Tree Frog Forestry News

Daily Archives: March 24, 2015

Froggy Foibles

Tree bark fashion lights up Vancouver show

The Weekly Voice
March 23, 2015
Category: Froggy Foibles
Region: Canada, Canada West

Vancouver: For 22 seasons, Vancouver Fashion Week has striven to deliver a fashion experience that celebrates multi-culturalism and diversity, attracting Canadian and International designers from around the world… Designer Jose Hendo from London showcased her environmentally friendly collection that is made mostly from tree bark… The material is renewable and the concept is based on 700 years of traditional tree bark cloth-making skills in Uganda and other African countries. “Tree bark is the most sustainable fabrics ever. Because when you harvest from the tree, it regenerates and you can harvest again and again,” she told Xinhua.

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Business & Politics

Rising demand brightens future for battered, falling lumber stocks

Globe and Mail
March 23, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, United States

Lumber stocks have taken a beating so far this year amid falling prices for the key construction commodity, but some investors see it as a buying opportunity, betting the U.S. housing market will bounce back and growth in Asia will remain steady. Lumber prices are down about 20 per cent since late last year amid a slump in North American housing starts, due in part to severe winter weather that has slowed building activity, and weaker exports to China. Canadian lumber stocks have also fallen by an average of about 20 per cent so far this year. The drop is prompting analysts and fund managers to take a harder look at the sector as a potential place to make profit in a market where many stocks are considered too expensive.

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Feds to probe what Maine mill owners call unfair Canadian paper subsidies

Bangor Daily News
March 23, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, United States

PORTLAND, Maine — Federal trade officials have launched an investigation of Canadian government subsidies to the Port Hawkesbury Paper mill, which two paper companies with mills in Maine argue unfairly undercut and damaged their business. The U.S. Department of Commerce has recommended opening an investigation of 28 instances of government help to the Canadian mill in response to a petition from Verso Paper Corp. and Madison Paper Industries, working together as The Coalition for Fair Paper Imports. The companies are seeking to have a duty imposed on Canadian imports of supercalendered paper, an uncoated but glossy paper used for magazines, catalogs, flyers and other printed material.

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Lakeland experienced “near miss” day before Babine blast

Prince George Citizen
March 23, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

The coroner’s inquest into the deadly Lakeland Mills explosion heard further detail Monday about a “near miss” that occurred about three months before the incident that leveled the operation… Shift supervisor Bob Sutton was walking along a catwalk on Jan. 19, 2012 when a saw came off the large headrig and created some sparks that ignited the fine, flour-like sawdust that came from the dry, beetle-killed pine the sawmill was processing. “It happened so quick, there was just a poof of dust and it ignited from the spark and it was over just as quick as it happened,” Sutton said. It is common in sawmills for saws to create sparks when they come off, but this was different.

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INQUEST: Lakeland, coroner’s counsel spar; Steelworkers withdraw, call for public inquiry

Prince George Free Press
March 23, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

The coroner’s inquest into the April 23, 2012 explosion and fire that killed two men and injured 22 others has taken some unexpected turns over the past few days. When the inquest, looking into the deaths of Alan Little and Glenn Roche, adjourned on Friday, chief coroner Lisa Lapointe ruled that an investigation into the explosion conducted by legal counsel for Lakeland Mills was relevant to the inquest. However, she also ruled that the information was subject solicitor/client privilege and had given Lakeland the weekend to determine whether it would waive that privilege in order for it to be presented at the inquest.

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Lakeland Blast Shook Home of WorkSafe BC Manager

250 News
March 24, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

Prince George, BC – Testifying at the Coroner’s Inquest into the deaths of Glenn Roche and Alan Little, WorkSafe BC’s Barry Nakahara said he felt the blast that ripped through Lakeland Mills on the night of April 23rd, 2012. “It actually shook my house,” said the Regional Prevention Manager. “I thought, ‘This has to be a terrorist thing’, that was my first thought.” Although Nakahara had been working with a group of WorkSafe BC Prevention officers to examine potential causes of that type of incident since the deadly explosion that leveled Babine Forest Products just three months earlier, he said combustible dust had not been pinpointed as the problem.

