Tree Frog Forestry News

Daily Archives: February 16, 2015

Business & Politics

Canadian Pacific Railway Engineers Go on Strike Over Pay and Benefits

New York Times
February 15, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada

OTTAWA — About 3,000 locomotive engineers and conductors at the Canadian Pacific Railway walked off the job Sunday morning in a dispute over wages and benefits. Although the company said it would try to maintain some service by using managers, the strike is likely to disrupt major industries throughout North America, including automakers, oil companies, paper businesses, lumber suppliers and agriculture and mining companies… David Lindsay, the president of the Forest Products Association of Canada, said about three transport trucks would be needed to replace one rail car. A typical paper mill, he added, would need about 40 trucks a day to move its production. “Getting that many trucks and drivers to replace rail cars is a physical challenge,” Mr. Lindsay said, particularly in the remote regions were most mills operate.

CP Rail engineers and conductors launch strike from Revelstoke Times Review 

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Feds to introduce legislation that would force striking CP Rail employees to get back to work: source

Canadian Press
February 15, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada

OTTAWA — The federal government will introduce legislation to end a strike by more than 3,000 members of the Teamsters against Canadian Pacific Railway. A government source tells The Canadian Press the legislation will be tabled Monday morning. A notice to allow for introduction of the bill was placed on the Commons order paper late Friday afternoon. The strike against CP Rail began after contract talks failed to reach an agreement before the midnight deadline.

CP Rail employees on strike to be ordered back to work from CBC News

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Catalyst announces resignation of VP, Finance & CFO

Canada Newswire press release
February 13, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

RICHMOND, BC, – Catalyst Paper Corporation (TSX:CYT) announced today that Brian Baarda, Vice President, Finance and Chief Financial Officer, has decided to leave the company to advance his career in a more senior leadership role with another organization. “Brian has made a tremendous contribution to Catalyst since joining the company 25 years ago, says Joe Nemeth, President & Chief Executive Officer.” During his tenure, Brian held key leadership positions in both operations and finance, and played a critical role in many major projects and initiatives, including the recent acquisition of two US mills.

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Northwest Hardwoods to Temporarily Curtail Centralia Mill Production

Port Slowdown Blamed: Sawmill, Sander Operators Affected Most, But Company Official Says Everyone at Centralia Plant Will See Effects
The Chronicle
February 12, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States, US West

A major lumber mill in Centralia has announced plans to temporarily curtail its production, possibly to half its operating capacity, due to the ongoing West Coast port slowdown. Northwest Hardwoods will begin reducing hours of employees at the Centralia plant on Galvin Road this coming Monday, according to company vice president of human resources Brian Narramore. The curtailment comes as negotiations between longshoremen and port association officials on a new dockworkers’ contract continue, in the face of a slowdown at several ports including Seattle and Tacoma — where Northwest ships internationally-bound products from.

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Is the economic impact of the labor disputes at West Coast ports just hype? (& video)

PBS Newshour
February 15, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States, US West

In Canada today, 3,000 members of the Teamsters went on strike. They are in a dispute with the Canadian Pacific Railway over wages and benefits. Analysts say a prolonged strike would affect the flow of oil, lumber, auto parts and other products into the United States. Another labor dispute between ship owners and longshoremen has been going on for months now on the West Coast of this country. And, this weekend, the president dispatched Labor Secretary Thomas Perez to California to try to resolve it. For more about this, we are joined now from Los Angeles by Christopher Thornberg. He is an economist and a founding partner of Beacon Economics.

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SOAR overlooking economic, job potential of forests

By Chris Barton and Jeff Stringer
Kentucky.com
February 15, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: US East, United States

As SOAR moves into its second year, we wonder why the forest hasn’t been at the forefront of discussions on the economic future of Eastern Kentucky. The forest is intertwined with the culture of the people who live there and largely defines a region that is 80 percent to 90 percent forested. We have many opportunities for utilizing this natural resource for economic gain. A recent analysis indicated the forest industry could provide the region with an additional $1.4 billion annually and over 7,000 new jobs. These increases can be obtained through expanding current industries and improved use of abundant degraded timber resources, as well as improving the utilization of raw timber products currently harvested in the region. 

