Tree Frog Forestry News

Daily Archives: March 9, 2015

Business & Politics

Sawmill worker killed in blast had to be driven to ambulance, inquest hears

Prince George Citizen
March 6, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

PRINCE GEORGE — A worker who was killed in a Prince George sawmill explosion had to be loaded into the back of a truck and driven to an ambulance, a coroner’s inquest has heard. Firefighter Peter Brbot said he found Alan Little lying in some mud outside, burned beyond recognition but still alive, after the blast at Lakeland Mills on April 23, 2012. Little, whose clothes were burned off to the point that he had nothing but a sock on one foot, was taken to a triage station at the scene where firefighters waited “seven, eight, nine minutes maybe” for an ambulance to arrive, Brbot said.

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Inquest Resumes, Fire Response the Focus

250 News
March 9, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

Prince George, B.C.- The Coroner’s Inquest into the deaths of Alan Little and Glenn Roche, resumes this morning. The inquest will hear from fire responders, including Prince George Fire Rescue Chief, John Iverson, who will continue his testimony that was started last week.So far, the inquest has heard from workers who had long time experience at Lakeland, and some who survived the events of that tragic evening in April of 2012 when there was an explosion and fire. While the WorkSafeBC investigation concluded the explosion was the result of combustible dust being ignited by an issue with a gear reducer, some workers dispute that conclusion.

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What will we learn from the inquest?

Prince George Free Press
March 6, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

There are a few things emerging at the inquest into the deaths of Alan Little and Glenn Roche. One of the first things that is becoming clear is that the mill was in dire need of being cleaned. Workers have testified that clean-up crews were being pilfered for production. Senior managers have yet to testify, but will likely have their own story as to how clean-up was handled. But, there are some pretty damning stories. Donald Zwozdesky talked about an exit door that had so much sawdust piled behind it that it often couldn’t be opened. The steel door was bent and broken because the guys had put their boots and their shoulders to it so many times.

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Equipment not up to code, Lakeland inquest told

Prince George Citizen
March 6, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

The explosion that destroyed the Lakeland Mills sawmill originated in a spot where equipment not rated for use in a high sawdust area was operating, a coroner’s inquest into the disaster heard Friday.  B.C. Safety Authority engineer Jeff Coleman was on the stand to present findings from that organization’s investigation into the April 23, 2012 disaster that killed two employees and injured 21 others, some severely. Coleman said the explosion’s source was in the sawmill’s basement directly below where the large headrig was located on the main floor, one level above.

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Operations resume at APD mill

Fire started in head rig area
Alberni Valley Times
March 9, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

A fire that forced the evacuation of the Alberni Pacific Division sawmill last Tuesday was not caused by combustible dust, according to a joint investigation undertaken at the waterfront facility last week. An assessment by owner Western Forest Products, WorkSafe BC and the Port Alberni Fire Department has concluded that the incident started in the head rig portion of the mill where a saw makes the initial cuts to logs. But information gathered from the damaged facility has yet to determine if the blaze was the result of human error or a mechanical failure.

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Five areas businesses receive nearly $500K from NOHFC

TB Newswatch
March 6, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada East, Canada

THUNDER BAY – Andreas Petersen knows how important it is to be adaptive when conducting business in the forestry industry. After weathering the ups and downs of the industry for the past 25 years, the co-owner of Murillo Millworks is getting help from the province. The company was one of five area businesses to receive a total of nearly $485,000 in grant funding through the Northern Ontario Heritage Fund Corporation. “Do you go out and get the business first without having the infrastructure to support the business or do you have the infrastructure in place and then go get the business,” Petersen said at the funding announcement, which was held at their mill on Friday morning.

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Long road back from ‘disaster’: How one bad investment nearly destroyed Forest Paper Ltd

by Peter Kuitenbrouwer
Financial Post
March 9, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada East, Canada

Mr. Wasilenkoff is a high-flying guy; a few years ago, so was his company. In 2011 Fortress Paper stock hit $62.89. The stock has since lost 97% of its value, closing Friday at $2.15. Fortress announces its year-end results on Monday; analysts expect the company will lose $4.05 per share. The answer to what went wrong lies far from the glamourous world of the jet-set, in Thurso, Que., a village of 3,500 on the Ottawa River 40 kilometres east of our nation’s capital, buried right now under a metre of snow. Thurso is famous for two things: Guy Lafleur, the all-time leading scorer of the Montreal Canadiens; and its pulp mill, which opened in 1956 and emits an acrid stench one can smell several villages away.

