Tree Frog Forestry News

Daily Archives: June 11, 2015

Business & Politics

B.C. climbs out of commodity slump with U.S. export boom

Globe and Mail
June 11, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

British Columbians have long been known for dancing to their own tune. And now, that can be said for the province’s economy, too. In Canada’s new version of a two-speed recovery, the West Coast is zooming off on its own. …B.C. manufacturers are benefiting in a big way from the long-awaited resurgence in U.S. business investment and construction, as the U.S. economy gains serious momentum for the first time since the financial crisis. The province’s biggest export to the U.S. market – wood products – surged more than 12 per cent last year. Machinery and equipment exports to the United States jumped nearly 14 per cent.

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Resolute blames Green Peace for temporary Quebec shutdowns

TB Newswatch
June 10, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada East, Canada

Resolute Forest Products is temporarily closing two of its paper mills in Quebec, due to a lack of demand for commercial paper.  The company is placing blame on Greenpeace for the closures, claiming that environmental organization is using “blackmail and misinformation.”  The mill in Dolbeau will close for 10 days, while the plant in Alma will shut its doors for three weeks.  Greenpeace officials say rather than blaming them, Resolute needs to look internally and improve its logging practices in the Boreal forest.

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SPI shows off new large-log sawmill

Plumas County News
June 10, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States, US West

A group of more than 50 community leaders and elected officials, including Congressman Doug LaMalfa, received a firsthand look at Sierra Pacific Industries’ new large-log sawmill in Quincy on Friday, May 29. SPI owners Red and George Emmerson were on hand to field questions and emphasize their commitment to keeping jobs in Plumas County. “We are really happy to be here today,” George Emmerson told the group during a post-tour luncheon. “We would not have made this investment if we didn’t plan to be here for the long haul.” SPI spent more than $14 million to build the new sawmill.

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UPM papers meet WWF’s highest standards

Pulp and Paper News
June 11, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: International

Using WWF’s check-your-paper (CYP) tool WWF’s Check-your-paper (CYP) tool is a public database for pulp and paper products with high environmental standards. The CYP method focuses on a limited number of environmental parameters including how well forests supplying fibre are managed, use of recycled fibre, fossil CO2 emissions, waste going to landfills and water pollution from mills. UPM has been part of CYP since the very beginning and one of the first companies to rate papers in the tool.

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Wood, Paper & Green Building

B.C. battling to keep tall wood bragging rights

Journal of Commerce
June 11, 2015
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: Canada

Quebec is looking to snatch B.C.’s bragging rights for having some of Canada’s tallest wood structures, but the University of British Columbia (UBC) is working hard to keep the glory. The Origine, a 13-storey residential project in Quebec City’s Pointe-aux-Lievre eco-district, has been announced. It will include 12 floors of wood, mainly constructed of cross-laminated timbers and will sit on a concrete podium. The 40.9 metre structure is the design of Yvan Blouin Architecte and is being constructed by Nordic Structures, a CLT manufacturer.

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Thermalwood Canada brings ‘baked wood’ to Bathurst

CBC News
June 10, 2015
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: Canada East, Canada

 Bathurst wood supplier is smoking the competition by baking its building products. Thermalwood Canada takes planks from across the province — and some from Ontario — and cooks them in a giant kiln at high temperatures to darken the colour. Aesthetics are the biggest selling point, but Pierre Friolet, Thermalwood’s general manager, said the benefits to putting the wood through this process go far deeper. “We raise the temperature anywhere from 185 C to 225 C. It removes the resins in the wood so it renders the wood rot resistant without adding any chemicals,” he said. …The wood is used in place of traditional, pressure-treated planks. The

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Hardwood Ad Checkoff Amended, USDA Seeks Comments

Woodworking Network
June 10, 2015
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: United States

WASHINGTON – The USDA is once again seeking public comments on the proposed Hardwood Checkoff program following seven editorial amendments made to the proposal. Persons interested have until July 9 to submit comments. Comments on the proposed Hardwood Lumber and Hardwood Plywood Promotion, Research and Information Order (79 FR 68298) can be submitted online at www.regulations.gov. Published in the Federal Register in November 2013, and revised in the spring of 2014, the proposed Hardwood Checkoff program has received its share of controversy, with industry groups taking sides on the proposal.

