Tree Frog Forestry News

Daily Archives: April 8, 2015

Special Feature

UBC Forestry Alumni Social in Prince George, BC

Tree Frog News
April 7, 2015
Category: Special Feature
Region: Canada, Canada West

Tree Frog News attended the UBC Forestry Alumni Social in Prince George. Hosted in conjunction with the 2015 COFI Conventiona mix of x-students representing more than a 30 year spread in graduation classes filled the room. More than 35 alumni attended the event. Dean Innes said a few words of welcome and gave a brief update on Faculty news and events. He announced that UBC is in the process of establishing a new degree in Urban Forestry. Although still snipping at red tape, they already have students waiting to enrol in the new program. One surprise was to learn that the number of students in the forest management stream is currently surpassing those in the conservation program. This is a first! Click Read More to see some pictures from the event.

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Froggy Foibles

Ten facts about beavers on International Beaver Day

Statesman Journal
April 7, 2015
Category: Froggy Foibles
Region: United States, US West

April 7 is International Beaver Day. To help the state celebrate its state animal, we’ve compiled, with help from sites including the Oregon Blue Book, YoungVeggie.com, the Lands Council, and IMDb.com, 10 interesting facts about the largest living rodent in North America. Beavers are vegetarians; they eat plants and trees, and prefer aspen, cottonwood, willow and dogwood. Contrary to popular opinion, they do not eat fish.

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Business & Politics

FPInnovations’ Dr. Paleologou receives R&D awards

Pulp and Paper Canada
April 7, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada

Dr. Michael Paleologou, a group leader with research institute FPInnovations, has been named winner of the 2015 Research and Development Technical Award and William H. Aiken Prize by TAPPI’s International Research Management Committee. This award is given for outstanding accomplishments or contributions which have advanced the technology of the paper and related industries in the field of research and development. The award will be presented to Dr. Paleologou at PaperCon 2015 in Atlanta, Georgia.

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COFI Convention Starts Today

250 News
April 8, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

Prince George, B.C. – The who’s who of the forest industry will be in Prince George starting today for this year’s annual Council of Forest Industries Convention (COFI). It begins with a welcome address at 8 this morning at the Civic Centre and will feature a variety of workshops says COFI’s director of communications and engagement Cam McAlpine. “We’ve got people from the forest industry across B.C., Alberta, the Pacific Northwest, upwards of 500 delegates discussing all kinds of issues central to the industry,” he says. “Everything from fibre and timber supply to a new bio-economy to world markets and market access as well as some of the key issues around transportation.”

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Electricity Support for Northern Industries Program Made Permanent

Net News Ledget
April 7, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada East, Canada

THUNDER BAY – “I am delighted to announce that our government is committing to an ongoing Northern Industrial Electricity Rate support program,” said Michael Gravelle, Minister of Northern Development and Mines. “As part of our work to help build up the north, this vital program will help Northern Ontario’s largest industrial electricity consumers reduce their electricity costs and sustain jobs to help continue to position Northern Ontario as a competitive place to do business.”… Ontario is making the level of support for the Northern Industrial Electricity Rate Program permanent for qualifying large northern industrial consumers.

Energy subsidy to stay from the Chronicle Journal

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Cogen facility at Thurso passes test to provide green power

Pulp and Paper Canada
April 7, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada East, Canada

Fortress Paper Ltd. has successfully completed the mandatory 100-hour test for its cogeneration facility at the Fortress Specialty Cellulose Mill in Thurso, Que. This will allow for the addition of 5.2 MW of incremental power. The cogeneration facility can now deliver up to 24 MW of power to Hydro Québec at the contract commercial rate. The successful test follows completion of certain gear repairs to the cogeneration facility. After the repairs, the ramp-up of the cogeneration facility proceeded smoothly, the company states.

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Firefighters battle blaze at Cottles Island Lumber near Summerford

‘Kinda makes you wonder what’s going on down here’
CBC News
April 8, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada East, Canada

Summerford’s fire chief has stopped short of calling three fires in Newfoundland’s Notre Dame Bay suspicious, but admits a fire Wednesday at a lumber yard is cause for concern. Fire crews from Twillingate and Summerford — including three pumper trucks and two dozen firefighters — were still at Cottles Island Lumber’s main warehouse late Wednesday morning. They arrived around 2 a.m. By the time firefighters reached the burning warehouse after being alerted by a passing motorist, it was entirely engulfed, said fire chief Terry Hann. The warehouse contains the operation’s lumber and boiler, making the fire tougher to fight.

