Tree Frog Forestry News

Daily Archives: March 31, 2015

Business & Politics

Canada’s lumber exports rising as U.S. housing starts recover

By Keith Norbury
Canadian Sailings
March 29, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, United States

Canada’s lumber production and trade has steadily increased since bottoming out in 2009 in the wake of the global financial crisis. Expected to add fuel to that rising trend in 2015 are a stronger U.S. economy and increasing U.S. housing starts, a sagging Canadian dollar, and the global drop fuel prices, according to forest industry experts and analysts. Looming over those prospects, however, is uncertainty about whether or not Canada can forge a new softwood lumber agreement with the U.S. after the current deal expires later this year.

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Top North American lumber producers in 2014: Canadian sawmills continue to expand in the U.S.

IHB The Timber Network
March 30, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, United States

Canadian and U.S. softwood lumber producers reported modest gains in 2014 as lumber demand continues to rise slowly (but steadily) in the U.S. as well as in key export markets. Total U.S. softwood lumber shipments increased 4.1% to 31.3 billion bf and Canadian production recorded smaller gains, or +3.1% to 24.2 billion bf . Corporate acquisitions were again a big part of the story as the Canadian buying frenzy continued in the U.S. South – since 2004 when only 2 U.S. sawmills were owned by Canadian companies (only West Fraser), there are now more than 35 mills that have been purchased by Canadian firms in the South as well as the U.S. West. 

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Witness list may grow when Lakeland inquest resumes: Orr

Prince George Citizen
March 31, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

The inquest into the Lakeland Mills sawmill explosion was nearing the finish line when it was adjourned last week after coroner’s counsel came across new evidence. Just one witness was left to be heard – WorkSafeBC investigations director Jeff Dolan – but that list may be lengthened somewhat once the proceedings resume. Coroners counsel John Orr has already served notice he will be summoning former WorkSafeBC president David Anderson who held the position at the time of the blasts that leveled Lakeland Mills sawmill on April 23, 2012 and Babine Forest Products on Jan. 20, 2012.

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Polar Mill Still Down

250 News
March 30, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

Prince George, B.C. Canfor’s polar sawmill at Bear Lake is still down. Director, External Affairs and Communications Corinne Stavness, says the dyke adjacent to the site that supplies water to the fire pond has been repaired but notes the company is still working to repair the supply lines for their fire suppression system. “Crews are working full time on this and it’s obviously our priority to get the mill back up and running, but it is unclear at this stage how long the repairs will take,” she says. The mill has been down since Friday night.

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Canada’s top lumber companies boost U.S. mill activity as domestic production wanes

by Gordon Hamilton
Business in Vancouver
March 30, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

Canada’s top lumber companies, struggling to make two-by-fours from trees killed by the mountain pine beetle, made less lumber at home in 2014, but made up for it by increasing production at mills they own in the United States, according to a survey by industry consultants International Wood Markets. The top five Canadian companies saw their production here drop by 3.6% over 2013, according to Wood Markets. However, three of those five companies — Canfor, West Fraser Timber, and Interfor — have mills in the United States, and they made a dramatic increase in production from their U.S. mills. The other two on the Wood Products list of top five companies, Tolko Industries and Resolute Forest Products, do not have mills in the U.S.

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West Fraser Timber Co. Ltd. (“WFT”): James Gorman to Join West Fraser

Market Watch
March 30, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

VANCOUVER — West Fraser today announced the appointment of James Gorman as Vice-President, Corporate and Government Relations effective May 19, 2015. Mr. Gorman will join West Fraser after having served as President and Chief Executive Officer of the Council of Forest Industries since 2013. Prior to joining COFI, Mr. Gorman served in a number of senior leadership roles with the Government of British Columbia.

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Hardwood Demand Indicator Lags Year-Ago Levels as Inventory Rises

Woodworking Network
March 26, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States

Hardwood Publishing says its latest Leading Hardwood Demand Indicator (LHDI), while rising in the March through May 2015 period, is falling behind the levels of 2014. A big unknown: how much lumber China will be buying. The LHDI, a forecast of future demand for U.S. hardwood lumber based on residential and commercial construction, import/export trends, inflation levels, and job markets, was 106.3 in March, rising to 116.4 in April to 129.4 in May 2015, based on growth in non-residential construction; the normal seasonal bump in residential remodeling; and seasonally higher exports (January 2013=100).

