Tree Frog Forestry News

Daily Archives: March 2, 2015

Business & Politics

Rapid response to massive layoffs

Columbia Valley Pioneer
February 27, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

With a looming shift layoff of more than 80 workers at Canfor’s Canal Flats sawmill — more than half of the mill’s employees — effective May 4th, provincial resources are flooding into the village to assist in the transition. On the morning of Monday, February 23rd, Canal Flats mayor Ute Juras and other councillors met with a representative from the Ministry of Jobs Tourism and Skills Training to work on an inventory of available industrial land in Canal Flats to entice other industries to the area. With an abundance of fully serviced, level land near railway access, there is potential in Canal Flats, Ms. Juras noted.

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Coroner’s inquest into deadly B.C. sawmill explosion begins Monday

March 2, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

Three years after a deadly sawmill explosion at Lakeland Mills, workers and relatives of the victims say they are resigned to not getting the justice they want from an inquest that starts Monday. Coroner’s inquests are fact-finding processes and do not find fault. However, family and workers say they hold out some hope the inquest in Prince George will help provide answers on how and why the dust-fuelled explosion happened. It’s important, they say, if recommendations are made, they are followe …The quasi-judicial inquest provides the first public airing of the facts surrounding the Lakeland explosion after Crown counsel rejected charges following a botched WorkSafeBC investigation.

Inquest to Start in Lakeland Mills Deaths from 250 News

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Western Montana company putting beetle-killed timber to good use

KPAX
February 26, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States, US West

DRUMMOND – The infestation of the Mountain Pine Beetle continues to grow across the West and Montana’s forests are not immune to the damage and destruction that’s left behind when these nasty, little creatures move in. Reporter Brenda Bassett went On Special Assignment and found a small, silver lining when it comes to making something out of nothing. When the conditions are right, beetles can kill large numbers of healthy trees across thousands of acres. It’s not a pretty sight as the once flourishing forests are now spotted with the ugliness of beetle kill.

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Madison mill joins complaint against Canadian papermaker

Madison Paper and a Minnesota mill have asked the U.S. to slap a higher duty on special publishing paper imported from Nova Scotia.
Central Maine
February 27, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: US East, United States

Madison Paper Industries has joined with a Minnesota-based producer of supercalendered paper to file a formal complaint with two U.S. government agencies against a Canadian mill that they say is hurting the U.S. market. The complaint, filed Thursday with the U.S. International Trade Commission and U.S. Department of Commerce by the Coalition, seeks higher import duties on the special publishing paper made by Port Hawkesbury Paper in Nova Scotia. …Executives at Madison Paper said they have been working for about two years to bring the focus of the U.S. officials to a $125 million funding package that the Nova Scotia government granted to Port Hawkesbury Paper in 2012 to restart the mill, Drechsel said.

Collins questions subsidies to Canadian paper mill from The Ripon Advance

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Wood, Paper & Green Building

Old-growth stumps and burls command high prices in furniture, landscape enterprise

The News Tribune
February 26, 2015
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: United States, US West

When John Evans looks at logging debris he sees more than lumps of wood. In fallen logs he finds retaining walls, in standing snags he visualizes garden art and in gnarled burls he sees tables. For over a century, logging in the Pacific Northwest has been about board feet and right angles. Now, landscapers and homeowners are seeing the beauty in untouched wood. They’re using it as garden focal points and to make rustic furniture. Call it the whole tree movement. The company Evans works for, NDC Timber Inc. of Elma, makes the bulk of its revenue from contract logging and milling tongue and groove boards.

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Letter: Lightweight construction costs lives and treasure

NJ.com
February 27, 2015
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: US East, United States

I wasn’t aware of lightweight wood construction until the catastrophic Edgewater fire (“Edgewater fire raises concerns over AvalonBay development,” Jan. 27). It took little effort, however, to discover that firefighters have long known lightweight construction burns hotter and collapses faster than other types of construction, posing increased risk to firefighters and occupants. For years, firefighter associations have been calling for upgraded fire, life-safety and construction codes, but their efforts have been thwarted by the construction and developer lobbies.

