Tree Frog Forestry News

Daily Archives: June 5, 2015

Business & Politics

David Coon loses bid to cancel wood supply contracts

CBC News
June 4, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada East, Canada

Green Party Leader David Coon has failed in a bid to cancel the wood supply contracts between the provincial government and several forestry companies. Liberal and Progressive Conservative members joined forces on Wednesday to defeat Coon’s Bill 13: An Act to Return to the Crown Certain Rights Relating to Wood Supply and Forest Management. Coon called it a “sad day for New Brunswick forests.” “This government has favoured industry over reclaiming its authority for managing Crown lands and its ability to uphold its treaty obligations to First Nations,” he said in a statement.

Read More

No early word on Northern Pulp appeals

Three contesting five-year approval
Chronicle Herald
June 4, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada East, Canada

Randy Delorey doesn’t expect to rule on the appeals to Northern Pulp’s industrial approval until his deadline Tuesday. “I don’t have a final decision yet,” said the environment minister on Thursday. Northern Pulp, along with the Pictou Landing First Nation and the group Clean Pictou Air, have all filed appeals to the conditions allowing the kraft pulp mill to operate. Those conditions were laid out in the industrial approval granted by Delorey this spring.  …But, in its appeal, the mill called requirements around wastewater and water usage “impossible to meet” and “unrealistic or otherwise unreasonable.”

Read More

Maibec millworkers face temporary layoff

Bangor Daily News
June 4, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: US East, United States

MASARDIS, Maine — A Quebec-based company that completed the purchase of Fraser Timber’s lumber mill in Masardis in January will temporarily layoff its 135 employees next week due to market conditions. The layoff at Maibec will last four weeks, according to Charles Tardif, vice president of Maibec. The mill normally shuts down for a week during this time of year, Tardif said Thursday afternoon. Mill officials made the decision to extend the layoff by an additional three weeks due to a downturn in the market.

Read More

Resolute Forest expands in Calhoun

Lebanon Democrat
June 4, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: US East, United States

Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam and Economic and Community Development Commissioner Randy Boyd, along with Resolute Forest Products U.S., Inc. officials announced the company would invest $270 million to undertake a major expansion at its pulp and paper mill located in Calhoun. Resolute Forest Products, a top global paper products manufacturer, is one of McMinn County’s largest employers and through this expansion, will create 105 new jobs. “We want to thank Resolute for expanding in Tennessee and for the new jobs they’re creating in Calhoun and McMinn County,” Haslam said.

Read More

Finnpulp to launch environmental impact assessment program for its new softwood pulp mill

Lesprom
June 4, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: International

Finnpulp Oy has submitted an environmental impact assessment program to the North Savo Centre for Economic Development, Transport and the Environment regarding the pulp mill project in Sorsasalo, Kuopio, as the company said in the press release received by Lesprom Network. The assessment program includes Finnpulp Oy’s plans on the various implementation alternatives for the mill project and a plan (working program) on the environmental impacts to be assessed and the implementation methods of the assessment.

Read More

German hardwood plywood imports down 4 %

EUWID
June 5, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: International

The slowdown in German hardwood plywood imports that was seen in the final quarter of 2014 actually intensified in the first three months of 2015. Data from the German Federal Statistical Office shows that some 146,179 m³ or 4 % less hardwood plywood had been imported into Germany between January and March than in the same timeframe last year. The final quarter of last year ended with just a 1 % rise in imports. This development came on the heels of double-digit growth in the second and third quarters when deliveries from Russia and China increased.

Read More

International interest raises prospect of pulp mill being built in northern Tasmania

ABC News, Australia
June 5, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: International

An international buyer for the multi-billion dollar pulp mill project in northern Tasmania has emerged. Since the 2012 collapse of timber giant Gunns the Bell Bay pulp mill has been a parentless project. Receivers for Gunns have wanted to sell the pulp mill licence and the Tamar Valley site together or else accept an offer for the land only, which would void the permit. They have fielded at least one binding offer for the licence from overseas as well as land-only offers from Australian companies.KordaMentha spokesman Mike Smith would not confirm the number of bids.

