Tree Frog Forestry News

Daily Archives: June 15, 2015

Business & Politics

Softwood Lumber Export Surge Charge Applies To Alberta Region For April 2015

Livingston Internation
June 14, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

The Canada Revenue Agency has issued notice SWLN47 to provide exporters of softwood lumber products under the Softwood Lumber Products Export Charge Act, 2006 with information on a surge charge for the month of April 2015 for the region of Alberta. Pursuant to the surge mechanism described in subsection 14(1) of the Softwood Lumber Products Export Charge Act, 2006, the charge that applies to the export of softwood lumber products from a region that is not governed by an export allocation (an Option A region) is increased by 50% when exports of softwood lumber products from this region during a particular month exceed the applicable monthly trigger volume by more than 1%.

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Former forest industry exec honoured

Prince George Citizen
June 15, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

The College of New Caledonia has recognized Dunkley Lumber’s former vice president as this year’s Industry Partner Award. Jason Fisher was recognized for his role as “the driving force” behind the current partnership with the college, which includes joint management of the research forest. “I have enjoyed working with the college immensely and will continue to look for opportunities to support it,” said Fisher, who practicing law in Prince George with DLA Piper (Canada) LLP, in a press release. “CNC is one of the pillars of the community and it is a huge honor to be associated with it.” Fisher has supported the college’s natural resource and forestry programming, helping enhance student learning and activities through on-site mill tours, participation in research projects, and summer work opportunities.

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Mercury levels still rising near Grassy Narrows First Nation, report says

50-year-old contamination that was never cleaned up still polluting water and fish, report says
CBC News
June 15, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada East, Canada

Fifty years after a Dryden pulp mill dumped its effluent into a northern Ontario watershed, mercury continues to rise in some lakes, according to a study commissioned by the provincial government and the Grassy Narrows First Nation. The report released Monday also reveals how little is known about the environmental and health consequences of the mercury that flowed freely into the English-Wabigoon water system between 1962 and 1970. The research review of human and ecological health in Grassy Narrows was conducted by fresh water scientist Patricia Sellers. It takes a wide-ranging look at all published research into the contamination and mercury poisoning of people at Grassy Narrows.

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FAIRFAX ANNOUNCES ACQUISITION OF SHARES OF TEMBEC

The Canadian Business Journal
June 14, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada East, Canada

Fairfax Financial Holdings announced today that it has acquired, through its subsidiaries, 19,991,044 common shares of Tembec, representing approximately 19.9% of the issued and outstanding Shares. The Shares were purchased by way of a private transaction at a price of $2.25 per Share pursuant to a share purchase agreement, and represent the only securities that Fairfax currently owns or controls in Tembec… Fairfax is a holding company which, through its subsidiaries, is engaged in property and casualty insurance and reinsurance and investment management.

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Court reverses ruling ordering BLM to log more in Oregon

OregonLive.com
June 14, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States

GRANTS PASS — A federal appeals court on Friday overturned a 2013 ruling that ordered the U.S. Bureau of Land Management to sell more timber in southern Oregon. The U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit also overturned a ruling in the same case that had annulled a system federal scientists used to estimate the harm to northern spotted owls, a threatened species, from logging projects. The appeals court found that timber companies and organizations demanding more timber under a 1937 law known as the O&C Act had no standing to sue because they failed to show evidence they suffered harm from reduced logging levels.

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Hardwood Producers Start Tapping the Brakes

Woodworking Network
June 14, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States

Many sawmills have reduced production due to low log supplies, difficult business conditions, or both. Even so, mills and drying operations continued to churn out more lumber than already saturated markets can absorb. One large concentration yard reportedly had 90% of its kilns turned off due to lack of dry storage. Many sawmills and concentration yards are now planning to shut down during the week of July 4th, some for the first time ever. A contact at one such yard said, “With a lot of other companies closing for a week or two, we would get buried with lumber if we have our doors open.” Distribution yard sales of hardwood lumber remain brisk, particularly in the western U.S. and Canada. 