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Expansion will make SmartLam No. 1 in the world

Hungry Horse News
March 27, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States, US West

When completed, a new wood products plant at the Columbia Falls Industrial Park north of town will be the largest cross-laminated timber plant in the world, Sen. Jon Tester learned during a meeting with city officials and business leaders at Freedom Bank on March 20. SmartLam general manager Casey Malmquist said he’s in talks with the industrial park’s new Canadian owners about plans for construction of a new manufacturing plant to produce the giant wood panels. “We plan to quadruple our capacity, which will make us the largest CLT plant in the world,” Malmquist told Tester.

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C. Falls timber plant may quadruple output

NBC Montana
March 30, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States, US West

COLUMBIA FALLS, Mont. SmartLAM — one of three cross-laminated timber (CLT) plants in North America — started in the Flathead in 2012. The plant currently operates out of Columbia Falls behind Super 1 Foods. But if all goes according to plan, it will move to a larger lot north of town, in the Columbia Falls Industrial Park. Cross-laminated timber is timber that has been cut into small pieces and reformatted into large panels. Owners say it is sustainable — and more sturdy than regular wood. SmartLAM staff met with Sen. Jon Tester at Freedom Bank in Columbia Falls earlier this month to discuss expansion plans that could quadruple the plant’s output and double the number of full-time jobs available to over 60.

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Log export operation at port ended with one shipment

The Advocate
March 28, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: US East, United States

Ralph R. Stewart Jr. had been a Louisiana logger for decades before he became an iconic hope for resumption of large pine log shipments last year from the state to foreign markets. Demand for domestic timber dropped dramatically, as home construction dwindled in the years after the nation’s slide into recession in late 2007. Louisiana forest owners collected $558 million from timber sales that year, according to the Louisiana Forestry Association. Sales sank to a low of $338.9 million by 2009 and recovered to only $425 million by the end of 2013. So, Stewart’s shipment last spring of more than 57,000 tons of logs from the Port of Greater Baton Rouge to Asian buyers was welcomed by both state officials and forest owners who hoped for a flood of foreign money into the state.

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Southern pine lumber exports down 15% in January

Lesprom
March 30, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: US East, United States

To begin the new year, exports of Southern Pine lumber dropped 15% in January, when compared with the same period last year, as the Southern Forest Products Association said in the press release received by Lesprom Network. Southern Pine lumber exports to be approximately 37.5 million board feet (MMbf) during January 2015. Offshore shipments during January roughly break down as follows: 21.3 MMbf dressed, 7.7 MMbf rough, and 8.5 MMbf treated lumber. Softwood lumber imports to the U.S. during January were just below 1 billion board feet, up 10% from the volume imported during January of 2014.

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Wood, Paper & Green Building

On Your Side: Some laminate flooring may contain cancer-causing formaldehyde

FOX WRBC
March 30, 2015
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: United States

BIRMINGHAM, AL (WBRC) – Have you checked out the floors in your home lately? Recent reports say laminate flooring imported from China may contain potentially hazardous emissions of formaldehyde, a chemical known cause cancer. According to the Federal Trade Commission, “Formaldehyde is a naturally-occurring substance that’s used in the manufacture of pressed woods, glue and preservatives.” Several customers have raised concerns about Lumber Liquidators. The company has stores in 46 states, 5 in Alabama and one of the largest laminate flooring inventories in the industry. FOX6 News found these complaints to the Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC).

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Monday Close-up: Modern technology meets old-world craftsmanship at Euclid Timber Frames

Spenser Heaps Daily Herald 0
March 29, 2015
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: United States, US West

HEBER CITY — When Euclid Timber Frames built its first homes at Sundance in the late 1980s, the employees were doing things the old-fashioned way — with saws and Japanese chisels made of folded steel like samurai swords. Then in the late 1990s, the company bought its first European CNC saw and the software to go with it. Euclid had to deliver the timbers for 174 rafters on a Saturday, and it wasn’t until Friday afternoon the computers and the saw were assembled and programmed. Running up against its deadline, the team started loading the wood into the saw, and only a few hours later had all the timbers cut, stacked and loaded on the truck.