Read More

Sweden’s lumber exports raised by 17.5% in March

EUWID
June 5, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: International

After two months of lower exports than last year, Sweden raised its softwood lumber and planed product exports in March by 17.5% to around 1.22m m³. Here, exports to buyers in Europe were around 11% higher than the figure for March 2014 at a total of 754,600 m³. Disproportionate rates of growth were achieved in exports to Africa, rising roughly 59% above the figure for last year to 229,300 m³.

Read More

Wood, Paper & Green Building

Cement future with less concrete

The Star Phoenix
June 4, 2015
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: Canada, Canada West

Imagine a 10-kilogram cube of gravel and cement being dropped off at your front door every morning, every day of the year. That would be equivalent to your share of global daily production of concrete which, next to water, is the most used material in the world. About three tonnes per capita of “construction minerals,” more than 20 billion tonnes, are dug up and turned into concrete each year.  The material is used so widely that world concrete production contributes five per cent of annual humanmade carbon dioxide emissions. For every tonne of cement, one tonne of CO2 is produced. Concrete production is responsible for so much CO2 because making Portland cement requires significant amounts of energy to reach reaction temperatures of up to 15,000 Celsius. On top of that, the chemical reaction itself releases CO2.

Read More

Traditional and innovative – a way with wood

Coast Reporter
June 4, 2015
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: Canada, Canada West

If you are wondering what happened to the roof of the Gibsons Public Art Gallery this month, wonder no more. No, it’s not under construction. An assortment of wood panels in varying colours and sizes has been mounted on it, drawing varying comments from the public, both positive and negative. A shower of seatless chairs cascades from the eaves to the ground – they signal the entrance to a group woodworking show that features 26 artisans with work that is both traditional and innovative. …Among the more unusual items are yellow cedar human skulls by Andrew Dunkerton that look surprisingly decorative. 

Read More

The Home Front | Wood a West Coast designer favourite

Vancouver Sun
June 4, 2015
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: Canada, Canada West

It makes sense that the material we have in greatest abundance on the West Coast — wood — is also the most preferred by local furniture designers. “It’s alive, it’s in its true form, it’s just such a beautiful material and it’s so versatile,” says Romney Shipway of Vancouver’s Shipway Design, who designed the new store for lifestyle brand Sitka on West 4th Avenue. …Shipway is fully supportive of Metro Vancouver’s Clean Wood Disposal Ban, which comes into effect on July 1, with a 50 per cent surcharge being applied to “all loads of garbage containing clean wood if the quantity of wood exceeds 10 per cent of the garbage load.”

Read More

The cause of the Princess Street inferno may never be known

CKWS TV
June 4, 2015
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: Canada East, Canada

The cause of the Princess Street inferno may never be known. That’s according to Kingston’s fire chief. He says the Ontario fire marshal’s office has produced its final report into the december 2013 fire at an apartment building under construction. As Newswatch’s Morganne Campbell reports, there was so much damage that the results were “inconclusive”. …The report — which hasn’t been released publicly — found the inferno consumed the wood-framed apartment shell at Princess and Victoria Streets, leaving few traces for investigators to pinpoint the cause. There was speculation a propane heater to keep workers warm may have sparked the blaze. But that can’t be proven. While no one died in the blaze — there were casualties of a different kind.

Read More

Wood reaches hew heights

On the surface, it looks like a small tweak to the Ontario Building Code. But some construction industry experts say changing rules for wood-frame buildings will alter city skylines to something lower, more liveable and more affordable.
The London Free Press
June 4, 2015
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: Canada East, Canada

On Jan. 1, it became legal to construct a wood-frame building up to six storeys, up from a maximum four. “It’s great for affordable housing (and students’) residences. I can see these (buildings) popping up all along the new bus routes,” said Mike Baldinelli, a partner in the London engineering firm Strik Baldinelli Moniz. His firm did the structural design for a building at 356 Dundas St. that will have 52 affordable housing rental units. It will be the first six-storey wood-frame building in London and only the third in the province.