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Lakeland Mills Will Provide Documents From Forensics Investigation

250 News
March 23, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

Prince George, BC – A spokesperson for Lakeland Mills says the company will be making all documents pertaining to a forensics investigation conducted following the 2012 explosion at its sawmill available to the Coroner’s Inquest. Cam McAlpine made an announcement to the media during the lunchbreak, effectively pre-empting discussion of the matter that’s set to occur with Coroner Lisa Lapointe at 4:30pm this afternoon. On Friday, Lapointe ruled the evidence was relevant to the inquiry, but that it was protected by privilege. She had asked Lakeland counsel, Gavin Marshall, to consider waiving that privilege when the inquest resumed today.

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‘Prosecutorial stance’ not acceptable to Lakeland Mill owners

Prince George Citizen
March 23, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

The owners of Lakeland Mills say they are willing to share any information the coroner considers relevant but have taken issue with the tone coroner’s counsel John Orr has used during the inquest into the fatal blast that leveled the operation’s sawmill nearly three years ago. On Friday, Orr called on Lakeland to waive client-solicitor privilege and share the results of an investigation into the April 23, 2012 explosion carried out by a forensic engineer the company had hired, saying it would be “Unconsionable” to refuse the request. In a prepared statement issued Monday, company spokesman Cam McAlpine labeled Orr’s comment “disparaging.”

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New bill could mean good things for Alberta forestry

Whitecourt Star
March 24, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada East, Canada

Proponents of the bill say it’s a win-win win for Alberta. The innocuous sounding Bill 203 titled “Safety Codes (Sustainable Structures) Amendment Act, 2014,” might sound dry but it could dramatically impact the province’s forestry industry and those who depend on it. The legislation was tabled as a private members bill back in December 2014 by Whitecourt – Lac Ste. Anne MLA George VanderBurg. …“It’s really exciting, especially for MLA’s that are tied to the forestry industry,” said VanderBurg. “It’s permissive legislation that allows the construction of wooden structures up to 18 metres, or six storeys high.” Previously, provincial building codes only allowed wooden framed structures to be built three storeys high. Bill 203 doubles that.

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Lumber Liquidators slides on new call for investigation

Washington Post
March 23, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States

NEW YORK — Shares of Lumber Liquidators edged lower Monday, hitting their lowest price in almost three years after a second U.S. senator called for an investigation into the safety of laminate flooring made in China. Sen. Charles Schumer of New York said the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission should investigate the safety of the wood flooring material and make recalls if the products are found to be dangerous. Schumer also said the CPSC and other agencies should test the flooring to see if it complies with safety rules or poses a risk to consumers and recommended that it investigate the safety standards that apply to laminate flooring.

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Bulgarian companies threaten to protest against ban on log exports

IHB The Timber Network
March 23, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: International

Parliamentary parties in Bulgaria recently agreed that a ban on log exports is an adequate method to combat illegal harvesting in the country. However, industry representatives demand that the ban should be revoked. Bulgarian MPs have a different opinion on how long this measure should be applied, with some even calling for an indefinite ban. Bulgaria’s Parliament eventually adopted a 3-month moratorium on log exports, specifying that changes to the Forest Act were to be drafted during the period.

[You may need to create a free Fordaq account to access IHB stories]

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Wood, Paper & Green Building

New Titan Brick Is Environmentally Friendly

Green Building Elements
March 23, 2015
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: United States

Meet the Titan Brick, a new building block made of 90% dirt that has been waterproofed with non-toxic chemicals. The manufacturer, Titan Brick, Inc. of San Antonio, Texas, claims many advantages for its invention, beginning with high thermal mass and a heat resistant coating which combine to give it an R-20 insulating rating. That alone can cut the energy costs of a building made with Titan Brick by 50% or more. …The company says its Titan Brick is two and half times stronger than concrete block and is fire resistant up to 1800 degrees F. It also is mold and mildew resistant, able to withstand…high winds and flood waters better than conventional building materials.

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Westchester County Workforce Housing Wins LEED Silver

Multi-Housing News
March 23, 2015
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: US East

Greenburgh, N.Y.—22 Tarrytown Road recently received LEED for Homes Silver, the first property in the town to win the designation (previously 600 White Plains Rd. was LEED certified). The 28-unit workforce housing development replaces three vacant buildings, which had previously been used as a homeless shelter and before that, as a motel. …One of its main sustainable elements is a timber framing structural system, according to MAP. Wood is a carbon-neutral material, for one thing, as well as recyclable, biodegradable, and renewable. It also has a long life span.