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US softwood lumber export to Mena reaches $27.4m

Trade Arabia.com
March 8, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States

The overall export of US softwood lumber in 2014 increased 26 per cent over the previous year with total exports to the Mena region reaching $27.4 million. The top five markets for American softwoods in the region last year were Egypt ($8.268 million), Libya ($5.245 million), Algeria ($2.981 million), Jordan ($2.252 million), and the UAE ($1.845 million)… “The Mena (Middle East and North Africa) region is growing in importance for producers of American softwoods and we have been pleased with how well the market has accepted our species and products. We would like to expand further particularly in the UAE and in other Gulf markets such as Saudi Arabia. In North Africa, Libya and Morocco are significant importers as well as Egypt,” said Charles Trevor, consultant to American Softwoods (AMSO) – the promotional partnership formed by three major US softwood trade associations.

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New Montana sawmill bucks logging industry trends

Great Falls Tribune
March 7, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States, US West

BABB – Bill Fenner has cut timber along the Rocky Mountain Front for decades, but logging in the 21st century isn’t what it was 30 years ago. Tightening regulations, slimmer profit margins and diminished access to standing timber have led to deep consolidation within the forest products industry. Today, only seven major lumber mills remain in operation in Montana, and little remains of the scores of small, family-run logging and milling operations that once dotted the forests of Montana. But with financial help from the Great Falls Development Authority, Fenner is now preparing to open a new, rough-cut lumber mill outside Babb that promises to keep independent logging alive in northcentral Montana.

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U.S. housing uptick could help Montana timber industry

Great Falls Tribune
March 7, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States, US West

The outlook for the forest products industry in Montana is guardedly optimistic — knock on wood, say industry experts. The national demand for timber, based on slowly increasing U.S. housing starts, is expected to continue its gradual rise since hitting rock bottom during the Great Recession in 2008 and 2009, said Todd Morgan, a certified forester and director of the Montana Bureau of Business and Economic Research. Timber prices have risen substantially and the number of Montanans working as loggers, mill workers and forestry support roles has increased the last few years, which are promising signs, said Julie Altemus, executive vice president of the Montana Wood Products Association.

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Bad news for log sellers. Good news for builders.

Naturaral Resource Report
March 9, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States, US West

Mortgage Interest rates are still under 4% but rising. Logs prices are dropping unseasonably, and lumber prices are lower. Yet, housing starts remain stable, and home values are still rising but gradually. Trends of lumber, home construction, and housing markets, are compared to 2006. Logs look respectable at $753, but word on the street is gloomy for log sellers, with prices for February predicted to be far lower than the January price, and are still falling. Why? First, and obvious to those living in the Northwest, the unusually dry and mild winter allowed logging to take place on normal spring or even some summer dirt road systems. Logging is not restricted to rock roads.

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Swedish softwood sawlogs stocks 43% higher

EUWID
March 6, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: International

The Swedish sawmilling industry had stocks of softwood sawlogs totalling some 3.3m m³ on 31 December 2014, roughly 43% more than at the same time a year earlier. The results of surveys carried out by the Swedish Forest Agency show that the stocks in the works in the regions of Västra Götaland, Örebro, and Värmland have by far the highest rate of growth at roughly +60% above the previous year.

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Forestry

Forest fire risk rising due to low snowpack

CBC News
March 7, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

It’s only March, but provincial firefighters are already issuing warnings about increased fire risk in several areas of B.C this weekend due to a lower than usual snowpack. Concerns about water levels and salmon streams were raised just last week . Now provincial authorities are warning about the potential for an earlier than usual wildfire season. The Kamloops Fire Centre says grass and small shrubs are unseasonably dry and dead grasses have quickly dried out — conditions not normally seen until April. The Southeast Fire Centre in the Kootenays has issued a similar warning.