Read More

Laurentian School of Architecture built with cross-laminated timber

CBC News
June 4, 2015
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: Canada East, Canada

At first glance, it looks like a wooden castle is going up in downtown Sudbury. Crews at the site of the new 54,000 square foot Laurentian University School of Architecture building have been pouring concrete and installing rebar in the way you might expect at a construction site. But two-story high walls made from an engineered wood product not often seen in northern Ontario have also suddenly popped up over the last couple of weeks. “It goes together like an erector set,” said Terrance Galvin, the founding director of the school. “The panels came flat. People have been excited, I think, watching how quickly — in under two weeks — these two storeys seems to get snapped together.”

Read More

American Wood Council gets USDA grant to study tall construction

Fire Engineering
June 4, 2015
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: United States

The American Wood Council (AWC) has been awarded a $250,000 grant from the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) to conduct research on the fire performance of mass timber buildings. AWC will partner with the National Fire Protection Association’s (NFPA) Fire Protection Research Foundation and the Property Insurance Research Group. The AWC proposal is intended to advance the construction of taller wood buildings in the United States by demonstrating the fire performance of newer mass timber products.

Read More

Cross-laminated Timber: the Future of Building?

Seattle Business Magazine
June 5, 2015
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: United States, US West

Before aerospace, software and coffee defined the Pacific Northwest, timber was the industry that fueled our economy. Now, a radical new approach toward sustainable construction — building high-rises from wood — could bring timber back into the spotlight, stimulating rural economies and promoting forest health in a way that architects, conservation groups and timber companies can get behind. While the Pacific Northwest likes to boast of its many green buildings, they can’t match wood high-rises in Europe and Australia that have carbon footprints a quarter that of similar-size buildings of steel and concrete.

Read More

Could Marshall Square have been Saved with Different Construction Material?

WJBF News Channel 6
June 4, 2015
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: US East, United States

Augusta, GA – Many buildings are built with a wood framing, including the Marshall Square Resort Community, which was home to 89 residents. We know wood can be used to start fires, so we wanted to know why it’s such a common building material, even more common than steel. “I would say most people today are continuing to use wood simply because of the affordability of it,” Richard Johnson with Augusta Remodeling Construction said. Richard Johnson with Augusta Remodeling Construction says wood is Inexpensive and more efficient. Steel cost 15 to 18 percent more than wood.  He says a construction company has to keep in mind that not all workers are familiar with building with steel. 

Read More

Will Wood be the Future of Skyscraper Engineering?

Engineering
June 4, 2015
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: International

Imagine the Empire State Building. Now image it made of wood. That concept may sound ludicrous at first, but Metsä Wood, a Finnish woods products producer is tackling the idea to prove its feasibility, titling the project ‘Plan B.’ For nearly 40 years after its completion in 1931, the Empire State Building was the tallest building in the world, standing at 1,454 ft. with 86 stories. Designs for a wooden version of the building mirror exactly the overall size, floor to floor height and column spacing. …The design and construction plan for the wooden Empire State Building was made by Canadian architect Michael Green and his firm, MGA. Equilibrium Consulting, a specialist in timber engineering, provided expertise on structural matters. Metsä Wood’s own material and construction experts rounded out the team. …With Plan B, Metsä and Green hope to open the minds of construction engineers, architects and builders to the possibilities of wood as a key building material.

Read More

Forestry

Pressure to continue for Macpherson plan

Revelstoke Review
June 4, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Local politicians say they will keep pressing for a new land-use plan for Mount Macpherson, after the Minister in charge said that would not be happening. Steve Thomson, the Minister of Forests, Lands & Natural Resource Operations, told the Review last week that the land-use plan would not be re-visited, even after the City of Revelstoke made a request to do so, and more than 1,600 people signed an online petition asking for a new plan. “We believe there’s a robust process in place that is working to address the concerns and under no circumstances will the cross-country ski and mountain bike trails be affected by the proposed development other than some alterations to the visual landscape,” Thomson said.