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Weyerhaeuser seeking Eugene tax waiver for factory upgrade, but doesn’t want to promise job creation

The Register-Guard
June 13, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States, US West

Weyerhaeuser Co. is lobbying for a hefty property tax waiver on a $55 million modernization of its west Eugene floor- and roof-beam factory, even while the company acknowledges it may not be able to meet the job-creation requirements spelled out in the city’s enterprise zone program. The Federal Way, Wash.-based company wants to be exempt from property taxes on the modernization at the North Bertelsen Road plant for three years. That waiver would save the company an estimated $2.1 million to $2.4 million during the three-year period. The company acknowledges it will conduct the modernization regardless of whether the Eugene City Council grants the waiver but is asking for the break anyway.

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Timber Report: Housing starts up 20 percent, unsold home inventory dropped

By Rick Sohn, retired CEO of Lone Rock Timber Co. in Roseburg.
NR Today.com
June 14, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States, US West

Mortgage interest rates remain favorable, and home value is increasing. Yet, U.S. softwood market is being harmed by Canada. Trends of lumber, home construction and housing markets are comparable to 2006. From the standpoint of the producers, things are not so rosy. Log prices, which have already dropped $102 since January, are already at a typical summer price of $651. The early price drop this year is symptomatic of the dry winter and spring months, which permitted more logging in winter months than usual. But the price is still high for the mills, relative to the log price. The lumber price, at 41 percent of the log price in April, is the lowest it has been for the last three years, except for December 2013.

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Lumber Firms Lose Right to Expand Logging as Court Overturns Ruling

WoodWorking Network
June 15, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States, US West

Two lumber firms – Swanson Manufacturing, and Rough and Ready Lumber – suffered a reverse as a Federal court in Washington DC overturned a lower court’s ruling. At issue was a claim by the logging and lumber firms – both based in Oregon, suffered damages when the Bureau of Land Management restricted the volume of wood they could harvest. Joining the suit were the Washington Contract Loggers Association, Inc.; the American Forest Resource Council; and Douglas Timber Operators, Inc.  At issue are timber sales from lands in the Roseburg and Medford districts of western Oregon from 2004 to 2010. 

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Don’t forget farming and forestry

Lawmakers should find a way to fund L.D. 290, which would help farmers and loggers with fuel prices.
Central Maine
June 13, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: US East, United States

As the 127th Maine Legislature attempts to complete its first session, the topic of tax reform is certainly dominating the conversation, with most of the conversation focused on income taxes. Certainly, income taxes are important to both commercial agriculture and commercial wood harvesting, but in the long run, the health and well-being of these industries has much more to do with other factors than just the income tax.  On June 2, the Legislature enacted L.D. 290,
“An Act to Refund the Sales Tax Paid on Fuel Used in Commercial
Agriculture Production and Commercial Wood Harvesting,” with
overwhelming bipartisan support.

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Does Maine want 1 ‘F’ for its economy or all 3?

Bangor Daily News
June 15, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: US East, United States

Over the last six months, the governor and both major parties in the Maine Legislature have debated the merits of income tax reform to incentivize economic development. …Hopefully, this will not be the case with LD 290, as this kind of common-sense tax relief is critical for two of Maine’s three “F’s”: farming and forestry. Farming and forestry, more specifically logging, have a great deal in common, notwithstanding the fact that they — along with fishing, the other “F” — have been part of the economy from the state’s beginning. …What have loggers and farmers gotten in return for this increase in cost and tax? A blind eye and a cold shoulder, while state government benefits each time the price of fuel increases.

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Lumber imports to China were close to record high in April; Russia, Sweden and Finland increased shipments the most

Wood Resources International LLC
Business Wire press release
June 12, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: International

SEATTLE—-Demand for imported softwood lumber in China sky-rocked this spring after a slow period from August 2014 to March 2015. In February, import volumes were down to 860,000 m3 for the month, a two-year low. In just two months, shipments doubled to 1.7 million m3 for the month of April, the second highest monthly import volume on record. Year-to-date import volumes were 2.1 percent higher this year than during the same period in 2014, with Russian shipments having increased 13 percent, as reported in the latest issue of the Wood Resource Quarterly.