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Softwood Log Imports to China Slowed in the 4Q/14, but 2014 Was Still a Record Year

Wood Resources International
Market Watch
February 15, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: International

SEATTLE — China continued to dominate global log trade and was setting a new record high in the consumption of imported softwood logs in 2014. The seemingly endless increase in demand for wood raw-materials from the manufacturers of wood products in China has resulted in year-over-year import increases in eight of the past ten years. The total value of the imported logs has surged from 2.2 billion dollars in 2009 to 5.4 billion dollars in 2014, according to the Wood Resource Quarterly. Over the past five years there has been close to a doubling of the log volume being unloaded at Chinese ports with a majority originating from three countries; New Zealand, Russia and the US. 

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Wood, Paper & Green Building

Demand Concrete Block

CCMPA
February 13, 2015
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: United States

Code officials ignored it. Developers ignored it. Wood you? Demand concrete block. It was built to code. It had working sprinklers. But as local firefighters pointed out, once the lightweight wood assembly caught fire, sprinklers were simply no match for the 5-alarm blaze that tore through this luxury apartment complex recently in Edgewater, New Jersey. It prompted local officials to declare a state of emergency, and displaced more than 1,000 residents. It also has resulted in several lawsuits against the developer for millions of dollars in damages. Though it begs the question: Who is responsible? The designer? The developer? The owner? Or building officials?

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Letter: Support moratorium for light wood frame multistory construction

New Jersey.com
February 15, 2015
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: US East, United States

We ask that New Jerseyans voice support for bill A4195 recently introduced by Assemblyman Scott Rumana (R-Passaic). If enacted, it would impose a moratorium for up to two years on the construction in New Jersey of light wood frame multistory apartment housing. The summary of the bill states that it “requires evaluation of appropriateness of light frame construction for multiple dwellings and imposes a moratorium on light frame construction until determination and recommendations are adopted.”

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Concrete block manufacturers at it again, attacking wood construction

TreeHugger
February 16, 2015
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: US East, United States

The embers were barely cool before the concrete blockheads in Canada were running full page ads in all the newspapers decrying the dangers of wood construction. They go on in their ad: …They are running these scary ads because the Province of Ontario, like many other jurisdictions, has changed its building code to permit wood frame construction up to six stories high. They do claim that the Edgewater building was “built to code”, but which code? The blockheads don’t mention that the fire was started by workers with a blowtorch who didn’t call 911 but decided that they could put it out themselves, delaying response by at least 15 minutes.

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Forestry

Forestry is mismanged

Letter by Anthony Britneff
Vancouver Sun
February 13, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

The old axiom, “if it is too good to be true, then it probably isn’t”, applies to the fairytale opinion piece penned by James Gorman and Rick Jeffery, the CEOs of two forest industry associations. Gorman and Jeffery write, “B.C. plants 200 million trees a year” which is a woefully inadequate number. The Forest Practices Board pointed out in a special report that the area of forestland that is economic and feasible to plant is in the order of 2 million hectares, the greatest area in need of replanting in B.C.’s history of forest management. The CEOs trumpet, “our forests capture two billion tonnes of carbon annually,” a statement that is pure bunkum given that our forests are net emitters of carbon.

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TimberWest passes forestry audit

BC Forest Practices Board
February 13, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

VICTORIA – An audit of TimberWest’s operations in Tree Farm Licence 47, near Campbell River, found legal compliance with B.C.’s forestry legislation, as well as the South Central Coast Order and the Vancouver Island Land Use Plan Higher Level Plan Order, according to a report released today. “The audit identified an area of improvement related to assessing wildfire hazards,” said Tim Ryan, board chair.

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That Clayoquot, clearcut sound on St. Margarets Bay

Chronicle Herald
February 16, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

St. Margarets Bay is seriously up in arms. Three huge clearcuts are proposed for the mouth of the Ingram River. People are readying chains and padlocks. Ringing in their ears, the echo of B.C.’s massive (and successful) demonstrations, “Clayoquot!!” Bay people know management of the province’s .6-million-hectare Western Crown Lands (less the 14,800-hectare Medway Community Forest and the proposed 14,800-hectare Mi’kmaq Forestry Initiative) is about to be handed over to a consortium of 16 mills. They say now is the time for the Department of Natural Resources to put paid to last year’s Western Crown Lands Conceptual Plan and much ballyhooed 2011 Natural Resource Strategy, idealistically entitled “The Path We Share.”

