Tree Frog Forestry News

Daily Archives: March 12, 2015

Business & Politics

Two Sides, Anti-Greenwash Campaign

PapNews
March 11, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, United States

As a result of Two Sides ongoing educational campaign, over 30 leading North American companies have removed or corrected their ‘anti-paper’ environmental claims being used to promote electronic billing and other e-services as a more environmentally-friendly solution than paper. These companies are primarily top Fortune 500 organizations in the banking, utilities and telecommunications sectors.

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WorkSafeBC investigator outlines where Lakeland Mills blast originated

Prince George Free Press
March 11, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

It was a trip to the washroom that likely saved his life. Wayne Cleghorn went to the basement washroom moments before the April 23, 2012 explosion and fire that destroyed Lakeland Mills’ sawmill, killing Glenn Roche and Alan Little and injuring 22 others. “It’s very likely he would not have survived the blast if he had been in his booth,” Paul Orr, WorkSafeBC’s lead investigator, told a six-man coroner’s inquest into the disaster Tuesday. Cleghorn was the slasher operator, which is directly above where WorkSafeBC believes the first explosion originated.

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Excessive dust found at Prince George mill before fatal blast: inquest

Prince George Citizen
March 11, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

PRINCE GEORGE — An inspection five months before a deadly explosion at a Prince George sawmill uncovered excessive amounts of pine wood dust, a coroner’s inquest has heard. Fire prevention officer Steven Feeney found the problematic levels of dust at Lakeland Mills in November 2011. In March 2012, Feeney found the dust was back to what he deemed an acceptable level, but continued to list it as a deficiency in his inspection reports. The next month, an explosion at the mill killed Glenn Roche and Alan Little and injured 21 other workers. At an inquest into their deaths, Feeney showed a series of inspection reports and followup letters written to Lakeland beginning with his first inspection there in September 2010.

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Few Details, but New Theory in Lakeland Tragedy

250 News
March 12, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

Prince George, B.C. – Maintenance Supervisor Jason Rustad doesn’t recall much about events prior to the explosion and fire that destroyed the Lakeland Mills April 23rd 2012. Rustad has testified at the coroner’s Inquest into the deaths of Alan Little and Glenn Roche, that while he “typically” would escort the Fire Prevention Officer through the mill during a fire inspection, he doesn’t recall conversations he may have had with Captain Steve Feeney about fire code deficiencies. Rustad testified he was not aware that having a Fire Safety Plan was a requirement of the Fire Code. He also testified that he believed someone in administration was developing such a plan when two subsequent re-inspections noted the plan had yet to be developed.

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City grants projects with forest profits

Alberni Valley Times
March 12, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

After an extended period of consideration city council has agreed to grant $350,000 to six local projects from profits generated by the Alberni Valley Community Forest. At a public meeting on Monday elected representatives approved recommendations made by the Community Forest Legacy Committee, determining the investment of revenue from the 6,400-hectare forest the city owns by Sproat Lake. The Alberni Valley Regional Airport is by far the largest recipient with $185,750 allotted for a runway extension and a GPS system, bringing the facility a step closer to serving scheduled commercial flights.

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Canadian Institute of Forestry – Outreach and Technical Coordinator

Canadian Institute of Forestry
March 11, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada East, Canada

CIF is looking to hire an Outreach and Technical Coordinator for a full time, 1 year Internship based out of the Canadian Ecology Centre (CEC) – the national office of the Canadian Institute of Forestry (CIF). The Forestry Outreach and Technical Coordinator will assist in the national implementation and delivery of forest science, extension and knowledge exchange programs to CIF members, the forest sector and the public in support of the Institute’s mission. The successful incumbent will provide leadership in the implementation of regional, provincial and national programs, including workshops, technical sessions, field tours and electronic lectures, all which support and promote sustainable forest management across Canada.

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Westville sawmill felled by wood Shortage, layoffs coming

The Groupe Savoie sawmill in Westville has one week of work left
CBC News
March 12, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada East, Canada

The largest sawmill in the province says it has only enough hardwood supply to keep working for another week. Forty-five people work at the mill in Westville, Pictou County, owned by Groupe Savoie based in northern New Brunswick. Mill manager Andrew Watters says the same supply constraints that forced two flooring companies to close recently —? Finewood Flooring of Cape Breton and River’s Bend, Antigonish County — are also hurting its business. “We will be forced to look at shutting down,” says Watters. “We could have enough to sustain a day, a week, or couple of days every couple of weeks, but that depends on our deliveries.”

