Tree Frog Forestry News

Daily Archives: February 4, 2015

Froggy Foibles

GIANT TREE SCULPTURE CAST FROM OLD-GROWTH HEMLOCK

Juxtapoz.com
February 3, 2015
Category: Froggy Foibles

Middle Fork – MadArt from John Grade on Vimeo.

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Business & Politics

Crofton mill feeling hit of dropping dollar

Cowichan Valley Citizen
February 4, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

Catalyst is still a major player in North Cowichan’s economic and tax landscape, despite efforts to stop the municipality putting all its eggs in one basket. Rob Belanger, Catalyst manager, spoke to council at its regular January meeting, giving some background and adding some new information to keep councillors – and the big gallery at the meeting – up to date on doings at the company’s Crofton mill and elsewhere. One timely subject Belanger addressed was Canada’s plunging dollar….

He also talked about the demographic of Catalyst’s workforce, calling it “another challenge and an opportunity we face.”

Belanger
explained that the average age of a mill worker in Crofton is around 50
as the baby boomer generation works its way through the mill.

– See
more at:
http://www.cowichanvalleycitizen.com/news/crofton-mill-feeling-hit-of-dropping-dollar-1.1751841#sthash.khtBfWHP.dpuf

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New trucking commissioner tasked with keeping trucks rolling at B.C. port

Canadian Press
February 4, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

VANCOUVER – The union representing container truck drivers at Canada’s largest port claims the person who’s been hired to improve their members’ working conditions is in a “blatant conflict of interest.” B.C.’s Ministry of Transportation Todd Stone announced Tuesday the appointment of Andy Smith as the container trucking commissioner. His appointment comes a week after Port Metro Vancouver announced changes to its licensing system, which excluded some companies that once hauled cargo. … But Gavin McGarrigle, area director for Unifor BC, said Smith is also president and chief executive officer of the BC Maritime Employers Association, which represents companies during contract talks with unions at Metro Vancouver ports.

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Judge dismisses BCR Properties bid to throw out Brink lawsuit

Prince George Citizen
February 3, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

A B.C. Supreme Court Justice has rejected an application from BCR Properties Ltd. to dismiss a lawsuit against the Crown corporation brought on by Prince George lumber manufacturer John Brink. The outcome, issued Monday by Justice John Steeves following a hearing in early December, means the matter, a dispute over the condition of land at the BCR industrial site where Brink had intended to build a sawmill, can be taken to trial. Brink is alleging BCR acted fraudulently by trying to hide the true state of the land on which he had intended to build a new sawmill complex.

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Raw Log Exports: A Made-in-BC Problem that’s Only Getting Worse

by Torrance Coste – BC Stats shows the practice has reached record levels in recent years.
The Tyee
February 4, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

For as long as I’ve been aware of raw log exports I’ve been unwaveringly against them. The controversial practice of shipping logs overseas without processing them or adding any value has been in place for years. When logs are exported in raw form, they provide the lowest possible value for B.C. communities and starve the mills and the livelihoods that rely on timber. Over the last few weeks, I’ve looked into the most recent data and I’ve been heartbroken to see just how bad things have become….Exporting raw logs eliminates forest sector jobs and diminishes the value of our forest products.

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Port Metro Vancouver launches compensation program for unlicensed truckers

Union says the licensing and support payment systems are unfair
News 1130
February 3, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

VANCOUVER – Port Metro Vancouver has unveiled a compensation program for around 650 unlicensed truckers with which it’s severing ties. The offer comes after the Port made changes to its licensing system which shut out some companies that once hauled cargo. With the number of truck drivers licenses pared down, those displaced drivers are eligible for up to $15,000 under Port Metro Vancouver’s transition support program. Gavin McGarrigle with UNIFOR, representing unionized container truckers, believes everything from the licensing system to the support payments is unfair.