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Forestry Agreement Decision Delay (radio)

CBC News
February 13, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

Terry Seguin talks to NB’s minister of Natural Resources Denis Landry, about the controversial Forestry Agreement.

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House panel advances bill calling for study of public land transfer

The Santa Fe New Mexican
February 12, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States

A House committee on Wednesday gave a thumbs up to a bill that would establish a commission to study the transfer of federal public lands to state, tribal or land grant control. Rep. Bill McCamley, D-Mesilla Park, was the only member of the Agriculture, Water and Wildlife Committee to vote against House Bill 291, which drew opposition from a number of witnesses. …. Many said they were frustrated with increasing restrictions on grazing and logging on federal lands, blaming federal agency land management practices for the increase in wildfires in the last few years.

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Public lands: Obama’s budget includes boost for national parks

Summit County Voice
February 15, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States

FRISCO – The National Park Service could see funding for essential programs and operational needs climb $432.9 million this year under President Obama’s proposed budget for fiscal year 2016. “This is an investment in ‘America’s best idea’ that pays dividends in gateway communities across the nation,” said National Park Service Director Jonathan B. Jarvis.”For every dollar appropriated to the National Park Service in the President’s 2016 Centennial budget, $10 is returned to the American economy in the form of visitor spending, travel and tourism and construction jobs,” Jarvis said. The funds will help parks upgrade aging infrastructure and respond to climate change, he added.

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Fallen trees, rickety bridges plague nation’s trails

USA Today
February 12, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States

DENVER — The world’s largest trail system has fallen into significant disrepair thanks to budget cuts and ballooning costs to fight wildfires across America. The U.S. Forest Service’s 158,000 miles of trails across forests and grasslands serve 165 million hikers, motorcyclists, equestrians, mountain bikers and hunters annually, but only about 25% of the trails meet the agency’s own quality standards. Good trails make it possible to go deep into forests to find solitude, to track big game, and to appreciate the great outdoors.  Washed-out trails, rickety bridges and fallen trees pose a danger to
users who expect government lands to be well run, say advocates who want
Congress to give the Forest Service more money and resources to fix
things.

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Wyden introduces bill to restore timber payments

Bend Bulletin
February 13, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

WASHINGTON — Sens. Ron Wyden, D-Ore., and Mike Crapo, R-Idaho, introduced legislation Thursday that would reinstate timber payments for rural counties for three years. The bill, called the Secure Rural Schools and Payment in Lieu of Taxes Repair Act, would provide funding at 2011 levels, or roughly $360 million for more than 700 counties nationwide. Wyden and Crapo co-wrote the 2000 law that created county payments as a way for rural counties to transition to new economies after logging on federal land decreased dramatically in the 1990s. The Secure Rural Schools legislation was reauthorized several times, but it lapsed last year, and without additional congressional action, counties will receive much smaller payments in 2015.

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Commissioners consider challenging feds over timber payments

Don Gurney offers advice on wagon road lands, shares details from BLM meeting
The World
February 12, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

COQUILLE — Coos County commissioners held a special work session on Tuesday to consider taking the federal government to task when it comes to payment for the Coos Bay Wagon Road lands. The commissioners, for the first time as an elected body, started a discussion about valuating the timber those lands hold — a value estimated in the billions of dollars — and using that value to calculate payments the county gets from the government. Those payments are calculated now only on the value of the land, not the trees on it. Don Gurney joined Commissioners Melissa Cribbins, Bob Main and John Sweet, along with county assessor Steve Jansen, to offer his advice on the matter and share details of his recent meeting with the Bureau of Land Management regarding the wagon road lands.

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Use every tool with the feds

Baker City Herald
February 11, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Bill Harvey, the new chairman of the Baker County Board of Commissioners, speaks with passion about protecting Baker County from the onerous and sometimes just plain silly decisions federal agencies make regarding the 1 million acres of the county that are public land. (That’s about half the county’s area, by the way.) We agree with Harvey about the importance of this topic, and we like his enthusiasm. Ultimately, though, we want Harvey and fellow commissioners Mark Bennett and Tim L. Kerns to employ the strategy that gives the county the loudest possible voice, as it were, in exerting its influence over how federal agencies manage that massive chunk of ground that’s so vital to our economy and our way of life.