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In Wyckoff, building materials become issue in proposed health care center expansion

North Jersey
March 1, 2015
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: US East, United States

WYCKOFF — Residents opposed to the expansion of the Christian Health Care Center say January’s fire at the Avalon at Edgewater apartment complex shows what can happen if the center developer is allowed to use combustible construction material, as it wants to. State law currently allows such material, and that has become a point of potential conflict over the expansion application as opponents call on the township’s zoning officials to stand their ground after recently refusing to allow such materials. In 2013, the center’s representatives signed an agreement with Wyckoff that it would use only non-combustible construction materials. But then they asked to be allowed to use cheaper, combustible materials like wood framing. 

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Minneapolis Office Building Made of Wood Would Be a U.S. First

NextCity.org
February 27, 2015
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: US East, United States

Last November, the Hines development company unveiled plans for a new office building in the North Loop section of Minneapolis. Seems like ordinary news, except that the building would be the first of its kind in the U.S to be made primarily of wood. The builders refer to the project as “T3” for “Timber, Technology and Transit.” …“This building is very unique,” the lead architect, Michael Green, told the Minneapolis Heritage Preservation Commission earlier this month. “It is the first large-scale office building built of timber in America. It is part of a revitalization of century-old ideas of how to build buildings.”

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US Reclaimed Wood from Pioneer Millworks to be Featured at Architecture & Construction Materials Show in Tokyo

Virtual-Strategy Magazine
March 1, 2015
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: International

Pioneer Millworks reclaimed USA wood will be on display at the 2015 Japan Architecture & Construction Materials Show, an annual, premier sustainable building event in Tokyo, Japan. They’ll join more than 1,000 suppliers and top manufacturers of the latest building products, services and technology. Reclaimed wood products sourced and manufactured by Pioneer Millworks from their Oregon and New York facilities have found popularity in Japan at restaurants, hotels, retailers, and corporate offices.

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Forestry

Forest fire expert says N.W.T. may be in for lots more smoke and flame

‘It’s Mother Nature doing her job,’ Mike Flannigan says
CBC News
March 1, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

A record fire year in the Northwest Territories in 2014 may not be an isolated occurrence, according to a professor at the University of Alberta in Edmonton who is an expert on forest fires. Historically, bad fire years are caused by conditions that may last for several years, Mike Flannigan said. “They often come in clumps,” he said. “So if 2014 is the first year of a clump, you know, I wouldn’t be surprised to see a bad fire year either this year, next year or the year after.” Flannigan said. “I would expect one or two more bad fire years in the next three or four years.”

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Nova Scotia squanders its forest resources

Chronicle Herald
February 27, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

It has been a year since the Ivany commission published its One Nova Scotia report, setting out 19 goals for the province. Among them were 4,200 new business startups annually, increasing exports, and more full-time, year-round jobs. Since last February, however, two hardwood flooring mills have gone out of business, putting 28 skilled, full-time employees out of work. Finewood Flooring in Victoria County was in operation for 33 years, Rivers Bend Wood Products in Antigonish County for 20 years, and both were heralded as model, value-added wood products operations. At their peak, their combined workforce was 36 full-time employees.

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Clear-cut logging, predators decimate moose

Letter by Dave Huckell
Chronicle Journal
February 28, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

Re Moose Measures Get Mixed Reaction — CJ, Feb. 10: Why is the Ministry of Natural Resources so surprised that the moose population has hit rock bottom in many wildlife management units in the Northwest? The animal’s population has been on a steady decline since 2000. That’s when the ministry began allowing forest companies to expand the size of clear-cuts, clearing away anything a moose could possibly hide behind As a hunter in the Dryden-to-Basket Lake area for the past 45 years, I’ve seen the changes in how the ministry manages the forest, and it isn’t pretty. Moose that live in these newly logged areas are killed en masse when they are opened to hunters.

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Administration officials support changing wildfire funding

Treat largest blazes as natural disasters, they urge Senate panel
Bend Bulletin
February 27, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States

WASHINGTON — Administration officials gave full-throated support for treating the largest wildfires as natural disasters as they defended the White House’s budget on Capitol Hill this week. In separate appearances before the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee, U.S. Forest Service Chief Tom Tidwell and Interior Secretary Sally Jewell said the administration would like to revise the framework the federal government uses to pay for fighting wildfires. “It’s a better business model, it’s a better approach,” Tidwell said Thursday, referring to the plan to treat the top 1 percent of wildfires, which account for 30 percent of the cost of fighting wildfires, as natural disasters, with response funded through the Federal Emergency Management Agency.