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Director Park needs $790,000 in repairs six years after opening

The Oregonian
June 10, 2015
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: United States, US West

One of Portland’s most architecturally celebrated parks needs $790,000 in “emergency structural repairs” less than six years after its ribbon-cutting ceremony. Director Park, the bustling downtown urban plaza that cost $9.45 million to build, was among five finalists in 2011 for a prestigious Open Space Award bestowed by the Urban Land Institute. Now part of that distinctive design is failing. Parks officials say the wood beams that help support Director Park’s overhead glass canopy have moisture damage and need to be replaced.

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Dalston embraces green buildings trend with world’s largest ‘plyscraper’

Regal Homes says wooden tower blocks are recyclable and have significantly lower environmental impact than cement
Business Green
June 11, 2015
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: International

Dalston in east London might be best known for trailblazing long bushy beards and fixed-gear bikes, but now it is set to lead the world in a new green building technology trend. Regal Homes has announced it is to build the world’s largest “plyscraper” in Dalston Lane, Hackney – a 10-storey development made of plywood that is expected to be completed next summer. The towers are constructed with cross-laminated timber, which comprises layers of small wooden pieces glued and pressed together to make boards up to 18in thick. The structures are expected to last for 150 years and can be recycled at the end of their life.

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Forestry

Public input sought on the Great Bear Rainforest

Ministry of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations
BC Government
June 10, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

VICTORIA – Public input on proposed land use objectives and the potential for new biodiversity, mining and tourism areas (BMTAs) and a conservancy in the Great Bear Rainforest is being sought until Aug. 10, 2015, Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations Minister Steve Thomson announced today. The intent of the proposed Great Bear Rainforest land use order and potential BMTAs and conservancy is to meet the goals of reserving 70% of historic old-growth forests (with minor exceptions), while maintaining a viable forest industry in the Great Bear Rainforest.

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BC gov’t invites letters on Great Bear Rainforest land use

Vancouver Observer
June 10, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

If you have some input on proposed land uses in the Great Bear Rainforest, now’s the time to speak out. The Province has put the call out for written public input on the proposals and the potential for new biodiversity, mining and tourism areas (BMTAs), by Aug. 10, 2015. The Ministry of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations’ conservancy plan includes “maintaining a viable forest industry” in the Great Bear Rainforest, reserving “70 per cent of historic old-growth forests (with minor exceptions).”

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CSRD director calls forest minister’s response disappointing

Revelstoke Mountaineer
June 10, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Columbia Shuswap Regional District director Loni Parker says the province’s response to the CSRD board’s appeal for more consultation on logging issues like planned logging in the Mount Macpherson recreation area was “disappointing.” Parker, whose CSRD electoral Area B encompasses Revelstoke, described the May 13 response letter from Minister of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations Steve Thomson as standard. “He just reiterated what process the industry had done to update us on the procedures,” she said. “It was disappointing to hear, of course, that he doesn’t think it’s necessary to have any more in-depth planning than what they have and are legislatively required to do.”

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Logging company is required to cut trees

Letter to the editor
Victoria Times Colonist
June 11, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

The preservationists seeking to stop licensed logging of areas surrounding the Carmanah Walbran Provincial Park have targeted the wrong organization, as they well know. If Teal Jones has a logging licence from the provincial government to log those old-growth trees, then it is required by the provincial government to log them. It is not an option for Teal Jones, although it is given discretion as to the timing. So go after the provincial government. The fact is: Those trees are outside the park, not inside it.

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Zinke’s bill is latest lie about logging

Daily Inter Lake
June 10, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

The June 5 Inter Lake contains the story “Zinke bill aims for limits on lawsuits” and reports that the legislation would restrict individuals or groups who file logging lawsuits by requiring them to post a bond equal to the Forest Service’s cost of defending the project — a totally unknown amount. And if you don’t prevail on every point in your lawsuit, you wouldn’t get your bond back. Could you afford that? A better title might have been “Zinke launches all-out attack on the Constitution.”

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Restoration project to protect watersheds

Bigfork Eagle
June 10, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Bull trout are a fickle fish, picky about where they spawn and sensitive to change, according to Forest Service Fisheries Biologist Beth Gardner. Protecting the quality of spawning habitat for bull trout, as well as other species is just one of the goals behind the Forest Service’s Chilly James Restoration Project. The Chilly James Restoration project area encompasses the Jim Creek, Cold Creek and Swan River-Pony Creek watersheds and is approximately 41,232 acres. The Forest Service began working on the assessment for the project, with surveying in 2012 and input gathered from the public in 2013. Recently they released the environmental assessment outlining the reason for the project and the actions to be taken.