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State ban on environmentally friendly construction advances

Atlanta Journal Constitution
March 23, 2015
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: US East, United States

State buildings would be effectively banned from using environmentally friendly construction standards known as LEED certification, under a measure passed Monday by a committee in the Georgia Senate. The “wood wars” battle over the national certification system comes as the state’s timber industry claims it discriminates against the use of local wood products that aren’t registered through the Forest Stewardship Council. According to the Georgia Forestry Association, only about 32,000 acres of the timber industry’s 20 million acres in Georgia currently meet that standard —since much of the industry here uses competing guidelines. … supporters of House Bill 255 say the state should do more to promote Georgia-grown wood. 

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Maker of Louisville Slugger bats selling brand to Wilson

Washington Post
March 23, 2015
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: US East, United States

Over a century of family ownership of Louisville Slugger bats is going … going … nearly gone. The company that makes the iconic bats gripped by generations of ballplayers — from Babe Ruth to David Wright — announced a deal Monday to sell its Louisville Slugger brand to rival Wilson Sporting Goods Co. for $70 million. …Under terms of the agreement, H&B will continue to manufacture Louisville Slugger wood bats at its factory in downtown Louisville, Kentucky. …Louisville Slugger’s wood bats are formed mostly out of northern white ash or maple, but a small percentage is made out of birch. The timber comes from forests in New York and Pennsylvania.

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AHEC and American Softwoods to promote ‘American Wood Solutions’ at ‘Talking Timber’ seminar in Dubai

Zawya (Thomson Reuters)
March 23, 2015
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: International

The American Hardwood Export Council (AHEC) and American Softwoods (AMSO) will be promoting ‘American Wood Solutions’ at the ‘Talking Timber’ seminar, which will be held on April 13, 2015 at The Address Dubai Marina. As part of their sponsorship of the industry-focused seminar and networking event, which is being organized by Timber Design and Technology Middle East, Dr. Scott Bowe and Professor Chris Knowles will present on behalf of AHEC and AMSO respectively to an audience comprising importers, manufacturers, specifiers and end-users. The seminar and networking evening is the first of its kind for the timber industry and is being held to coincide with the Dubai WoodShow, which opens on April 14, 2015 at the Dubai International Convention and Exhibition Center.

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UEA’s Enterprise Centre Makes Good Use Of Local Resources

Green Building Press
March 23, 2015
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: International

An innovative green building – the UEA Enterprise Centre is due to complete at the end of April. … The building is clad in thatch panels (a world-first) made by East Anglian master thatchers using local wheat straw, the timber has been sourced from local forests in Thetford… The project combines traditional methods with innovative design and construction techniques and concepts. The structural frame was constructed using timber sourced from local Thetford Forest. Morgan Sindall collaborated with Cygnum, The Forestry Commission and Thomson Saw Mills to take lumber that isn’t generally used for timber frame construction and use it to compose some of the structural elements of the building. 

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Sound simulations for building design: new Cundall discipline to up ante on acoustics services

Architecture and Design
March 23, 2015
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: International

Listening environments, sound acoustics for timber buildings, and alternative materials for acoustic products – these are the areas of acoustic innovation the industry can look forward to in coming years, says Cundall Australia’s new head of acoustics, Dr Chris Field. Dr Field, an award-winning acoustics inventor and leading Australian acoustics consultant, was recently appointed to lead multi-disciplinary consultancy Cundall’s new local acoustics department – a move that is expected to bring a new dimension to the firm’s offerings, including improving its work on sustainable projects… Timber acoustic engineering and design is set to become more popular as more timber buildings are designed and built in Australia, especially if the National Construction Code approves the proposal for a deemed-to-satisfy requirement for the creation of timber structures up to 25 metres.

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Forestry

Lorax YXE uses social media to protect Saskatoon trees

Fictional character protects Farnam Block elm
CBC News
March 24, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

As people in Saskatoon gathered to watch the demolition of a historic building on Broadway Avenue, the gaze of one mythical activist was focused solely on a 100-year-old elm tree. The Lorax YXE exists only on Twitter, but waged a rhyming social media campaign to make sure the elm sitting in the demolition zone was properly protected as the bricks came down. That campaign captured the attention of one city councillor. Charlie Clark took the concerns seriously, and made sure the old tree was well protected. Clark even engaged the Lorax YXE in Dr. Suess-like prose “That’s right, Clark laughed.