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Weyerhaeuser cautiously optimistic after fourth quarter results released

Kenora Online
February 3, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada East, Canada

Weyerhaeuser’s feeling good about the shape of the economy. Company spokesman Wayne Roznowsi offers an update on their fourth-quarter results. “We’re certainly cautiously optimistic. Fourth-quarter sales were up, compared with last year,” he said. “More than 20 per cent improvement in earnings. That was certainly positive.” Overall, the company’s net sales until the end of December 2014 were about $7.4 billion, that’s up from $7.25 billion in 2013. Dividends for common shares were also up to $1.02 at the end of December, up from 81 cents at the same time in 2013.

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Responses mixed to mill’s approval

The Pictou Advocate
February 4, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada East, Canada

ABERCROMBIE – Northern Pulp Nova Scotia Corporation has received approval to operate for five years. But not everyone is happy with the provisions contained in the mill’s approval to operate, especially Northern Pulp, which intends to appeal the industrial approval. The Department of Environment announced the new industrial approval last Friday. It will last until Jan. 30, 2020 and replaces the existing one which expired on Jan. 30. “We have heard the concerns raised by the people of Pictou County and the new approval demonstrates that the status quo is no longer an option,” said Environment Minister Randy Delorey.

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NS: Province’s new agreement with Northern Pulp includes reductions in emissions, water use

Daily Business Buzz
February 3, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada East, Canada

ABERCROMBIE, N.S. – A Pictou County pulp mill has been given approval to continue operating under a new industrial agreement for the next five years that includes reductions in emissions and water. The new industrial approval for Northern Pulp was granted Friday by the province and focuses on improvements for air emissions, water usage and wastewater emissions that are expected to bring it in line with other kraft mills across the country. ;Environment Minister Randy Delorey said Friday that he believes the province has taken steps to address the concerns of Pictou County residents over the mill’s emissions.

Northern Pulp aims to appeal new conditions from The New Glasgow News

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Mill Layoffs In Prineville Are About More Than Jobs

Oregon Public Broadcasting
February 4, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States, US West

Last November the Woodgrain Mill shut down most of its operation in Prineville and laid off nearly 200 workers, after the mill’s roof collapsed. The mill was one of the largest employers in Crook County. Now, both the community and laid-off workers are struggling to recover. For many mill employees, the layoffs meant not only the loss of a paycheck, but also a lost community. A small group of women, former employees, gather around Mary Sanislow’s kitchen table in Powell Butte, just outside of Prineville. Sanislow offers soda and her friend, Peggy Murphy makes the group laugh with her response: “You know that’s not how we roll, Mary.”

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EU: Imports of Russian hardwood logs decline in 2014

IHB The Timber Network
February 3, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: International

According to the latest Eurostat data, EU imports of Russian hardwood logs declined in the period from January to September 2014 compared to the same period in 2013. Thus, the first five Russian hardwood logs importing countries in 2014 were Finland, Sweden, Poland, Estonia and Czech Republic. Total import volume in terms of value decreased by 8% to 163.87 million euro in 2014 (from 178 million euro in 2013). Traditionally, Finland is the main importing market in Europe for Russia. Even though hardwood logs imports to Finland decreased by 4% in 2014, Finland’s market share in terms of import went up from 88.7 % to 92.8% in 2014 over 2013.

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Stora Enso Fourth Quarter and Full Year Results 2014

Globe Newswire
February 4, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: International

Stora Enso’s CEO Karl-Henrik Sundström comments on the fourth quarter and full-year 2014 results:  “Stora Enso reported yet another stable quarter. Despite some headwind in the market, our sales increased by 1.4% compared to the fourth quarter of 2013, excluding the structurally declining paper business and divested businesses. Today, our growth businesses form already 62% of our total sales. The significant improvement in operational EBIT is a result of our own initiatives to transform our business and improve cost efficiency. –

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Wood, Paper & Green Building

The future points to manufactured wood buildings

Pre-fabricated wood components are already being used extensively in Europe for large structures
Vancouver Sun
February 3, 2015
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: Canada, Canada West

VANCOUVER — The best way to build more tall wood buildings — and boost a higher-value wood products industry in British Columbia — is to manufacture them in factories, an audience of industry professionals heard during a recent symposium in Vancouver. Pre-fabricating sections of houses in factories to be assembled on home sites is not a new concept, but builders are increasingly using pre-fab to make the construction of bigger buildings more efficient, and wood is a material particularly suited to its techniques, said Lynn Embury-Williams, executive director of Wood WORKS! BC, the symposium’s host. “We’re promoting the use of wood in projects, and wood lends itself really well to being manufactured into components,” Embury-Williams said.