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Ontario gives northern industry permanent relief from energy costs

The Northern Industrial Electricity Rate Program will carry on indefinitely, province says
CBC News
April 7, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada East, Canada

A program that reduces energy costs for northern industries — like mining and forestry — will carry on indefinitely, the Ontario government says. Speaking at a news conference at Resolute Forest Products’ Thunder Bay pulp mill on Tuesday, Northern Development and Mines Minister Michael Gravelle told reporters that Ontario would commit up to $120 million a year permanently to the Northern Industrial Electricity Rate Program, which was to expire in March of 2016. First introduced in 2010, the program is a benefit to companies such as Resolute, Goldcorp, AV Terrace Bay, and North American Palladium, Gravelle said.

Ontario extends industrial electricity rate program permanently from TB News Watch

Press release form the Government of Ontario

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EU sawn tropical hardwood imports still low

IHB The Timber Network
April 7, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States

The recent 5% increase in European sawn tropical hardwood imports to 985,000 m3 was insufficient to offset the 8% drop in deliveries experienced in 2013. A closer look at the most important supplier countries reveals that Malaysia (+13%), Brazil (+19%) and Ivory Coast (+15%) boosted their deliveries to Europe significantly last year. This came after decline in imports from these three countries in 2013. Deliveries from the Congo Republic and Gabon also continued their positive trend last year. EU imports from Cameroon (-4%), Ghana (-9%) and Indonesia (-8%) continued their downhill slide in 2014.

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Oregon, Washington push ahead with manufacturing partnership

Statesman Journal
April 8, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States, US West

An ongoing effort to support manufacturing in Oregon got a recent boost in legislation with the passage of Senate Bill 482, which created an advisory committee for the Pacific Northwest Manufacturing Partnership. The partnership, abbreviated as the PNMP, was formed last year. It includes 17 counties in Oregon and Washington and spans from the Eugene area up to Portland and east through The Dalles. …Need a more concrete example of how the partnership can help? Business Oregon has one: cross laminated timber. These are massive timber panels that can actually be used to build skyscrapers — an industry that’s already taken off in Europe, driven by environmental and aesthetic advantages over steel and concrete.

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Commissioner: Log shipping slump erodes Port of Port Angeles revenue; 40 percent to 60 percent decline expected at terminal

Peninsula Daily News
April 7, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States, US West

PORT ANGELES — The Port of Port Angeles faces dwindling revenue from its log shipping terminal even as it encounters environmental challenges on the harborfront, a port commissioner said Tuesday. Not only is China buying fewer raw logs, Port Commissioner Colleen McAleer said, but more of them are being sold to Asian nations by Canada, whose oil-fueled economy has been hurt by falling prices for crude and which is trying to fill the deficit with timber sales. Log shipments account for 35 percent of the port’s revenue, she said — $3.8 million — and the port anticipates reductions of 40 percent to 60 percent. 

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New report explores the engineered wood product market trends and forecasts for next five years

whaTech.com
April 7, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: International

Engineered wood, also known as composite wood comprises of a number of wood products made by binding veneers, particles, fibers and strands of wood, together with adhesives to form composite materials. They are modeled to absolute design requirements as per the client’s specifications and tested to meet international and national standards.hey include a variety of products ranging from plywoods to roof trusses. Browse Full Report With TOC:- http://www.transparencymarketresearch.com/engineered-wood-product.html

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Belarus loaned $40m for forestry development

HD FestForest
April 7, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: International

The World Bank is to provide a $40.71 million (€37 million) loan for the development of forestry in Belarus.  This funding will be used to improve the effectiveness of forest breeding, recreation and planting in the nation, as well as ensuring more logging residue is utilised, BelTA reports. Young Chul Kim, head of the World Bank’s representative office in Belarus, revealed the forestry development product would support 25,000 jobs at 88 businesses, as well as boosting the fortunes of woodworking enterprises, 