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Lumber Liquidators seeks to reassure public about safety

Associated Press
March 12, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States

NEW YORK — Shares of Lumber Liquidators slumped 5 percent in volatile premarket trading Thursday before the company, which has been battered by reports of unsafe products, provides investors with an update about its business. Shares rose almost 11 percent on Wednesday. A “60 Minutes” report earlier this month said that the company’s laminate flooring made in China contained high levels of formaldehyde, a carcinogen. Lumber Liquidators has said that it complies with all regulations for its products. The “60 Minutes” report said the company’s laminate flooring fell short of California’s standards, something that the company has denied.

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Brown ends contract with Kitzhaber adviser-business owner

Mail Tribune
March 11, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States, US West

PORTLAND — A forest policy adviser to former Gov. John Kitzhaber collected nearly $400,000 in fees and expenses from the state while also running a consulting business.
For nearly three years, Tom Tuchmann was both the former governor’s part-time forestry adviser and owner of Portland-based U.S. Forest Capital, a private consulting firm that orchestrated the types of deals that Tuchmann helped Kitzhaber promote, The Oregonian reported Wednesday. Tuchman said he did nothing wrong, and his arrangements were transparent. Environmentalists and a timber industry leader said they questioned the arrangement privately, but they didn’t want to challenge Tuchman’s state job for fear of alienating Kitzhaber.

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West coast log and lumber exports decreased in 2014

Drop in Chinese demand slows exports, year-end analysis finds
USDS FS Pacific Northwest Research Station
March 11, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States, US West

PORTLAND, Ore. March 11, 2015. Log and lumber exports from Washington, Oregon, northern California, and Alaska both decreased in volume in 2014 compared to 2013, the U.S. Forest Service’s Pacific Northwest Research Station reported today. Exports of west coast logs decreased 13 percent to a total of 1,706 million board feet, while lumber exports decreased 14 percent to 892 million board feet. The total value of these exports also dropped—by 7 percent for logs to a value of $1,310 million, and by 11 percent for lumber to a value of $657 million.

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Sweden’s December exports top previous year again

EUWID
March 12, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: International

After the average reduction of 3.1% in softwood lumber and planed product exports in November, the foreign trade statistics of the Swedish Forest Industries Federation show another increase of 4% in the export figures of December 2014 against the same month of the previous year to 899,400 m³. A minor increase of a little more than 1% in exports to buyers within Europe to 391,200 m³ coincided with perceptibly higher delivery figures to Africa at almost +17% to 326,300 m³. Exports to Asia, however, remained roughly 1% short of the previous year’s level at 159,900 m³.

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Domestic Log Price Gives Sawmills Chance to Thrive

By The New Zealand First Party
Scoop Independent News
March 12, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: International

New Zealand First Leader Rt Hon Winston Peters is calling for a log price to be set to end the regional devastation that has occurred with so many sawmill closures. “In the past decade nationwide more than 20 big sawmills, and many smaller ones, have closed with the loss of more than 1700 jobs,” he says. Mr Peters was speaking at North Pine Sawmill, Waipu, which has many workers from the Northland electorate. “The value of log exports has tripled in the past decade.

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Wood, Paper & Green Building

Cement industry fires up search for alternative fuels to reduce CO2 emissions

Effort sparked by transition plan launched in 2015 B.C. budget
CBC News
March 11, 2015
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: Canada, Canada West

The cement industry, already self-conscious about its carbon-emissions impact on climate, says it was delivered something of a double-whammy by British Columbia’s carbon tax. The tax, at $30 per tonne of carbon dioxide emissions, pushed up the cost of coal — the industry’s primary fuel for its energy-intensive process — to between $53 and $62 per tonne at B.C. cement plants after it was applied in 2008, said Michael McSweeney, president of the Canadian Cement Association. Then they watched as cheaper imports from Asia and the U.S. cut into their market share, from six per cent of the market before the tax to 40 per cent now, McSweeney said.

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Forestry

Risch, Crapo Introduce Future Logging Careers Act

PoliticalNews.me
March 11, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States

Washington, D.C. – U.S. Senators Jim Risch and Mike Crapo introduced the Future Logging Careers Act, which would equalize the status of those coming to the logging trade with other agricultural fields. The Act allows family members to learn the trade of logging from a younger age so that they may carry on the family business. “In the logging industry, as in many other agricultural industries, family business is a way of life,” said Risch.

