Tree Frog Forestry News

Daily Archives: May 25, 2015

Business & Politics

Chuck Chiang: Trade with ASEAN nations can and does work

B.C. pulp traces circuitous path to washrooms around that world
Vancouver Sun
May 24, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

JAKARTA — Given Ottawa’s recent focus on trade opportunities in Southeast Asia, it’s natural that people start asking whether such trade is realistic. The countries of ASEAN, the Association of Southeast Asian Nations, combined are the seventh-largest economy in the world with a population of more than 600 million. But logistical challenges abound when it comes to trading with any of the 10 countries comprising the region. Canadian officials have spent the past few years aggressively promoting trade with ASEAN, topped by the announcement in August of a diplomatic mission dedicated to the regional association… The geographical distance and the lack of ASEAN diaspora in Canada inevitably makes one ask whether Canada-ASEAN could ever reach a large-enough scale to benefit both parties? The answer is yes. And the proof is a giant roll of toilet paper.

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Efforts underway to reopen Rutherglen plant

North Bay Nuggett
May 22, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada East, Canada

Five years after Columbia Forest Products shut down its Rutherglen veneer plant, efforts are underway to reopen the facility. “I’m very optimistic,” said Nipissing-Timiskaming MP Jay Aspin, who toured the plant Tuesday with company representatives, as well as Nipissing MPP Vic Fedeli and members of the Mattawa-Bonfield Economic Development Corporation. Aspin said he’s hopeful the company will be able to get the facility back up and running with a little assistance and co-operation from from the development corporation and all levels of government. He said the same sort of approach aided in the reopening of Antoine Mountain in Mattawa.

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More layoffs expected at Catalyst Paper

WCSH6.com
May 24, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: US East, United States

RUMFORD, Maine — Catalyst Paper has announced a temporary shutdown of the No. 12 paper machine has been extended to August, resulting in the layoff of about 50 workers. According to Rumford mill spokesman Tony Lyons the layoffs are “directly market-related.” The No. 12 paper machine manufacturers coated paper used in magazines and catalogs. It has been shut down since the beginning of May but it was only supposed to be temporary. Lyons said the layoffs will be on a “last in, first out” basis. “We’re not laying off workers based on their job titles,” he said.

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More layoffs expected after Catalyst paper machine shutdown extended to August

River Valley Sun Journal
May 22, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: US East, United States

RUMFORD — Catalyst Paper announced Wednesday that a temporary shutdown of the No. 12 paper machine here would be extended to August, resulting in the layoff of approximately 50 workers. The machine manufactures coated paper used in catalogs and magazines. Rumford mill spokesman Tony Lyons said the layoffs are “directly market-related.” The machine has been on a temporary shutdown since the beginning of May and has been “up and down for the last year or so,” he said. “We have decided to extend the downtime of the No. 12 paper machine through the end of August,” Lyons said. “The extension of the downtime is expected to impact about 50 employees.”

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China Dissolving Pulp Industry — Global Market Analysis, Size, Share, Growth, Trends and Forecast, 2014 – 2017

ForImmediateRelease.net
May 24, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: International

The research report throws light on the global dissolving pulp industry, emphasizing on the China market. Dissolving pulp is the pulp that bears more than 90% cellulose content, majorly comprising bamboo pulp, wood pulp, and cotton pulp. It finds application mostly in the viscose fiber industry.  In 2014, a significant number of capacities for dissolving pulp market, such as 110 kt/a capacity of OJI (Japan), 330 t/a capacity of Sappi (North America), and 175 kt/a capacity of Double A (Thailand). However, owing to the constantly declining downstream witnessed by the viscose fiber industry, the cost of dissolving pulp continued to plummet and it reached a worth of US$800 per ton by the of 2014.

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European biomass power is a stranded asset risk

Energy and Carbon
May 24, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: International

Britain’s Drax power plant is one of Europe’s biggest coal plants, and it is in the process of converting its boilers to become one of the world’s biggest sources of biomass power. These are facts. But the company also makes rather large claims about the carbon savings it is achieving from converting to biomass from coal, which in fact depend on very particular assumptions. A new report by the U.S. NGO, the Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC), lays those assumptions bare. Burning wood and other organic matter, called biomass, certainly produces carbon emissions, just as burning any carbon, whether coal, gas or newspapers. The question is whether these emissions are subsequently offset by planting new, replacement trees, which absorb carbon dioxide from the atmosphere as they grow.