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PUSH TO CHANGE CODES AFTER MASSIVE APARTMENT COMPLEX FIRE

Philadelphia Action News
February 3, 2015
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: United States, US West

PRINCETON, N.J. (WPVI) — Mercer County officials are taking steps to prevent massive apartment complex fires in the future.  A seven-alarm fire in Edgewater, New Jersey destroyed an apartment complex and left more than 500 people homeless last month. Avalon Bay, the builder of that complex, is poised to build a project in Mercer County on the site of the old Princeton Hospital. Local officials are now calling for upgrades in fire and construction codes before that project gets built. …Mercer County Executive Brian Hughes says, “We want to make sure we do now the things we can do now to make these as safe as possible.”

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Appetite for reproduction furniture takes heavy toll on forests

Reproduction furniture from the last 700 years is affordable and has spawned a huge industry with thousands of workshops and showrooms across the country. There …
Business in Vancouver
February 2, 2015
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: International

During Mao Zedong’s Cultural Revolution from 1966 until his death a decade later, Chinese were exhorted to destroy “the four olds.”  Sadly, they went at it with a will, vigorously trying to erase old customs, old culture, old habits and old ideas. The cultural carnage included a substantial amount of China’s surviving art, architecture and historic artifacts such as furniture. ….But reproduction furniture from the last 700 years is affordable and has spawned a huge industry with thousands of workshops and showrooms across the country.

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Forestry

Logging close to marsh near Qualiucm Beach is legal

Parksville Qualicum Beach News
February 3, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Island Timberlands is logging 25 hectares of their land between Hamilton Marsh and the Inland Highway, leading to concerns about the popular wilderness area. “We want to make sure the public knows what’s going on,” said local birder Sandra Gray. “It is private managed forest land and we’re harvesting second-growth timber,” said Island Timberlands spokesperson Morgan Kennah, of land between Hilliers Road South, Highway 4 (Alberni) and the Inland Island Highway, near the Qualicum Beach exit. Gray said residents were worried they are trying to sneak the logs out at night, but Kennah said they are following provincial requirements by doing the work at night when there is less disruption to traffic in the area.

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Wildsight explains support for wolf cull

The Cranbrook Townsman
February 3, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

The recent decision by the provincial government to make a last ditch effort to save the South Selkirk caribou herd through removal of predators, namely wolves, has generated a great deal of discussion. It has put East Kootenay-based conservation group Wildsight in the somewhat difficult position of reluctantly supporting the removal of wolves. John Bergenske of Wildsight explains that he has been involved with mountain caribou since the 1970s and with Wildsight since the 90’s when they first sponsored caribou research in the Purcell Mountains.

Wildsight supports wold cull from The CBC Radio

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If we don’t watch out old-growth forests will be a thing of the past

Alberni Valley Times
January 30, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

The other day I went out for supper with a friend. When we left the restaurant it was hard to miss the enormous logging truck taking up half the parking lot. In a city like Port Alberni, which relies heavily on logging to pay the bills, seeing a logging truck isn’t anything shocking. The surprise came when I saw what was on the trailer: four logs….It made me sad to look at that enormous log. How can anything built with wood be so important that it would justify cutting down such a remarkable old tree? …Although Vancouver Island is famous for the huge trees, 73% of the original productive old-growth forests of the Island have been logged. In this area, that number is believed to be as high as 87%. This number will increase if companies don’t change methods.