Read More

City faces criticism from resident

Opponents of Lot 450 logging want more support
Powell River Peak
June 3, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

City of Powell River Council was told that many citizens believe city officials could be doing more to prevent the logging of Lot 450…. . “Being told that the issue is not in the city’s jurisdiction is very frustrating for people,” she said. Gould said that while council is at arm’s length from the PRSC Limited Partnership lands, owned jointly by the city and Tla’amin (Sliammon) Nation, she asked whether council thinks those parcels of land, where Island Timberlands has the tree harvesting rights, should be clear cut. While the city and the first nation own the property, Island Timberlands has the rights to the trees.

Read More

From conflict to world leader in forest practices

Cloudburst
June 4, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

British Columbia’s Forest Practices Board (FPB) is 20 years old. It was created in December 1994 to provide independent oversight of forest and range practices in BC and to help ensure compliance with legislation. In 1999, BC’s Supreme Court (and later the Supreme Court of Canada) upheld the Board’s right to comment on the soundness of forest practices beyond just looking at compliance, thus affirming the Board’s essence as a public watchdog. In 2004, the results-based Forest and Range Practices Act replaced the prescriptive Forest Practices Code, and the FPB’s oversight role took on added significance as onus shifted to reliance on industry’s resource professionals. In 2005, the FPB’s role expanded again under a new Wildfire Act in the wake of the epic 2003 wildfire season. (continued on page 11)

Read More

Sahota wins lumber grader championship

Williams Lake Tribune
June 4, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

After 25 years as a lumber grader and several attempts at the championship, Tolko Industries’ Rachhpal Sahota captured the title of B.C.’s Top Lumber Grader for 2015. “I finally got it,” a happy Sahota said Thursday, holding a framed certificate of the win. “It feels good.” Sahota beat out close to 30 of the top lumber graders from across the province who competed in the 47th BC Lumber Grading Championship staged in Prince George on May 23.

Read More

First Nations series: Natives seen as better protectors of the land despite occasional clashes

June 5, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

…The growing economic power and influence of aboriginals in B.C. is raising questions about the future of environmentalism and how it can remain relevant — and whether industrial projects with First Nations involvement are more environmentally friendly. Locally, the Tsawwassen First Nation has been criticized for transforming some of Canada’s best farmland into shopping malls and port development. And around B.C., natives are gaining revenue from private, run-of-river hydro projects, which are frequently cited as expensive, unreliable power almost always located within fish habitat. Overall, however, there is a sense that aboriginals are the best bet for protecting the environment.

Read More

Column: Quality versus quality (fibre versus dimension lumber)

Williams Lake Tribune
June 4, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

When I first became involved in forestry in the 1980s there was a debate over choosing a younger harvest age which would maximize fibre production rather than produce larger dimension more valuable lumber from older forests. The rapid growth rates of young forests produces more fibre per hectare which could be reconstituted (glued back together) to produce better more acceptable products than dimension lumber. …There is still an ongoing debate over rotation ages but a few new considerations have been added.

Read More

Comment: Is clean water a right for only some Islanders?

by Torrance Coste
Victoria Times Colonist
June 4, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

On Vancouver Island, there are two sets of rights when it comes to clean, safe drinking water. Some of us get water from sources controlled by our municipalities and protected in perpetuity. Others drink from watersheds that are privately owned and open to all manner of industrial exploitation. …Last summer, I spoke at a rally in Port Alberni, organized by residents and local organizations working to protect McLaughlin Ridge, the site of the last remaining old-growth forest in the community’s watershed. McLaughlin Ridge is a steep slope above Port Alberni’s water intake, and clearcut logging in this type of landscape has serious implications for erosion and runoff rates, which in turn affect water quality.

