Tree Frog Forestry News

Daily Archives: February 10, 2015

Business & Politics

Domtar’s diaper business ready for a change

Canadian Press
February 9, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada

MONTREAL—Domtar says its diaper business is about to reach a turning point where cost savings from new production lines will begin to drive higher earnings. Chief executive John Williams said he’s disappointed that it has taken longer than expected to ramp-up five new production lines at three locations. But he anticipates costs will fall and margins will begin to improve in the second quarter as it shifts from outsourcing production to making more of its own adult incontinent products. “We’ve built the base, we’re getting more stability, our product offering is resonating with the customer so, going forward, I ‘m feeling pretty good about it actually,” he said February 6 during a conference call to discuss Domtar’s 2014 results.

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Western Forest Products Announces Completion of Sale of Former Pulp Mill Site

Marketwired
February 6, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

VANCOUVER, BRITISH COLUMBIA, — Western Forest Products Inc. (WEF) (“Western” or the “Company”) announces that it has completed the sale of its former pulp mill site to Woodfibre LNG Limited at a purchase price of $21.8 million. The sale, which was previously announced on January 28, 2013, includes 212 acres of industrial waterfront land located at the head of Howe Sound, southwest of Squamish, British Columbia, and all associated foreshore leases, water licenses and permits. The Company intends to use the proceeds of sale to pay down outstanding debt and to further its strategic capital plans.

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Canfor announces shift reduction at Canal Flats saw mill

Kimberly Daily Bulletin
February 6, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

The Canal Flats saw mill will begin operating on one shift as of May 4, 2015, Canfor has confirmed. Corinne Stavness from the corporate head office in Toronto says that due to a lack of economically available fibre in the region, the saw mill will go from two shifts to one. “This reduction will affect 81 Canal Flats-based employees, all of whom will be offered positions elsewhere in the company,” Stavness said. “The Canfor executive and management teams recognize that this decision will involve great personal cost to employees at our Canal Flats mill. Unfortunately, the available fibre supply in the region is not sufficient to support the processing capacity and we must make this reduction.

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Resolute Celebrates Ground-Breaking MOA with Six First Nations – Memorandum of Agreement Has Resulted in $100M in New Aboriginal Business

Canada Newswire press release
February 10, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada East, Canada

MONTRÉAL  – Resolute Forest Products Inc. and six First Nations Chiefs today held an official signing of a Memorandum of Agreement (MOA) that sets out a framework for negotiating business agreements related to the company’s sawmill investments in Northwestern Ontario. In attendance at the signing, hosted by Resolute, were Chief Mainville of Couchiching First Nation, Chief Klyne of Seine River First Nation, Chief Windego of Nigigoonsiminikaaning First Nation, Chief Henderson of Mitaanjigamiing First Nation, Chief Jordan of Lac La Croix First Nation and Chief White Cloud of Lac des Milles Lacs First Nation, as well as the Honourable Bill Mauro, MPP for Thunder Bay-Atikokan and Minister of Natural Resources and Forestry.

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Bitterroot log home industry seeing rebound

NBC Montana
February 8, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States, US West

VICTOR, Mont. –  There’s evidence the Bitterroot’s custom log home industry continues to pull out of the recession. Montana Idaho Log and Timber, south of Victor, forecasts 2015 will be the best year since 2007.  At its peak, Montana Idaho employed 22 people. It’s now back up to 14 workers. The company stayed afloat during the recession, often by doing remodel jobs. It’s owner, Jim Cain, said he sees a turn around, especially with wealthier clients who disappeared when the financial bubble burst. “We’re booked out six, eight weeks, which is unusual,” said Cain. “We were always booked out two, three weeks, four weeks. But now we’re getting extended further out there. The quality of the projects, and the size of the projects is increasing.”

