ten workers died in forestry accidents that year as logging activity peaked, triggering last year’s Independent Forest Safety Review which made wide ranging recommendations for improving safety standards. Forest Industry Contractors chief executive John Stulen said the review brought with it a huge improvement in the accident and injury rate. “The industry really changed its behaviour and became a lot more aware of safety, each and every day, which resulted in only one death, in January 2014,” he said.

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Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy

Could planting trees help ease carbon budgets?

‘No regrets’ negative emission technologies could allow 11 per cent more emissions by 2050, says new study, but bulk of fossil fuel reserves would still have to stay in ground
BusinessGreen
February 2, 2015
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: International

Planting forests, adding lime to oceans, and improved soil management techniques are among the so-called Negative Emissions Technologies that could help buy the world extra time to tackle climate change. But it would be “foolish” to assume these measures can outweigh the climate impacts associated with continuing to burn fossil fuels, Oxford University researchers have today warned. The latest report from the university’s Stranded Assets Programme details how deploying NETs could save around 120 GtCO2 by 2050, extending by 11 to 13 per cent the nominal global carbon budget required to deliver a 50 to 80 per cent change of limiting average warming to 2C.

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