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Wood, Paper & Green Building

Colorado company creates bicycles out of wood (& video)

The Denver Channel
June 12, 2015
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: United States, US West

DENVER – A Colorado company is taking an old material and making a new kind of bike. In about 40 hours Chris Connor can turn a piece of wood into a bicycle built for you. “The love was always with building things and putting things together with my hands that were beautiful and functional,” Connor said. Connor has a background building guitars. “I use American white ash and black walnut,” he said. He soon realized combining his woodworking skills and his love of cycling was the natural next step. “I actually could make this work. I could put this together and build a bike that behaved as a bicycle but had these other magical qualities,” he said.

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Microtimber could transform building projects

Climate Control News
June 15, 2015
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: International

Macadamia shells are already used as a biofuel. Australian researchers are now proposing to use the nut’s extraordinary properties as a basic element in a new Microtimber, made using pioneering 3D-printing technology. Until now, this technology has been primarily used for small-scale, industrial design products. A research team led by University of Sydney architecture and engineering experts has received funding to investigate ways to 3D-print a new gradient timber panel using forestry waste and by-products, including the discarded shells of the popular Australian bush nut. …Researchers will experiment and test different material compositions using timber flours, including hardwood, softwood and macadamia shells.

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Forestry

End in sight for decades-long battle to protect B.C.’s Great Bear Rainforest

Reporter Justine Hunter and photographer John Lehmann visit the forest that inspired a unique collaboration between industry, environmentalists and First Nations
Globe and Mail
June 13, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Long before the phrase “Great Bear Rainforest” was dreamed up by environmental activists, David Garrick – better known as Walrus – had set up camp to protect the region’s ancient trees from logging. An anthropologist and one of the founders of Greenpeace, Walrus has been ensconced on the site he calls Earth Embassy on Hanson Island for so long he has come to resemble a woodland spirit, with his green felted hat, wild eyebrows and flowing silver mane of hair. In 1982, he launched a campaign to stop logging on Hanson Island on behalf of the Kwakwaka’wakw First Nation. He knew from the start what others would take many years to recognize: Protecting old growth forests on B.C.’s coast requires collaboration with First Nations.

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Lytton fire continues to spread despite rain

The rain is no match for fire, which has grown to 1,500 hectares overnight
CBC News
June 12, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

A fire near Lytton, B.C., continues to spread despite fire crews’ hope that rainfall on Friday morning would help contain the flames. The fire grew overnight to 1,500 hectares on Friday morning, up from 1,300 hectares on Thursday afternoon. Although there has been rain in the area, strong winds continue to fuel the fire. “It did grow significantly yesterday due to the steep terrain, hot and dry conditions and gusty winds,” said fire information officer Kayla Pepper.

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Logging Plans Could Rekindle BC’s War in the Woods

by Torrance Cost – Teal Jones marked our ‘no-go zone’ for clear-cut. Here’s what happens next.
The Tyee
June 13, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Eight months ago, a hiker and friend of our organization found new surveying tape in the central Walbran Valley. There, centred around the iconic Castle Grove, stands one of the largest intact tracts of unlogged old growth rainforest on southern Vancouver Island. …The lack of a coherent strategy on old-growth in B.C. does not mean the provincial government can sit by while some of the last of it is liquidated for private profit. The government must step up and head off this conflict. We should all be working together to build a forest industry that provides the sustainable jobs forest communities need, includes the First Nations who have been largely excluded in the past, and respects the environmental limits of these ecosystems.