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CLT House by Susan Jones shows the future of sustainable, green and healthy housing

Treehugger
March 30, 2015
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: United States, US West

It is the usual practice in covering architecture to wait until a building is complete before it gets published. However in the case of the CLT house in Seattle, designed by Susan Jones of atelierjones, I can’t wait. That’s because it’s so TreeHugger; the house is relatively small at 1500 square feet, it’s on an impossible triangular lot that really limits the design options, it’s almost passive house, it’s covered in one of my favorite materials, Shou sugi ban, but most importantly it is built of Cross-laminated timber (CLT), one of the most important innovations in wood construction of the last few decades. It is also going to be stunningly beautiful.

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Brad Pitt foundation sues manufacturer over allegedly defective wood

The New Orleans Advocate
March 30, 2015
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: US East, United States

Actor Brad Pitt’s Make It Right Foundation is suing the maker of a supposedly glass-infused wood that the nonprofit group used to build decks and stairs at dozens of homes in the Hurricane Katrina-ravaged Lower 9th Ward. The group says the innovative product began rotting prematurely despite a 40-year guarantee. The 12-page lawsuit, filed Monday in Orleans Parish Civil District Court, alleges that South Carolina-based Timber Treatment Technologies LLC intentionally sold a defective product. The lawsuit calls the episode “an egregious example of a manufacturer’s repeated misrepresentations, breaches of warranty and knowing deceptions.” Make It Right used the glass-infused wood, called TimberSIL, from 2008 to 2010. 

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Forestry

Vancouver’s urban forest on the decline: arborist

News 1130
March 30, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

VANCOUVER – A Vancouver arborist says the city has fewer trees now than 20 years ago. David Tracey with the non-profit TreeKeepers is trying to change that by running a campaign this spring to get people in Vancouver to plant a tree or two. He says Vancouver’s canopy cover is shrinking. “We’ve seen a loss of canopy cover over the city, that’s the amount of tree cover you would see if you were looking down on the city from the air, we sued to have 22 to 23 per cent 20 years ago, now we’re about 18 per cent and that’s really low. For the health of the city, we want to have a healthy urban forest so we’re doing all we can to get those numbers up and get more trees planted in the city.”

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First Nations want management control of Ogoki Forest

Northern Ontario Business
March 31, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

The northwestern Ontario First Nations of Aroland, Eabametoong and Marten Falls have signed a forest tenure agreement on the Ogoki Forest in northwestern Ontario. The three First Nations say they will play “a leading role in forest governance” toward obtaining a long-term forest license for the Ogoki Forest Management Unit. The communities want take control of forest management planning, harvesting, road construction, silviculture, environmental monitoring, reporting and also establish forest-based First Nations business ventures.

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Forests: Senators disregard logging impacts

Letter to the editor
The Missoulian
March 30, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Recent newspaper articles have reported that the U.S. Forest Service and Montana’s senators agree on the need for more logging. The Forest Service chief reported at a Senate Appropriations Interior Subcommittee that the number of restored (i.e. logged) forest acres needs to increase at least four times. U.S. Sen. Steve Daines commented to the chief that environmentally, the best thing we can do are responsible timber practices; he then asked if 300 million board feet was a reasonable logging target. In 2014, only 113 million board feet of timber were cut, s Daines is proposing increasing logging by about three times. U.S. Sen. Jon Tester noted to the chief that taxpayer-funded logging was important to keep the timber industry afloat.

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A Year Round Fire Season?

USDA Blog
March 30, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

There was a time when fire season for Western states meant only certain months out of the year. Not so long ago the U.S. Forest Service considered it primarily a summer problem with a few regions breaking the trend in early spring and late fall. But climate change, according to most wildland fire experts, has turned fire season into a year-round issue. What used to slow down fire season was winter—a long and cold time of year with lots of snow that killed off many invasive or destructive pests and filled rivers and reservoirs with ample water to supply the needs of millions living in the West.