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Trees require constant attention, and need to be cut down on occasion

Mel Fast
Langely Times
February 2, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Editor: Langley Township has been in existence for decades without a tree bylaw, and yet we still have an abundance of trees. There seems to be this imagined threat that, without a tree bylaw, men armed with chainsaws will clear cut the Township just because there is no bylaw to stop them. ….Trees have a limited life span, and not all trees are worth saving. Before Christmas, an alder next door came down in the wind, taking down a power line and ripping a transformer from the pole. The same day a fir crashed across the road, just missing the power line. At my sister-in-law’s place, a massive hemlock came down from across the road, ripping all the wires off the power pole and barely missing the house.

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We need more urban oases, not fewer

February 4, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

agree with recent letter writer S. Walton: Destroying Green Timbers Urban Forest would be nonsense. I’ve been driving from 156 Street to King George Boulevard using 100 Avenue for four years. It is a joy to travel to and from work surrounded by the relative calm and beauty of an urban forest. It is lovely to hear the birds sing. It calms the nerves. For a while I’ve been thinking that something fishy is going on. There have been fewer tall trees in that park on both sides of 100 Avenue as if little by little, trees are being cut, pulled, pushed or broken down. The green and lush canopy on the edges on 100 Avenue is gone. We need more urban oases, not fewer.

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Family Forests: A Key Piece of Protecting Critical Forestland

Huffington Post
February 3, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States

… That’s what will happen to the puzzle of protecting critical forestland if we don’t make family-owned woodlands part of the conservation conversation. More than a third of U.S. forests are owned by individuals and families — a larger share than the federal government or various companies own. As we work to protect both the environment and rural economies, family-owned forests are hugely important yet too often overlooked. Having grown up surrounded by my family’s woodlands in Wisconsin, I have seen firsthand how the woods give us so much more than peaceful beauty. 

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Daines calls for wide-ranging forest reform in phone-in town hall meeting

Independent Record
February 3, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

MISSOULA — Montana needs timber management that addresses all 10 of the state’s national forests, Sen. Steve Daines told listeners on a statewide conference call. The Republican senator from Montana questioned callers for about an hour on Tuesday evening from his office in Washington, D.C. He introduced the issue by noting Montana harvested 624 million board-feet of timber at its peak in 1987, but just 113 million board-feet in 2014. “We need to find a path forward to create economic opportunities in rural forest counties,” Daines said. “One that supports access for sportsmen and multiple use.”

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Legislature needs to make rural Oregon a top priority

The Argus Observer
February 1, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Oregon’s Legislature will begin meeting in [one day] and high on the agenda should be a strong effort to help rural Oregon join the Willamette Valley in recovering from the 2008 recession. Part of that should come from moves that would help the entire state economy such as keeping a firm grip on state budget demands and looking for — and enacting — ways to streamline regulatory processes. …Use of timber is a big issue. Because so much of rural Oregon is in federal hands, the state is limited in what it can do, but that doesn’t preclude a real push from legislators to make something good happen. That might include better access to O&C and other federal lands for industrial purposes that can dovetail the needs of rural areas for jobs with the federal regulatory processes.

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Small Communities’ Public Lands

Huffington Post
February 2, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

In rural Oregon, here in Lake County, the debates over public lands and small towns are made of flesh and blood, not concept and theory. The federal government owns 78 percent of Lake County, so it’s a very interesting situation, considering that everyone in town has friends who work for the Forest Service and the BLM. People sitting in church pews, the high school auditorium, or a booth at the Burger Queen, they know each other and they know federal employees are simply carrying out policies handed down from a higher office, far beyond the state border. Land management is trapped between the Endangered Species Act of yesteryear and fear of another lawsuit being slapped on the Forest Service tomorrow.

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Why Wyden’s Bill Doesn’t “Double” Timber Harvests

Naturaral Resource Report
February 2, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Sen. Ron Wyden recently announced the reintroduction of his O&C federal forest legislation, pledging once again to “double” timber harvests as a way to create desperately-needed jobs in rural Oregon. However, a recent report commissioned by Oregon’s affected counties indicates that the Wyden plan would actually reduce harvest levels. Sen. Wyden is doubling-down on his O&C plan, even though it lacks the support of Oregon’s O&C counties, the forest products industry and the House members who have long been engaged in the issue. The only support for Wyden’s bill came from the Portland and Washington D.C. environmental groups that helped write the legislation.