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Wood, Paper & Green Building

Letter: Paper bags are a better choice environmentally than plastic ones

By John Mullinder, executive director, Paper & Paperboard Packaging Environmental Council
Montreal Gazette
May 24, 2015
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: Canada East, Canada

Re: “The future of plastic bags” (Editorial, May 22). We challenge your claim that “paper bags take more energy and precious resources to produce (than plastic shopping bags).” First, what resources are more “precious”? The non-renewable fossil fuels that most plastic bags are derived from? Or the renewable trees that paper bags are made from? We would argue that fossil fuels are more precious, that we can’t get them back. Canada’s forests, on the other hand, are regenerated by provincial law. We use them over and over again.

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The core skyline is about to change with addition of two buildings

The London Free Press
May 24, 2015
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: Canada East, Canada

It’s the wood that makes it work. A recent change to Ontario’s building code has allowed a veteran downtown developer to put up one of the first six-storey apartment buildings in the city with a wood frame. In contrast to the flurry of high-rise luxury towers slated for downtown, Yossie Lavie said the building he plans at 356 Dundas St., on a parking lot near Waterloo St., will provide 52 modest one-bedroom units suitable for young people working in the tech or service industries nearby. “There’s a demand from people who work downtown and don’t own cars. Downtown is coming to life,” he said. Lavie said he can keep the costs down because the province, as of Jan. 1, is allowing wood-frame buildings up to six storeys high, up from the previous maximum of four storeys.

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New hotel on Redstone the first of its kind

Waaytv.com
May 22, 2015
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: US East, United States

A new four story hotel being built on Redstone Arsenal is significant in more ways than one. Yes it is the first new hotel to be built on the installation in years, but it is also being built in a brand new way. “We are innovating the construction industry,” said Bill Toben, the Master Superintendent for Lend Lease which is the developer and asset manager for all of the Army’s privatized lodging. That’s a big claim, but it very well may end up being an accurate one. The new Candlewood suites being built in the place of the former troop barracks area on Redstone Arsenal is the first in the United States built with cross laminated timber.

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Japanese home uses wooden material stronger than steel to combat natural disasters

Inhabitat
May 21, 2015
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: International

Japan’s scenery is both mesmerizing and inviting, yet its landscape is also often threatened by natural disasters. This leaves homeowners with the task of reinforcing their homes. One family in southwest Japan has opted to hire Architecture Studio Nolla to build a hybrid house of both traditional lumber and glued laminated timber (glulam, for short), which provides protection from Mother Nature, cost-effective climate control, and – most importantly – peace of mind. Glulam is a versatile wooden beam consisting of multiple “wooden laminations” which are fused together with a strong, moisture-resistant adhesive. The product boasts to be, pound for pound, stronger than steel, and is revolutionary in both commercial and residential constructions. This means that the material can withstand normal weathering, as well as a more intense

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University of Canterbury Forestry part of new multi-million forestry research

By the University of Canterbury
Scoop Independent News
May 25, 2015
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: International

The University of Canterbury is part of a new $14 million, seven year collaborative research effort aimed at maximising the value and export earnings of the forestry industry. The Government recently announced it will invest the research funding in the effort, to be matched dollar for dollar by the forestry industry. The programme will be led by industry-operated entity Future Forests Research, in collaboration with Scion, UC, and the New Zealand Dryland Forests Initiative. The Government funding is provided through the Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment’s Research Partnerships Programme. Industry fiunding is being provided by Forest Growers Levy Trust and a number of leading forestry companies and Farm Forestry Association.

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Forestry

Cenovus Shuts Alberta Oil Sands Site Due to Forest Fire

May 25, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Canada’s Cenovus Energy Inc. said Saturday it is shutting down oil production at its Foster Creek oil sands project in northeastern Alberta “as a precautionary measure” because of an out-of-control forest fire in the area that could threaten the safety of the more than 1,700 workers on site. Cenovus and ConocoPhillips each own 50% of the Foster Creek oil sands project, which produces about 135,000 barrels of oil a day… The fire started Friday inside CLAWR, covers about 9,884 acres, and is considered “out of control,” according to the Alberta government’s website. The fire is moving northwest as well as south, the provincial government said.