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Parity with the Australian Dollar Won’t Help Timber Exports

By New Zealand Timber Industry Federation
Scoop Independent News
April 8, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: International

Jobs will go and sawmills may be forced to close if the Australian dollar continues to lose value against the Kiwi dollar says John McVicar, President of the New Zealand Timber Industry Federation. Australia is a very important market for New Zealand timber representing 21% of the value of our timber exports. More importantly it has been a higher value market that the industry has relied on to make money. However since 2012, the rising value of the New Zealand dollar has eroded 20% of the value of our timber sold in Australia. Mr McVicar says there simply isn’t that sort of margin in the product and mills will now be supplying at a loss to stay in the market.

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Forest Jobs Forecast for the South East (radio)

ABC News, Australia
April 8, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: International

The forest industry sustains a large part of the South East economy. With a long pedigree, forestry has been a part of the local community for over a century. Forestry is a huge employer in the region with preparation, establishment, treatment, thinning and clear-falling all very labour intensive tasks. With the advent of blue gum plantations, the forest estate has grown even further.

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Wood, Paper & Green Building

Cellulose nanocrystals found to boost strength of concrete

Pulp and Paper Canada
April 7, 2015
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: Canada

Cellulose nanocrystals derived from agriculture, pulp or paper industries have been shown to increase the strength of concrete, representing a potential renewable additive to improve this construction material. Researchers at Purdue University have demonstrated that the cellulose nanocrystals can increase the tensile strength of concrete by 30%. “This is an abundant, renewable material that can be harvested from low-quality cellulose feedstocks already being produced in various industrial processes,” said Pablo Zavattieri, an associate professor in the Lyles School of Civil Engineering.

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New design for Sixth St. Bridge unveiled

Comox Valley Record
April 7, 2015
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: Canada, Canada West

A new design for a pedestrian and cycling bridge over the Courtenay River will be officially unveiled at a meeting of the City Council on Monday evening (April 13). But today readers can get a sneak peek of what the Sixth Street Bridge Steering Committee is now proposing in order to address some concerns expressed when its idea for a timber-framed bridge was first put forward. Having consulted in detail with bridge-building engineers, the committee is now promoting the concept of a 60-metre (200 ft.) cable-stayed suspension bridge, primarily built of special steel, with a 4.5-metre (15 ft.) wide wood deck “as the most practical, cost-effective and best fit for this site.”

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Timber Frame Structures in Multi-Storey Projects

There are a few key elements in the development and design process that underpin successful outcomes for timber projects in the commercial construction industry.
Sourceable
April 8, 2015
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: International

You’ve doubtless read the recent industry assertions that a timber-framed build can be cheaper than concrete. This can be the case, but as in much of construction, the devil is in the detail. The new buzzword is ‘hybrid’ construction – the use of both in-situ and prefabricated structural elements. Originally applied to the advent of pre-cast concrete panels, hybrid timber construction is now commercially feasible using floor cassettes and prefabricated wall frames. The accuracy, speed and high-quality finish of factory made components can be combined with the economy and flexibility of timber and of timber trades.

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What’s Holding Back the Wooden Skyscraper?

Sourceable.net
April 7, 2015
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: International

They offer robust carbon sequestering and have the potential to reach skyscraper heights, so why aren’t we building more wooden skyscrapers in cities? Earlier this year, the CTBUH predicted that 2015 would be the year of the woodscraper. So far the predictions are proving  However, in Australian cities and other major urban pockets where skylines are rising at a rapid rate, there remains some resistance to high rise wooden structures. Australia has just one tall timber building reaching 32 metres and that was built three years ago.

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Forestry

Harper announces expansion of student grant program at North Vancouver school (with video)

Vancouver Sun
April 7, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada

Prime Minister Stephen Harper made an announcement Tuesday about expanding the student grant program. …Harper announced that the federal government is expanding the accessibility of Canada’s grant program for low- and middle-income post-secondary students. The expansion of the program now provides $250 a month for low-income students and $100 a month for those from middle-income families. …“One can qualify as a forestry technician in just shy of a year…

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Spider Lake near Qualiucm Beach gets 7,500 new rainbow trout

Parksville Qualicum Beach News
April 7, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Spider Lake will soon have 7,500 more fish, thanks to the Freshwater Fisheries Society of B.C. Forests Minister Steve Thomson announced last week that the province is making good on a decade-old vow to direct all its fishing licence revenue to the society and will increase the annual revenue from $7 million to $10 million this year. That will mean more fishing spots and trout to catch in B.C. lakes and streams this year with 103,100 trout being added to 58 lakes in the spring and 65,150 to 32 lakes in the fall.