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Column: Forestry grows strong in Louisiana

The News Star
February 7, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: US East, United States

Trees cover half of our state, and forests are the single greatest land use in Louisiana. It is still the most valuable crop, although tree farmers certainly don’t have a harvest every year. Figures from the LSU AgCenter show forestry is an $11 billion industry providing 45,000 jobs and generating $700 million in taxes. So who owns our forests? Like most of the Southern states, Louisiana has most of its timberland owned by small landowners. The average landowner is 55 years of age and has 40 acres or less. Most of our forest manufacturers have spun off their forestlands during the last decades to concentrate on production. At the Louisiana Forestry Association, we work with landowners, manufacturers, foresters and loggers to ensure that our forests will be here today and sustainably managed for future generations.

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Madison Paper employees returning to work

Concerns remain about the long-term future of the mill as workers come back after a two-week layoff.
Central Maine
February 6, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: US East, United States

MADISON — Employees at Madison Paper Industries will be returning to work at the mill early next week following a temporary shut-down that left about 110 people out of work for two weeks. Workers will be called back to the mill beginning Monday. It will take a few days before production is back to normal, according to UPM President Russ Drechsel. The mill, owned by UPM Paper Europe & North America, has not been producing paper since Jan. 24. …Andrea Maker, spokeswoman for the Maine Pulp and Paper Association, said she could not comment specifically on the situation at Madison Paper but she conceded that the paper industry is generally struggling.

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Rainforest Alliance claims paper industry helps conservation.

Earth Times
February 10, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: International


When 2 opposing forces can be presented alongside each other, sometimes all becomes a lot clearer. In the case of The Rainforest Alliance and the Asia Pulp and Paper company (APP), perhaps you will agree. The Alliance audited all of the pledges made by this beleaguered deforester and came up with quite a result. 2013 saw the APP presenting a Forest Conservation Policy in response to conservationists who really would rather it just gave up. Those tropical rainforests are almost lost and constitute perhaps the most precious resource on earth. We just can?t price it! Pulping paper from wood or growing monocultures of oil palms just seems sensible if you look at the profits.

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Rainforest Alliance audit confirms Jakarta deforestation unchecked

Phys.org
February 6, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: International

Two years after Asia Pulp & Paper (APP) announced a new “forest conservation” policy, APP’s pledge to halt forest clearing has held, but its forests are still disappearing. A Rainforest Alliance audit released today confirmed the findings by WWF and local NGOs that APP is failing to stop deforestation and illegal activities in its concessions by other parties, even in areas already identified by the company as containing high conservation values and carbon stocks. “APP has halted its own forest clearing and embarked on a wide array of assessments in its concessions,” said Aditya Bayunanda, Forest Commodity Leader WWF-Indonesia.

Forestry giant’s zero deforestation committment put to test from Mongabay
APP’s Deforestation Efforts Make “Moderate Progress:’ Environmentalists from The Wall Street Journal

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Wood, Paper & Green Building

Room for growth in ICI modular steel structure market

Daily Commercial News
February 9, 2015
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: Canada East, Canada

Factory-built modular steel structures aren’t about saving money — they’re about saving time and quality control. …The residential construction sector has long used factory-built wood modular sections, either as stand-alone custom homes, tract homes or renovation additions. But, lately the general ICI sector has also been paying more attention to this construction technique. Steel framing is an option for modular non-combustible structures, said McNeil, though there are a couple of tricks to handling it during the transportation and installation phase because steel can be a little more ductile than wood and that in turn can cause issues with the finish such as drywall and tile.

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In fire aftermath, reforms push up against industry norms

Associated Press
February 6, 2015
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: US East, United States

EDGEWATER, N.J. — The fire that destroyed most of a large apartment complex in northern New Jersey last month has prompted talk of legislation to toughen building codes, an effort that would butt up against long-established building practices like the use of lightweight wood. …Fire officials said the fire was worsened by lightweight materials, such as engineered wood, and by an open, truss roof style. One state legislator, Republican Assemblyman Scott Rumana, proposed a bill this week that would put a freeze on permits for new multi-family homes that use lightweight wood.