Cantwell applauds National Fires Service funding in wake of WA wildfires from KGMI.com

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Plumas Collaborative recruits Portola residents for forest restoration initiative

Plumas County News
February 27, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

In the second of a series of introductory meetings countywide, Plumas Collaborative representatives met with dozens of Portola residents Feb. 18, at the city library, to ignite a collective dialog on the management of local forests. The grassroots collaborative is a partnership between the Plumas National Forest and the Plumas County Fire Safe Council. The goal is to develop a new community-based effort rethinking how to bring the public back into the management of public lands. The group looks to the Collaborative Forest Landscape Restoration Act as a platform, which can provide federal funding for forest management on public lands. CFLRA also requires diverse involvement with public input for a strategy aimed at meeting the needs of the forest and its users.

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My Turn: The folly of Chenault’s federal land grab

Juneau Empire
February 27, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

If House Speaker Mike Chenault, R-Nikiski, has his way, the Tongass National Forest and another 150 million acres of federally owned land will soon become state of Alaska property. The state could then sell the resource rights, or the land itself, to the highest bidder. After splitting the proceeds with the feds, our long-term fiscal crisis will be solved. In some circles, this would be known as daydreaming. …My first criticism regarding HB 115 is that, as drafted, it’s completely unrelated to the Statehood Act. While it’s true Alaska hasn’t been given patent to more than 42 million of the 104 million acres in accordance with the Act, this legislation, if passed, would demand the federal government turn over 165 million acres above and beyond those.

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Tester lawsuit gaffe reveals real frustration with logging litigation

The Missoulian
March 1, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Anyone who’s worked a fire lookout knows it’s tough to tell a wisp of morning fog from the smoke of a fresh lightning strike. Not to excuse last week’s “four Pinocchios” gaff Sen. Jon Tester made regarding timber lawsuits, but it’s really hard to figure out just what the U.S. Forest Service is up to. And Tester’s misstatements about problems with national forest management may reveal a hotter issue: Congress’ fixation on changing the way people can challenge the agency in court. “There’s nothing in the cut-and-sold reports about lawsuits – it’s just about timber sales,” said Todd Morgan of the University of Montana’s Bureau of Business and Economic Research. 

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Meet Your Forest: What’s happening with pine beetles in our forests?

Summit Daily
March 1, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta) is a two-needled pine that grows at elevations as high as 12,000 feet and is well suited to the White River National Forest ecosystem. It is often called Rocky Mountain lodgepole pine. Unfortunately, in Summit County and most of Colorado, lodgepole pines are dying by the thousands because several years of drought have stressed the trees and encouraged infestation by pine beetles. Lower than normal precipitation affects the ability of trees to fight off the pine beetle.

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Heavy toll of fire season prompts changes

Herald and News
March 1, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Remember the wildland fire smoke this past summer? Nationwide, about 63,000 fires burned more than 3.59 million acres. Oregon had the fourth-highest number of acres burned, with 2,848 fires scorching 351,000 acres, according to the National Interagency Fire Center. The 2014 federal firefighting costs were $1.5 billion. That figure does not include property damage. Final 2014 property losses have not been tallied, but the trend is not good. According to the National Fire Protection Association, 2004-2012 primary structure losses totaled more than 13,000. In 2013, it reported that 21 individual fires accounted for $10 million or more in property losses, with the costliest at $420.5 million.

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Forest restoration gets help from state utility giant

AZ Daily Sun
February 28, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Several new watershed restoration and monitoring projects are taking shape around northern Arizona’s forests, but the impetus behind them isn’t a nonprofit, municipality, university or the Forest Service. It’s Salt River Project, the utility that provides water and power to hundreds of thousands of people in and around the Phoenix metropolitan area. The projects, which aim to increase understanding and preservation of the state’s ponderosa forests, indicate the vital role these landscapes play in the utility’s power and water operations.

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Environmentalists give Kurt Schrader lower scores than other Oregon Democrats in Congress

The Oregonian
February 26, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Among the Oregon Democrats on Capitol Hill, Rep. Kurt Schrader was even more of an outlier Wednesday on environmental issues when the League of Conservation Voters released its latest scorecard. The influential environmental lobby said that Schrader voted with the group 60 percent of the time — compared to the other three House Democrats from Oregon who each received ratings of at least 94 percent. Oregon Democratic Sens. Ron Wyden and Jeff Merkley both received scores of 80 percent. But the league said only five major bills related to the environment reached the Senate floor, so the senators only disagreed with the league on one bill — a measure supported by a strong majority of the Senate that reversed a controversial flood insurance law.