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STUDY: Mild Winters Not Fueling All Pine Beetle Outbreaks in Western United States

The Snap Online
March 30, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

HANOVER, N.H. – Warming winters have allowed mountain pine beetle outbreaks in the coldest areas of the western United States, but milder winters can’t be blamed for the full extent of recent outbreaks in the region, a Dartmouth College and U.S. Forest Service study finds. Milder winters have contributed to recent beetle outbreaks in Canada, but this is the first climate study to evaluate warmer winters as a factor permitting simultaneous outbreaks across the majority of its range in the western United States. In the last 15 years, bark beetles in the western U.S. have killed pine forests over more than 140,000 square miles (about the size of Montana), which exceeds the area killed by forest fires during the same years. 

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Endangered bighorn sheep moved to Yosemite, Sequoia parks

The Missoulian
March 30, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

FRESNO, Calif. — For the first time in a century, endangered Sierra Nevada bighorn sheep are back on their ancestral range and headed toward recovery, wildlife officials said Monday. During an ongoing relocation effort, hundreds of bighorn have been captured with nets dropped from helicopters then moved to Yosemite and Sequoia national parks. “We’ve got the sheep where we want them on a broad geographic basis, which is a huge milestone,” California Department of Fish and Wildlife biologist Tom Stephenson said. “We’ve still got to get their numbers up a bit.”

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Restore Payments

Payson Roundup
March 27, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

…The federal government long relied on revenue from logging, grazing permits and mining royalties to raise the money to make the PILT awards. The payments shrank as federal mismanagement all but wiped out logging and grazing on millions of acres. Instead of regulating logging and grazing to ensure a sustainable harvest and consistent source of revenue for counties and schools, the Forest Service and other agencies made one misjudgment after another — resulting in an unhealthy forest and programs drowning in lawsuits. Rural counties and schools proved the victims of this mismanagement.

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Murkowski Adds Federal Land Disposal Measure to Budget

Alaska Public Media
March 27, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Environmentalists are saying a budget amendment authored by Sen. Lisa Murkowski could lead to a plundering of treasured federal landscapes. Murkowski’s amendment on federal land disposals was part of a national budget resolution the Senate passed early this morning. Senators offered hundreds of amendments that don’t have the force of law but often serve symbolic or political purposes. Murkowski said on the Senate floor her amendment could facilitate state and local land exchanges to create balanced resource policy. But, the senator says, the amendment doesn’t, on its own, sell or exchange any particular piece of federal land.

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On sprays, transparency should trump profit

The Register-Guard
March 29, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

I am writing in support of Senate Bill 613, a simple law that would require accurate records, accountability and access to information concerning poisons used in forestry applications. I can speak with authority about this based on my experience as Siuslaw National Forest supervisor from 1992 to 1999, and as deputy chief of the U.S. Forest Service after leaving Oregon in 1999. The federal government ceased using forest herbicides in Oregon just before my arrival after notoriously losing a landmark lawsuit over human health issues associated with miscarriages and birth defects. We had to figure out a way forward without herbicides in our toolkit. The outcome is instructive to today’s protracted struggle to ensure human health in the face of corporate greed.

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Rattlesnake wrong place for commercial logging

by Cass Chinske, President of Friends of the Rattlesnake
The Missoulian
March 30, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Therefore, when I read the March 15 Missoulian, I was stunned to learn that the Forest Service is planning commercial logging in the Rattlesnake National Recreation Area. This was the first time I had ever even heard of this USFS proposal. Proposed Action Alternative B would use prescribed burning, thinning and commercial logging, with the stated goal of improving forest health while lessening the possibility of catastrophic fire. I was stunned by this news because the USFS-Missoula Ranger District would use commercial methods to harvest timber for so-called thinning. This action would use heavy equipment such as bulldozers, skidders and drag lines, build roads and truck 80 full loads (1/2 million board feet) of trees to the mills.

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Federal wildfire bill takes step forward

Senators attach provision to budget
The Bend Bulletin
March 28, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

A measure to treat large wildfires as natural disasters passed a procedural test late this week as part of a marathon vote in the Senate. Sens. Ron Wyden, D-Ore., and Mike Crapo, R-Idaho, introduced the Wildfire Disaster Funding Act of 2015 back in January. It would allow the federal government to pay the expense of fighting the most destructive wildfires through the Federal Emergency Management Agency. This week, the pair attached a provision to the Senate budget to adjust a funding cap that has prevented agencies from treating wildfires as natural disasters in the federal budget. The Wildfire Disaster Funding Act, which is still in committee, would need to pass separate from the budget.