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How fire-resistant are our new buildings?

A devastating fire at AvalonBay Communities development in Edgewater, N.J. raised questions about the fire safety measures built into local, new construction.
lohud.com
February 8, 2015
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: US East, United States

A fire at AvalonBay Communities’ development in Edgewater, New Jersey, that destroyed more than half of a 408-unit complex raised questions about the fire safety measures built into new construction. …The Avalon in Edgewater had sprinklers in its hallways and inside the apartments, but not in the uninhabited roof and attic areas where the fire spread. No one was killed in the Jan. 21 fire, which was started by workers using a torch and reportedly spread for several minutes before the workers called 911. New York has a variety of rules for what types of construction materials can be used. Some blame for the Edgewater fire was put on lightweight building materials like prefabricated wood, which New York’s building code allows.

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Japan makes further steps in LVL use

IHB The Timber Network
February 9, 2015
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: International

Japan LVL Association held the regular directors meeting and the chairman commented that the members have been struggling to sell LVL after the tax hike in last April because the demand drop is much more than expected. The Association has been developing LVL products for residential use and non-residential use. Since new housing starts are hard to increase, it is necessary to develop more non-residential use of LVL. At the meeting, it showed road map for development of important factors of materials, structure and fire proof.

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Forestry

Wetlands logging raises concerns

Oceanside Star
February 5, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Island Timberlands is logging 35-40 hectares (86-98 acres) along the Alberni Highway near Hamilton Marsh. The area, outside Qualicum Beach across from the Highway 19 onramp to Nanaimo, itself contains about a half-dozen small wetlands, according to a news release Monday from Ceri Peacey, chair of the Hamilton Marsh Committee, and Lynne Brookes, president of Arrowsmith Naturalists. …Though the logging is not technically in Qualicum Beach, Mayor Teunis Westbroek said he as well was invited by Island Timberlands to review the logging plan. Island Timberlands is using the variable retention method, he said, meaning the area won’t be clearcut and some trees will remain standing.

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Drought only a partial reason for the turbidity issue

Letter by Rob McCulloch
Comox Valley Record
February 6, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

What is needed is the CVRD and the health officer to get their collective heads out of the sand and look at the actual cause of the turbidity in the lake water. …The truth is that certain logging companies have clearcut right to the water’s edge and there is nothing to hold back the hillsides from falling into the creeks and rivers flowing into Comox Lake. What is really needed is for the regional district and municipalities to recognize the obvious and complain to the source of the problem: that would be BC Forest Service, the department of the environment and the provincial government itself.

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Cheakamus Community Forest plans revealed

Old growth trees continue to be harvested in Callaghan, Brandywine Creek and Wedge Creek areas
Whistler Question
February 9, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

The community needs to be concerned about the long-term impact of logging in old growth areas like the Callaghan and Brandywine, said Claire Ruddy, executive director of the Association of Whistler Area Residents for the Environment (AWARE). Ruddy was one of about 20 people at the Cheakamus Community Forest (CCF) open house last Thursday (Feb. 5) at the Whistler Library where officials shared plans for timber harvesting in Whistler and surrounding areas for 2015. “I think people are still concerned about whether we, as a tourist community, should be logging small areas of old forest when on a global scale these older forests are becoming rarer and rarer,” said Ruddy. “If we’ve logged large portions of old trees to meet our quotas, what’s the opportunity cost for that in the future?”

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Petition launched to halt Mt. Macpherson logging

Revelstoke Times Review
February 9, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

A petition has been launched calling for a halt to logging on Mt. Macpherson “until a publicly acceptable solution is found that considers and legally protects all values and interests (recreational, quality of life, economic) in the area.” The petition was posted to Change.org on Monday. It asks the City of Revelstoke, Columbia Shuswap Regional District and provincial government engage with local stakeholders regarding the future management of the Macpherson area. The Times Review reported in September that sections of Mt. Macpherson are slated to be logged by BC Timber Sales in 2016. The harvesting would impact several mountain biking and cross-country ski trails.

