Tree Frog Forestry News

Daily Archives: June 10, 2015

Business & Politics

Nominations open for Forest Industry Aboriginal Business Award

Forest Products Association of Canada
Canada Newswire press release
June 9, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada

OTTAWA – The Forest Products Association of Canada (FPAC) and the Canadian Council for Aboriginal Business (CCAB) today opened nominations for the 2015 Aboriginal Business Leadership Award. This annual $5,000 award recognizes and celebrates First Nations entrepreneurs for their success in a forest products business that demonstrates business leadership, exceptional environmental and safety performance and the delivery of high-quality products and services.

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Alberta Forest Products Assn. members’ lumber production up 3.2% in 2014

Lesprom
June 10, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

The latest numbers indicate that Alberta’s forest industry is continuing to grow and contribute to the province’s economic diversity. Values of lumber, pulp and paper, and panelboard manufactured by Alberta Forest Products Association (AFPA) members totaled $2.9 billion in 2014. The numbers reflect a 7.7% increase from 2013. Industry growth was fueled by a 12% increase in revenue from lumber sales and 6% increase in pulp sales, as AFPA said in the press release received by Lesprom Network.

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Fort St. James mill closing in July

Prince George Citizen
June 9, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

Tl’oh Forest Products will be closing its Fort St. James finger-joint plant at the end of next month. “We profoundly regret the decision we have had to make today,” Tl’oh president Leonard Thomas said in a statement issued Tuesday. “Our biggest hope was that we could find some way to continue operations. Unfortunately, prevailing business conditions prevent us from doing so.” There has been a fundamental shift in markets that does not allow the business to remain viable, said the statement. These market forces, combined with future fibre uncertainty, led to the decision to permanently close Tl’oh’s operations.

Tl’oh Forest Products in Ft. St. James to Close from 250 News

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B.C. extends export exemption on northern timber

Ministry of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations
BC Government
June 9, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

VICTORIA – The Province is continuing to allow limited exports of low-grade logs in an effort to support economic development in northwestern B.C., Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations Minister Steve Thomson announced today. The Province is extending an exemption that allows forest companies in the Northwest to export up to 20% of the logs they harvest on the North Coast and in the Northwest Interior without first having to offer these logs to domestic markets. The exemptions were first put in place in 2002. The Forest Act has always contained provisions for log exports.

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Corner Brook mill pensioners committee recommending denial of Kruger’s deferral request

The Western Star
June 9, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada East, Canada

Gerald Parsons is not happy with the process Kruger Inc. is again taking in its quest to modify pension payments into the Corner Brook mill. The chair of the Corner Brook Pulp and Paper Union Pensioners Committee said they were approached about a month ago to defer funding to the plan, which a 10-year re-payment plan is already in place. Negotiations followed, but an agreement could not be reached. Parsons said the company was asked not to deliver letters to pensionsers
and beneficiaries, like was done in 2012. However, letters were sent
out May 26, 2015.

Kruger looking to modify pension payments at Corner Brook mill from The CBC News

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Falling cargo activity drags down port income

The Longview Daily News
June 9, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States, US West

Port of Longview’s net income plunged 34 percent in the first quarter compared to the same time last year, pulled down by falling log and grain exports. Total net income for the first quarter was $1.65 million, down from $2.5 million last year. Port CEO Geir-Eilif Kalhagen said the decline seems dramatic because 2014 was a record year, and “not every year can be a record year.” “Cargo markets are tough right now,” added Laurie Nelson-Cooley, business development manager. Overall, cargo activity was 23 percent lower than last year.

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Clearwater Paper settles pollution case for $1.1 million

The Spokesman-Review
June 10, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States, US West

Clearwater Paper Corp. has agreed to pay $1.1 million to settle allegations of federal Clean Air Act violations at its Lewiston mill The Spokane-based company will pay a $300,000 civil penalty and spend $800,000 on stricter pollution controls at the pulp mill, according to a negotiated settlement signed by the company, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the U.S. Department of Justice. “We don’t agree with EPA’s reasoning. We don’t believe that we were ever in violation of our air permit,” said Matt Van Vleet, a Clearwater Paper spokesman. “But we agreed to settle rather than go through lengthy, expensive litigation.”

