Tree Frog Forestry News

Daily Archives: June 9, 2015

Business & Politics

Canada: America’s frustrated trade partner

By Colin Robertson
Globe and Mail
June 9, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada

What’s $3-billion? It’s the price that Canada will exact from the United States in reparations over the country-of-origin labelling dispute. Armed with a World Trade Organization (WTO) ruling, Canada is threatening to slap retaliatory surtaxes of up to 100 per cent on U.S. products, including chocolates, wine and jewellery, cereal and orange juice, barbecues, stoves, swivel seats and mattresses…. In bargaining the reform of supply management at the TPP table, we should push for better access for our forest products. We are likely to do better at the multilateral negotiating table, especially given the approaching expiration (October) of the current Canada-U.S. lumber agreement.

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2 Northern Pulp appeals denied, 1 extended by Randy Delorey

Review of an appeal from Northern Pulp has been extended by another 30 days
CBC News
June 8, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada East, Canada

Nova Scotia’s environment minister has denied two appeals challenging the industrial approval of the Northern Pulp mill in Pictou County. An appeal from the group Clean Pictou Air said the Abercrombie Point mill’s industrial approval did not address the department’s need to protect the health and wellness of citizens and businesses. The group wanted more monitoring of the area’s ambient air quality and emissions from the mill. Environment Minister Randy Delorey found the current two air monitoring stations are enough to comply with industry standards.

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N.S. turfs two of three appeals of North Pulp permit

Chronicle Herald
June 8, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada East, Canada

Two of three appeals of Northern Pulp’s industrial permit have been denied. “I appreciate that there has been a lot of public interest in this approval, as demonstrated by the level of engagement in the appeal process,” Environment Minister Randy Delorey said in a news release Monday. “Ultimately, we all want a clean operating mill and a prosperous Pictou County.” Clean Pictou Air, a group of county residents and business people, and the Pictou Landing First Nation both had their appeals of the March 9 industrial approval denied by Delorey.

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Weyerhaeuser moving ahead with a $57 million expansion

Associated Press
June 7, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: US East, United States

PHILADELPHIA — One of the largest employers in Philadelphia and Neshoba County is moving ahead with a $57 million expansion. Expanding and modernizing Weyerhaeuser’s Philadelphia lumber mill is expected to take 10 months, The Meridian Star reports. Company spokesman Monte Simpson said the mill has about 180 workers. He said construction is well underway. Improvements include a new sorting and stacking system that will be in place next year and a new drying kiln that will go online this summer, Simpson said.

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UPDATE: Industrial accident at Resolute Forest Products

WRCB
June 7, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: US East, United States

UPDATE: A spokesperson for Resolute Forest Products confirms to Channel 3 the man injured Friday at the Kraft Mill Plant has passed away from his injuries. Seth Kursman with Resolute Forest says an investigation is underway to determine the cause of the accident. The victim was an employee of Jake Marshall Mechanical Contractors located in Chattanooga, TN. His identity has not been released.

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Forestry Tasmania debt guarantee increased to $41 million by State Government

ABC News, Australia
June 8, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: International

The Tasmanian Government has increased the level of debt it will guarantee for the state-owned forestry business. Treasurer Peter Gutwein has revealed he signed off on another Letter of Comfort for Forestry Tasmania (FT) in February, increasing the debt level covered by $10 million to $41 million. The letter allows FT to rack up more debt by assuring its lenders that taxpayers will repay the debt if the business falters. Forestry Tasmania is currently $30 million in debt. In a fiery exchange, Greens MP Nick McKim questioned how the Treasurer expected FT to pay back the money.

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Týden: Illegal tree cutting in becomes organised crime

Prague Monitor
June 9, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: International

Prague – The illegal cutting of trees in Czech forests has assumed the dimensions of organised crime which is due to the high prices of wood, and the damage caused reaches dozens of millions of crowns, weekly Tyden writes in its latest issue out yesterday.
Stooges, firms always changing their names and a network of collaborators, these are the features of the gangs plundering Czech forests, which the Czech Environmental Inspectorate has found out and of which the police also have knowledge, Tyden writes.
Police Presidium spokesman David Schoen told Tyden that the criminals make use of sham forest owners, selected woodcutters and mainly attempts to obscure the origin of wood in trading in it.