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Woodland caribou study finds herds face trouble in remote areas

CBC News
February 6, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

As northern Ontario’s woodland caribou numbers continue to dwindle, an environmental watchdog says the province needs to step up to protect the remaining population. The Wildlands League is applauding the release of a Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry report on the state of the woodland caribou. Spokesperson Anna Baggio said the report provides a lot of information about the northern Ontario herd, but says much of the data within the document is troubling. The report shows woodland caribou — a species designated as threatened — faces trouble in even the most remote areas, including near the Ring of Fire in the James Bay lowlands.

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New Farm Bill Program to Help Protect Longleaf’s Legacy for Future Generations

USDA Blog
February 6, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States

…USDA and our many conservation partners are working to restore longleaf forests, and we’ve seen significant progress in the recent years. Now, a new Farm Bill program, the Regional Conservation Partnership Program, or RCPP, is providing additional support to the effort. RCPP puts our partners – landowners, conservation organizations, states and others — in the driver’s seat by allowing them to develop projects that utilize USDA dollars to leverage additional support for conservation. Some of RCPP’s funding is dedicated to priority landscapes, or what we call critical conservation areas. The Longleaf Pine Range is one of those areas.

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Other Views: Overhaul the national firefighting budget

Corvallis Gazette-Times
February 7, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States

Congress is back in session and so lawmakers are giving the usual lip service to working together in a bipartisan manner. May we suggest one place to start? Last week, a group of U.S. senators from both parties introduced a common-sense solution to overhaul the way we pay for the largest wildfires on federal lands. It’s a measure that should have passed last session, but became yet another victim of what became the least-effective Congress in memory. The bill, sponsored by Oregon Sen. Ron Wyden (a Democrat) and Idaho Sen. Mike Crapo (a Republican), essentially would treat the biggest wildfires as natural disasters. Federal agencies currently base wildland fire suppression budgets on the average costs of the last 10 years.

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Logging competitions give teens an active alternative: Astoria Timber Festival 2015

The Oregonian
February 7, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

There’s a very difficult decision that comes to every high school student’s mind: What do you want to do with your life? Any more, the encouraged answer is higher education. Somewhere between 50 and 63 percent of graduating high school seniors went directly to college in 2014, but what happens to the rest of them? Do they take day jobs? Do they travel? Do they stay at home, unemployed? Those in the Oregon timber industry know one place kids aren’t going, and that’s to their businesses. There are myriad hypotheses for the lack of interest in logging – or in any skilled trade for that matter – but the consensus seems to come down to the fact that kids simply aren’t interested in spending their days in the business of cutting down trees.

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Change in tactics made in Colorado, Wyoming forests as mountain pine beetle epidemic wanes

Daily Journal
February 9, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

CHEYENNE, Wyoming — National forest officials in Colorado and Wyoming said Monday they plan to reopen more campgrounds and change tactics as a massive outbreak of mountain pine beetles wanes. Workers will now turn their attention more toward removing dead trees to prevent them from exacerbating wildfires, Medicine Bow-Routt National Forest Supervisor Dennis Jaeger said. “How can we get some of the dead lodgepole that still has market value out of the woods?” said Jaeger, whose forest straddles the Wyoming-Colorado line about 120 miles northwest of Denver.

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Thompson Falls lawmaker presents bill transferring federal land management to state

The Missoulian
February 9, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

HELENA – The contentious issue of transferring management of federal lands to the state got its first airing at the 2015 Legislature Monday, as a Republican senator presented her bill to prevent the state from selling any transferred land. Sen. Jennifer Fielder of Thompson Falls, a leading proponent of the transfer, said her Senate Bill 215 counters the argument from opponents that the transfer would lead to a sell-off of federal public lands. “There is no question in my mind that the public lands would remain public,” she told the Senate Natural Resources Committee. “This would put into law a prohibition to sell (these lands).”