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Winnipeg councillors say more money should be spent removing black knot fungus

City foots bill to remove between 200 and 300 trees a year
CBC News
May 25, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Two Winnipeg city councillors are heading up a town hall meeting Monday about black knot fungus affecting the city’s cherry and plum trees. Couns. Janice Lukes and Brian Mayes are working together to fight the crunchy, twisted, black clumps that weigh down Winnipeg tree branches. “It takes a long time. It’s an ugly disease and unfortunately in Winnipeg it’s really affecting the Schubert chokecherry tree,” Lukes said Monday. There are about 7,800 chokecherry trees in Winnipeg, Lukes said, adding that it’s surprising that greenhouses are still selling the trees and that Winnipeggers continue to buy them.

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Small forest fighting plane crashes in northern Alberta, no word on injuries

Canadian Press
May 22, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

COLD LAKE, Alta. – A small air tanker used for fire suppression crashed Friday afternoon about 100 kilometres east of Lac La Biche, Alta., killing the 37-year-old pilot and sole passenger. Jeff Barry of Conair Aerial Firefighting, a contractor for the Alberta government, said the pilot was in his fourth firefighting season with the company. “We’ve sent our accident investigation team and we’ll be co-operating with the Transportation Safety Board and the Alberta ESRD (Environment and Sustainable Resource Development) folks will be there as well,” said Barry. Barry said the plane was a single-seater Air Tractor 802, known in the company as the “Fire Boss.” The company’s website said the amphibious plane is used to scoop up water from lakes or deliver fire retardent.

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Little Bobtail Lake Fire 100% Contained

250 News
May 25, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Prince George, B.C.- The Little Bobtail Lake fire is now 100% contained after crews worked long and hard yesterday to patrol and mop up any hot spots around the perimeter of the fire.An evacuation order remains in effect for areas of the Bulkley Nechako regional District. That order will remain in effect while crews work to remove dangerous trees and remove sprinkler units. While the fire is contained, the Wildfire Management Branch still has more than 200 crew working on this fire.

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Tent caterpillar numbers up in Saskatoon

CKOM.com
May 24, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

It’s “the year of the forest tent caterpillar” in Saskatoon. Thousands of the tiny black, green, yellow and white insects are crawling their way up local trees and homes in their search for food. The good news, is the bug is relatively harmless. City of Saskatoon pest management supervisor Jeff Boone said tent caterpillar outbreaks come in cycles of three years. The city received lots of calls about tent caterpillars the last two years, so Boone is not surprised they have received even more calls this year. Though unusual, outbreaks can last up to six years.

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Alberta Forest Fires Shut 9% of Canada’s Oil Sands Capacity

Bloomberg News
May 24, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Alberta forest fires have prompted the shutdown of about 9 percent of Canada’s oil sands production. Cenovus Energy Inc. closed its 130,000-barrel Foster Creek operations and Canadian Natural Resources Ltd. shut its 80,000-barrel-a-day Primrose project after a forest fire broke out on the Cold Lake Air Weapons Range in northeastern Alberta, the companies said. The shutdown curtails oil sands production at a time when the price for heavy Canadian crude has been at its strongest in five years. Western Canadian Select traded at an average discount to U.S. benchmark West Texas Intermediate of $8.66 a barrel this month, the smallest since 2010, data compiled by Bloomberg show.

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Grassy Narrows 12-year blockade against clear cutting wins award

Ontario Nature recognizes ‘exceptional environmental achievement’ of northern Ontario First Nation
CBC News
May 24, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

An Ontario environmental group is recognizing one of Canada’s longest standing blockades with a public service award. Grassy Narrows First Nation in northwestern Ontario received Ontario Nature’s J.R. Dymond Public Service Award for exceptional environmental achievement at a ceremony on Saturday. Members of the First Nation first began a blockade 12 years ago against logging trucks on its traditional territory north of Kenora, Ont. “The land is what sustains the Ojibway culture,” said Chief Roger Fobister Sr. who accepted the award on behalf of the community. “Everybody’s got a homeland and this is ours, so we need to protect it.”