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Dry conditions and high fuel load around Chilliwack spells fire danger

Chilliwack Progress
June 12, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West


Don’t even think of flicking that lit cigarette butt right now. From the backyard to the back country in Chilliwack, it’s really dry out there. That means heightened fire risk and extra vigilance by everyone is needed to prevent fires from breaking out, say officials. By comparison to this time last year, it’s about 20 per cent drier, said Lisa Axelson, fire prevention education officer with the Chilliwack Fire Department. Low snow pack levels in the upper Fraser watersheds this spring and much less rain is taking its toll. The Chilliwack area has already seen a few hedge fires, bark mulch fires, and grass fires, and the Fraser Valley Regional District has had to put out a few wildfires.

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Saving the Great Bear Rainforest with good marketing

Globe and Mail
June 14, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Sitting in an Italian restaurant in San Francisco in 1997, a gathering of environmental activists wrestled with a marketing challenge. They were mapping out an ambitious plan to prevent logging of old growth forests along the edge of British Columbia’s coastline. The area is visually stunning, and is home to the rare Kermode bears, which survive only in pristine sections of B.C.’s temperate rain forest. The group knew that these ingredients, matched with its clout in international markets, could be used to put significant pressure on the forest industry. The problem was the name of the region: The Central Mid-coast Timber Supply Area. The intent of the campaign was to persuade consumers in Europe and the United States to stop buying B.C. forest products from the region. Asking people to protest against logging in a timber supply area was not going to fly.

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Greenpeace fights ‘eco-terrorist’ charge

Nugget.ca
June 14, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

TIMMINS – Greenpeace is fighting back after members of North Eastern Ontario Municipal Association likened the environmentalist group to “eco-terrorism.” During a press conference this week, the mayors of NEOMA member communities, including Timmins’ Steve Black, announced that they were banding together to fight environmental groups such as Greenpeace, which they believe are making it impossible to start new forestry products in the region. Greenpeace has responded by denying any claims they are calling for a boycott of companies harvesting in the Boreal Forest. According to Greenpeace spokesman, Richard Brooks, the group has a problem with just one major forestry company harvesting in the Boreal Forest, Resolute Forest Products, and they don’t even operate anywhere near Timmins.

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Scientists Are Color-Coding Forests To Make Maps Showing Best Path To Conservation

Techtimes.com
June 14, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States

The word “green” has become common parlance for “good for the environment.” However, for researchers studying images of forests from the Carnegie Airborne Observatory, doing what’s good for the environment means using all of the colors of the rainbow. The CAO, as its name suggests, is not a building but a twin-engine plane. Equipped with pulsing lasers, the planes allow scientists to create 3D maps of forests. What really makes these planes so useful for conservation efforts is the onboard spectrometer, a device that measures chemical features based on the way light gets reflected off of objects. Using these devices, scientists can make large-scale 3D maps of forests that show the invisible differences in the trees’ chemical compositions in bold — and often beautiful — colors.

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Oregon Department of Forestry spokesman earns ‘Bronze Smokey’

Brian Ballou hailed as “innovative” in public outreach efforts
The Mail Tribune
June 12, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

The man much of Southern Oregon relies on for updates about wildfires burning across the region each summer has received a prestigious award from the U.S. Forest Service for his efforts to educate the public about wildfire prevention. Brian Ballou, Oregon Department of Forestry spokesman for the southwest district, has received the Bronze Smokey Award, described on the USFS website as “the highest honor given to organizations or individuals for outstanding wildfire prevention service over at least a two-year period that has impact within a state.” “I’m still kind of recovering from the shock,” Ballou says. “It is quite an honor. Very few people receive those.”

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Partnerships integral to Colorado’s forest health

Guest Column
The Gazette
June 14, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Last week, Colorado hosted Interior Secretary Sally Jewell, Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack and U.S. Forest Service Chief Tom Tidwell, who thanked interagency firefighters for their service and emphasized the importance of continued forest and grassland restoration… A report was released recently called “Innovations in Forestry and Fire Mitigation.” We welcome the enthusiasm and passion of the collaboratives, citizens, communities and elected officials. The report appears to parallel many of the goals of the National Cohesive Wildland Fire Management Strategy.