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EDITORIAL: Minister off base on Cherry Ridge

Vernon Morning Star
March 22, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

It’s unfortunate that Forests Minister Steve Thomson simply sticks to the party line. While in Vernon Thursday, Thomson was asked if his ministry would hold off on construction of a logging road on Cherry Ridge while Cherryville residents conduct their own hydrological and slope stability studies because of concerns about potential landslides. Not surprisingly, he defended the government’s own reviews of the site. “The studies have all been shared and the plans meet technical standards,” he said. And Thomson may be correct, there may be absolutely nothing wrong on Cherry Ridge. …However, a strong sense of uncertainty exists in Cherryville and Thomson
has the responsibility of trying to address those concerns.

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Fighting Forest Fires: Lessons for Corporate Risk Management

Wall Street Journal
March 23, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States

Forest fires are burning bigger, faster and hotter than ever before, and the risk management approaches used to counter them can inform corporate strategy as well, U.S. Forest Service chief Tom Tidwell told Risk & Compliance Journal in an interview. What risk management lessons from the Forest Service can be applied in other contexts, such as corporate strategy? …What are the main risks managed by the Forest Service? …How is the risk changing? …How does the Forest Service manage the risk?

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Should bottled water companies sell national forest water?

CBS News
March 20, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States

A water battle is on tap in drought-hit California, thanks to the lucrative bottled water industry tapping a national forest’s spring water for corporate profits. The issue is coming to a head at a time when many Californians are feeling the effects of a long-term drought. Yet despite the water shortages in the state, Nestle Waters North America has been piping out water from the San Bernardino National Forest without a valid permit, while critics also charge that the impact on flora and fauna is unknown, according to an investigation published in the Desert Sun newspaper.

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Whither the Northwest Forest Plan?

US Forest Service launches process to revise landmark public lands management plan. Greens fear rollbacks.
Earth Island Journal
March 20, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

The US Forest Service insists that nothing has been decided upon. “Absolutely not,” said Rogue River-Siskiyou National Forest Supervisor Rob MacWhorter as the first of three scheduled “listening sessions” on the Forest Service’s process to revise the Northwest Forest Plan got underway in Portland, Oregon on Tuesday evening. But environmental advocates fear otherwise and are expressing concern that changes to the landmark forest management plan will jeopardize conservation goals. …“We’re nervous about the forest plan revision. There’s more to be lost than gained at this point,” said Doug Heiken, conservation and restoration coordinator for Oregon Wild. “The plan has been very successful in its biggest task of putting the brakes on the forest cutting binge.”

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Conservationists say thinning Sierra forests may help state water supply

The Sacramento Bee
March 20, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

With the state entering its fourth year of drought, some conservationists are looking at thinning Sierra forests to increase the amount of water that flows into area rivers. The Nature Conservancy issued a report Friday that argues that thinning forests on public lands can reduce wildfire risk in the Northern Sierra. The report also found that such action brings a bonus: water conservation. Thinning dense forests may lead to a 3 percent to 6 percent increase in mean annual stream flow to some watersheds, according to the report.

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Scientists confirm renewed threat to white pine trees

Associated Press
March 21, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

DURHAM, N.H. — A mutated fungus is infecting white pine forests in parts of New Hampshire, according to a U.S. Forest Service study. White pine blister rust comes from a combination of white pines and flowering plants — called ribes — like gooseberries and currants. When infected ribes lose their leaves in the fall, spores of the fungus invade white pines and eventually kill the tree. The study says fungus is infecting trees in Epsom and Concord, and possibly elsewhere in the Northeast.  Scientists became concerned in October 2013 that the mutated fungus was
seen on black currant plants that were said to be immune in
New Hampshire.

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USFS Celebrates Big Thorne Decision As Environmental Groups Weight Options

Alaska Public Media
March 23, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

The U.S. Forest Service says a Friday court decision allowing a timber sale will help speed changes in Tongass National Forest logging. But opponents say it will damage other Southeast Alaska industries. The Forest Service designed the Big Thorne sale as part of its transition from old-growth to second- or young-growth timber cuts. Ten environmental organizations sued to block the sale, saying the acreage is critical habitat for deer and wolf populations, as well as salmon. The ruling was made by U.S. District Court Judge Ralph Beistline. His 25-page decision rejects claims that the Forest Service failed to follow proper procedure before offering the sale.