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Wood, Paper & Green Building

35-Story Carbon Neutral Timber Skyscraper Proposed for Paris

Sustainable Cities Collective
June 9, 2015
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: Canada, Canada West

Vancouver architect Michael Green is a world leader in designing and building tall buildings out of wood and has co-authored the definitive book on the subject, called The Case For Tall Wood Towers. It has caused a stir among architects since it was first published in 2012. Now, in partnership with French architects DVVD Paris and developer REI France, he has proposed a 35 story carbon neutral wood skyscraper for the Reinvent Paris competition, a bold effort by local authorities to inspire innovations in urban design and sustainability that will revitalize Parisian architecture.

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In aftermath of Edgewater fire, construction code legislation considered by Senate committee

Politicker NJ
June 9, 2015
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: US East, United States

TRENTON – A mixed group of firefighters, labor leaders, local residents, architects and real estate developers descended on a state Senate community and urban affairs committee meeting in Trenton on Monday to debate an issue burning in their minds: should construction code regulations change statewide, especially in the aftermath of a Bergen County blaze earlier this year that torched an Edgewater apartment complex. The proposed bill, S2824, requires certain new residential buildings to have fire barriers in cocklofts, concrete or steel frames, and fire stops. The measures are meant to deter the type of fast-spreading, five-alarm fire that consumed Edgewater’s Avalon apartment complex in January, which left approximately 1,000 borough residents displaced. Local fire officials declared the blaze to be accidental.

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Forest and Wood Products Australia backs tall timber buildings

Sydney Morning Herald
June 9, 2015
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: International

Timber buildings could automatically be built to an effective height of 25 metres, or eight storeys, under changes to Australia’s building code proposed by the forestry industry. The National Construction Code allows an automatic right, or “deemed to satisfy” solution, for timber for up to three storeys, but beyond that height the code specifies only concrete, masonry and other non-combustible materials. Timber does not fit into these categories. Under the proposed changes, timber would be deemed acceptable through extensive sprinkler systems, fire-grade plasterboard and fire-resistant mineral wool. Fire-grade plasterboard is used in buildings.

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Forestry

Protests will follow if old-growth logging proceeds on Vancouver Island: group

Canadian Press
June 8, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

VICTORIA – A British Columbia forest company’s plan to log centuries-old cedar trees in southern Vancouver Island’s Walbran Valley cuts into the heart of one of Canada’s most ecologically sensitive forests, says an environmental group. Wilderness Committee spokesman Torrance Coste said that forest company Teal Jones is courting conflict with environmental groups in its bid to harvest almost 500 hectares of old-growth forest in eight separate land parcels. The Walbran Valley’s old-growth forest near Lake Cowichan, about 100 kilometres northwest of Victoria, has been the site of past blockades and arrests over logging.

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Forest fires in Saskatchewan leave haze over Winnipeg

CBC News
June 8, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

A number of fires burning along in Saskatchewan have left the sky over Winnipeg hazy. According to Environment Canada, a west wind is pushing smoke from fires burning in Saskatchewan into Manitoba. A number of smaller fires are burning near the border between Saskatchewan and Manitoba, but bigger forest fires are burning in central Saskatchewan.  Winnipeg’s air quality rating was upgraded to a “moderate risk” on
Monday afternoon. That was expected to continue into Monday night.

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Forest fires near First Nations no longer immediate threat

CBC News
June 8, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

Forest fires that broke out near three northern First Nations on the weekend were effectively fought by Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry (MNRF) fire fighters. In an update released on Sunday, the MNRF says a fire in the Nipigon District near Eabametoong First Nation (also known as Fort Hope) was declared out and another fire in the same district near Kasabonika First Nation is being held at 2.5 hectares.