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Global warming: California’s majestic redwoods at risk

New study pinpoints climate-change threats to Pacific Northwest rainforests
Summit County Voice
February 27, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

FRISCO — Huge reservoirs of biodiversity in the rainforests of the Pacific Northwest are at risk as global warming reshapes climate conditions in the region. Suitable habitat for majestic coastal redwoods could shrink by 23 percent, and other species like Alaska’s yellow cedars are already dying back as temperatures warm. “In the Pacific Northwest, the glass is half empty as the climate may no longer support rainforest communities like coast redwood,” said Dr. Dominick A. DellaSala, Chief Scientist of Geos Institute, announcing the results of a recent study that focused on the future distribution of eight rainforest conifers across a 2,200-mile stretch of coastal rainforests in the Pacific Northwest, British Columbia, and Alaska.

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Murkowski slams agency over Tongass harvests

EENews
February 27, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Timber mills in southeast Alaska are “hanging on by their fingernails” and may disappear forever if the Forest Service does not increase harvests on the Tongass National Forest, a key senator warned yesterday. “It feels like ‘Groundhog Day’ all over again,” Energy and Natural Resources Chairwoman Lisa Murkowski (R) told Forest Service Chief Tom Tidwell at a panel hearing yesterday to discuss the agency’s fiscal 2016 budget request. “It seems like we have the same conversation year after year after year about how the Forest Service is going to get the timber cut up.”

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Oregon bans use of bee-killing insecticides on linden trees

The Oregonian
February 27, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

A state rule established Friday bans the use of four types of bee-killing insecticides on linden trees and related species. The rule, enacted at the request of the Oregon Department of Agriculture, makes it illegal to spray lindens, basswood trees and their relatives with any product containing dinotefuran, imidacloprid, thiamethoxam or clothianidin. The four chemicals are all neonicotinoids, a class of insecticides that has been identified as a major contributor to the collapse of bee colonies around the world. They’ve also been implicated in seven major bee die-offs in Oregon since June 2013, when 50,000 bees dropped dead in a Wilsonville Target supermarket parking lot after workers sprayed dinotefuran on trees the bees swarmed.

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Four Corners logging, regrowth offer ‘instant curriculum’

Superior Telegram
February 27, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

Wrapped in layers of warm clothing, Four Corners Elementary School students made the trek along the school’s Burstrom Trail on Tuesday to see a changed landscape. About 19 acres of forestland around the school is being logged for aspen, also known as poplar or popple. The operation will provide student safety and allow the forest and trail to grow. …”The money we earn from this timber sale is going to go right back into our trail and the future of our students and benefit them, and the woods,” Jones said. The dollars used to improve the trail — spreading new wood chips on the trail and adding another evaporator for maple syrup operations, building an outdoor classroom pavilion — and integrating forestry and environmental education into the school’s science curriculum.

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Beautiful birches: Flexible forest dwellers are built to survive even the harshest conditions

Concord Monitor
March 1, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

I’ve thought a lot about birch trees lately. One reason is that the clump of gray birches in our yard started the season by bowing down to the winter gods under the weight of the Thanksgiving snow. Though the day after that storm I shook the trees to relieve them of their burden, a couple of them still have a distinctly bowed shape, having been regularly assaulted by the great white blanket for several months. I’m hopeful that the coming warmth and new growth with help them “spring” back to their former upright stature.

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To Curb Bear Population, Florida Reinstates Hunting Season

NPR
February 28, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

For the first time in two decades, Florida officials have scheduled a bear hunting season. It’s a response to a rise in bear attacks — but it has some environmentalists upset. Experts say there’s plenty of room for humans and black bears to co-exist, but the smell of food is pulling the animals out of the woods and into neighborhoods. If you want to understand the situation, take a trip to Franklin County, in the pandhandle. A few months ago, a bear attacked a teenager there while she walked her dog near a convenience store. Kaitlin Goode, a biologist with the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, explains that garbage — strewn through the woods and across the road at a recycling center for appliances — is part of the problem. She says bears can’t help but drag tasty things back into the woods.