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Ecosystem restoration burn set for Johnstone Creek

Ministry of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations
BC Government
April 7, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

GRAND FORKS – The Ministry of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations is conducting an ecosystem restoration burn near Johnstone Creek between April 8 and April 30, 2015, weather conditions permitting. This controlled burn will cover 25 hectares and smoke may be visible from Rock Creek and surrounding areas. Smoke may be present for several days, as fires within the burn control lines are extinguished. Fire is a natural, normal process in many ecosystems. It can be beneficial and necessary to maintain a healthy forest and a diversity of plant and animal life. Through evolution and exposure to wildfires, many plants and animals have adapted to fire and actually depend on it to reproduce.

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MNRF returns to prescription fires to bring new life to forests

CBC News
April 7, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

Prescribed burns are becoming more common as a way to manage northwestern Ontario’s forests, said forest fire officials in the region. The intentionally-started fires are designed to renew vegetation and burn off dangerously dry or damaged areas. A specialist on prescribed burns for the Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry said that, for several years, the ministry scaled back on those types of fires after the logging industry began moving their slash piles out of the bush. Cleaning up after logging activity was no longer required. But Scott Wiseman said the province is now returning to the practice of prescribed fires.

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Transferring National Lands to the States Is the Wrong Policy Solution

Huffington Post
April 7, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States

…The bottom line is making simple cost or revenue comparisons that grab headlines claiming that the federal government is “losing money” by managing our national lands does nothing to solve the real problems of managing lands in an era of tight budgets, legislated fiscal subsidies, changing conditions due to climate change, increasing pressure for recreation and open space, and ever more expensive and dangerous wild fires in the West. We need to work together to ensure the agencies managing our national lands and resources are working under policies that reflect our current priorities and values. We should not blame the Forest Service and BLM for carrying out the laws Congress puts and keeps on the books. If we don’t like those laws, the answer is to change public policy, not change who manages the land.

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Forest Service museum efforts moving forward in Missoula

Missoulian
April 7, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

If you ask Dave Stack, the old wedding dress stitched from a silk parachute may be the oddest artifact held by the National Museum of Forest Service History. Once worn by a proud Rocky Mountain bride, the item is one of 33,000 collected by a nonprofit group three years shy of turning 30 years old. With their eye on the future, backers of the proposed museum are working to raise $14.5 million to construct a 30,000-square-foot facility on 36 acres of land held by the U.S. Forest Service near the Aerial Fire Depot and Smokejumper Center on Airport Road. Those behind the effort remain optimistic in their endeavor.

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Wildlife Officials Consider Endangered Listing For Spotted Owl

Oregon Public Broadcasting
April 8, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

The Northwest’s most iconic bird could get a conservation boost in the coming years. On Wednesday the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is announcing it will review the protection status of the Northern Spotted Owl. The result could be an endangered species listing. The owl was first listed as threatened in 1990. It was the height of the “Timber Wars” in the Northwest and the listing became a pivotal moment in the region’s cultural and economic history. It led to a temporary ban on logging in federal old growth forests and eventually to the Northwest Forest Plan, which cut logging on national forests and other federal land by more than 80 percent.

As spotted owl number fall, federal biologists reconsider protections from The Associated Press

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CARROLL: Congress could do more for forests

Rapid City Journal
April 7, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

The recent headline about an artice in the South Dakota Law Review describing our current state of forest management as needing a congressional fix is based on research accomplished during years I spent using public relations skills to try to reconcile public discomfort and dismay over forest management with federal laws that seemed tailor-made to frustrate and confuse. …If the current federal forest policy shambles weren’t enough, Congress, and just to be clear, Congress includes Sen. Rounds and Thune, and Rep. Noem, has been unable to change the ridiculous way they force the Forest Service to pay for firefighting costs out of individual forest budgets.