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Burned-out forests helping some birds thrive

Yakima Herald Republic
June 11, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

NACHES — On this rocky slope west of Naches, all the trees were killed by a fire last summer, but that doesn’t mean the forest is lifeless. In fact, it’s just the opposite. The clear “ra-ta-ta-ta-ta-ta-ta” drilling of woodpeckers echoes through the trees where a group of wildlife biologists and forest managers gathered recently to discuss how a controlled burn killed a cluster of skinny fir trees and created perfect habitat for birds, which feed on bugs that love dead trees. “When you get a place where all the trees die, the black-backed woodpeckers go there right away,” said Teresa Lorenz, a bird biologist with the U.S. Forest Service’s Pacific Northwest Research Station in Olympia. “The burn created excellent habitat for these at-risk species.”

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Logging accident kills Oregon man

Coos County, Ore., sheriff: Logging accident kills Myrtle Creek man
Associated Press
June 11, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

COQUILLE, Ore. — The Coos County sheriff’s office in southwest Oregon says a 45-year-old Myrtle Creek man has died in a logging accident. The sheriff’s office said a load of logs was being pulled to a log landing Wednesday when one of the logs swung around and fatally struck Darrell Carmichael. Carmichael was working for JSP Cutting out of Myrtle Creek on a tree-thinning project for the federal Bureau of Land Management.

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Lightning strikes, dozens of blazes signal early start to fire season

The Oregonian
June 10, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Hundreds of lightning strikes have sparked dozens of wildfires on state and federal land in southern Oregon since Monday, and continued thunderstorms and high winds have prompted a “red flag” fire warning for Hood River, Curry, Josephine, Jackson, and Klamath counties. On a day when the Obama administration warned of potentially catastrophic wildfires in the Northwest and Southwest this summer, Oregon officials say fire season has begun far earlier than usual. “This is the earliest that I can remember in a long time,” said Don Ferguson, a spokesman for BLM’s Medford district. “I heard someone say it’s burning like August out there. “

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What’s Killing Forests in California?

The Epoch Times
June 10, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

More than 12 million trees have died in California. A combination of drought, heat, and insects may be to blame. A new study is the first to examine the wide spectrum of interactions between drought and insects. Researchers first devised a framework to look at the effects that each stressor can have on tree mortality and then examined interactions among them. “We wanted to be able to get a sense of how these die-off patterns will shift with climate change,” says study coauthor Naomi Tague, associate professor at University of California, Santa Barbara. “Are there huge forests that will be at higher risk of dying sooner?”

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Forest lightning fires mostly contained

Eureka Times-Standard
June 10, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Multiple fires were started by lightning strikes in national parks Tuesday, but most of them have been contained, officials say. As of Wednesday, there were 25 confirmed fires in the Six Rivers National Forest, eight small fires in the Klamath National Forest and additional fires active in the Rogue River-Siskiyou National Forest, the Modoc National Forest and the Shasta-Trinity National Forest. The Trinity County Sheriff’s Office issued a mandatory fire evacuation for Lower South Fork Road north of Big Slide Campground to Manzanita Ranch on Wednesday afternoon.

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Time to focus on healthy forests

Daily Inter Lake
June 10, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Has the logjam finally been broken? Let’s hope so. For the past 20 to 30 years, timber on national forest land has been tied up by regulations, lawsuits and politics. As a result, fire danger has jumped, while jobs and the timber industry have plummeted. This morning, the U.S. House Natural Resources Committee will be working on House Resolution 2647, known as the Resilient Federal Forests Act of 2015. The bill incorporates a previous bill submitted by Rep. Ryan Zinke, R-Mont., as well several other bills, and has the aim of speeding up timber harvests and removal of fire fuel.

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At 30,000 acres, forest treatment levels continue to increase Hills-wide

All-lands approach ups ante in pine beetle battle
Black Hills Pioneer
June 10, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

NORTHERN HILLS — “Annually, 30,000 acres is what we’re treating,” said Craig Bobzien, supervisor of the Black Hills National Forest. “We’re trending up in acres thinned every year, steadily increasing based on our capabilities.” With national legislators pushing for more and faster treatment for America’s drought- and pine beetle-compromised forests, local forest officials say they realized the value of a team approach years ago and use an “all-lands” approach to upping the ante on forest treatments.