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Northeast Fire Region Forest Fire Situation Update – June 8

Wawa News
June 8, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

The forest fire situation remains relatively quiet. As of June 8, there are currently no active forest fires. Throughout the region, the fire hazard ranges from low to moderate. The areas of greatest concern are in the far north. Ontario continues to support Alberta firefighting efforts. Currently there are 103 personnel in Alberta along with pumps and hose equipment from Ontario, and 1 personnel in Manitoba on a training assignment.

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Wet spring reduces wildfire risk in most of US for June

Washington Post
June 9, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States

DENVER — An unusually wet May reduced the likelihood of wildfires during June over much of the nation, but the danger will increase from July through September, the National Interagency Fire Center said in its latest outlook report. The risk is below normal in a vast area of the central and Southern U.S. in June, but above normal in drought-stricken California, according to June 1 report. Hawaii and parts of the Southwest and Alaska are also at above-normal risk. As the summer progresses, fire danger is expected to increase across the country, especially in the Northwest, Georgia and the Carolinas. Above-normal temperatures are forecast for most of the West and the Atlantic coast. Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack and Interior Secretary Sally Jewell will discuss wildfire threats and the nationwide outlook for the wildfire season Tuesday in Denver.

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Alaska’s Wolves Face Catastrophe

TakePart.com
June 9, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Southeast Alaska’s isolated wolf population has declined by 60 percent in just one year, dropping from an estimated 221 individuals in 2013 to 89 wolves in 2014, according to the U.S. Forest Service… The figures were reported in a brief written by U.S. Forest Service officials who worked with Alaska’s Department of Fish and Game to update the region’s wolf population estimates… The Alexander Archipelago wolf range includes the entire 500-mile-long, 120-mile-wide Alaskan panhandle, and the animals mostly stay in the dense tree cover provided by the 17-million-acre Tongass National Forest. 

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Guest Opinion: Native, not invasive plants, are best to curb wildfires

June 9, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

I am a recently retired ecologist, having worked 25 years for the U.S. Forest Service and my last five years as the program lead for the BLM’s Colorado Plateau Native Plant Materials Development Program in Utah. I am writing in response to the May 11 article, “BLM decides to build fire break network along Interstate 84.” Many of our Western landscapes are broken. …It is, therefore, disappointing to see the agency use a non-native invasive species such as forage kochia to build a “356-mile network of fuel breaks along a 57-mile section of the Interstate 84 corridor from Boise to Glenns Ferry.

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Republicans seek fewer environmental reviews, lawsuits in bid to up tree removal in forests

Associated Press
June 8, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

House Republicans have long sought more aggressive tree removal from national forest lands. Legislation in the last Congress would have required the government to increase significantly the amount of timber it offers for sale each year. The lawmakers say more aggressive timbering would make for a healthier forest and improve rural economies. But such mandates went nowhere in the Senate and prompted a veto threat from the White House. This year, the Republican-led push is focused on slimming down and streamlining environmental reviews for projects and by making a lawsuit to stop a project potentially much more expensive to file.

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Montana Groups Butt Heads Over Rep. Zinke’s Forest Bill

Montana Public Radio
June 8, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Montana’s congressional delegation agrees on at least one issue; too many of our timber stands are sickly, overgrown, and fire-prone. Senators Jon Tester and Steve Daines, and Congressman Ryan Zinke say it’s time to reform how we manage our National Forests. Michael Garrity of the Helena-based environmental group, Alliance for the Wild Rockies, doesn’t trust any of them to lead that charge. “During the civil rights era we didn’t let the Mississippi congressional delegation try to solve civil rights problems. I don’t think our country is going to let the Montana congressional delegation try to solve environmental problems on our national forests,” says Garrity.

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Guest Opinion: Native, not invasive plants, are best to curb wildfires

June 9, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

I am a recently retired ecologist, having worked 25 years for the U.S. Forest Service and my last five years as the program lead for the BLM’s Colorado Plateau Native Plant Materials Development Program in Utah. I am writing in response to the May 11 article, “BLM decides to build fire break network along Interstate 84.” Many of our Western landscapes are broken. …It is, therefore, disappointing to see the agency use a non-native invasive species such as forage kochia to build a “356-mile network of fuel breaks along a 57-mile section of the Interstate 84 corridor from Boise to Glenns Ferry.