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Funding confirmed for Cherry Ridge studies

Vernon Morning Star
March 6, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Cherryville residents hope science will confirm the risk of possible landslides above them. The Electoral Area Advisory Committee agreed Thursday to allocate up to $30,000 towards hydrological and slope stability studies on Cherry Ridge. “We have some slopes with a history of instability,” said Hank Cameron, Cherryville director. “There were slides in 2012 and 1999 and no one has ever looked at the potential risk.” The issue arose when B.C. Timber Sales, a government agency, began construction of a road on Cherry Ridge. The road would eventually open the area up to commercial logging and some residents have suggested the road and clearcutting could trigger landslides that impact properties in the valley bottom.

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SURETTE: Split DNR and put its agenda through the chipper

Chronicle Herald
March 9, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

Surely this is the last straw in the long-running calamity which is woodlands management in Nova Scotia. As predicted, the Port Hawkesbury biomass generator, making 60 MW of electricity by burning wood, is a disaster — so much so that two high-end flooring mills in eastern Nova Scotia are shutting down mainly because the good hardwood they need is going into the biomass hopper, the latest version of the long-running arrangement wherein small operators are starved in favour of big ones. Who’s to blame? It would be too easy to blame the NDP government alone.

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Government hands over stewardship of Crown forest in Southern NB to J.D. Irving [video]

NB Media Co-op
March 7, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

Charles Theriault, of the docu-web project, Is Our Forest Really Ours, discusses the contract signed between the province of New Brunswick and J.D. Irving in 2014 that effectively gives more control of the management of public forest to the company.

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3M’s new pulp & paper policy impacts Resolute Forest Products

March 9, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

A new pulp and paper sourcing policy, aimed at protecting forests and respecting human rights, announced Thursday by 3M in collaboration with the environmental group ForestEthics, could have implications for industry giant Resolute Forest Products. Under the revised strategy, the maker of Post-it® notes will only accept materials made from virgin fibre that can be traced to the forest source and proven to be obtained legally. Suppliers must also protect high carbon stock forest, high conservation values, and workers’ and indigenous peoples’ rights. 3M has put Resolute on notice over its relationship with First Nations, and its logging of caribou habitat, said ForestEthics executive director Todd Paglia. 

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Wholesale destruction

Letter by Eleanor Trombley
Chronicle Herald
March 9, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

Re: your Feb. 19 story, “No hardwood, no business.” No wonder! The rural area where I live is bordered on the west side by thousands of acres of Crown land, on the east side by lands formerly owned by Kimberly Clark and now owned by the American company Wagner’s. Over the last few years, our government has contracted out acres and acres of Crown land to be cut. Some of the spruce and fir had reached maturity and needed to be cut. However, a lot of trucks that went by looked like they were carrying matchsticks. The hardwood was another matter. The very best of maple, beech, white birch, etc., went by daily. Wagner’s is stripping anything and everything off their land.

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Finally, a ray of light amid Nova Scotia’s forestry gloom?

Chronicle Herald
March 9, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

Much has been said recently about clearcutting on public lands in southwestern Nova Scotia, including the former Bowater lands acquired by the province in late 2012. Comments both for and against have shown a large, and potentially growing, gap between the various viewpoints of stakeholders and members of the public. Amongst that confusion, however, and the potential for entrenched positions, the minister of Natural Resources has come forward with a welcome policy statement that has the potential to improve this situation substantially. In a recent CBC radio interview, Minister Zach Churchill indicated that the Department of Natural Resources will be pursuing Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) certification on all public lands in western Nova Scotia.

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Timber myths reemerge to plague Montana

The Wildlife News
March 9, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Timber sales and timber harvest declined on the national forests in the Rocky Mountains during the Clinton Administration. The reason was the withdrawal of subsidies that supported higher levels of timbering. Unlike the Southern national forests and those west of the Cascade mountains in Oregon and Washington, the large majority of national forests actually lose money on their timber programs. Trees are harvested (cut) not to make money for the U.S. government, but for other considerations, though this is not generally recognized. Montana is no different from Colorado, New Mexico, Idaho, Wyoming, Utah, and Arizona, only in the details of timbering. None of these states have public lands that are productive enough to make money on timber sales.