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The ‘Settled’ Science of Eggs

American Clarion
February 12, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

…The northern spotted owl was declared an endangered species back in the early 1990s and the remedy was that large swaths of forest in the Northwest were placed off-limits for timber harvesting. Now, two decades later, mill towns are ghost towns, and environmentalists are pressing to take even more land out of production. Yet, the original goal of the northern spotted owl recovery plan was to get 3,000 nesting pairs well distributed throughout the region that included northern California, Oregon, Washington and Idaho. Today, there are 3,000 nesting pairs on privately-owned land in California alone. Privately-owned land where timber harvesting continues and peacefully co-exists with a thriving species.

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Assembly to consider Tongass Transfer support

KRBD
February 13, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

The Ketchikan Gateway Borough Assembly on Tuesday will consider a resolution supporting efforts by the state and its Congressional Delegation to transfer the Tongass National Forest from federal control to the State of Alaska. The resolution was placed on the agenda at the request of Assembly Member Glen Thompson. In his sponsor statement, Thompson writes that the Tongass Transfer and Transition Act would provide a mechanism for such a transfer of ownership. The resolution states that the president of the United States has “demonstrated that he will utilize executive orders to put Alaska’s natural resources off limits to all Alaskans.”

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Focus on Fielder: Thompson Falls senator leads charge on land transfer debate

Independent Record
February 15, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Republican state Sen. Jennifer Fielder says she sees “a lot of hopelessness” in her northwestern Montana district — and that’s why she’s leading the charge in Montana to transfer management of most federal lands to the state. Fielder represents rural, forested Sanders and Mineral counties, where logging and other work in the woods provided a good living for many. But those days have waned, and Fielder believes it’s largely because of federal land-management policies.

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State takeover: A look at land management legislation proposed by Sen. Fielder

The Missoulian
February 14, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

HELENA – Sen. Jennifer Fielder, R-Thompson Falls, is behind several bills related to federal land management in Montana. Here’s a summary: Senate Bill 215: Prohibits the state from selling any federal lands transferred to the state. Before the Senate Judiciary Committee. SB274: Prohibits the sale of any federal land in Montana. Hearing Thursday in Senate Judiciary Committee. SB298: Requires the attorney general to seek state’s 5 percent share from sales of any national forest land since 1889. Hearing Thursday in Senate Judiciary Committee.

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Our View: An aggressive approach with the feds and timber

Coos County begins to stand on its hind legs over timber federal payments issue
The World
February 12, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

The commissioners held a work session with Gurney on Tuesday. And while it was in no official capacity, Gurney gave the commissioners strong advice on a new and bold approach the county should take regarding Coos Bay Wagon Road lands and the payments we receive from the federal government. Basically, it’s this: We estimate the value of the timber on those lands — which, by the way, has never been calculated in federal payments before — and send the U.S. government a bill. Up to now we’ve simply waited for the Bureau of Land Management to send the county funds every year based on what it thought the land itself was worth. Timber was always valued at zero. But Gurney has always maintained that the original 1939 bill establishing the wagon road lands required that the timber be valuated, too.

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Guest Opinion: Legal poisons in our waters

Ashland Daily Tidings
February 13, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

For decades, we’ve feared potential terrorist contamination of our water supplies. But spraying poisons on our roads, farms and forests for mere weed control? — Legal, throughout the state. The following example is but a flea-bite of what has been going on for the past several decades, in which we’ve also seen a dramatic rise in various diseases. What was once only correlation is now becoming clearer as causation, thanks to independent research — often, international. Recently, a local timber company notified the state of chemical ground application (banned on federal lands). …This is the annual nightmare in our rural community, together with aerial spraying of farms and forests and roadside applications.

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U.S. logger urges prairie residents to take charge of policy debates

The Western Producer
February 12, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Bruce Vincent has probably given his speech dozens of times, but he still tears up when the audience really “gets” his message.? The American logger and motivational speaker earned a standing ovation after he addressed the Sask-atchewan Beef Industry Conference Jan. 21 in Regina and urged producers to be advocates for their industry and the new leaders of the environmental movement. He gave a similar speech a day later at the annual Tiffin Lecture in Lethbridge.? …Vincent said he is a third-generation logger, but Vincent Logging of Libby, Montana, is a victim of a society that decided chainsaws were not part of its vision of the forest.?