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NCEC sceptical about new environmental regulations for logging operations

ABC News, Australia
June 9, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: International


The North Coast Environment Council (NCEC) said it does not think any good will come from a trial of new timber industry environmental regulations. The rules aim to simplify environmental protections around logging operations. They will be trialled for three months in forests between Bulahdelah and Macksville. The Forestry Corporation said it hopes the regulations will be easier to obey and enforce. But NCEC spokeswoman Susie Russell said the process seems to be solely aimed at intensifying logging and cutting costs.

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Prices paid for New South Wales state forest site permits at inaugural auction have apiarists buzzing with concern

ABC News, Australia
June 9, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: International

Beekeepers in New South Wales claim an online auction for site permits in state forests on the south coast came “from left field”. Just over $1,300 was the average price paid for a year’s access to each of the 24 sites sold by the Forestry Corporation of NSW. This compares to about $90 a year paid previously. NSW Apiarists Association vice-president Neil Bingley conceded there was probably a need for an increase, but said there was no real discussion prior to the auctions. “This was thrown at us,” he said.

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The $5700 tree house in Helms Forest

Margaretrivemail.com
June 9, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: International

Australia – CLIMBING a tree cost one Helm Forest protester $5700 in fines and reparations. Claire Anderson pleaded guilty to two charges of committing a nuisance after preventing logging in the area by climbing a tree in the area and refusing to come down when instructed by police.  She was ordered to pay a $200 fine for causing a nuisance and $500 for obstructing police. The $5000 in reparations will be paid to the Forest Products Commission. Ms Anderson believed everybody had a responsibility to stop forest logging and felt their voices weren’t being heard through any other method.

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Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy

The G7 and its 85–year carbon pledge

The G7 gives itself a lifetime to fulfil its climate change promise
CBC News
June 9, 2015
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: Canada

If you thought it was hard to keep up your New Year’s resolution, try keeping an 85-year pledge. That’s exactly what Canada and the other G7 countries are committing themselves to as they try to get control of global greenhouse gases. While Canada failed on its Kyoto agreement and won’t meet its 2020 Copenhagen target, that’s not stopping Prime Minister Stephen Harper from making even more long-lived environmental pledges. First, a deep cut in carbon emissions by 2050 and second, an eventual end to fossil fuel use by 2100. At first glance, it’s praiseworthy. The world’s leading economies commit to decarbon the world economy. Some environmental groups were quick to call the G7 announcement “groundbreaking,” although not everyone is as supportive and approving.

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Cultural identity and climate change

Doug Craig Blog
June 9, 2015
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: United States

I just started and finished reading a brief (90 pages) and quite excellent book by Andrew Hoffman, How Culture Shapes the Climate Change Debate. Hoffman explains what many of us have long known. Our collective inability to cope with the climate crisis has very little to do with science and is instead caught up in the dense weeds of culture, cognition, psychology and unconscious bias. Each of us creates our own reality through the cognitive filters we use to interpret and understand our experience. We think we know what is true and real, but each of us has a different idea of what that means exactly. Our filters are biased because they arise from our emotionally-based cultural identity, which is ultimately much stronger than the cold, emotionless process we use to think about climate science.

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Associations weigh in on bioenergy coverage

Agri-view
June 9, 2015
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: United States

Forest owners, wood suppliers and manufacturers of pulp and paper goods are creating Biomass101.org — a clearinghouse for scientifically sound information on carbon-neutral bioenergy. “With biomass becoming a more prominent part of the national renewable-energy discussion, Americans deserve a conversation that is honest, accurate and reliable,” said Chuck Fuqua, executive director of strategic communications for the American Forest and Paper Association. Biomass101.org will include blog posts, infographics, videos and other media content. It is jointly produced by the American Forest and Paper Association, American Wood Council, Forest Resources Association and National Alliance of Forest Owners.

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