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Allen’s Mill to close

Forks Forum
June 9, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States, US West

…In a conversation with Jerry Lane, General Manager at Allen Logging Company, on Tuesday morning, Lane said Allen’s Mill will close in about 3 weeks. Lane said, “We plan to process the current log inventory until we run out.” …”The current log situation is so sad, you can’t buy a predictable supply of marketable logs. We are seeing the same thing as Interfor and the Simpson Mills that recently closed.” Lane added Lane went on to say, ” It is just a sign of the times, a strong U.S. dollar gives Canadians incentive to import which puts log exports at a disadvantage.”

Allen Logging – last lumber mill on the West End – expect to cease operations next month from The Peninsula Daily News

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Former GM of Corner Brook mill joins board of Soundview Paper

Pulp & Paper Canada
June 9, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: US East, United States

Soundview Paper Company has announced senior management changes, including the addition of longtime tissue and paper industry executives Steve Ziessler and Bob Snyder to the Board of Managers. Company president Karl Meyers has been appointed chief executive officer, and senior vice-president of strategy Rob Baron has been named the company’s new president.

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Minister’s refusal to answer Forestry Tasmania questions angers MLCs

ABC News, Australia
June 10, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: International

Tasmania’s Resources Minister Paul Harriss has put some of his former Upper House colleagues offside after refusing to answer questions over the restructure of Forestry Tasmania at a budget hearing. Mr Harriss fronted a Legislative Council budget estimates hearing to account for his handling of the mining and forestry portfolios. The former Upper House MP turned Liberal MHR and Government Minister will also front a House of Assembly estimates committee tomorrow afternoon.

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Wood, Paper & Green Building

B.C.’s Building Act moves towards province-wide requirements

British Columbia has a new Building Act. It is intended to ensure that building requirements are set at a provincial, rather than municipal, level. The act also provides for minimum qualifications for building officials.
Journal of Commerce
June 9, 2015
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: Canada, Canada West

It received Royal Assent on March 25, 2015 but as of the date of this writing is not yet in force. The underlying purpose of the new act is to establish consistent building requirements throughout B.C. This is intended to improve efficiency, productivity and innovation in the construction sector. …It intends to improve the approval process for innovative buildings, such as the Wood Innovation and Design Centre in Prince George or recent moves towards taller wood-frame and cross-laminated beam structures.

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Wood based paper and non-wood based paper equally sustainable

Pulp and Paper News
June 10, 2015
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: United States

According to new study from Two Sides Paper manufacturing is based largely on the use of renewable natural fibers. Until the mid to late 1800s, non-wood plant fibers, in the form of linen and cotton rags and hemp ropes, were the main raw materials for the pulp and paper industry. Increasing demand and developments in low cost wood pulping resulted in a large expansion of the wood-based pulp and paper industry during the early to mid-1900s. Today, wood is the dominant fiber resource for the pulp and paper industry accounting for 90% of the world’s fiber utilization.

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Forestry

Heavy wildfire smoke subsiding in the north, blowing east

Hundreds of people have evacuated communities in northern Saskatchewan due to heavy smoke
CBC News
June 9, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

The heavy smoke from forest fires in the La Ronge area that affected air quality and forced evacuations is subsiding in the north and heading slightly south. Environment Canada ended its special statement for extensive and widespread smoke in northern Saskatchewan communities early Tuesday morning. A few hours later, Environment Canada sent out another alert for the northeastern grain belt and communities such as Hudson Bay, Kamsack and Melfort.

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Activists vow to defend B.C’s Walbran Valley from new logging plans

Globe and Mail
June 7, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

When the “war in the woods” was in full swing in British Columbia, one of the front lines ran through the Walbran Valley on southern Vancouver Island. And now, after 24 years of relative peace, it may do so again as a dispute is set to spill out of the back rooms and into the forest. For the past nine months, the Wilderness Committee has been in discussions with Teal-Jones Group, the logging company that holds cutting rights to a section of the Walbran Valley left unprotected when part of the area was set aside in 1991. But all that talk seems to have failed.

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Little being done to prevent urban wildfires in B.C.