Read More

What does the logging industry mean to Squamish?

Q & A with forestry manager Jeff Fisher
The Squamish Chief
June 4, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Even the newest residents of Squamish likely have a sense that the forest industry is a large part of Squamish’s past, but what does it mean to Squamish today? The Squamish Chief sat down with Jeff Fisher, president and forestry manager of Sqomish Forestry LP, to talk about logging in the district. …A lot of the new people don’t understand that it is still here and is still a fairly big industry. Even our current council, I think, underestimates its significance. There’s probably 200 people who go to work every day in the logging industry in Squamish still, or are somehow tied into it. And you look at those logging trucks that come into town, the only time people seem to notice them is when there is some kind of traffic issue, but you have to think, each one of them is worth somewhere between $4,000 and $7,000 of economic activity.

Read More

Updated: Lark Harbour forest fire impacts 1.5 hectares

The Western Star
June 4, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

A provincial forest fire duty officer confirmed a Lark Harbour forest fire is currently under control and posing no threat. Eric Young said the crews dispatched to the scene of last night’s forest fire in the hills behind the school in the south shore of the Bay of Islands town are dealing with some smouldering conditions this morning. He said about 1.5 hectares was impacted. A helicopter and bucket was dispatched to the scene. The threat to the town was minimal, he said, as the fire and smoke were both moving away from residential area.

Read More

Top Threats to Forests Do Not Include Over Harvesting

American Forest Foundation
June 3, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States

Yesterday’s Washington Post article about the growth of the biomass industry in the southern U.S. to fuel European markets, showcases a narrow and inaccurate view of the true threats to forests–which in the south especially–are largely owned by families and individuals. The American Forest Foundation’s (AFF) recent report – Vanishing Pieces of the Puzzle – based on data from the U.S. Forest Service, highlights the most significant threats to family-owned forests, with one of the largest being development pressures or converting forests to non-forest uses, followed closely by environmental threats that degrade forests like insects, diseases, and natural disasters like wildfires and hurricanes.

Read More

Loggers to begin salvaging trees burned in Baily Butte Fire

Statesman Journal
June 4, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

A logging company will soon salvage lumber that was burned in last year’s Baily Butte Fire at Ochoco National Forest. The Bend Bulletin reports the logging contract amounts to more than $323,000 and was awarded to international lumber provider Interfor in an expedited, emergency sale approved by the U.S. Forest Service. Interfor U.S. operations manager Chuck Burley says the company plans to start logging as soon as possible, before the burned wood deteriorates and becomes less valuable.

Read More

Guest Opinion: Idaho’s land grab is foolishness that needs to go away

Idaho Statesman
June 5, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

I read the piece in the May 16 Statesman (Labrador: Give state role on feds’ turf), regarding Rep. Raul Labrador’s latest federal land transfer legislation, with disappointment. I am a father, hunter, fisherman and small-business owner. I choose to live and raise my family in Idaho because of the wonderful outdoor activities on abundant public lands. I am also former deputy attorney general for the Idaho Department of Lands, the presumptive management agency were Idaho to be successful in its efforts to seize federal lands. Labrador has bought into the theory that transferring our federal lands to state ownership could avoid federal regulations that protect air, water and wildlife.

Read More

A Trap Of Our Own Making

Forest tour reveals dirty secret behind unhealthy tree thickets
Payson Roundup
June 4, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

The wood-gobbling machines trundled across the thickly forested site atop the Mogollon Rim, while a gaggle of politicians, anxious officials and forest experts watched. I stood to one side, wondering how we’d gotten ourselves into such a fix — having turned a fire-adapted forest into a catastrophe waiting to happen. The cutter bounced across the churned up soil, reaching out with a massive clamp to seize the seemingly solid trunk of a foot-thick ponderosa pine. Such spindly pines since about 1920 have formed thickets across millions of acres — increasing tree densities from 40 an acre to maybe 800 per acre.