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Flathead Forest’s draft managment plan ready for public review

by Rob Chaney
The Missoulian
March 8, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

The revised guidebook for managing the Flathead National Forest is ready for public review. Several years of workshops, surveys, debates and deliberations came to a head late last week when forest officials published the draft version in the Federal Register. Now, anyone interested in the Flathead’s snowmobiling, wilderness, downhill skiing, river floating, timber cutting, trail hiking, wildlife research and huckleberry picking has 60 days to add their opinions. “This plan is 165 pages of proposed actions, not counting appendices,” Flathead Forest project leader Joe Krueger said on Friday. “But this is just the starting point in the dialogue.” Changing recreation styles could have big impacts on forest management.

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Judge Dismisses South Fork Logging Lawsuit

The two timber projects in the South Fork have been the subject of scrutiny and litigation for over four years
Flathead Beacon
March 6, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

A District Judge has dismissed a lawsuit conservation groups filed against the Flathead National Forest over logging projects in the South Fork Flathead River corridor. U.S. District Judge Dana Christensen sided with a Magistrate Judge who ruled in favor of the U.S. Forest Service and approved a pair of timber management projects in the Spotted Bear Ranger District. Friends of the Wild Swan and Swan View Coalition filed suit in 2012 in U.S. District Court in Missoula in opposition to the Forest Service’s Soldier Addition II Project on the west side of the South Fork near the Bob Marshall Wilderness Complex, and the Spotted Bear River Project, a logging proposal on the opposite side of the South Fork Flathead River.

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Southern Oregon wildfire experts expect tough 2015 season

Associated Press
March 6, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

MEDFORD, Ore. — Fire bosses in Southern Oregon are bracing for a season that could start earlier, last longer and burn hotter than usual in a part of the world known for major summer fires. “It seems inevitable,” said Allen Mitchell, fire management officer for the Medford District of the federal Bureau of Land Management. “It will depend on lightning.” The snowpack in the mountains is at a record low in the southern part of the Cascade Range and the Siskiyou Mountains, and the region is in the second year of drought. The dearth of moisture in the middle elevations of the mountains means the sun will cook hillsides into tinderboxes waiting for a lighting strike, said National Weather Service meteorologist Ryan Sandler. There were 130,000 strikes last year.

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Committee debates land transfer legislation

Great Falls Tribune
March 6, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Members of the House Natural Resources Committee took up a controversial bill Friday that would create a task force to study the feasibility of the state assuming ownership or management of federal land now run by the U.S. Forest Service and Bureau of Land Management. Proponents cited loss of access to forests, the increasing threat of wildfires and pests such as mountain pine beetle and other problems under federal management as reasons for supporting the study of state management.

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Catastrophic wildfires expected in Southern Oregon this summer

Pre-season conditions worst in 25 years; Ashland thinning project awarded $2 million
The Mail Tribune
March 5, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Record low snowpack amid a second straight drought year has wildland managers bracing for what they consider an upcoming wildfire season in which catastrophic fire in the Cascades or Siskiyous “seems inevitable.” State and federal wildfire experts said Thursday in Medford that they expect mid- and high-elevation forestlands to be prime for generating a 2015 fire season that will start earlier, last longer and likely burn hotter than normal in this area known for summer fires.  With minimal or no snow around places such as Howard Prairie and Mount Ashland, the sun’s rays that normally would melt snow and wet the forest instead will be cooking it tinder dry this spring, making slopes more able to carry flames and more susceptible to fire starts caused by
lightning downstrikes.

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As West burns, local forests get scorched of resources

Asheville Citizen-Times
March 8, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

Months into his Forest Service career, Danny Lee stood amid a vast, charred forest in Idaho where a wildfire had consumed a quarter of a million acres, its temperatures hot to enough melt glass bottles. “I thought I was joining the Forest Service to swim around in the creeks and look at fish,” said Lee, who came to the agency as an aquatic biologist. “Given that fire is such a dominant disturbance agent on our landscape, if you want to understand what’s happening to the trees and the forest and the fish and wildlife that inhabit it, you have to understand fire.”