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Montana Wood Products Association: Don’t transfer federal lands to state

The Missoulian
February 14, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

The Montana Wood Products Association warned legislators on Friday that trying to take control of federal lands would return the state to the “timber wars” of the 1980s and ’90s. “This issue is fraught with way too many questions than answers,” MWPA executive director Julia Altemus said. “The timber industry does not have time to deal with that. It muddies the waters, and it’s a distraction from what we need to be focusing on.” Altemus said the policy statement came in response to a slate of bills working through the 2015 Legislature to study or commit the state to manage or own national forests and other federal property. While the Wood Products Association decries the steep decline in access to timber on federal lands over the years, its board argues that state control wouldn’t help.

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Two locals reappointed to state forestry board

The Times-Standard
February 13, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

California Gov. Jerry G. Brown Jr. announced Friday that two Humboldt County democrats have been appointed to the California Board of Forestry and Fire Protection. Mark Andre, 59 of Arcata, and Michael Miles, 44 of Eureka, were both reappointed to the board, where they have served for five and four years respectively, according to a press release from the governor’s office. The position is not compensated and requires confirmation from the Senate, according to the release. Andre has been director of environmental services at the city of Arcata since 2006 and served on the California Board of Forestry and Fire Protection since 2010.

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The Existential Threat

Payson Roundup
February 13, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

… That’s why we’re so excited about the growing support for the Forest Service’s Four Forests Restoration Initiative (4FRI), perhaps the only way to prevent the next mega-fire. The most recent bit of good news comes in the form of a crucial endorsement of the Forest Service prescription for forest rejuvenation. The so-called Stakeholders Group consists of 30 wildly diverse groups, which spent years forging a consensus among local officials like Gila County Supervisor Tommie Martin, key environmental groups and even timber company officials on the need to log small trees and leave the remaining big trees standing.

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Daines to hold forest management reform roundtables

The Missoulian
February 15, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Sen. Steve Daines will travel to Columbia Falls, Missoula and Bozeman this week to hold roundtables on forest management reform… Daines will meet with local stakeholders – including sportsmen, local elected officials, timber representatives, mill workers, conservationists and local business owners – to discuss the Senate’s work to develop comprehensive forest management reform legislation that grows jobs, improves the health of all 10 of Montana’s national forests, increases recreational access and secures a stable revenue source for Montana counties.

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Activists Concerned About DNR’s Ash Salvage Sales

Indiana Public Radio
February 12, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

As the Emerald Ash Borer continues to spread throughout the state, the Department of Natural Resources is trying to make use of some of the infected trees. The department held an ash salvage sale this week at the Jackson Washington State Forest, allowing loggers to purchase timber from trees the bug has invaded. It’s the first of several sales planned throughout the state. While the DNR says it’s a way to generate revenue from trees that will eventually have to come down, activists worry about the implications for state forests. …“What this represents is this pattern of using selective science or no
science to support a forest management plan that maximizes commodity
timber production on state forests, on public forests, over habitat
preservation, over public recreation,” Luurstema says.

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Acres of trees down but forester says reservoir land will recover

Standard Speaker
February 15, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

Logs, tree limbs and twigs lie pressed into the snow after loggers cut into a forest near the Humboldt Reservoir in Hazle Township. “Aesthetically, it looks like a moonscape now, but come June I’d be glad to take anybody back there to see what it’s like when it re-foliates,” said Paul Kowalczyk, a forester, who decided that the best plan for the oak trees on 76 acres was to cut them all down. A swarm of gypsy moths in 2009, followed by drought, killed the big trees on the land owned by the Hazleton City Authority, which supplies water to the region.

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Clear-Cut Issue: Global Brands Ranked (and Urged) to Address Deforestation

Brand Channel.com
February 15, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: International

Deforestation is at last being acknowledged as a global problem, and nonprofit Forest 500, a modern-day Smokey the Bear, aims to stamp it out entirely. Forest 500 identifies, ranks and tracks companies, governments and financial institutions worldwide that together could virtually eradicate tropical deforestation. Of 250 companies ranked using a five-point scale developed by Global Canopy Programme, only seven received top marks: Groupe Danone from France; Kao Corp. from Japan; Nestle from Switzerland; Procter & Gamble from the US; and, from the UK, Reckitt Benckiser, Unilever and HSBC.