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$37 million for Black Hills restoration project

kotatv.com
March 27, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

RAPID CITY, S.D. – The U.S. Department of Agriculture is giving $37 million dollars to South Dakota so a number of forest districts in the country can be thinned, including one district in the Black Hills. The machine in the video is sawing and stripping trees in the Hell Canyon Ranger District of the Black Hills National Forest, which is near Custer. 65 hundred acres in the district are already contracted and scheduled to be thinned. With more money allocated to the Black Hills vestal project, an effort aimed at improving the health of the forest, 14 hundred more acres will be thinned.  This is great news for both the forest service and homeowners in the area.

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Abbott’s forestry call shamed Aust: Greens

AAP
February 28, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: International

PRIME Minister Tony Abbott made a “captain’s call” over Tasmanian forestry policy which globally humiliated Australia, the Greens and a conservation group claim. THE Wilderness Society (TWS) says Freedom of Information documents reveal Mr Abbott pushed forward with election commitments in the sector despite departmental caution.  One pledge included de-listing 74,000 hectares of Tasmanian Wilderness World Heritage Area, an application swiftly rejected by the United Nations’ World Heritage Committee in June last year.

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Modern logging techniques benefit rainforest wildlife

Science Blog
February 27, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: International


New research has highlighted the value of a modern logging technique for maintaining biodiversity in tropical forests that are used for timber production. Researchers at the Durrell Institute of Conservation and Ecology (DICE) at the University of Kent say that with over 4 million km2 of tropical forests harvested for timber worldwide, improving the way logging impacts on wildlife is essential for global biodiversity conservation. Members of DICE conducted the most comprehensive study of Reduced-Impact Logging (RIL) to date, surveying wildlife communities over a five-year period before and after timber harvesting.

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Forest tree seeds arrive at Svalbard’s ‘Doomsday vault’

BBC News
March 1, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: International

The Svalbard “doomsday” vault – widely known for protecting global food crop seeds – has accepted its first delivery of forest tree species seeds. Norway spruce and Scots pine samples have entered the vault inside a mountain on the Arctic archipelago. The frozen depository opened in 2008 and is designed to withstand all natural and human disasters. Researchers hope the tree seed samples will help monitor long-term genetic changes in natural forests.

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Argentina fire chief sacked over Patagonia blaze

BBC News
March 1, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: International

Jorge Barrionuevo was sacked during a visit to the region by the government chief of staff. The fire is advancing towards Los Alerces National Park, which is home to larch trees dating back more than 1,000 years. The flames have already destroyed 200sq km (77 sq miles) of forest. Government chief of staff Anibal Fernandez said Mr Barrionuevo’s work had been “unsatisfactory”. The fire is believed to have been started by a lightning strike more than a week ago.

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Bamboo – An Answer to Deforestation or Not in Africa?

IPS News.net
March 1, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: International

HARARE – Deforestation is haunting the African continent as industrial growth paves over public commons and puts more hectares into private hands. According to the Environmental News Network, a web-based resource, Africa loses forest cover equal to the size of Switzerland every year, or approximately 41 000 square kilometres. The United Nations Environment Programme is also on record as saying the African continent loses over four million hectares (9.9 million acres) of natural forest annually, which is twice the world’s average deforestation rate… The dangerous pace of deforestation has triggered a market-based solution using bamboo, a fast-growing woody grass that grows chiefly in the tropics.

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No ‘captain’s call’ on forestry: Joyce

AAP
March 2, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: International

AGRICULTURE Minister Barnaby Joyce has rejected a claim that Prime Minister Tony Abbott made a “captain’s call” over Tasmanian forestry policy. THE Wilderness Society released Freedom of Information documents on Saturday claiming they revealed Mr Abbott pushed ahead with election commitments in the sector despite departmental caution. ,…But a spokesman for Mr Joyce on Monday said the letter was a departmental draft that was never signed by either of the ministers. “The draft letter was never sent to the prime minister,” he said.

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Satellite data suggests forest loss is accelerating

Reuters
March 2, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: International

LONDON – Satellite images suggest tropical forests from the Amazon to the Philippines are disappearing at a far more rapid pace than previously thought, a University of Maryland team of forest researchers say. The annual rate of deforestation from 1990 to 2010 was 62 percent higher than in the previous decade, and higher than previous estimates, according to a study carried out of satellite maps covering 80 percent of the world’s tropical forests. The new study questions the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization’s (FAO) assessment, which suggested that the rate of deforestation actually decreased 25 percent from 1990 to 2010.