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EDITORIAL: Counties deserve fair compensation for federal lands

The Missoulian
February 8, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

It may not seem like much to Congress, but $389,000 is a lot of money in Missoula County. So is $725,000 in Ravalli County, and $2.4 million in Lincoln County. …Today’s Congress seems to have lost sight of the original purpose of these funds. When the national forest system was created, the Forest Service started paying counties that contained these federal lands 25 percent of its logging revenues. This was done in recognition of the fact that counties could never collect taxes on national forest lands, but still had to pay for necessities such as roads and schools. However, after logging on federal forests fell precipitously, Congress began offering counties the option of receiving a three-year average of payments instead of the 25 percent collected from timber sales.

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Public lands: Transfer unconstitutional, wasteful

Letter by Max Mclaughlin
The Missoulian
February 10, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

State Sen. Jennifer Fielder, R-Thompson Falls, seems to think that Montana can just magically take over 27 million acres of federal land in the state. But her repeated assertions that this is the only solution “big enough” to solve federal land management problems is shortsighted, unrealistic and most of all, illegal. ..Not only has Fielder done no analysis of the costs of managing these lands, she’s also failed to look into the fact that this issue has been tested in court several times, and found to be unconstitutional. Tell Fielder and any other state legislator considering this crazy scheme to stop playing games and get serious about real solutions to federal land issues.

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Spruce Beetle Hits More Colorado Forests; Pine Beetle Slows

Associated Press
February 6, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

DENVER — One type of tree-killing beetle is attacking Colorado forests at a faster pace, but another is slowing down, mostly because it’s running out of live trees to infest, officials said Friday. The twin epidemics of mountain pine beetles and spruce beetles have struck a total of 7,500 square miles of forests in Colorado since 1996, leaving large swaths a dull, rusty brown. Young, healthy trees are appearing in some areas, forest managers said. An annual aerial survey of 44,000 square miles by the U.S. Forest Service and Colorado State Forest Service found the spruce beetle outbreak grew quickly last year. It was active on nearly 760 square miles, compared with fewer than 625 square miles in 2013.

Aerial survey shows pine beetles waning, but spruce beetles continue to spread across Colorado forests from Summit County Voice

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Finding a middle ground on forest management

Asheville Citizen-Times
February 6, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

The North Carolina Wildlife Federation and The Nature Conservancy recently submitted joint comments on the U.S. Forest Service’s management framework for Nantahala and Pisgah National Forests. We believe that our comments are a good middle ground between the draft framework and the concerns that have arisen from that framework. . …Too much of the recent rhetoric has focused on an all-or-nothing approach when it comes to logging: log all of the forest versus don’t log the forest. We recognize that there is a place for logging as a part of forest restoration. There are places in the forest where logging makes sense.

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Forestry School Gets New Name, New Direction

Saline River Chronicle
February 9, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

MONTICELLO, AR — Arkansas’ only school of forestry is getting a new name to go with a broadened, updated academic direction. The School of Forest Resources at the University of Arkansas at Monticello has been renamed the School of Forestry and Natural Resources, according to an announcement this morning by Dr. Philip Tappe, dean of the school. The name change was made to coincide with a new curriculum that provides students with broad options for studying natural resource management while also maintaining excellence in forestry education. According to Tappe, the changes are being made to “better reflect the role and mission of our academic program and to provide more educational options for persons interested in natural resource management.”