Business in Vancouver
June 9, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

It’s the end of May and already the ponderosa pine forest around Peter Dooling’s Naramata residence, which he has named Castle Rock, is tinder dry. Dooling, a retired professor of natural resource conservation at the University of British Columbia’s faculty of forestry, is one of thousands of people living in what is called the wildland-urban interface, the two-kilometre-wide forested area around B.C. communities comprising 6,850 square kilometres of land that the province has assessed to be at the highest risk of wildfire.

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Proposed deal to preserve large swaths of B.C.’s Great Bear Rainforest

Globe and Mail
June 10, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

The last land parcels of the Great Bear Rainforest have been identified, clearing the way for an extraordinary pact between the forest industry, First Nations, the province and a coalition of environmental organizations to be finalized by September. The new land-use agreement, if approved following a summer-long public consultation period, would ensure the preservation of 70 per cent of the old-growth forests in a huge section of the province’s north and central coast. It has taken almost two decades of unprecedented collaboration, led by the forest industry and environmentalists, to engineer this deal.

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Talks continue on future of TLC-owned Wildwood Ecoforest

Victoria Times Colonist
June 10, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

The Wildwood Ecoforest near Cedar has been pulled from the agenda of Friday’s Land Conservancy of B.C. meeting as talks about the property’s future continue. The move staves off a potential confrontation over the future of Wildwood. The 77-acre woodlot near Cedar was established by the late Merv Wilkinson, who dedicated his life to proving it is possible to harvest trees in an ecologically sustainable way. The property is one of dozens that The Land Conservancy is looking to transfer to other conservation groups as it looks for ways to pay off creditors. The Victoria-based non-profit organization has $8 million in debt and has been under creditor protection since fall 2013.

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Southern N.W.T. tent caterpillar invasion part of natural cycle

Mild spring has made for the perfect conditions for two types of tent caterpillars in the N.W.T.
CBC News
June 10, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West


They’re fuzzy and a bit creepy to some, but tent caterpillars are also a sure sign summer has arrived. This year, their numbers also appear to be on the rise in the southern Northwest Territories. “It’s really hard to say if we’re dealing with an outbreak right now, but we’re definitely dealing with increased population levels that we haven’t seen for a while now,” says Jakub Olesinski, an ecosystem forester for the territorial government.  Olesinski says the upswing in population is probably the part of a
natural cycle, prompted by an early spring and relatively mild weather
with no heavy frosts.

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Watershed group ‘essentially formed’

Mayor says roundtable would also help preserve and enhance relationship with Stz’uminus First Nation
Nanaimo Daily News
June 10, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

The idea of an official roundtable being formed regarding the protection of the Ladysmith watershed is one step closer to fruition. Watershed advocate and Ladysmith resident Greg Roberts first proposed the idea to town council with the hope of putting together a group to orchestrate formal talks. Now Mayor Aaron Stone has said that it is “essentially formed now.” A recent public meeting saw presentations from similar setups south in the Cowichan Valley with a large turnout highlighting strong interest for one in Ladysmith. Stone, Roberts and Stz’uminus First Nation Chief John Elliott were all in attendance and all are set to play active roles in the group, whether it be a roundtable or a committee in formal terms.

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DNR invests in science and infrastructure upgrades in NB

Atlantic Farm Focus
June 9, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

Canada’s Natural Resources Minister Greg Rickford was in Fredericton, New Brunswick June 8 to announce a $5.8-million investment in science and infrastructure upgrades for the Atlantic Forestry Centre and the Acadia Research Forest. The investments will cover: • Upgrades to NRCan’s Atlantic Forestry Centre’s scientific laboratories, heating and ventilation and air conditioning system; Installing a specialized geomagnetic calibration facility at the Acadia
Research Forest. This facility will be used to calibrate equipment in
the national geomagnetic observatory network.

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Joining forces against ‘eco-terrorism’

The Timmins Press
June 10, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

TIMMINS – Mayors from Northern Ontario and Quebec are banding together in a fight against they describe as the “negative impacts from environmental extremism.” Forestry companies have been targeted by special interest groups like Greenpeace for harvesting within the Boreal Forest which spans across the country including much of Northern Ontario. Hearst Mayor Roger Sigouin, Cochrane Mayor Peter Politis and Timmins Coun. Mike Doody, who is also chairman of the North Eastern Ontario Municipal Association (NEOMA) were among the leaders who attended a recent meeting in Ottawa involving mayors from 22 communities in Ontario and Quebec.