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Brazil’s king of deforestation dethroned in drive to beat land clearers

Arrest of Ezekiel Castanha shines new spotlight on financial crime and may help bring breakthrough in effort to protect Amazon rainforest
The Guardian
March 2, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: International

For most of the past six years, Ezequiel Antônio Castanha had seemed a pillar of the community in the small Amazonian city of Novo Progresso. As the owner of a supermarket, hotel and car dealership, he provided more jobs than anyone else. … Today, however, the thick-set, middle-aged man sits in jail with a notoriety across Brazil as a Tony Soprano-like character whose businesses were used to launder money from one of the biggest land clearance syndicates ever uncovered. Castanha was arrested last weekend, along with 15 associates, in what has been hailed as a major breakthrough for environmental enforcement. The local media have described the detainee as the “king of deforestation”. According to the environment ministry Ibama, he and his gang were responsible for about 10% of deforestation in the Brazilian Amazon last year.

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Coalition splinters over timber policy

The Australian
February 28, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: International

A HIGH-LEVEL Coalition split over forest policy was resolved only after Tony Abbott overruled his Environment Minister and ignore­d departmental advice, The Weekend Australian can reveal. The Coalition went to the September 2013 election promising to rescind a swath of the recently extended Tasmanian Wilderness World Heritage Area and to halt all further forest protection. It did so against the urging of key timber industry players, fearful that the policy would destroy their “peace deal” with conservation groups, spook key markets and jeopardise top-flight product certification. The Weekend Australian can reveal the federal departments responsible for forest policy, Environ­ment and Agricult­ure, expressed serious concerns about the policy in the weeks after the Coalition formed government.

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Buddhist monk ordains trees to help the environment

BBC News
March 1, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: International

A Buddhist monk from north-east Thailand is so worried about the environment that he has been ordaining trees for 25 years. Since 1990 Phrakru Pitak Nanthakthun has been leading ceremonies to dress trees in orange robes as a way of convincing people that they should be viewed as sacred. He believes the symbolic act can help prevent the logging and deforestation that plague his home province of Nan. And people are taking notice, as Phrakru Pitak Nanthakthun has started a movement that is spreading across south-east Asia.

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Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy

Pellet plant process questioned

Stephanie Hoffman, Coldstream
Vernon Morning Star
March 1, 2015
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: Canada, Canada West

I have never been a political person until a pellet plant was being proposed for our community. I’ve done a lot of research on what Pinnacle Renewable Energy has stated it will be contributing to our air and surroundings in this beautiful Coldstream valley. What I’ve found is nothing but pollution of all sorts, but most importantly, a lung-clogging, potentially cancer-causing and all around environmentally detrimental particulate discharge. I thought that there was no way our mayor, our representative, would jeopardize the health and safety of our community. I was wrong. Even when errors in the data have been brought to council’s attention, majority rules on this process that has been flawed from the start.

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Round Valley First Forest Carbon Offset Project on Native Trust Land for California

Indian Country Today Media
February 26, 2015
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: United States, US West

The discussions of climate change and carbon footprints are important subjects within Indian country, and on February 24 the Round Valley Indian Tribes became a part of history as far as carbon emissions goes. Round Valley and New Forests on Tuesday announced the regulatory approval of the first forest carbon offset project developed on Native American trust land for the California carbon market. Carbon offsetting, according to carbonneutral.com, “is the use of carbon credits to enable businesses to compensate for their emissions, meet their carbon reduction goals and support the move to a low carbon economy.” The offsetting provides funding for renewable energy, forestry and resource conservation projects that generate reductions in greenhouse gas emissions.

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Middleton’s woodlands granted carbon credits of more than $2 million

The Post and Courier
March 1, 2015
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: US East, United States

Thousands of acres of woodlands adjacent to a historic Charleston landmark have gained another layer of protection in a first-of-its-kind project in the United States. More than 3,700 wooded acres of the 5,800-acre Middleton Place plantation forestlands west of S.C. Highway 61 have been awarded carbon credits to limit the amount of trees cut on the property and help California industries. If the more than 250,000 credits issued were sold at once, they would generate more than $2 million for the Middleton Place woodlands, a separate entity from the tourist attraction across the street along the Ashley River, said Colby Hollifield, Middleton’s woodlands manager.

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