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Solomon Islands landowners on Kolombangara Island challenge logging approval for forest minister’s company

Radio Australia
February 16, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: International

A logging company majority-owned by Solomon Islands’ forestry minister is facing a legal challenge from landowners keen to protect the cloud forest on Kolombangara Island in the country’s Western Province. The ground-breaking case has been in and out of the courts for five years and is due for its next appearance soon. It has been a long and tortuous road for the landowners who first brought legal action in 2010 to prevent Success Company Ltd logging cloud forest on the slopes of Kolombangara’s imposing volcanic mountain.

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China’s rosewood craving cuts deep into Madagascar rainforests

Prized timber is being felled illegally at increasing rate despite Cites ban and environmental outcry
The Guardian
February 16, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: International

Another day draws to its end in Antanandavehely, a peaceful village on the eastern slopes of the Masoala peninsula, the largest nature conservation area in Madagascar. The last rafts, loaded with rosewood, pull into the river bank. As the loggers return, the atmosphere grows festive, infused with the smell of beer and the sound of dice clicking. Among the russet logs, exhausted by a hard day’s labour, Blandine checks the weight of the incoming cargo. Wearing a little black dress and sparkling jewels, she is a go-between for the big businessmen on the coast. Dipping into a bag full of banknotes she pays $135 for a two-metre-long log, generally weighing about 120kg, a fortune in this poverty-stricken country.

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Trials show phosphite halts kauri disease

Radio New Zealand
February 15, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: International

Scientists working on the kauri die-back programme have found a way to arrest the disease that is killing trees from Auckland to the Far North. Dr Ian Horner, from Plant and Food Research, said the horticultural chemical, phosphite, was proving very effective against phytophthora: the water mould that infects kauri through their roots. He said avocado growers used phosphite to ward off a similar disease in their orchards, and over the past three years, researchers had been using the chemical in field trials in four kauri forests. Dr Horner said the results were promising. “In the trees that had not been treated, many of the lesions, these big bleeding cankers at the base of the tree, were spreading and advancing up the trunk and will eventually cause death.

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Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy

There You Go Again

Biomass Magazine
February 13, 2015
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: United States

Frequent readers of my blogs know that I find mainstream coverage of the biomass industry wanting. A story from the New York Times authored by Eduardo Porter entitled “A Biofuel Debate: Will Cutting Trees Cut Carbon?” is the latest in a growing string of well-intentioned stories about our industry that I’m afraid do little to illuminate the realities of how our industry fits into the broader energy, forestry and agriculture landscape. While Porter never mentions wood pellets, it is clear that early in his piece he’s talking about global and national policies that support a transition to the production of electric power from woody biomass.

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Missoula team’s wood waste project wins $25,000 award

The Missoulian
February 15, 2015
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: United States, US West

About one quarter of all the wood cut on a logging project gets left in the woods. Stephen Jenkins thinks he has a way to make money off those leftovers. The idea that he and Jena Trejo came up with was good enough to win $25,000 as runner-up in the second Barrett Foundation Business Concept Challenge… “At 33 cents a ton, loggers would have to pay for any methods to dispose of it. I’m a wildland firefighter in the summers, and we spend a lot of time burning those slash piles. That’s tax money is lost, and it’s dangerous. We wanted to find a way to make it economically viable.” Jenkins and Trejo (who graduated from UM last semester) conceived a trailer equipped with a digester that turned branches, boughs and other wood waste into methanol and liquid carbon dioxide.

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Are wood chips really worse than burning coal?

Some campaigners believe that using apparently environmentally friendly wood can be three times worse for the climate
The Telegraph
February 14, 2015
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: International

This week two US green groups – the Natural Resources Defence Council and the Dogwood Alliance – met the Energy Secretary Ed Davey to urge him to stop Europe’s second biggest polluter, Drax power station, cutting coal use. And the Royal Society for the Protection of Birds has said much the same, even though the Yorkshire plant has already slashed carbon dioxide emissions from its chimneys by eight million tons a year through converting two of its six boilers to burn wood pellets. The reason for this apparent illogicality is that the groups believe that using apparently environmentally friendly wood can be three times worse for the climate than burning the world’s most polluting fuel, and threatens some of the world’s most wildlife-rich forest.

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