Tree Frog Forestry News

Daily Archives: June 17, 2015

Business & Politics

Paper Excellence will be here for a century, says executive

Pulp and Paper Canada
June 16, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada

On the occasion of the re-start of Paper Excellence’s Chetwynd pulp mill, the media-shy company opened up a bit in an interview with Business in Vancouver. The company’s deputy CEO, Pedro Chang, said the company is in Canada for the long haul. “Many pulp manufacturers look at the pulp industry [to be in] sunset,” Chang told the magazine. “Paper Excellence, our vision is different. We look at it as sunrise. We will be here for a century – as far as Asia continues emerging.” While there is a family connection between Paper Excellence and Asia Pulp and Paper (Jackson Widjaja is the son of Teguh Widjaja, chairman of Sinar Mas Group, which owns APP), Chang told Business in Vancouver that Paper Excellence is not a subsidiary of either company.

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Canadian construction capacity utilization dips at start of 2015

June 17, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada

Capacity utilization in the construction industry decreased for a second consecutive quarter, falling to 83.5 per cent in the first quarter of 2015 compared to from 84.7 per cent last quarter. A decline in non-residential building construction and engineering structures was the reason for this decrease. The industrial capacity utilization rate is the ratio of an industry’s actual output to its estimated potential output. Canadian industries operated at 82.7 per cent of their production capacity in the first quarter, down from 83.5 per cent in the previous quarter. It was the largest decline since the second quarter of 2009.

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Paper jam sparks blaze at Catalyst

Alberni Valley News
June 16, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

Local fire departments were at the Alberni Valley’s largest mill on Monday after sparks emerged from a particularly hot machine on the Catalyst Paper property. Alarms were raised when a paper jam occurred in Catalyst’s sweat dryer, a section of the mill where equipment regularly operates at 150 Celsius (over 300 degrees Fahrenheit) in order to reduce the moisture level of the paper to seven per cent. The temperature rose when a tail jammed in the section where a paper roll is threaded into the machine, creating a friction that spread sparks to other areas, said Harold Norlund, general manager of Catalyst’s Port Alberni division.

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Man accused in Western Forest Products mill shooting to stand trial in January

Nanaimo Bulletin
June 16, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

The man accused in shootings at Western Forest Products mill in April 2014 is set to stand trial in B.C. Supreme Court, in Nanaimo, beginning Jan. 11. Kevin Douglas Addison, 48, faces two counts of first-degree murder and two counts of attempted murder. The Nanaimo waterfront mill was shut down at the end of 2014. The trial is scheduled to take place over six weeks. [END]

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Council of Forest Industries announces Susan Yurkovich as new president

Vancouver Sun
June 16, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

BC Hydro executive vice-president Susan Yurkovich will become the new president and chief executive officer of the Council of Forest Industries on Sept. 14, COFI announced today. Yurkovich will replace James Gorman, who has accepted a new position as vice-president of Vancouver-based wood products company West Fraser. Yurkovich was responsible for the Site C Clean Energy Project at Hydro and prior to joining Hydro, she spent 10 years at Canfor Corporation, where she was vice-president of corporate affairs. Yurkovich will also serve as president of the BC Lumber Trade Council.

COFI Names New CEO from 250 News

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Most Alberni wood cut overseas

480,000 cubic metres of raw logs exported from Port last year
Alberni Valley Times
June 17, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

After 480,000 cubic metres of raw logs were exported from Port Alberni to oversees sawmills last year, the city’s elected officials are asking why more of the local product isn’t being cut in town. Raw log shipments are encompassing a rapidly growing portion of Canada’s forestry industry, growing from under 2.5 million cubic metres – roughly equal to 2.5 million telephone poles – to over 6.5 million in 2013. In Port Alberni the demand for unmanufactured logs has so far filled 25 vessels bound for foreign ports this year, far surpassing the four ships packed with lumber cut locally. In 2014 the Port Alberni Port Authority saw 53 vessels loaded with raw logs, while just 13 ships carried lumber oversees.

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Provinces the key to resource-revenue sharing with First Nations

Tom Flanagan is professor emeritus of political science at the University of Calgary and chair of the Aboriginal Futures program for the Frontier Centre for Public Policy.
Globe and Mail
June 15, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

Resource-revenue sharing has emerged as the next Big Idea for First Nations. Like most Big Ideas, it seems simple, but in reality is full of legal difficulties and unintended economic consequences. Perry Bellegarde, National Chief of the Assembly of First Nations (AFN), said immediately upon being elected to that position, “If our lands and resources are to be developed, it will be done only with our fair share of the royalties, with our ownership of the resources and jobs for our people.” By “our” he meant all the natural resources of Canada, everywhere, not just on reserves or First Nation settlement lands.

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U.S. housing market expected to boost slumping lumber prices

Vancouver Sun
June 16, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

Canadian softwood lumber prices have fallen substantially in the past nine months, but that long, steady decline should end soon, according to industry analyst Hakan Ekstrom. The president of Seattle-based Wood Resources International said early signs of a resurgent U.S. housing market should boost the demand for Canadian wood. “We probably reached the bottom on prices two weeks ago and can expect them to start moving up now,” he said. Ekstrom noted approved U.S. building permits last month increased by nearly 12 per cent to an annual rate of 1.28 million housing units, the highest level since August 2007.