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June Miracle: Let It Burn

Payson Roundup
June 12, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Now, here’s how weird things are this year. When lightning started a fire north of Strawberry this week — the Forest Service decided to let it burn. For the past few years, firefighters, air tankers and water-dropping helicopters starting in May have raced to snuff any hint of a fire, for fear tinder-dry brush and sweltering temperatures will quickly produce another fire like the Wallow or the Rodeo-Chediski. …As a result, Coconino National Forest fire managers since Saturday have
let the Horse Tank Fire atop the Rim six miles north of Strawberry burn
through dead and down forest litter, small underbrush and pine needles.

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Letter: Healthy forest management will save Oregon from serious wildfire

By Paul Sunset, retired chemist and college educator
Bend Bulletin
June 14, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

The project being developed in Lakeview to replace controlled burns with collection of thinned and waste forest materials on Winema National Forest lands should serve as a model for all of Oregon. The woody materials are to be transported to the Lakeview facility where they will be processed into fuel for jet aircraft. There will be no carbon dioxide or particulate emissions. Some of the water produced will be recycled through the process with the balance to waste treatment. Since 1 million tons of wood waste produces about 22 acre-feet of water, it would be desirable to purify the water to the extent the excess could be returned to the aquifer. If more facilities were developed around the state, other products such as methanol, biodiesel, and a number of “plastics” such as plywood glue, Formica, polypropylene bottle polymers, etc. could also be produced

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Fire crews face danger from a forest of dead trees

Bend Bulletin
June 14, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

PORTLAND — Crews mobilizing to fight a new fire in southwestern Oregon face a danger left over from a major fire 13 years ago: dead, standing trees that could fall on them. Those dead trees are called snags, always a danger for fire crews working in the woods. The extensive Biscuit Fire of 2002 left behind what fire spokeswoman Pam Sichting described Saturday as “a multitude of snags.” Some of them will have to be cut down before crews can safely dig containment lines around the new fire, she said. The new fire is called Buckskin after a nearby peak, and it’s within the Biscuit Fire area. The Biscuit eventually burned a mosaic of land covering 780 square miles — half a million acres — and was the biggest fire in the nation that year.

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Breaking Down The Northwest Forest Plan Report Card

Jefferson Public Radio
June 14, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Northwest forest policy is once again heating up. Last week, federal officials presented their latest assessment of the Northwest Forest Plan, which covers more than 2 million acres of federal land in Washington, Oregon and California. Jes Burns from our EarthFix team gets together with JPR’s Liam Moriarty to break it all down.
Q: Can you remind us what the Northwest Forest Plan is?
A: The Northwest Forest Plan was adopted back in 1994. It’s what essentially ended the Timber Wars in the Northwest – That’s when timber and environmental interests were locked in tense battles over logging on public lands. Logging had come to a standstill because of endangered species lawsuits around the spotted owl. 

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‘Messy’ woods serve critical purpose in forest management

Poughkeepsie Journal
June 13, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

Visitors to the Cary Institute’s Millbrook campus will admire our diverse woodlands, but may wonder why there are so many standing and fallen dead trees left scattered, sometimes in prominent places. Some might even say that our forests are messy. …The adoption of renewable forest management practices can allow the continued harvest of fiber and fuel while leaving adequate dead snags and woody debris to fulfill their important ecological functions. The result may look messy, but there is a lot happening out there that makes it worth the visual sacrifice.

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Mainer to compete at national collegiate lumberjack competition

Bangor Daily News
June 12, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

UNITY, Maine — Blake Wilder crouched atop a round of poplar Thursday morning and — despite the heat, the sweat and his tired muscles — used a practice ax to methodically, energetically chop the wood in two. “I don’t care who you are or what shape you’re in,” the recent Unity College graduate said, breathing heavily after he was done. “If you chop a block for 30 seconds, you’re tired.” Wilder, a 22-year-old originally from Lamoine, has dreams of being the best collegiate lumberjack in the whole country.