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Forest fire near Kenora, Ont. causes heavy smoke, road closure

Roads to Shoal Lake, Dryden, Sioux Lookout open again after Saturdays fire-related closures
CBC News
May 24, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

Forest fires closed three separate highways in northwestern Ontario on Saturday, but provincial police say traffic is flowing again Sunday on the roads to Shoal Lake, Dryden and Sioux Lookout… The biggest of the fires is Kenora Fire Number 28, near Shoal Lake. It grew to 350 hectares under high winds on Saturday, according to the Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry. But the Ministry said as of Saturday night the fire was not a threat to any community, including Shoal Lake 39, which is several kilometres to the south and the fire is burning north.

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MNR fighting more forest fires this year the last

Q92 Timmins
May 22, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

It’s been a busy season for MNR firefighters. MNR firefighters have tackled over 120 more forest fires this year compared to last year. Fire Information Officer, Robert Woodrich, says they’ve burned over 500 hectares of land so far. “In Timmine, the MNRF has detected six fires, burning a total of 11.3 hectares.” “No new fires have been detected in the region but the latest, Timmins 3, is being declared out. The forest fire hazard is ranging from low to high across the region.” Woodrich is also reminding you to bring chipping, composting, leaves, or brush to a landfill and not burning them. He says winds are usually higher and it can spread the fire faster.

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Ontario’s tallest tree is rooted in the Ottawa Valley (& video)

Eastern white pine is 47 metres tall, which reaches higher than a 13-storey building
CBC News
May 23, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

The town of Arnprior, Ont., now has one tall order — the bragging rights to Ontario’s tallest tree. Just west of Ottawa, Arnprior is home to a 47-metre tall eastern white pine tree, which reaches higher than a 13-storey building. The tree is more than 200 years old, which means it escaped loggers and developers for quite some time thanks to community support. A towering red pine in Algonquin Park used to hold the record and foresters there are fighting to regain that title with a newly discovered yellow birch. Watch Ashley Burke’s video above to see just how tall and wide the Arnprior tree is.

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Rod Cumberland says lumberjack games gaining popularity

Lumberjack competitions remain popular because it is a part of Canada’s heritage, says Rod Cumberland
CBC News
May 25, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

Rod Cumberland started out competing in lumberjack competitions for almost 30 years, now he commentates on them. Four years ago, Cumberland, a six-time New Brunswick provincial lumberjack champion, started working for The Sports Network (TSN), using his expertise in woodsmen competitions to provide colour commentary on the television broadcasts.  Cumberland, who lives in Keswick Ridge, has travelled the country
and the world for the job. He said the sport is a big deal in many
small communities across the country, particularly on the east and west
coasts.

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9 forest fires in northeast since May 23

NorthernLife.ca
May 24, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

The Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry has confirmed nine new forest fires in northeastern Ontario since May 23. The ministry said two of the fires are still active, including one near Sudbury that has covered 0.1 hectares of territory. The forest fire hazard currently ranges from moderate to extreme throughout the region, with a majority of the region experiencing a high or extreme hazard. The Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry advises those planning to enjoy outdoor activities to exercise caution when using fire.

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Tribe meets with groups to discuss collaboration on Anchor forest project

Tribal Tribune
May 21, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Representatives from the Colville Business Council, Tribal Land and Property Division, and Bureau of Indian affairs Forestry Division met Wednesday, May 13 with groups interested in collaborating with the tribes on the Anchor forest project. Groups in attendance included the North Central Washington Forest Health Collaborative, Washington Department of Natural Resources, Kettle Range Conservation Group, National Forest Service, Northwest Management Inc., Northeast Washington Forestry Coalition and the Evergreen foundation and federal lobbyist Brian Gunn.

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Rattlesnake National Recreation Area: Alternative B mitigates fire risk

Letter to the editor
The Missoulian
May 24, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

It is a certainty that more fires will start in the Rattlesnake in the coming years. In the last 115 years, there have been over 40 fires within the project area that firefighters have held to less than 10 acres in size with aggressive initial attack. There was a 20,000-acre fire in 1919 when a rancher in Grant Creek was burning hay piles and the fire got away from him. Aside from the Strawberry Ridge burn in the 1990s, there haven’t been fuels treatments to reduce hazardous fuels buildup. When the next large fire occurs there in its current state under dry, windy conditions, helicopters and air tankers would rapidly launch.