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Getting The Bugs Out Of Hardwood’s Comeback

Arkansas Business
March 9, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

“Adapt and overcome” is a common military phrase meaning troops must be ready to change plans quickly and push forward. That phrase might also apply to the state’s timber industry in coming years. After historically low prices kept loggers from removing hardwoods from Arkansas forests for many years, something of a hardwood rebirth began recently. However, at least one timber expert has predicted that market pressures may reverse that trend soon. “I think that hardwood markets will largely stabilize and the prices will be flat or even lose some ground in 2015 as substitution will occur,” said Dr. Matthew Pelkki, George H. Clippert, endowed chair at the University of Arkansas-Monticello School of Forest Resources.

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City’s trees keeps forester busy all year

Rutland Herald
March 9, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

David Schneider has been Rutland City’s forester and arborist for 16 years, and he was candid when comparing this winter season with all the others he has had to endure: “One of — if not the most — brutal.” Eighty percent of Schneider’s job description falls under the heading of arborist work, which means taking care of the city’s 4,200 publicly owned trees that are within the city’s rights of way. The winter often keeps him just as busy as the warm season, and this time of year, he spends a lot of time pruning around trees, trying to keep them clear of the sidewalks and roads. The wild winter weather has brought 4- to 5-foot snow drifts under many trees. It’s a great challenge to work around those drifts throughout the winter, Schneider said.

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Alabama professor explores ecosystems of forest streams

Alabama Media.com
March 7, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

A study published in the journal Science co-authored by a University of Alabama associate professor reports that nutrient pollution accelerates the breakdown of forest detritus in streams, affecting the food webs in the ecosystems. “The significance is … what we are seeing in our experiments is what we are seeing over large parts of the world because of human pollution,” said co-author Jonathan Benstead, an associate professor of biological sciences at UA. The paper, based on nine years of work between two experiments in forest streams in North Carolina, was published in today’s edition of Science. 

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Consecutive harsh winters hammer hemlock-killing insect (VIDEO)

WBIR.com
March 7, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

Great Smoky Mountains — After one of the coldest months on record in East Tennessee, many people are more than ready for some warm weather. But the especially frigid winter has been a life-saver for some of the mightiest trees in the forest. This winter’s sub-zero temperatures in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park have devastated the once unstoppable Hemlock Woolly Adelgid. The adelgid is an invasive insect from Asia that has killed millions of hemlock trees in the eastern United States. They first arrived in the Smokies in 2002.

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What Lies Behind the Recent Surge of Amazon Deforestation

March 9, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: International

Ecologist Philip Fearnside has lived and worked in the Brazilian Amazon for 30 years and is one of the foremost authorities on deforestation in the world’s largest tropical forest. A professor at the National Institute for Research in the Amazon, Fearnside has focused his work on how to sustainably develop the Amazon in the face of enormous pressures to cut and clear the forest. Fearnside is now watching with alarm as, after a decade of declining deforestation rates, the pace of cutting and forest clearing in the Amazon is on the rise again.

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Palm oil firms in Peru plan to clear 23,000 hectares of primary forest

March 9, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: International

Companies in Peru are planning to clear more than 23,000 hectares of primary rainforest in the northern Amazon in order to cultivate oil palm, according to NGOs. Operations on two plantations called Maniti and Santa Cecilia which would involve clearing more than 9,300 hectares of primary forest could start imminently following a recent government decision. “We’ve done an extensive analysis of satellite images of the project area and conclude that 84.6% of Maniti and Santa Cecilia is primary forest,” says a media statement from the Association for the Conservation of the Amazon Basin (ACCA), in Peru, and the Amazon Conservation Association (ACA), in the US.

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Patagonia forest fires may be worst in Argentina’s history (video)

CCTV – America
March 6, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: International

Fires have been raging in the thousands of years old forests of southern Argentina in Patagonia. While the operation to save the local environment is still on-going, the question is how and why the fires started in the first place. The Patagonia forest fires have been called the worst fires in the country’s history.

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Palm oil firms in Peru plan to clear 23,000 hectares of primary forest

March 9, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: International

Companies in Peru are planning to clear more than 23,000 hectares of primary rainforest in the northern Amazon in order to cultivate oil palm, according to NGOs. Operations on two plantations called Maniti and Santa Cecilia which would involve clearing more than 9,300 hectares of primary forest could start imminently following a recent government decision. “We’ve done an extensive analysis of satellite images of the project area and conclude that 84.6% of Maniti and Santa Cecilia is primary forest,” says a media statement from the Association for the Conservation of the Amazon Basin (ACCA), in Peru, and the Amazon Conservation Association (ACA), in the US.