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Forest supervisor heads to Alaska

AZ Daily Sun
March 24, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Earl Stewart, who has spent more than five years as the Coconino National Forest Supervisor, will be leaving the position mid-April. Stewart has taken the position as forest supervisor for the Tongass National Forest in Alaska. He will begin mid-April. In a press release, Stewart named projects like the Four Forest Restoration Initiative, the Flagstaff Watershed Protection Project and the Fossil Creek Comprehensive River Management Plan as some of the standout projects during his tenure. Stewart has been with the Forest Service since 1991 and has served in a variety of positions on six national forests in three different regions.

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Study: Beetle-killed trees don’t increase fire danger

USA Today
March 23, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

BOULDER, Colo. — The devastation wrought on Western forests by the tiny mountain pine beetle appears to have little impact on the size and severity of wildfires, a new study concludes. The study refutes fears by firefighters that the millions of acres of beetle-killed trees are a tinderbox waiting to explode with usually ferocious fires. The University of Colorado-Boulder study instead suggested that wildfires burn equally in live and dead forests, and said drought and climate change are more significant factors. “The bottom line is that forests infested by the mountain pine beetle are not more likely to burn at a regional scale,” Sarah Hart…

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Senator comment reveals federal forests madness

Natural Resource Report
March 23, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Fringe activists are predictably making hay over statements made by Sen. Jon Tester regarding the impact of litigation and the “analysis paralysis” driving federal forest management today. They are making the most of their “gotcha” moment; one individual went so far as to liken the Democratic senator to Adolf Hitler. To be clear not every timber sale on Montana’s federal forests is tied up in litigation. But it sure seems that way to those who’ve witnessed the steep decline in federal timber harvests and lamented the economic decline of our rural communities. Sen. Tester’s statement isn’t a whopper to those who understand the stranglehold that obstructionist groups currently enjoy over the U.S. Forest Service.

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CARROLL: Magazine helps frame pine beetle devastation

Rapid City Journal
March 24, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Life is filled with miracles, great and small. A few years ago, as we struggled with what to do about the mountain pine beetle, my wife said, why don’t you burn it in effigy? Thus was born the Burning Beetle and much that came after. Not content to suffer and celebrate quietly — it’s against my nature — I asked the Custer Arts Council if they’d mind if National Geographic covered the event. No, they said, they wouldn’t mind. I know they thought I was bat wing crazy and I was. My mother taught me to knock and ask, and it will be given or not, but it can’t be given if you don’t ask. I know some people so I called.

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Grant will help Dixmont create community forest

Bangor Daily News
March 23, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

Judy, Dixmont’s First Select Person, announced that the town Conservation Commission had been awarded a Project Canopy grant to create the Dixmont Town Forest. Dann explained that although Dixmont is heavily forested and has a proud heritage of commercial and family forest activity, the newly funded project is designed to raise awareness of the importance of wisely and sustainably managing local forestland. Project Canopy is a cooperative partnership between the USDA Forest Service, the Department of Agriculture, Conservation, and Forestry’s Maine Forest Service and GrowSmart Maine.

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National park concept wins Bangor council endorsement

Bangor Daily News
March 23, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

BANGOR, Maine — After a lengthy discussion and public comment period, the Bangor City Council voted 7-2 Monday to support the concept of a national park and national recreation area in the Katahdin region. The decision comes after Elliotsville Plantation Inc. — a group headed up by Lucas St. Clair, son of Burt’s Bees co-founder Roxanne Quimby — proposed donating up to 150,000 acres to the federal government for the creation of a new national park. The proposal has reignited an old debate over land use in Maine and the future of the state’s stagnant economy.

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Felled century-old tree to grow again from a clone in UK

Press Trust of India
March 23, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: International

A giant redwood tree that was felled 125 years ago in the US state of California to satisfy a drunken bet is all set to be reborn with scientist cloning the stump in the UK. The Fieldbrook Redwood Stump, whose stump is 35 feet in diameter, towered as high as a 30-storey building over the course of nearly 4,000 years in the US would have been the biggest tree alive today had it not been so ignominiously felled in 1890. The tree was felled to satisfy a drunken bet about making a table big enough to seat 40 guests from a single slice of tree-trunk, The Independent reported. The tree is about to be reborn as a clone planted on the coast of Cornwall, possibly as early as this spring.