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Lightning caused Brown Mountain fire

Sit News
May 22, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Ketchikan, Alaska – Lightning storms occurring late Wednesday evening started several fires in the Tongass National Forest. One of those fires is in the Brown Mountain area on the Ketchikan Ranger District approximately 15 miles north of Ketchikan. Forest Fire Management Officer Tristan Fluharty said, “Lightning fires are very unusual on the Tongass. This is an indication of how dry the forest is. Fire danger is very high across the Tongass”. According to Forest Service Public Affairs Officer Carol Lagodich, the fire is located in steep, rugged terrain which is preventing firefighters from reaching its location.

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Marten named new Northern Region forester

The Missoulian
May 22, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

A University of Idaho graduate and former employee of the Kootenai National Forest was named the new regional forester for the U.S. Forest Service’s Northern Region on Friday. Leanne Marten, a 20-year employee with the Forest Service, will replace Faye Krueger, who retired from the agency in January. “I’m very happy and excited to be returning,” Marten said. “I look forward to the opportunity to serve the wonderful people and employees in the region as we work together to care for and manage our natural resources.” Tom Tidwell, chief of the Forest Service, said Marten will manage federal lands across 25 million acres. The Northern Region spans five states and 12 national forests, along with the national grasslands in North and South Dakota.

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Women in Timber hand out scholarships

The Humboldt Beacon
May 21, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

A Fortuna High School student is one of four seniors to be selected as scholarship recipients by the North Coast Chapter of California Women in Timber. Kayleen Kemp and the other high school seniors will each receive a $500 scholarship. Kemp is planning to attend Cal Poly, San Luis Obispo in the fall to study animal science. She is interested in pursuing a career in equine therapy or as a large animal veterinarian. Other high school seniors receiving scholarships are Cole Davis and Ryan Sotelo, both McKinleyville High School students, and Del Norte High School student Connor Smith.

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Ecotrust forest deal returns an Oregon tribe to its ancestral lands

Portland Business Journal
May 22, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

In a first-of-its kind deal for Ecotrust Forest Management, the for-profit arm of Ecotrust has sold forestland. EFM said it sold 3,200 acres of Curry County forestland it’s held since 2006 to the Coquille Indian Tribe. It is the first time EFM has exited a property. It owns and manages more than 12,000 acres of Northwest forestland to meet conservation as well as financial goals. Terms were not disclosed, but the transaction is a rare opportunity for an Oregon tribe to reclaim access to the lands where ancestors hunted, gathered and lived.

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Juggling Forest Politics

Payson Roundup
May 22, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

State Forester Jeff Whitney chose his words carefully, like a man photographing bears. He stood in front of a roomful of lawmakers in the Mazatzal Casino in Payson, one of the headliners of a three-day forest tour intended to educate lawmakers to the perilous condition of the forest. …So Whitney, with deep roots in Payson and a lifetime of experience with forest management, wildfires and the politics of resource management, turned on the folksy charm to educate the dozen state lawmakers present on the forest tour arranged by the Eastern Arizona Counties Association, headed by Gila County Supervisor Tommie Martin.

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Bark-eating bugs target NJ trees

Courier-Post
May 25, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

PASSAIC – New Jersey’s trees could be in store for a rough summer from leaf-munching and bark-gorging insects, but officials don’t anticipate the widespread destruction seen in previous decades. The state’s most notorious devourer of leaves, the gypsy moth, is likely to increase its population, thanks to a dry spring and less aerial spraying than originally planned, state officials said. The emerald ash borer beetle, responsible for destroying 50 million ash trees in the U.S., may be migrating from central New Jersey, where it was first discovered in the state last year.

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Economic Driver: Loggers find their way clear to harvesting trees

The Telegram
May 24, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

HUBBARDSTON – Deep in the woods of Central Massachusetts, Tom King and his son, Shawn, hold court. The two-man team known as King Timber Harvesting Inc. holds down their own piece of the Massachusetts logging industry. They have worked together for 20 years, and they have survived not only a difficult economy, but also a huge shift in an industry that has been fraught with conflict. In 2010, the state put a hold on new logging contracts in land surrounding the Quabbin Reservoir, and re-evaluated its management practices for the 308,000 acres of state-owned forests and parks.

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Initiative seeks better habitat to help Minnesota’s moose

Associated Press
May 21, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

MINNEAPOLIS — With Minnesota’s moose population on the decline, conservation groups have teamed up with government agencies in hopes of helping the animals hang on by enhancing the habitat that’s critical to their survival. Northeastern Minnesota’s moose population is down to around 3,450, about 60 percent lower than the estimated 8,840 in 2006. Scientists are still trying to understand why, but they suspect interplay among warmer temperatures, parasites, disease, and changing forest habitat.