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What Lies Behind the Recent Surge of Amazon Deforestation

March 9, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: International

Ecologist Philip Fearnside has lived and worked in the Brazilian Amazon for 30 years and is one of the foremost authorities on deforestation in the world’s largest tropical forest. A professor at the National Institute for Research in the Amazon, Fearnside has focused his work on how to sustainably develop the Amazon in the face of enormous pressures to cut and clear the forest. Fearnside is now watching with alarm as, after a decade of declining deforestation rates, the pace of cutting and forest clearing in the Amazon is on the rise again.

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Extra resources for Pilliga Fires

ABC News, Australia
March 9, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: International

The New South Wales Rural Fire Service has declared Section 44 for one of the three fires burning in the Pilliga East State Forest. Additional resources have been brought in from across the state to help local RFS crews as they work to contain the fires. The fires are believed to have been started by lightning. The Brigalow Road fire is at patrol status, back burning is continuing on the Emu Road fire but is it considered contained, and efforts are continuing to control the Dangar Road Fire.

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Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy

In warmer climate, a bid to protect forests

West Central Tribune
March 8, 2015
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: United States

On the Chippewa National Forest – Researchers from the U.S. Forest Service are trying to find ways to save northern Minnesota from the emerald ash borer, a tiny pest with a voracious appetite. Since it was discovered in Michigan nearly 20 years ago, the emerald ash borer has killed millions of ash trees across the Midwest and Canada. In Minnesota, infestations have been found in the Twin Cities and in the state’s southeastern corner. In northern Minnesota, where there are more than one million acres of black ash forest containing nearly a billion trees, researchers say the threat is made worse by a changing climate. Research suggests the pest is only kept at bay when temperatures dive 30 below zero.

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Washington Post Editorial Board Slams Biomass Energy, Ignores Forestry Research & Economics

Environmental and Energy Study Institute
March 8, 2015
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: United States

On March 5, the Washington Post published an editorial entitled ‘the EPA’s not so-green emissions plan,’ in which the editorial board claim that the agencies’ plans to regulate biomass wastes as renewable power sources under the Clean Power Plan (CPP) will “sharply increase forest clearing.” The Post goes on to state that “giving biomass too much credit would encourage a lot of wood burning,” claiming that the CPP could result in 70 percent of the current US timber harvest being used for bioenergy, resulting in increased worldwide timber demand. The Post’s claims are not backed up by forestry economics and science. Additionally, providing an economic incentive to maintain forested lands, as bioenergy and long-lived timber products do, can also help to preserve forests and farms in the face of rampant exurban development. 

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General

Alberta delays energy lease sale on endangered caribou range

Canadian Press
March 7, 2015
Category: Uncategorized
Region: Canada, Canada West

EDMONTON – The Alberta government has postponed a huge sell-off of energy exploration leases on the range of an endangered caribou herd. “Right now what we’re deciding is a postponement of the land sales,” Chris Bourdeau, spokesman for Alberta Energy, said Friday. “That gives us a little more time to take a look at the issue and do our due diligence … because Albertans are very aware of some of the challenges concerning caribou, and government shares that concern.” ..  At least half the herd’s range in northwestern Alberta near the town of Grande Cache is already disturbed by energy and forestry development. Federal scientists have recommended the maximum be no more than one-third.

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3M’s new pulp & paper policy impacts Resolute Forest Products

March 9, 2015
Category: Uncategorized

A new pulp and paper sourcing policy, aimed at protecting forests and respecting human rights, announced Thursday by 3M in collaboration with the environmental group ForestEthics, could have implications for industry giant Resolute Forest Products. Under the revised strategy, the maker of Post-it® notes will only accept materials made from virgin fibre that can be traced to the forest source and proven to be obtained legally. Suppliers must also protect high carbon stock forest, high conservation values, and workers’ and indigenous peoples’ rights. 3M has put Resolute on notice over its relationship with First Nations, and its logging of caribou habitat, said ForestEthics executive director Todd Paglia. 

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