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PERC Issues Timely Report On Federal Lands Mismanagement

Fairfield Sun Times
March 10, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

The Bozeman-based Property and Environment Research Center (PERC) last week released Divided Lands – State vs Federal Management in the West. The study was published as legislatures in western states, including Montana, react to decades of mismanagement of federal lands at the hands of government bureaucrats. In the report, authors Holly Fretwell and Shawn Regan identify key points: • The federal government loses money managing valuable natural resources on federal lands, while states generate significant financial returns from state trust lands.

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New district ranger is first female to hold the position

Idaho State Journal
March 10, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

POCATELLO — Lori Bell remembers a time during college in a forestry class when the instructor called on a female student to answer a question. The student was daydreaming and was unable to answer the question. Bell vividly recalls the instructor’s response. “He said to the class, ‘I don’t know why I waste my time with you women. You’re all just going to get married and have children,’” Bell said. … Bell, who was announced last month as the new westside district ranger for the Caribou-Targhee National Forest in Pocatello, did not let these instances of chauvinism deter her. Instead, they drove her. “I wasn’t going to let anybody keep me from enjoying a career in the outdoors,” she said

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Brown cuts link with Kitzhaber adviser

Tom Tuchmann collected pay from the state while working as a consultant
Associated Press
March 12, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

PORTLAND — A forest policy adviser to former Gov. John Kitzhaber collected nearly $400,000 in fees and expenses from the state while also running a consulting business. For nearly three years, Tom Tuchmann was both the former governor’s part-time forestry adviser and owner of Portland-based U.S. Forest Capital, a private consulting firm that orchestrated the types of deals that Tuchmann helped Kitzhaber promote, The Oregonian reported Wednesday. Tuchman said he did nothing wrong, and his arrangements were transparent. Environmentalists and a timber industry leader said they questioned the arrangement privately, but they didn’t want to challenge Tuchman’s state job for fear of alienating Kitzhaber.

Advisor to John Kitzhaber collected nearly $400,000 from state wile running consulting firm on the side from The Oregonian

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Low Snowpack Could Lead To More Fires In Oregon And Washington

Oregon Public Broadcasting
March 11, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Low snowpack this winter could lead to an earlier, and more extreme fire season in the Northwest. In many parts of Oregon and Washington, the snowpack is just ten to twenty percent of the average. It’s not that precipitation is low, it’s just that it has fallen as rain rather than snow. John Saltenberger is with the Interagency Coordination center in Portland. He says the low snowpack means fire season could come early. Normally, firefighters are brought on in June, in anticipation of fires starting in July or August. “If the dryness that we’re seeing now continues I fully anticipate we’re going to see staffing up a few weeks earlier than usual,” he says.

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Fairbanks would control state forestry

Southeast lawmakers pen letter in support of local industry
Juneau Empire
March 12, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Through a House-proposed cut to the state’s timber program, the state’s two forestry regions — Coastal and Northern — will most likely become one. The lone remaining regional forester would be based in Fairbanks and be responsible for the whole state’s program, State Forester Chris Maisch said. A regional forester position in Ketchikan would be eliminated, but lower-level positions would remain. State Division of Forestry area offices would be consolidated through the budget reduction and their staffs would be thinned. In Southeast Alaska, the Ketchikan and Haines offices will most likely be combined.

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Why Are Inmates Planting Trees in Tillamook Forest?

A prison work camp deep in the Tillamook Forest turns inmate labor into reforestation and firefighting.
Portland Monthly Magazine
March 10, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

“Most people have no idea that there’s a 200-bed prison work camp right in the middle of the Tillamook Forest,” says Nathan Seable. He’s the camp manager at South Fork Forest Camp, a minimum security facility that turns a pre-screened group of low-risk inmates into a productive work force. Inmates, who can earn small wages based on an incentive system maintained by crew leaders, can apply to be assigned at South Fork but must have no history of escaping or arson crimes or arrests, and must possess good physical/mental health. … And work they do: this year, South Fork Camp inmates will plant 350,000 trees in the Tillamook Forest—close to a third of the total reforestation planting the forest will see in 2015.

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Loss Of Federal Timber Payments Hit Idaho Harder Than Most States

Boise State Public Radio
March 11, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Idaho is among five U.S. states losing the largest amount of federal timber payments aimed at rural counties and school districts. Congress let the Secure Rural Schools and Community Self-Determination Act expire in the fall of 2014, leaving Idaho counties and school districts with $26 million less than expected. Idaho counties will bear the brunt of this loss. Seventy percent of Secure Rural Schools money goes to counties for things like road maintenance. Thirty percent goes to school districts.