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Romania’s Competition Council: New Forestry Code articles need to be amended

Romania-Insider
May 25, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: International

The Competition Council doesn’t oppose the entire text of the new Forestry Code, but it has recommended the amendment of articles which raise suspicions of state aid, said Bogdan Chiritoiu, President of the Competition Council. It has also asked to increase the maximum threshold for buying and processing timber to 30%. “No industry in Romania has such limits; quite the contrary, there are many companies in Romania that have a rate higher than 30% on the markets where they are active, for example, the mobile phone sector, the banking system, cable television,” said Chiritoiu, cited by local Economica.net.

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Influence of different tree-harvesting intensities on forest soil carbon stocks in boreal and northern temperate forest ecosystems

Science Direct.com
May 24, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: International

Effective forest governance measures are crucial to ensure sustainable management of forests, but so far there has been little specific focus in boreal and northern temperate forests on governance measures in relation to management effects, including harvesting effects, on soil organic carbon (SOC) stocks. This paper reviews the findings in the scientific literature concerning the effects of harvesting of different intensities on SOC stocks and fluxes in boreal and northern temperate forest ecosystems to evaluate the evidence for significant SOC losses following biomass removal.

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Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy

Comment: B.C. can’t lead on climate and push LNG

By Caitlyn Vernon campaign director at Sierra Club BC
TimesColonist
May 24, 2015
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: Canada, Canada West

On the surface, the news that Premier Christy Clark has convened a climate leadership team is cause for optimism. We desperately need a climate action plan given that B.C.’s greenhouse-gas emissions are going up when they are supposed to be going down… Climate change is already affecting our economy for the worse. Experts say increasingly large and frequent wildfires, such as the one blazing out of control near Prince George, are being driven in large part by climate change. The mountain pine beetle epidemic has hit forest-dependent communities hard, contributing to mill closures and job losses.

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Western forests face climate change challenges

Standard Examiner
May 24, 2015
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: United States, US West

Climate change is coming, and land managers want to understand what it means for Western forests. The U.S. Forest Service Intermountain Region will be the next participant in a region-wide effort called the “Intermountain Adaptation Partnership,” or IAP. That partnership will merge the best science with the best forest management practices to better adapt to an uncertain climate future. “It’s not going to change resource management drastically, but it is a fine-tuning component of what we’ll do in the future,” said Dave Peterson, environmental researcher with the U.S. Forest Service.

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Climate impacts leave rainforests on edge of destruction

May 25, 2015
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: International

Rising temperatures will not themselves spell disaster for the world’s rainforests. It is the droughts and unpredictable rainfall patterns, which climate change is already worsening, that will settle the forests’ fate before the century ends, according to a new book. Claude Martin, who has worked in tropical rainforest conservation since the 1970s, is author of On the Edge, commissioned by the Club of Rome, which published the seminal Limits to Growth report in 1972. Since then, nearly 50 per cent of the world’s forest cover has disappeared.

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Climate impacts leave rainforests on edge of destruction

May 25, 2015
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: International

Rising temperatures will not themselves spell disaster for the world’s rainforests. It is the droughts and unpredictable rainfall patterns, which climate change is already worsening, that will settle the forests’ fate before the century ends, according to a new book. Claude Martin, who has worked in tropical rainforest conservation since the 1970s, is author of On the Edge, commissioned by the Club of Rome, which published the seminal Limits to Growth report in 1972. Since then, nearly 50 per cent of the world’s forest cover has disappeared.

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General

Forest fire evacuees at North Wabasca Lake return home

Blaze in Northern Alberta forced evacuation of 60 people, who remain on notice
CBC News
May 24, 2015
Category: Uncategorized
Region: Canada, Canada West

Approximately 60 people from the Bigstone Cree Nation who were evacuated from the their homes near North Wabasca Lake due to wildfires have been allowed to return, but remain on a 30-minute evacuation notice. The wildfire, which started at the north end of the lake, is estimated to be 50 hectares in size at this time. As of Saturday night, firefighters were making progress containing the blaze with the help of aircraft and heavy equipment.

a

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