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Commissioner Peck speaks to Congress

The Western News
March 27, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Lincoln County Commissioner Mark Peck appeared before the United States Senate Energy and Natural Resource Committee Tuesday morning and urged Congress to rectify not just the processes used to manage the forest, but also the paradigm. “The harmony and vitality of my community have given way to decades of conflict built upon the false premise that management, conservation, wildlife and sustainable community economics are diametrically opposed to one another,” he said. … The first solution Peck suggested was a change in not just how the forest is managed, by in the framework behind the decisions. “The process is fundamentally broken and we must fundamentally change how we look at resource management in this nation.

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Wyden aims to bring logic to funding wildfire battle

Portland Business Journal
March 29, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

An Oregon Democrat is teaming with an Idaho Republican to insert language in the Senate budget that could lead to passage of the Wildfire Disaster Funding Act. Senators Ron Wyden and Mike Crapo, of Oregon and Idaho respectively, attached a provision to the Senate budget that adjusts a funding cap that prevents agencies from treating wildfires as natural disasters, leading to a cycle of underfunding fire suppression. The move sets the state to pass the Wildfire Disaster Funding Act, which would eliminate the need for federal agencies to raid their prevention budgets to pay to fight increasingly fierce forest fires.

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Conservationist Concern Over Klamath Fire Follow (radio)

Jefferson Public Radio
March 30, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Count on a lot of comments on the Westside Fire Recovery Project in the Klamath National Forest. The project would involve salvage logging and other activities in three major areas burned by fires in the summer of 2014. We talked to the forest bosses in a previous segment; now we hear the concerns of KS Wild and other conservation groups. George Sexton from KS Wild and Craig Tucker from the Karuk Tribe join us.

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More U.S. Forest Service obfuscation

Letter to the editor
Summit Daily
March 27, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Lack of transparency in government? Blind persistence in ill-conceived plans? Our Dillon Ranger District is the poster child for both. On May 29 of last year, 80-plus citizens turned out on a rainy night at a nonprofit-group Forest Health Task Force meeting to express their anger at the atrocity of clear-cutting destruction of Gold Hill and the Colorado Trail. Six Forest Service officials droned on forever with their standard stuff to try to limit discussion time, but the citizens did manage to get some words—and telling photos—in. Never once did the “Forest Disservice” officials mention that new clear-cutting projects near the main trails in the Iron Springs area would begin the next day.

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Drought damage leads to widespread forest death

Phys.Org
March 30, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

The 2000-2003 drought in the American southwest triggered a widespread die-off of forests around the region. A Carnegie-led team of scientists developed a new modeling tool to explain how and where trembling aspen forests died as a result of this drought. It is based on damage to the individual trees’ ability to transport water under water-stressed conditions. If the same processes and threshold govern the future, their results suggest that more widespread die-offs of aspen forests triggered by climate change are likely by the 2050s. Tree mortality can radically transform ecosystems, affect biodiversity, harm local economies, and pose fire risks, as well as further increase global warming.

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Public Feedback Needed on Kentucky’s Wildlife and Forest Management

WMKY 90.3 FM
March 30, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

The Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources is seeking additional public input about forest management and restoration of woodland species such as grouse. A recent series of public meetings on the topic included a survey for attendees to complete afterward. …Kentucky officials are using public input to build the framework of a long-term plan to boost populations of grouse and other woodland species in the eastern part of the state. Wisconsin and the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation are partnering with Kentucky to help fund habitat work. Kentucky has agreed to supply Wisconsin with 150 elk over the next five years to assist with that state’s effort to boost its small elk herd.

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Miller: The national forests belong to you

The Roanoke Times
March 29, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

Miller lives in Lexington and works for the Virginia Wilderness Committee and is a member of the Stakeholder Collaborative. Citizens in the commonwealth are fortunate to have the George Washington National Forest. Acquired in the early 1900s, these public lands provide a large, relatively unfragmented forested landscape, which includes the headwaters of the James and Potomac rivers as well as habitat for a diversity of fish and wildlife species. In addition to providing clean drinking water for millions of people, the GWNF offers many recreational and economic opportunities including hiking, mountain biking, horseback riding, camping, hunting, fishing and forest products.