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My Turn: Southeast Alaska’s wood product industry is world-class

Juneau Empire
April 8, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

There have been 50 lawsuits filed against timber sales in the Tongass since the 1990s. Can you imagine if every time your corner coffee shop tried to buy local coffee beans, or every time your favorite bar tried to use local beverages, or every time your favorite restaurant tried to get salmon from local fishermen, a group that was anti-coffee, anti-beer or anti-fish sued to stop them — and redoubled their efforts when these lawsuits were rejected by the courts? You would (rightly) think it was unfair, and feel helpless and frustrated in the face of unlimited outside spending and lawyers. Can you imagine if it were your business that was the center of these attacks? Could your small business survive a single one of these lawsuits, let alone 50 of them?

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Siuslaw to host listening session

The Corvallis Gazette-Times
April 7, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Corvallis-area residents will have an opportunity to weigh in on the question of how to revise the Northwest Forest Plan. The Siuslaw National Forest will host a listening session on the topic from 6 to 8 p.m. April 27 at Oregon State University’s LaSells Stewart Center, 875 S.W. 26th St. Headquartered in Corvallis, the Siuslaw covers 630,000 acres between Tillamook and Coos Bay. The Corvallis event is a follow-up to regional listening sessions held last month in Portland, Seattle and Redding, California, intended to gather public input on possible revisions to the Northwest Forest Plan.

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Pine beetle battle becomes national news

My Informs.com
April 7, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

When it comes to the mountain pine beetle, Dave Thom, Coordinator of the Black Hills Regional Mountain Pine Beetle Working Group has plenty of numbers. “The mountain pine beetle has infested 430,000 acres over the last 15–20 years most recently infested 110,000 in the last 3 years,” Thom said. Numbers considered so large, that National Geographic came to Custer, and Frank Carroll of Professional Forest Management says BBC is right behind them.

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Wash. buying 1,700 acres of forest on Olympic Peninsula

Associated Press
April 8, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

OLYMPIA, Wash. — The Washington state Department of Natural Resources is buying more than 1,700 acres of forest land north of the Quinault Indian Reservation on the western Olympic Peninsula. Purchased for $5.2 million from The Nature Conservancy, the land will add to both wildlife habitat and working forests. The acreage will become part of the Olympic State Experimental Forest, which the Natural Resources department manages under its Habitat Conservation Plan for timber revenue to trust land beneficiaries, including the Common School Trust. The majority of the site’s standing timber will be ready for harvest in 10 to 20 years.

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Guest column: The problem with Westside salvage

The Westside salvage logging proposal from the Klamath National Forest has deservedly received a whole lot of attention lately.
The Siskiyou Daily News
April 7, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

. …Unfortunately, much of what the Klamath National Forest is proposing in the Westside timber sale has little to do with fire hazard, watershed health or community safety. Instead, most of the clearcut salvage units are planned in Late-Successional Reserves located on steep slopes in the remote backcountry. Special places far from any home or community, like Tyler Meadows trailhead and Cliff Valley in the Grider Creek headwaters are targeted for clearcutting and conversion to fire-prone tree plantations.

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Grant will fund work to reduce wildfire risk in northeast Washington

The Spokesman-Review
April 8, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Steve Parker had two reactions to last summer’s wildfires in Central Washington: a deep empathy for the people who lost homes and businesses, followed by the thought, “What if that happened here?” It wasn’t hard for the Stevens County commissioner to imagine a catastrophic wildfire sweeping through northeast Washington. In northern Stevens County, where he lives, Parker has walked through forests so crowded and unhealthy that “it looked like a dead zone,” he said. “If a fire started, it would burn all the way to the Canadian border.”

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Professor motivated to teach while getting master’s in forestry

Hilltop Views
April 6, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

His colleagues describe him as a sweet man who loves to teach. Meanwhile, his students describe him as funny, intelligent and passionate. Whenever his name is mentioned, people are sure to talk about his obvious passion for his subject, apparent by his tendency to show great enthusiasm during lectures. His name is William J. Quinn, professor of biology and computer science at St. Edward’s University where he has been teaching since 1983. Growing up in the suburbs of Houston, Quinn spent much of his childhood outdoors.