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Baltimore fighting against beetle that targets its ash trees

Associated Press
June 13, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

BALTIMORE — With the arrival of an invasive green Asian beetle in Baltimore, local governments and property owners are confronting tough — and potentially costly — choices about whether to try to save ash trees at risk of infestation or cut them down. The culprit is the emerald ash borer, which could attack any of the 5 million to 6 million ash trees across the Baltimore metropolitan area. With the infestation already underway, City Hall is seeking a contractor to inject as many as 820 curbside ash trees with insecticide. “We are taking the initial steps to deal with what’s going to be a tragic situation,” said Erik Dihle, the city’s arborist.

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Cottonsoft applauds increased APP PEFC product availability

New Zealand Scoop
June 15, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: International

Cottonsoft has applauded its affiliate Asia Pulp & Paper Group (APP) for being awarded the Indonesian Forestry Certification Cooperation (IFCC) certification, endorsed by PEFC, to more than 300,000 hectares of supplier plantations. Cottonsoft has been producing PEFC certified product since 2009 and this latest development provides yet another option for sourcing with the potential to provide a greater range across the market. The 306,400 hectares of IFCC-PEFC certified plantations are operated by two of APP’s suppliers in Riau province, Indonesia; PT. Arara Abadi and PT. Satria Perkasa Agung respectively. In addition, more than 1,000,000 hectares of plantation area are in the final stages of IFCC-PEFC certification, with certification anticipated imminently. 

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Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy

Science helps trees adapt to new conditions of a changing climate

TimesColonist
June 14, 2015
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: Canada, Canada West

Canadian scientists are helping trees outrun climate change. “Trees are adapted to historical climate and the climate’s moving out from under them,” said evolutionary biologist Sally Aitken. “We’re using genomics to generate answers more quickly than they can.” Foresters have long known that the best seeds for replanting forests comes from trees in the same area, said Aitken, whose research at the University of British Columbia is financed by Genome Canada. Trees within a couple of hundred kilometres or a few hundred metres of elevation are precisely adapted to local conditions. “Climate change comes along and it’s disrupting that match between populations and climate,” Aitken said. 

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Climate Change: Warming Temperatures Prompts Boreal Forest Shift

University Herald
June 14, 2015
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: United States, US West

New research suggests that a climate change has contributed to a decline in white spruce tree growth in Interior Alaska. Researchers at the University of Paris found that warming summer temperatures across Alaska has declined to record low levels in Interior Alaska, while the same species in Western Alaska is growing better than ever measured before. “For the first time across a major forest region, we have real data showing that biome shift has started,” researcher Glenn Juday said in a statement. “This is not a scenario model, or a might, or a maybe. The boreal forest in Interior Alaska is very near dying from unsuitably warm temperatures. The area in Western Alaska where the forest transitions to tundra is now the productive heart of the boreal forest.”

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NZBio backs fresh debate over new biotechnologies

Scoop.co.nz
June 14, 2015
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: International

NZBio has waded into the debate over using new biotechnologies, including genetic modification, backing a call by Treasury secretary Gabriel Makhlouf for another look at New Zealand’s attitude to risk… Makhlouf cited the example of a new variety of high-yielding eucalyptus tree recently approved for cultivation in Brazil which will allow growers to get a 15 percent increase in wood for the same area, processors to get a 20 percent reduction in the cost of wood production, while the environment benefits from a 12 percent increase in the amount of carbon dioxide stored per hectare. Although high-yielding wood is at the core of the pulp and paper industry, New Zealand’s current regime for regulating new organisms is highly restrictive in practice, and doesn’t allow flexibility to choose whether this is something wanted here, Makhlouf said.