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Oak wilt fight among top goals for Michigan forest managers

Associated Press
February 10, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

LANSING, Mich. – Officials say controlling a tree disease called oak wilt was among top priorities for managers of Michigan’s forests last year. The Department of Natural Resources describes its battle against the threat to red oaks in a new report on the health of the state’s 20 million forest acres. Workers installed tens of thousands of feet of root graft barriers on state land. The barriers prevent oak wilt from moving to healthy trees through infected root systems. The report also discusses other illnesses and insects that have threatened forests over the past year and what the department is doing about them.

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Big Ivy draws big crowd in talk over logging

Asheville Citizen-Times
February 6, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

BARNARDSVILLE – If a U.S. Forest Service meeting in the Big Ivy community is any indication, the collaboration the agency hopes to foster looks a lot like an abandoned mountain road — uphill, winding and pitted, but passable. Probably. More than 200 people packed into the Big Ivy Community Center on Thursday to ask questions of Forest Service officials about the future of their corner of the Pisgah National Forest. Officials later estimated that 75 people showed up who could not fit inside the crowded venue. Mostly, the standing-room only crowd wanted to talk logging.

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£1.5million awarded to Argyll forestry projects

Press and Journal
February 6, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: International

Two Argyll organisations have been awarded a total of £1.5million to buy more than 3,000 acres of woodland for their local communities. The Scottish Land Fund has announced that South West Mull and Iona Development (SWMID) will receive £750,000 to buy the 1,957-acre Tiroran Forest on the Isle of Mull from Forestry Commission Scotland. And Kilfinan Community Forest Company (KCFC), which already owns 313 acres of the Upper Acharossan Forest, near Tighnabruaich, has been awarded £750,000 to buy a further 1,072 acres from the commission. Morven Gibson, who is local development officer for SWMID, said: “Much work has gone into the project over the past few years and this is an enormous boost for local people.

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Sunday explainer: A new plan for a timeless land in Tasmanian south-west wilderness

Tasmania’s famous wilderness is up for grabs under a new contentious state government proposal for the south-west. Or is it? Andrew Darby explains.
The Sydney Morning Herald
February 8, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: International

…It is redrawing the management plan for the 1.58 million hectare Tasmanian Wilderness World Heritage Area, and opening it for some business. Under a draft management plan that was released last month, the wilderness world heritage area would remain wilderness in official name only. The “wilderness” zone across more than 90 per cent of its extent would be rebadged as a “remote recreation” area. For the first time, most of the south-west would be opened up to “sensitive” development. It includes commercial accommodation inside the world heritage area, new landing sites for float planes and helicopters, limited logging for specialty timber and easier access for boats.

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Causes and Cures for Deforestation

Science 2.0
February 9, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: International

The Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations’s Forest Resource Assessment for 2005 used the word “alarming” 20 times to describe the trend lines for deforestation. And, a commonplace inference is that forests are rapidly disappearing due to logging. Deforestation, that is the conversion from forest to non-forest, is not necessarily due to logging (illegal or otherwise). So it is not greed, but survival that often drives deforestation… The primary culprit is conversion to agriculture, often by poor farmers, followed by wood for heating and cooking. Fires, slash and burn agriculture, mining, and hydro-electric projects also cause deforestation. 

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Chernobyl’s nuclear threat returns: Forest fires in Ukraine cause radioactive particles to be released over Europe

Daily Mail.co.uk
February 9, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: International

It’s been 29 years since an explosion at the Chernobyl nuclear plant in Ukraine released large doses of radiation across Europe. But the effects of that devastating event could still be affecting the continent as a result of recent forest fires in Ukraine. According to new research, these fires are causing radioactive caesium in the soil around the nuclear plant to be released into the atmosphere as smoke, which then travels across Eastern Europe. An explosion and fire released radioactive particles into the atmosphere, which spread over much of the western USSR and Europe. There is still an exclusion zone in place that measures approximately 1,000 square miles (2,600 square km) and surrounds the plant. 