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Longleaf Pine Savanna Helps Educate Farmers, Others on Value of Forest

USDA Blog
April 7, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

The Nature Conservancy’s Apalachicola Bluffs and Ravines Preserve, an hour west of Tallahassee, Florida, protects nearly 6,300 acres of restored sandhill habitat. Young longleaf pines stand in thick waves of golden wiregrass. Wild turkey, bobwhite quail, gopher tortoise and Florida pine snake once again populate what 25 years ago were rows of industrial timber and bare sand. About 50 people recently toured the preserve to see for themselves the beauty and benefits of the longleaf pine, many of them landowners interested in restoring stands on their properties. They learned how The Nature Conservancy hand planted millions of longleaf pine seedlings and wiregrass plugs.

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After a Decade of Declines, Amazon Deforestation Sharply Rises

Discover Magazine
April 7, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: International

In a world that is quickly losing its tropical forests, Brazil was — until recently — the solitary bright spot. Deforestation rates actually declined there by more than three quarters from 2004 to 2011, winning the praises of the world. But in the past half a year, the trend has dramatically reversed, sparking new worries about the future of the world’s largest rainforest. The pace of forest destruction soared in Brazil from August 2014 through February 2015, according to two different surveys of satellite images. One analysis by the Brazilian space agency INPE reports a 63 percent rise; the other, monthly tallies by the Amazon watchdog group IMAZON, shows deforestation tripling (up 215 percent) in Brazil over the same period a year earlier.

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Condition of tropical forests ‘worsening’, could become ‘critical’

Mongabay.com
April 7, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: International

World leaders are continuing to overlook the worsening condition of tropical forests despite the biome’s vast potential to help mitigate climate change, support local livelihoods and ecosystem services, and stabilize global agriculture, warns a comprehensive review published by a body founded by Prince Charles. Synthesizing a large body of reports and academic research, The Prince of Wales’s International Sustainability Unit’s Tropical Forests: A Review lays out the current state of tropical forests, their importance, the threats they face, and what will be needed to save and restore them. 

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Losing the forest in Papua New Guinea

The Washington Post
April 8, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: International

Papua New Guinea is the second largest island in the world. It is inhabited by diverse tribes that depend on nature to provide them with food and medicine. In ecological terms, the island has a rich array of botanical and animal species. Medicinal plants, which many natives use for traditional healing methods, are spread across the forest. Kangaroos, cassowaries, birds of paradise, cockatoos and crocodile are among the species. Yet, as in the other parts of the world, global industry has started to penetrate remote areas of Papua New Guinea. Timber exploitation on the island has been occurring for decades.

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Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy

Fundy Biosphere group sees dramatic change in Acadian forest

Fundy Biosphere Reserve scientist Ben Phillips says overall the Acadian forest will do worse
CBC News
April 8, 2015
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: Canada East, Canada

Climate change will have a dramatic impact on New Brunswick’s Acadian forest, according to a new study. The Fundy Biosphere Reserve completed an analysis of which native species have the best chance to thrive, and which could suffer under changing climate conditions over the next 100 years. Ben Phillips, a conservation scientist, says a two-degree difference in temperature would have a big impact on trees that prefer the cold. “That puts us here in southeastern New Brunswick more in a Boston type of climate,” said Phillips. “If you think of Boston, they have temperate forests there, the trees grow much faster, you don’t see the coniferous softwoods down there.”

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How wood could be the new oil, add value to Maine’s forestry industry

Bangor Daily News
April 7, 2015
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: US East, United States

At the start of the modern petroleum industry in the 1850s, we devised ways to distill useful products from the otherwise largely worthless oily tar we now go to great lengths to extract, process and sell… More than 150 years later, we so thoroughly rely on oil for heat, transportation and materials yet understand the reserves are finite, so we find ourselves needing to transition back to biomass… With Maine’s forestry industry in need of a way to produce value-added products from wood and without the concern we’re diverting a potential food source for fine chemical production, this is exactly the type of process that could help wean us from oil. Of course, to make a more significant dent in the oil drum, the higher-volume industries of energy and bulk materials also will need to continue their transition back to biomass as well.

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