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Oregon Wildfires & Forest Fires

The Oregonian
June 11, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Get Oregon and Northwest wildfires and forest fire news, resources and updates at OregonLive.com.

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Foresters using fungus to control invasive trees

Kentucky Daily Independent
June 10, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

NELSONVILLE, Ohio Researchers in the Wayne National Forest are using a native fungus they hope will help them control the spread of an aggressive, non-native tree species that can crowd out oaks and other native species. The tree is the ailanthus altissima, also known as tree of heaven. Native to China, the tree was brought to the U.S. in the 18th century by gardeners. Because it has no natural enemies, it spreads and blocks sunlight other species need to survive. The fungus kills the tree and spreads from one tree to another through interconnected root systems, according to U.S. Forest Service scientist Joanne Rebbeck. With the exception with a handful of non-native species, the fungus has no effect on other plant life.

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Thousands of trees to come down after discovery of emerald ash borer in Davenport

WQAD8
June 10, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

The Emerald Ash Borer (EAB) has officially entered Scott County, Iowa. The insect, which is one of the country’s most destructive tree pests, was positively identified in Davenport as well as the central/rural area of Davis County, which is roughly 80 miles west of Burlington, Iowa. The City of Davenport’s Forestry Division has been preparing for the EAB’s arrival. “With emerald ash borer already being in the area on the Illinois side, it was only a matter of time until it was found in Davenport,” said Mike Kintner, the Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship EAP and gypsy moth coordinator.

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Northern Bobwhite Restoration Initiative Confirms Nesting Quail In New Jersey Pinelands: First known nesting since the 1980’s!

New Jersey Audubon
June 10, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

Chatsworth, NJ – Two wild quail nests have been found at the study site where two months earlier wild Northern Bobwhite quail from Georgia were released into the Pinelands as part of Northern Bobwhite Restoration Initiative. …As part of a project to restore Northern Bobwhite to the Pinelands of NJ, on April 1, 2015 New Jersey Audubon along with project collaborators, Tall Timbers Research Station & Land Conservancy, and project partners the Pine Island Cranberry Company, Pine Creek Forestry, the University of Delaware, and the New Jersey Division of Fish and Wildlife (NJDFW), released wild Northern Bobwhite at the Pine Island Cranberry site.

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New funding available for forestry practices on Virginia lands

Augusta Free Press
June 10, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

Well-managed, productive forests offer numerous conservation benefits, but the long growth cycle of trees can present a financial challenge for landowners seeking to retain working forestlands. USDA’s Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) is now making $470,000 available to help increase adoption of forestry practices statewide through a new Regional Conservation Partnership Program (RCPP) project. Offered in cooperation with the Virginia Department of Forestry (VDOF), the RCPP Forestry Program offers landowners an opportunity to help establish and maintain the forestlands that are fundamental to clean air and water, wildlife habitat and recreation/tourism. 

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Predatory beetles fight to save Maine’s hemlocks

Bangor Daily News
June 10, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

An invasive insect called the hemlock woolly adelgid has been spreading up the Maine coast since first discovered in the state more than a decade ago. As its name suggests, the pest infests hemlock trees. It saps them of moisture and nutrients, causing the trees to become sick and, under certain conditions, die. Paul Dumdey, a private woodlot owner in Woolwich, knew it only was a matter of time before he found the foreign pest in his forest. Last fall, he harvested a large hemlock tree from his 150-acre woodlot, and at the top of the tree he found what he had been dreading: hemlock woolly adelgids.

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Japanese tree plantations causing nitrogen pollution

United Press International
June 10, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: International

FUKUOKA, Japan — New research suggests not all trees are ‘green.’ Some trees cause pollution. A new study out of Japan suggests some forests are polluters on par with industrial farms and urban expanses. Deforestation is one the largest drivers of climate change… Trees, of course, are much revered for their ability to suck planet-warming CO2 from the atmosphere. …But a group of scientists say several abandoned tree plantations in Japan are causing more harm than good. The problem is nitrogen — too much of it. The forests are leaching it, and it’s ending up in local waterways, causing algae blooms that damage local ecosystems. These tree plantations, made of up of aging timber, aren’t forests. They’re abandoned farms.