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Forest conference sows hope for restoration

Jagger: ‘We are at a tipping point’
Deutsche Welle
March 23, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: International

What do Bianca Jagger and Germany’s Environment Minister Barbara Hendricks have in common? Both Mick Jagger’s ex-wife and the German politician are strong supporters of reforestation initiatives. The two came together Saturday (21.03.2015) to promote a German-sponsored global reforestation plan at the second international Bonn Challenge conference.  The timing was no coincidence. Since 1971, the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) has used this day to commemorate International Day of Forests as a time to remember the continual worldwide destruction of forest areas.

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20% of the world’s forests are the distance of a football field away from a forest edge

TreeHugger
March 23, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: International

A new study on habitat fragmentation looked at data gathered over 35 years on 5 continents and quantified the alarming state of true wilderness on Earth: “The results were astounding. Nearly 20 percent of the world’s remaining forest is the distance of a football field – or about 100 meters – away from a forest edge,” Dr. Nick Haddad, William Neal Reynolds Distinguished Professor of Biological Sciences at NC State and one of the authors of the study. “Seventy percent of forest lands are within a half-mile of a forest edge. That means almost no forest can really be considered wilderness.”

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Solomon Islands Timber delegation seeking opportunities

By The Pacific Islands Trade and Invest
Scoop Independent News
March 24, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: International

A group of Solomon Islands timber exporters and government officials is visiting Australia and New Zealand this week. The export mission starts in Brisbane from 22 – 25 March and moves to Auckland from 25-30 March 2015. The group will meet with importers and government officials including a meeting with the New Zealand Timber Importers Association at the Pacific Islands Trade & Invest office in Newmarket. As 60% of sawn timber is sold to markets in Australia and New Zealand, the visits aim to increase understanding among both exporters and importers of market requirements and opportunities for Solomon Islands sawn timber.

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APP’s forest are still disappearing

Pulp and Paper News
March 24, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: International

Two years after Asia Pulp & Paper (APP) announced a new “forest conservation” policy, APP’s pledge to halt forest clearing has held, but its forests are still disappearing. A Rainforest Alliance audit released recently confirmed the findings by WWF and local NGOs that APP is failing to stop deforestation and illegal activities in its concessions by other parties, even in areas already identified by the company as containing high conservation values and carbon stocks.

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Eden Project scheme will preserve coast redwood trees for future generations

Remaining specimens of tallest living things on Earth are under threat in Californian home, due to drought and forest fire
The Guardian
March 22, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: International

At the moment they are whippy saplings needing the support of canes to stand straight. Over hundreds – and hopefully thousands – of years, they will soar high into the Cornish sky. Clones of some of the oldest and biggest coast redwoods have been flown in from the western seaboard of the USA to the Eden Project in the far south-west of Britain as part of a hugely ambitious scheme to preserve the magnificent trees for future generations.

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Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy

Climate change: The debate now is about how we adapt

Science tells us Northwest flooding and fires will intensify as carbon emissions rise.
Seattle Times
March 23, 2015
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: United States, US West

THE science is clear: The climate is changing and human activity is the major contributor. Rather than debating the existence and causes of climate change, as the state Senate recently did, the question before Washington’s residents and, importantly, our Legislature is what are we going to do about it?.. On the eastern slopes of the Cascades, new forest-health collaborations of local, state, federal and tribal landowners know that fires do not recognize property boundaries. These collaborations are using science to support state and federal initiatives to fund treatment of the most at-risk forests. 

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P&G celebrates one of the largest biomass energy plants in the US

Pulp and Paper News
March 23, 2015
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: International

The Procter & Gamble Company and Constellation, a subsidiary of Exelon Corporation, gathered with city, county and state officials today to celebrate the development of an up to 50-megawatt biomass plant that will help run one of P&G’s largest U.S. manufacturing facilities. Scheduled to begin commercial operation in June 2017, the plant will provide 100 percent of the steam, and up to 60-70 percent of the total energy used to manufacture Bounty paper towels and Charmin toilet tissue at P&G’s Albany, Ga., facility.

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