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Feds say Southwest, Northwest could see catastrophic fires

Associated Press
June 9, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States

DENVER — Despite a wet spring over much of the nation, the Obama administration warned Tuesday of potentially catastrophic wildfires this summer, especially in the Southwest and Northwest. “We’ve been very fortunate here in the central part of the country to have above-normal precipitation to allow us to postpone the fire season,” U.S. Forest Service chief Tom Tidwell said at a news conference in Denver. But as the summer heat dries out forests and rangeland, the fire danger will rise, said Tidwell, who joined Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack and Interior Secretary Sally Jewell at the Denver briefing. Southern Arizona and drought-stricken

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Doerner Fir tucked deep in Coos County forest is world’s tallest non-redwood tree

The Oregonian
June 9, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

The Doerner Fir will take your breath away three times: while you drive the maze of logging roads it takes to get there, as you hike the trail that gets little attention from the BLM and when you see the giant tree. The Doerner Fir is the tallest non-redwood tree on the planet, though an Australian eucalyptus is about the same height. This coastal Douglas fir is 327 feet, three inches tall. It grows in a remnant old-growth stand on the east side of Coos County in land managed by the Coos Bay BLM.

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Spotted owl numbers not only down but also at faster rate

Associated Press
June 9, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

PORTLAND, Ore. — Scientists report that after two decades of attempts to save the species, northern spotted owl numbers in the Northwest are still on the decline — and at a faster rate. The threatened bird nests in old trees and is at the heart of a decades-long struggle over the fate of the region’s old-growth forests. Scientists at a conference Tuesday in Vancouver, Washington, reported that owl numbers are now dropping at an annual rate of 3.8 percent, said U.S. Forest Service spokesman Glen Sachet. Five years ago, the rate was 2.8 percent.

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Predicting Tree Mortality

A National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis working group study analyzes a variety of factors contributing to forest die-offs
US Santa Barbara
June 9, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

A combination of drought, heat and insects is responsible for the death of more than 12 million trees in California, according to a new study from UC Santa Barbara’s National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis (NCEAS). Members of the NCEAS working group studying environmental factors contributing to tree mortality expect this number to increase with climate change.

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Study seeks to help southwestern white pine navigate climate change, disease

Phys.org
June 10, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

A new collaborative project involving Virginia Commonwealth University seeks to understand the ecology and evolutionary history of the southwestern white pine tree – found in the mountains of the southwestern United States and Mexico – so as to help predict the tree species’ response to climate change and infestations of an exotic fungal pathogen known as white pine blister rust. Andrew Eckert, Ph.D., an evolutionary geneticist and an assistant professor in VCU’s Department of Biology in the College of Humanities and Sciences, is the principal investigator at VCU on the five-year study,

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Colorado senators’ report: Bureaucratic squabbles hurt wildfire prevention

The Gazette
June 9, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Colorado U.S. Sens. Michael Bennet and Cory Gardner brought a report on wildfire mitigation back to Washington, D.C., last week after the report found that congressional squabbles and federal bureaucracy are among the obstacles standing in the way of healthier forests. The report, commissioned in 2014 by Bennet, was delivered to the U.S. Department of Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack for review, according to a news release from Bennet’s office. After a year of study, the group found that the U.S. Forest Service often favors cheaper and less effective fire mitigation projects over more expensive, but more effective ones.

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Payson fought the drought brilliantly. But is it enough?

Our View: Tackling the drought head on was the right call to make, but Payson isn’t out of the woods yet.
AZ Central
June 8, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Payson, the high-country gateway to the Mogollon Rim, is a textbook example of preparing for the worst nature has to offer. Drought? Fire? Payson is ready. … Recognizing that such freewheeling growth was not sustainable, town leaders took steps to rein it in, enacting restrictive zoning and mandating water conservation. Payson became one of the first Arizona towns to be certified as “Firewise,” the U.S. Forest Service’s designation for communities that take steps to prevent forest fires from consuming them.

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Forest Service Gives Us Hope

Payson Roundup
June 6, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

The solid progress on thinning the watershed draining into the C.C. Cragin Reservoir gives us cause for hope. Salt River Project officials say that crews working for the Four Forest Restoration Initiative (4FRI) contractor will thin a few thousand acres this summer. It turns out, the 64,000-acre watershed has some of the highest-value timber among the parcels already approved by the Forest Service for cutting. Moreover, the Forest Service has also started an environmental analysis to cover the whole 64,000 acres, which constitutes one of the most productive watersheds in the state.