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Timber: Forum in Comptche addresses hack and squirt

Ukiah Daily Journal
March 10, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

As you drive down Orr Springs Road between Ukiah and Comptche you see huge stands of dead trees. These hundreds of thousands of snags, killed with a practice called “hack-and-squirt,” aren’t particularly scenic. Still, depending on your point of view they might also be nothing more than good forest management practices, or they might be a lurking fire-hazard and evidence of large scale environmental damage. On March 5, at the Grange hall in Comptche a group of about 120 concerned citizens gathered to discuss the use of hack-and-squirt in the huge swath of timberland owned by Mendocino Redwood Company.

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Ancient Trees Sprout New Life

March 12, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Tucked away in the rolling hills of northern Michigan a once-dilapidated warehouse in the town of Copemish now brims with thousands of tiny saplings. But these trees are not as young as their sizes would suggest. A nonprofit, Archangel Ancient Tree Archive, has cloned from tissue samples of some of the world’s oldest and largest trees found across the U.S. and beyond—some more than two millennia old… But deforestation has rapidly decimated old-growth forests and has done so before scientists got much of a chance to study the genomes and even the ecology of such “champion trees.” In the U.S. only about 2 percent of its old-growth forests remain.

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Reps request additional listening session on future of Northwest Forest Plan

Forest Service has scheduled dates in Portland, Seattle and Redding
The Bend Bulletin
March 11, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

WASHINGTON — Eleven members of the House of Representatives asked the U.S. Forest Service Tuesday to hold additional listening sessions about possible revisions to the Northwest Forest Plan in forested communities as well as in big cities. Last month, the Forest Service announced plans to hold listening sessions in Portland (March 17), Seattle (March 18) and Redding, California (March 25) as the beginning of the process of revising the Northwest Forest Plan, or NFP. The plan, which has been in effect since 1994, set federal policy for public lands with the goal of protecting the spotted owl, which was listed as threatened in 1990. …Any changes to the NFP would have a profound impact on communities in the their districts, the members wrote.

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‘This park will not happen’: Opponents slam North Woods national park proposal

Bangor Daily News
March 11, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

TOWNSHIP 3 INDIAN PURCHASE, Maine – Opponents of Lucas St. Clair’s proposed North Woods national state park hosted an informational session on Wednesday that offered an at times scathing dismissal of his proposal. With St. Clair in the audience, speakers that included representatives from the Maine Snowmobile Association, Preserve Maine Traditions and Maine Woods Coalition dismissed the park proposal’s economics as unrealistic and based on faulty comparisons. They said the park proposal was vague, would grow much larger than 150,000 acres, choke off snowmobile access, and be run by an autocratic National Park Service that cannot afford the parks it presently manages.

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Logging, prescribed burning aims to bolster wildlife habitat

Smoky Mountain News
March 11, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

A U.S. Forest Service project aiming to improve wildlife habitat and forest health will allow logging, fire, thinning and other forest management techniques in a small area of the Nantahala National Forest on the Swain and Macon county line. Environmental groups so far are not objecting to the project wholesale, but are asking that a small portion of the roughly 250 acres slated for logging be taken off the table, specifically a roadless area and an space around Tellico Bald that is classified as a state Natural Heritage Area. 

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Explosion in Brazilian Amazon rainforest logging

The Independent
March 10, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: International

There has been an “explosion” of deforestation in the Brazilian rainforest in the past six months, dramatically ending a decade of declining tree loss and threatening a new era of accelerating wood chopping, a leading expert on the Amazon has warned. Analysis of satellite images reveals a rapidly accelerating rate of deforestation since last summer, particularly in October 2014, when the rate was 467 per cent higher than it was a year earlier, according to the IMAZON research institute in Brazil. The increase is driven by rising beef and soybean prices – which are often produced on deforested land – as well as an increase in the value of Brazil’s currency, the real, which makes their production more profitable.

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First UK-farmed truffle harvested

BBC News
March 11, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: International

The first truffle to have been cultivated on UK soil has been harvested from a field in Leicestershire, according to a plant biologist. Dr Paul Thomas planted the fungus on 20 farms and estates around Britain six years ago. He found the 39g specimen under a young holly-oak tree. The entrepreneur, who appeared on the TV series Dragon’s Den, said it was the “birth of the UK truffle industry”. After a decade of waiting, Dr Thomas believes that his other sites will also start producing truffles later this year. …Wild ones were once fairly common in Britain, but the loss of most of the country’s ancient woodland, compounded by modern farming methods, means truffles are now extremely rare.