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Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy

North American pellet exports reached a new record high in Q3

Biomass Magazine
February 9, 2015
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: Canada, United States

Pellet exports from North America rose in the third quarter of 2014 after a stable first half of the year that could be characterized as a temporary plateau. While pellet exports to Europe were up just marginally, the increase to Asia was more noticeable. Up until 2014, more than 95 percent of wood pellets leaving US and Canadian ports were destined for Europe. However, during 2014 there was a shift in Canadian exports from Europe to Asia, with pellet plants in British Columbia shipping record volumes to South Korea during the third quarter of 2014, as reported in the North American Wood Fiber Review. (

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State’s Forest Climate Action Team announces public meetings

Lake County News
February 9, 2015
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: United States, US West

The state of California’s Forest Climate Action Team (FCAT) will hold a series of public meetings in late February and early March to provide the public with information on the team’s proposed work, and to invite public comment… FCAT’s primary role is to develop a “forest carbon plan,” as called for in the scoping plan update. The forest carbon plan will provide strategies and targets to ensure that California forests will be managed to maintain healthy forest conditions, and continue to grow and store carbon in the form of wood to offset the negative effects of climate change for future generations.

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USDA study shows European demand for US wood pellets will benefit US forests

Bioenergy-news.com
February 5, 2015
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: US East, United States

The US Department of Agriculture (USDA) Forest Service has released a new report on the effects of the industrial wood pellet industry on southern US forests. Significantly, the Southern Research Station (SRS) study found that European demand for US wood pellets has a positive effect on US forests and forest markets. The report found that increased demand for wood pellets from the US South, driven primarily by the EU Renewable Energy Directive, will result in increased investments in forestland, which leads to greater forest cover over time. In addition, increased demand for wood residues and non-sawtimber feedstock from the wood pellet industry will lead to a greater increase in the number of pine and softwood trees in the US South than would have occurred otherwise.

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Stockholm Power Goes Green as Wood Ousts Coal: Carbon & Climate

Bloomgerg.com
February 9, 2015
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: International

For a lesson in global energy history, look no further than Stockholm’s oldest power plant. Since 1903, Fortum Oyj’s Vaerta harbor site has generated power using coal, oil, natural gas and even considered nuclear. Now it’s phasing out the last coal furnace and replacing it with the world’s largest combined heat and power generator that will burn just wood chips and timber scraps by next year. “It’s like looking at the growth rings of Swedish energy policy,” Ulf Wikstroem, an environmental manager at Fortum, said by phone Jan. 13 from Stockholm. “We plan to have the whole plant running on biomass by 2030 at the latest.”

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General

DNR temporarily halts massive conversion of Minnesota pine forest into farmland

February 10, 2015
Category: Uncategorised
Region: US East, United States

BEMIDJI, Minn. — The Minnesota Department of Natural Resources on Thursday announced it had temporarily ordered a halt to a massive conversion of thousands of acres of Minnesota pine forest into farmland out of concern for the state’s water supply and forest ecosystem. North Dakota-based potato grower R.D. Offutt Co. already has bought or could buy some 27,000 acres of Potlatch Corp. forest land in Becker, Cass, Hubbard and Wadena counties in north-central Minnesota with the intention of clear-cutting it for farming potatoes and other crops, the DNR said…. . “Experts say the current rate of forest loss in this region has not been seen in recent memory.”

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Raw logs a coastal problem

February 9, 2015
Category: Uncategorised

The record-number of raw logs being exported from B.C. are from the Coast, not the Okanagan. “Almost no raw logs are ever exported from the Interior,” said Ron Gorman of West Kelowna’s Gorman Brothers Lumber. “It’s just not something we do. But I know it’s done a lot from the Coast and it’s controversial.” Gorman Brothers mills logs into one-inch boards for furniture, panelling and home finishing. Tolko Industries, the Okanagan’s biggest forestry company, did not return calls to The Daily Courier. …The Wilderness Committee just released B.C. Statistics figures showing 2013 was a recored year for raw-log exports at 6.6 million cubic metres.

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