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Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy

AF&PA and AWC applaud Oregon’s carbon neutrality policy

PPI Environment
June 10, 2015
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: United States

WASHINGTON, DC, June 10, 2015 (Press Release) -American Forest & Paper Association (AF&PA) President and CEO Donna Harman and American Wood Council (AWC) President and CEO Robert Glowinski have issued the following statements supporting today’s passage of a bill (SB 752) by the Oregon Legislative Assembly to conditionally exempt carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from biomass from state air pollution regulations. 

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Sorry, “skeptics”: Global warming may not be so great for plant life after all

The Washington Post
June 10, 2015
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: United States

Climate change is already a heavily charged issue, fraught with political tension. But complicating the mix are a slew of misconceptions about exactly how it will affect the planet and its inhabitants. One confusion involves plant growth. Some skeptics have argued that rising carbon dioxide levels could actually benefit agriculture, and in fact, research shows that rising temperatures and more carbon dioxide can be a boon to plants — up to a point. But that’s not the whole story, according to researcher Camilo Mora, a professor of geography at the University of Hawaii at Manoa. And in a new paper, published today in the journal PLOS Biology, he and his colleagues attempt to set the record straight.

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California bill to incentivize biomass fuel passes Assembly

Biomass Magazine
June 9, 2015
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: United States, US West

Last Week, California Assembly Bill 590 passed the Assembly Committee on Appropriations unanimously with bipartisan support and is on its way to the Senate. The bill will add incentives for biomass utilization of agricultural waste and forest waste. Assembly Members Brian Dahle, R-Redding, and Rudy Salas, D-Bakersfield, introduced the bill in February. In April, it was passed by the Assembly Committee on Natural Resources and the Assembly Committee on Utilities and Commerce. Around the end of May, the legislation was undergoing review by the Assembly, and now, since it’s passed, has been ordered to the Senate.

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Wood-fired power plants under scrutiny as science questions low-carbon claims

Minn Post
June 9, 2015
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: US East, United States

It’s a common-sense tenet of the case against fossil fuels that burning coal, especially, but also oil and natural gas is a threat to earth’s climate because it disrupts the carbon cycle. You know the reasoning: Since the beginning of widespread industrialization, carbon locked up in the earth for millennia has been returned to the atmosphere on a timescale marked off in mere decades. The rate at which the world’s forests can recapture it, in the form of CO2, can’t accelerate to match. Which leads to a second, sensible-sounding tenet: Growing and burning wood as an alternative to fossil fuels must by definition be carbon-neutral, or nearly so, with each felled tree’s contribution of carbon emissions balanced by a growing tree’s recapture.

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Wisconsin plant: A win for paper mill, a loss for ratepayers?

Midwest Energy News
June 10, 2015
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: US East, United States

When the Rothschild Biomass Cogeneration power plant in northern Wisconsin was announced by We Energies in 2009, it was billed as a form of renewable energy that would burn wood waste from local logging, sawmill and paper operations to generate electricity for ratepayers and steam for the nearby Domtar Rothschild paper mill. As a 50 MW baseload plant, it was projected to run at about 70 percent capacity, a scale similar to a small coal plant. But the plant has in fact generated little electricity for the grid.

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Decade-Long UN Forest Climate Talks Reach Breakthrough

Bloomberg
June 10, 2015
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: International

A surprise agreement has been reached by envoys from about 190 nations after about a decade of talks on how to reduce deforestation in developing countries to help curb climate change. The deal agreed on at a United Nations meeting in Bonn this week provides clarity on safeguards such as helping protect indigenous communities and ensuring biodiversity, which countries need to report on when seeking funds in exchange for protecting forests, Niranjali Amerasinghe said. “We were surprised that countries came to an agreement” on REDD+, the UN’s Reduced Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation program, Amerasinghe said Wednesday in an interview in Bonn.

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Waste not, want not

European Biotechnology
June 10, 2015
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: International

St1 Biofuels has expanded beyond the Finnish borders and opened a bioethanol plant in Sweden. The plant will convert leftovers and waste from bakeries to biofuel. Finish bioenergy company St1 Biofuels Oy has delivered its first bioethanol plant outside of Finland to fuel supplier North European Bio Tech Oy. The plant was inaugurated this week in Danish Gothenburg. It will recycle feedstocks such as biowaste and process residue from local bakeries and bread from shops that is past its sell-by date into ethanol for transport fuel. “Ethanol produced using our technology generates virtually no lifecycle fossil emissions,” Patrick Pitkänen, Head of Business Development and Sales at St1 Biofuels, explained.

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