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Astoria Timber Festival adds job fair to annual event

Coast Weekend
February 3, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Astoria — It’s once again time to round up your crew and get yer tin pants on — logging lingo for heavy-duty, waterproof trousers — at the Astoria Timber Festival & Job Fair from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 7 at the Clatsop County Fairgrounds; admission is free. The festival is an exciting day of logging competitions, gear displays and craft vendors. The day kicks off with a Lumber Jack breakfast put together by the Astoria Rotary Club from 10 a.m. to noon. New this year is the addition of a Job Fair. The logging industry needs good people to learn the trade, and there
will be professionals on hand to talk about jobs in the timber
industry,” noted Mitch Mitchum, one of the principals involved in
coordinating the festival.

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Governor Deal promotes prescribed fires for healthy forests

Sowega Live
February 3, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

Governor Nathan Deal is helping raise awareness about the importance of fire to healthy forests by proclaiming February 2-8, 2015, “Prescribed Fire Awareness Week.” “Prescribed burning of Georgia forest lands is a valuable tool for protecting the forest from devastating wildfires and managing valuable wildlife species,” states the proclamation, to be signed February 4 at the State Capitol. The document notes that professional foresters and other land resource managers use prescribed burning for improving forest health, reducing hazardous fuels and enhancing reforestation.

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Despite green promise, Indonesian forestry giant continues to destroy forests

Mongabay.com
February 3, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: International

A year after it pledged a dramatic shift in how it operates in Indonesia’s fast dwindling native habitats, Asia Pacific Resources International Ltd (APRIL) continues to destroy forests and peatlands in Sumatra, allege environmentalists. On January 28th, 2014 — just days before APRIL’s biggest competitor Asia Pulp & Paper (APP) was to provide an update on its own efforts to reform its forest management practices — APRIL announced a sustainability policy that it said set a new standard for Indonesia’s pulp and paper sector. APRIL claimed its policy was backed by WWF, one of its chief critics, and did more to protect forests than APP’s commitment. APRIL’s claims were quickly refuted by environmentalists. 

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GFC has failed to address non-compliance with national forest policy

Letter by Howard Bulkan
Starbroek News
February 4, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: International

The statement from the Guyana Forestry Commission (GFC) as reported by Kaieteur News letter to the Editor, Saturday, January 31, fails to address the non-compliance with approved national forest policy for on-shore value-added processing of forest products, which is also the policy of all three main political parties in their last (2011) manifestos. Export volumes and values of forest products have changed by only small amounts for the last several years, while export volumes of unprocessed logs declared at what is widely believed to be below market values have continued to rise year after year.

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Conservationists v chainsaws: the RSPB’s battle to save an Indonesian rainforest

February 4, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: International

Brad Sanders, an American forestry manager in Jambi province on the Indonesian island of Sumatra, stood with members of his Harapan rainforest team, sharpening bamboo poles in anticipation of an attack. A stout, elderly ex-military officer who worked as a camp security guard asked Sanders’ advice on that morning in October 2012. “What should we do if they come into the camp and try to hurt us? … Indonesia is no stranger to conflict over its shrinking forests. But this fight does not involve the usual players.

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How Trees Can Make City People Happier (and Vice Versa)

NextCity.org
February 2, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: International

The trees out my fourth-floor New York City window were covered in snow a few days ago; now their bare branches are waving in the wind, against the gray-blue of the cloudy dusk sky. It’s nice to have them there. Without the trees, my view would be starker, nothing but flat roofs still white with snow and the rectangular outlines of overlapping buildings farther in the distance. They’re calming — something big and beautiful, that wasn’t made entirely by human hands, in a city full of people. …Mark Taylor, a public health researcher at the University of Trnava in Slovakia, wondered, though, if there might be a way to establish that connection between nature and mental health without relying on people’s own accounts of their well-being.