Read More

Emerald Ash Borers are killing local trees: Here’s how to stop them

KSHB.com
June 4, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

KANSAS CITY, Mo. – More than six million ash trees in the nine-county Kansas City metro could die in the next two years due to the Emerald Ash Borer. That’s because right now, the area is at the start of a sharp spike period that comes about seven years after infestation. The beetle was found in Detroit in 2002, in southeast Missouri in 2008 and in Platte County in 2013. Kansas City Parks and Recreation Forester Kevin LaPointe said, “The beetle has reached the population level where we’re going to start seeing hundreds and even thousands of trees dying basically at the same time.”

Read More

US and Peru fail to uphold forest protection laws

Peru This Weed
June 5, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: International

A new report highlights the failure of the United States and Peru to tackle unlawful logging and trade in Amazon, despite an agreement that is supposed to bind both countries. Signed in 2007, the United States–Peru Free Trade Agreement includes rules intended to improve environmental governance. So far, says a new report, the agreement has been largely ignored by both governments. The report was released yesterday by the Environmental Investigation Agency (EIA), a London-based non-governmental organization focussed on exposing breaches of environmental law. The EIA acknowledges the efforts of some in the Peruvian government but says that, without political will and adequate resources, these remain “marginal at best”.

Read More

Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy

Woodchips sound unsustainable, but they’re not as bad as you think

The Conversation
June 4, 2015
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: International

One of the byproducts of the haggling over the new, scaled-back Renewable Energy Target is a renewed focus on woodchips, with the federal government’s draft legislation seeking to include wood from native forests as a certified source of renewable energy. Forests produce a wealth of goods and services, but some of these goods are now being labelled as bad. Opponents of issuing renewable energy certificates to woodchip burning, such as The Australia Institute, point out that fuel wood and woodchips expand the commercial pressure on forests, while directing investment away from competing renewable energy industries like wind and solar power.

Read More

General

AHSS forestry program comes to an end

North Bay Nipissing News
June 4, 2015
Category: Uncategorised
Region: Canada East, Canada

SOUTH RIVER – AHSS is saying goodbye to its forestry program. After eight years, the forestry program at Almaguin Highlands Secondary School (AHSS) will disappear. Also saying goodbye is the program’s teacher, Brad O’Gorman, who will be retiring three years past his retirement date. There is one major question around the program’s end: why? Apparently, O’Gorman doesn’t fully understand. “That’s a good question,” he said. “I’ve been told lots of things as to why.” “Number one, I’m retiring. But it was actually the [ending] of the forestry program that made me decide to retire.”

Read More

The beetle is gone, now the hard work begins

WILDFIRES, JOB LOSSES, JEOPARDIZED WATERSHEDS
InfoTel News
June 4, 2015
Category: Uncategorised

Rhona Martin chairs the Southern Interior Beetle Action Coalition, and she says the beetle disappeared from the region about a year and a half ago. While that brought some good news, it also marked the beginning of a new phase in the fight. “What we’re dealing with now is the results of what the pine beetle has done,” she says. “The aftermath is the hardest part.” Environmental impacts are just the start. Forested areas turned barren due to the infestation run the risk of land slippages and flooding because there’s less roots and vegetation retaining water. Watersheds could be adversely affected.

Read More

First Nations series: Natives seen as better protectors of the land despite occasional clashes

June 5, 2015
Category: Uncategorised

…The growing economic power and influence of aboriginals in B.C. is raising questions about the future of environmentalism and how it can remain relevant — and whether industrial projects with First Nations involvement are more environmentally friendly. Locally, the Tsawwassen First Nation has been criticized for transforming some of Canada’s best farmland into shopping malls and port development. And around B.C., natives are gaining revenue from private, run-of-river hydro projects, which are frequently cited as expensive, unreliable power almost always located within fish habitat. Overall, however, there is a sense that aboriginals are the best bet for protecting the environment.

Read More