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Where Things Stand For Northwest Forests Under The Clinton Plan

Oregon Public Broadcasting
June 9, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

The issue of forest policy is once again heating up in the Northwest. On Tuesday federal officials presented their latest assessment of the Northwest Forest Plan, which covers more than 2 million acres of federal land in Washington, Oregon and California. ….Every five years federal agencies are required to release a “monitoring report.” It’s kind of like a scientific report card looking at whether the Northwest Forest Plan is meeting the goals it was set to accomplish. Tuesday’s release was the 20-year monitoring report. And after 20 years of study, scientists are getting enough data to make some conclusions about what’s happening out in the forests.

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Oregon’s gigantic trees meet Google’s all-seeing eye

Statesman Journal
June 9, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

On a sun-splashed afternoon in the Central Cascades, one of the newest forms of technology met some of Oregon’s oldest trees. Chandra LeGue set up the introduction. The field coordinator for the conservation group Oregon Wild carried a large neon eye upon her back, an orb outfitted with 15 rapid-fire cameras that captured every step of our journey into a remote valley home to Douglas fir, hemlock and cedar that sprouted roughly 800 years ago and rise like Gothic skyscrapers in the green canopy.

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Southern pine lumber exports increased by 26% in March

Lesprom
June 9, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

Exports of Southern Pine lumber made a dramatic jump in March, posting a monthly record. SP exports to be just over 58 million board feet (MMbf) during March 2015, as the Southern Forest Products Association said in the press release received by Lesprom Network. This volume represents a healthy boost of 26% above the same month last year, contributing to a year-to-date increase of 3% when compared with the first three months of 2014. Offshore shipments during March roughly break down as follows: 30.7 MMbf dressed, 9 MMbf rough, and 18.5 MMbf treated lumber.

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Tree root research confirms that different morphologies produce similar results

Phys.org
June 9, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

Despite markedly different root morphologies and resulting disparities in nutrient-uptake processes, forest trees of different lineages show comparable efficiency in acquiring soil nutrients, according to researchers in Penn State’s College of Agricultural Sciences. Some tree species produce thick, slow-growing roots, referred to as magnolioid-type, while other species grow thin roots, called graminoid-type, with rapid root proliferation. Trees that grow the thicker roots expend more energy and resources on them than those that grow the finer roots, and the thicker roots last longer before dying than the thinner roots.

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Windham looking to thin out Town Forest

Eagle Tribune
June 10, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

WINDHAM — Town officials are looking at removing some trees from the Town Forest and possibly spruce up the town coffers as well. In the interest of preserving the forest’s health, the Forestry Committee has recommended cutting down some of the larger trees across 116 acres of the 203-acre forest. “Basically, the idea is to weed out some of the older trees that are in decline,” committee chairman Wanda Rice said. It will also let some of the smaller trees prosper and grow more, she said. It’s the first time Windham will thin out the forest, according to Rice.

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Land board considers options for Elliott State Forest

The State Land Board is mulling options to sell the Elliott State Forest to another government agency or to a public-private partnership.
Blue Mountain Eagle
June 9, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

The State Land Board says interest groups that have battled for years over the Elliott State Forest must begin to trust each other, in order for the state to reach a longterm solution for the parcel near the southwest Oregon coast. The land board, composed of the governor, secretary of state and state treasurer, is currently exploring options to sell the Elliott State Forest to another government or public-private partnership that would commit to the goals voiced by the public, which range from protecting old growth forests and coho salmon spawning grounds, to supporting Oregon timber mills.

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Forest protection scheme sewn up at U.N. climate talks

Reuters
June 9, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: International

BONN, Germany (Thomson Reuters Foundation) – Negotiators reached a surprise resolution to thorny issues relating to forest protection at U.N. climate talks on Tuesday, increasing the odds it will be included in a new global climate deal due to be agreed in Paris in December, experts said. Forest researchers said they had not expected progress in Bonn on tough questions surrounding the Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation (REDD+) scheme. One of the issues was how projects to protect forests can show they are respecting the rights of indigenous people and other forest communities, and producing benefits for them.

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