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Forest Certification Moving Forward in India

PEFC International
March 11, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: International

The sustainable management of India’s forests is set to take a significant step forward next week with the launch of the development process of the Indian national forest certification system. This launch, an important step towards PEFC-recognized forest management certification in the country, will be part of an international conference on forest certification in New Delhi on Monday. “In light of India’s vast forest resource, burgeoning economy, and strategic position in international markets, there is great opportunity to further position India’s forestry sector on sustainability, especially through broader uptake of forest certification,” said Sarah Price, Head of Projects and Development at PEFC International.

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Removal of thousands of sick red pine trees said necessary to save the forest growth underneath

Gazette Net
March 11, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: International

NORTHAMPTON — Using an enormous crane, tree workers are removing piece by piece red pines towering up to 100 feet high off Chesterfield Road, painstaking work that will remove dying trees while protecting the smaller maple forest below. The work, on a 21-acre parcel of city property that falls between a stream and Chesterfield Road near Kennedy and Reservoir roads, ultimately will remove 2,151 trees, of which 429 are already dead, according to Nicole Sanford, senior environmental scientist with the city’s Department of Public Works. “It’s not traditional logging, it’s more like tree service removal,” Sanford said this week.

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Don’t plant bamboo on hillsides, Forestry Dept urges

Jamaica Observer
March 12, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: International

AS Government takes steps to develop a bamboo industry to satisfy the demand for charcoal, the Forestry Department is cautioning farmers against planting the crop on steep hillsides. …However, speaking with the Jamaica Observer after a press conference Monday to announce the changes in land use across the island, conservator of forests Marilyn Headley said that forests are being lost to bamboo cultivation, among other things. She added that the shallow root system of local bamboo does not lend itself to preventing soil erosion and as such is not ideal for hillsides.

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David Cunliffe shows support for tree protesters

3News.co.nz
March 11, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: International

Labour MP David Cunliffe has visited a protest site in west Auckland where a 500-year-old kauri tree is due to be felled. Protester Michael Tavares has been perched 25 metres up the huge kauri for almost three days, as he waits for Auckland Council to take action. The council granted property developer John Lenihan Resource Consent to fell the kauri and other native trees, including a 300-year-old rimu, in order to build a house on the land. “There’s clearly room to build,” says Mr Cunliffe. “You don’t have to knock over this tree to do it.”

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Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy

Climate change given new focus in latest edition of B.C. bestseller

CBC News
March 11, 2015
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: Canada, Canada West

Climate change’s impact on British Columbia’s ecology and biodivesity is reflected in the newest edition of local bestseller British Columbia: A Natural History of its Origins, Ecology, and Diversity. Authors and brothers Dick and Syd Cannings wrote the first edition of the book 20 years ago. While the third and latest edition talks about everything from B.C.’s diverse flora and fauna to rocks and rivers, there is a particular emphasis on how climate change is impacting the province’s ecology. “When the ecologists look back … in the 70s, British Columbia was mapped by Ministry of Forest ecologists into various ecological zones,” Syd told B.C. Almanac’s Gloria Macarenko.

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Study: As forests, grasslands gave way to farms, soil carbon emissions soared

CIFOR
March 10, 2015
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: International

BOGOR, Indonesia — The conversion of pasture to agricultural land has released more carbon from the soil in several South American grasslands in the past 40 years than the conversion of forests to grassland during the three centuries before, according to a new report. Not only does lost soil carbon cause land degradation and undermine biodiversity, the carbon emissions also contribute to climate change. With 2015 named the UN International Year of Soils, the book in which the report is published, Soil Carbon: Science, Management and Policy for Multiple Benefits, is well timed.

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General

Ancient Trees Sprout New Life

March 12, 2015
Category: Uncategorised

Tucked away in the rolling hills of northern Michigan a once-dilapidated warehouse in the town of Copemish now brims with thousands of tiny saplings. But these trees are not as young as their sizes would suggest. A nonprofit, Archangel Ancient Tree Archive, has cloned from tissue samples of some of the world’s oldest and largest trees found across the U.S. and beyond—some more than two millennia old… But deforestation has rapidly decimated old-growth forests and has done so before scientists got much of a chance to study the genomes and even the ecology of such “champion trees.” In the U.S. only about 2 percent of its old-growth forests remain.

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