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Conservationists v chainsaws: the RSPB’s battle to save an Indonesian rainforest

February 4, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: International

Brad Sanders, an American forestry manager in Jambi province on the Indonesian island of Sumatra, stood with members of his Harapan rainforest team, sharpening bamboo poles in anticipation of an attack. A stout, elderly ex-military officer who worked as a camp security guard asked Sanders’ advice on that morning in October 2012. “What should we do if they come into the camp and try to hurt us? … Indonesia is no stranger to conflict over its shrinking forests. But this fight does not involve the usual players.

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Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy

Rise in pellet exports to Asia

Canadian Biomass
February 2, 2015
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: Canada

Pellet exports from North America rose in the 3Q/14 after a stable first half of the year that could be characterized as a temporary plateau. While pellet exports to Europe were up just marginally, the increase to Asia was more noticeable. Up until 2014, more than 95% of wood pellets leaving US and Canadian ports were destined for Europe. However, during 2014 there was a shift in Canadian exports from Europe to Asia, with pellet plants in British Columbia shipping record volumes to South Korea during the 3Q/14, as reported in the North American Wood Fiber Review.

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Benefits of Removing Livestock from Rangelands to Sequester Carbon

The wildlife News
February 3, 2015
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: United States

Rangelands make up a large proportion of the Earth’s surface, and the soils hold a significant amount of sequestered carbon. Rangelands are estimated to contain more than one-third of the world’s above and below ground carbon reserves. As a consequence, there is interest in determining the potential for soil carbon sequestration in rangeland soils, and whether livestock grazing helps or hinders this sequestration… The issue of whether livestock grazing can sequester carbon in soils has gotten greater attention in recent years. Some proponents of livestock grazing assert that grazing can lead to the sequestering of significant amounts of carbon in soils, and thus reduce GHG emissions.

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Yellow light for forest-saving programme in Indonesia

fromb Victoria University of Wellington
Scoop.co.nz
February 3, 2015
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: International

A programme to curb deforestation and carbon emissions in Indonesia has improved forest governance but more changes need to be implemented if its original aims are to be met, according to Victoria University of Wellington research. Dr Andrew McGregor, from Victoria’s School of Geography, Environment and Earth Sciences, has been working with a team of international experts examining the societal impacts of the Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Degradation (REDD+) programme, developed through the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change and voluntary carbon markets.

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How bamboo bioenergy can help power remote communities

ClickGreen.org
February 3, 2015
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: International

Bioenergy has increased in popularity as a desirable form of energy over the past decade. Europe has been the leader in this innovation, driven predominantly through the use of wood waste from the United States.  However, sustainability and the high carbon footprint associated with the transportation of the material often long distances between source and energy plants, and the industry in general have been controversial.  Yet there are instances in which bioenergy can be a truly sustainable source of power, in a context where alternatives are simply not feasible.

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Man’s Best Friend Is Not the Dog – It’s the Tree

By Paul Brannen MEP, North East England
Huffington Post
February 3, 2015
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: International
As parliamentarians we are currently in the process of formulating our response to the proposed EU Forest Strategy. As I see it, the strategy should first and foremost focus on the mitigation impact our forests can have in relation to the growing problem of climate change. Secondly, the strategy should focus on the job protection and job creation potential of our forests and the wood they produce… Knowing this, the default position in construction and manufacture should be ‘make it from wood’ unless it can’t be (or it threatens the sustainability of existing woodlands). In addition to the climate change and job creation benefits of planting more forests there are further advantages 

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General

We need more urban oases, not fewer

February 4, 2015
Category: Uncategorised

agree with recent letter writer S. Walton: Destroying Green Timbers Urban Forest would be nonsense. I’ve been driving from 156 Street to King George Boulevard using 100 Avenue for four years. It is a joy to travel to and from work surrounded by the relative calm and beauty of an urban forest. It is lovely to hear the birds sing. It calms the nerves. For a while I’ve been thinking that something fishy is going on. There have been fewer tall trees in that park on both sides of 100 Avenue as if little by little, trees are being cut, pulled, pushed or broken down. The green and lush canopy on the edges on 100 Avenue is gone. We need more urban oases, not fewer.

Read More