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Veolia Signs $505 Million Wood-Chip Power Plant Deal in Ireland

Bloomberg
June 15, 2015
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: International

Veolia Environnement SA’s Irish unit won a 450 million-euro ($505 million) deal to operate a wood-fueled biomass power plant in the country’s west. Veolia won a 15-year contract from Mayo Renewable Power to operate the 42.5-megawatt heat and power plant producing enough electricity to supply 68,000 homes, it said in a statement Monday. The site is due to start operating in mid-2017, it said.

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Climate Change: Plants Choke on too Much Carbon

Nature World News
June 15, 2015
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: International

It looks like even for plants, there can be too much of a good thing. Tree and flowers use carbon dioxide (C02) to make energy, absorbing the gas to help fuel the process of photosynthesis. For this reason, some experts have theorized that rising carbon levels will eventually promote plant growth. Now new research claims that this assumption is dead wrong. That’s at least according to a study recently published in the journal Global Change Biology, which details how the plants in a number of very different ecosystems appear to actually suffer from too much carbon in the atmosphere. Sample crops, grasslands, and forests all seemed to lose some ability to absorb nutrients when exposed to rising CO2 levels in large-scale field experiment held in eight countries across four continents.

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General

Ship loading 5.5 million board feet of logs bound for China

June 15, 2015
Category: Uncategorised
Region: United States, US West

It was very early Thursday morning when Global Gold, a 580-foot bulk cargo ship moored to the Port of Port Angeles’ Terminal 3 to take on a load of debarked logs that are destined for China. Johnny Daquisto, a longshoreman whom I have gotten to know through the years, is the supercargo on the vessel. He saw me driving by the docks, waved me over and invited me aboard. Never one to turn down an opportunity to go aboard ship, off I went. But when he gave me a safety vest and a hard hat to wear, I was beginning to get concerned that I was going to be put to work. Anyone who has watched a log ship being loaded knows how physical and dangerous the work is. Both scenarios, I earnestly avoid. 

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Wildfire burning in scar of 2002 Biscuit fire

Associated Press
June 12, 2015
Category: Uncategorised
Region: United States, US West

GRANTS PASS, Ore. — The U.S. Forest Service is battling a wildfire growing in a remote part of southwestern Oregon burned by the 2002 Biscuit fire. High temperatures and gusty winds have helped the Buckskin Fire to burn about 1,200 acres, fire spokesman Brian Lawatch said Friday night. Burning roughly 10 miles southwest of the town of Cave Junction, Lawatch said the fire is visible from the town. Nearly 150 people are assigned to the fire, including five hotshot crews and four aircraft. Terrain that is steep and crowded with standing dead trees from the Biscuit Fire make it hazardous to fight on the ground.

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Ship loading 5.5 million board feet of logs bound for China

June 15, 2015
Category: Uncategorised
Region: United States, US West

It was very early Thursday morning when Global Gold, a 580-foot bulk cargo ship moored to the Port of Port Angeles’ Terminal 3 to take on a load of debarked logs that are destined for China. Johnny Daquisto, a longshoreman whom I have gotten to know through the years, is the supercargo on the vessel. He saw me driving by the docks, waved me over and invited me aboard. Never one to turn down an opportunity to go aboard ship, off I went. But when he gave me a safety vest and a hard hat to wear, I was beginning to get concerned that I was going to be put to work. Anyone who has watched a log ship being loaded knows how physical and dangerous the work is. Both scenarios, I earnestly avoid. 

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Pope Francis May Have To Walk on Water to Solve the Nagging Climate Change Problem

Empire States Tribune
June 14, 2015
Category: Uncategorised

Another pronouncement from the most popular pope, Pope Francis, will definitely make everyone listen. But despite his popularity, there will always be people on the opposite side of the spectrum. While the speech has still to be made, predictions of entanglement with the conservatives is expected to take center stage in an important meeting in Paris this year. The topic: man’s responsibility for climate change… Pope Francis said that love of money has caused forest denudation, land monopoly, and many other disastrous effects on the ecology, not to mention climate change. He continued that loss of forest cover and disappearing biodiversity is “already showing their devastating effects.”

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