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The New England Forestry Foundation Urges Maine’s Governor to Release Funds for Important Conservation Projects

New England Forestry Foundation
Marketwired
March 30, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

The recent news that Maine’s Governor Paul LePage has again delayed release of funds approved by voters for land conservation through the Land for Maine’s Future program was both surprising and disappointing to the New England Forestry Foundation (NEFF). NEFF is a recognized leader in conserving forests, supporting sustainable forestry, and assisting landowners in the protection and stewardship of their properties. “Forest land provides tremendous benefits to the people of New England, which was clearly stated in our 2014 Path to Sustainability Report, and we urge the Governor to rethink his stance and release the funds to the LMF Board,” said Timothy A. Ingraham, NEFF Board President.

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Climate Change Threatens to Kill Off More Aspen Forests by 2050s, Scientists Say

New York Times
March 30, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

The beloved aspen forests that shimmer across mountainsides of the American West could be doomed if emissions of greenhouse gases continue at a high level, scientists warned on Monday. That finding adds to a growing body of work suggesting forests worldwide may be imperiled by climate change. The new paper analyzed the drought and heat that killed millions of aspens in Colorado and nearby states a decade ago. Such conditions could become routine across much of the West by the 2050s unless global emissions are brought under control, the study found.

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Greens want to take Tasmania back to the stone age

The Australian
March 30, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: International

It is testimony to the human spirit that Tasmania has an economy at all, let alone one that is growing. If the Greens had their way, Tasmanians would be reduced to trading possum pelts and sharpened flint, scavenging thick forests for seeds, sap and berries to keep the hunger at bay. Yet the latest National Australia Bank quarterly business survey shows business confidence is higher in Tasmania than any other state. About 7000 jobs have been created since the last state election. Retail trade is at a high and building approvals are up.

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Despite deforestation, the world is getting greener: scientists

Business Insider.com
March 30, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: International

BANGKOK (Thomson Reuters Foundation) – The world’s vegetation has expanded, adding nearly 4 billion tonnes of carbon to plants above ground in the decade since 2003, thanks to tree-planting in China, forest regrowth in former Soviet states and more lush savannas due to higher rainfall. Scientists analyzed 20 years of satellite data and found the increase in carbon, despite ongoing large-scale tropical deforestation in Brazil and Indonesia, according to research published on Monday in Nature Climate Change.

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Good luck and the Chinese reverse global forest loss

Phys Org
March 30, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: International

Analysis of 20 years of satellite data has revealed the total amount of vegetation globally has increased by almost 4 billion tonnes of carbon since 2003. This is despite ongoing large-scale deforestation in the tropics. An Australian-led international team of scientists published the findings in Nature Climate Change, finding a range of causes for the increase. “The increase in vegetation primarily came from a lucky combination of environmental and economic factors and massive tree-planting projects in China,” said Dr Yi Liu a lead author and remote sensing scientist from the Centre of Excellence for Climate System Science at the University of New South Wales.

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Govt working to improve conditions for forest field staff

Live Mint
March 31, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: International

New Delhi: The ministry of environment and forests has proposed several steps to improve the working conditions of front-line forest field staff, who are responsible for protection and preservation of India’s wildlife and are often deprived of basic facilities such as clean drinking water, toilets, electricity, communication systems and medical aid. The ministry, in consultation with state governments, plans to provide them with specialized training, incentives for working under tough conditions and career growth on par with other security forces such as the police.

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Global Forest Map Created By Citizen Scientists Could Provide Insight Into Deforestation, Climate Change

HNGN.com
March 30, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: International

A team of citizen scientists helped create a super-accurate map of global forest cover, allowing researchers to gain insight into deforestation and the effects of climate change. There are currently a number of sources of data on forests, including satellite imagery, but much of these data disagree with each other, the International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis reported. These new findings could help clear up some of the confusion. “The new maps rely on a combination of recent multisensory remote sensing data, statistics, and crowdsourcing,” said Dmitry Schepaschenko, the lead author of the study. “By combining different data sources, and incorporating the input of trained citizen scientists, we were able to produce new maps that are more accurate than any existing data source.”

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