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Weyerhaeuser Distribution appoints David Helmers as Vice President

Lesprom
June 16, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States

Weyerhaeuser Distribution has appointed David Helmers to lead the division as vice president. The promotion comes at a time of growth for Weyerhaeuser Distribution, which over the past year has expanded its sales teams at several facilities and introduced a range of new product lines in multiple regions, as the company says in the press release received by Lesprom Network. Helmers is a 20-year veteran of Weyerhaeuser, most recently serving as director of sales and business development for Weyerhaeuser Distribution. He has held numerous other leadership positions within the company, including sales and operations process leader, mill manager, and corporate safety and environmental leadership.

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Scott Rowland new president of Forest Landowners Association

Magnolia Reporter
June 16, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States

A Magnolia man has been elevated to the presidency of the Forest Landowners Association during its annual conference in Virginia Beach, VA. Scott Rowland is president of Neill Forestry Consultants, which was founded by a former FLA president, Bobby J. Neill. Rowland succeeds Joe Hopkins of Folkston, GA. Rowland received a bachelor of science degree in education from Southern Arkansas University and a bachelor of science degree in forestry from Louisiana Tech University.

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Lumber Liquidators Ceases Sale of Chinese Laminate Flooring and CEO Resigns

Finance Yahoo
June 16, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States

BOSTON — Lumber Liquidators has announced that the Company will discontinue the sale of laminate flooring products manufactured in China, and the unexpected resignation of its former CEO, Robert Lynch. According to Gilman Law LLP, the announcements come as the Company faces a growing number of product liability and securities lawsuits stemming from, among other matters, its sale of Chinese-manufactured laminate wood flooring products. Just prior to his resignation, Lumber Liquidators former CEO, Robert Lynch, was quoted as saying “we believe it is the right decision to suspend the sale of these products,” referring to its Chinese manufactured laminate flooring. The Company also announced the termination and replacement of its Chief Merchandising Officer, William Schlegel.

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Tax waiver is for jobs

June 17, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States, US West

Weyerhaueser Co. can’t be faulted for trying, but the company must know that its request for a property tax waiver in west Eugene is a long shot. A tax waiver that is intended to encourage job creation is destined for denial if the applicant states from the start that an investment is not expected to result in a new or expanded payroll. Weyerhaueser’s laminated beam plant on North Bertelsen Road currently employs 210 workers. The company plans to spend $55 million to modernize the plant, which is good news for the plant’s workers and for the city as a whole — an investment of that size is strong evidence of Weyerhaueser’s commitment to continued production at that site.

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Former Carson Helicopters VP gets long prison term in helicopter crash that killed 9 on Iron 44 fire

The Oregonian
June 16, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States, US West

A former Carson Helicopters executive, whose falsification of flight performance specifications for a chopper that crashed and killed nine men in 2008, was sentenced Tuesday to more than 12 years in federal prison. Steven Metheny, who served as the company’s vice president at the time of the crash – the deadliest in the history of wild-land firefighting – was sentenced in Medford by Chief U.S. District Judge Ann Aiken after a two-day hearing. …Metheny, 45, had pleaded guilty last year to defrauding the U.S. Forest Service in a firefighting contract that was tied to the deadly Aug. 5, 2008, helicopter crash near Weaverville, California.

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Honeywell Technology Modernizes Mill for Europe’s Largest Forest Industry Company

Virtual Press Office
June 16, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: International

HELSINKI, Finland — Honeywell Process Solutions has announced that Europe’s largest pulp, board and paper manufacturer will use HPS process automation, safety system and manufacturing optimization technologies to modernize one of its key mills and help it meet rising demand for renewable packaging board. Stora Enso Oyi is implementing Honeywell’s technologies as part of a modernization and optimization effort at their paper mill in Varkaus, Finland. Headquartered in Helsinki, Stora Enso is the largest pulp, board and paper producer in Europe, and one of the largest in the world.

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Forestry partnership program delivers $7.1m final round of funds to south-east SA projects

ABC News, Australia
June 17, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: International

The South Australian Government has allocated the final round of funding under the South-East Forestry Partnership Program. Money from the $27 million fund has been granted in three phases. The latest recipients will share in $7.1 million to encourage innovation and increase efficiency and value adding to products. Six projects have been selected, including $1.87 million to South-East Pine Sales to implement a new softwood sawmill process and a timber treatment facility.

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Sue Smith says she believes Forestry Tasmania should be dismantled and all forest assets sold off

ABC News, Australia
June 17, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: International

Sue Smith explains why she believes Forestry Tasmania should be sold off – radio interview.

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Income boost to $73m

Gisborne Herald
June 17, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: International

GISBORNE -based Eastland Group has backed-up a record-breaking 2014 financial year by increasing its income in the year to March 2015 by $2.9 million, to $73.9m. The company says it was “another strong commercial performance”. For the year ending March 31, 2015 the community-owned business that operates Eastland Port, Gisborne Airport, Eastland Network and Eastland Generation reported a net profit after tax of $14.1m — down from the record $14.9m profit made the previous year but up on the $12.8m profit in 2013. …“Log prices were depressed as a result of a supply and demand imbalance in China and the lower prices meant forestry companies harvested less throughout the year.

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Wood, Paper & Green Building

Six-storey wood-frame buildings pose fire risk, chief says

CBC News
June 16, 2015
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: Canada, Canada West

Edmonton fire chief Ken Block is worried about changes to the national building code allowing the construction of six-storey wood-frame apartments and condominiums. …Although the new six-storey structures will have to have sprinklers in attics and balconies and non-combustible siding, Block isn’t sure those protections are enough. …Acting Deputy Fire Commissioner Jeremy Wagner said he would feel comfortable living in a six-storey wood-frame building. “I do trust in the codes,” he said. “They’re taking my safety in mind.” But Block and his colleagues aren’t so sure. They plan to lobby the province for revisions to the code.

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From Bamboo to Rayon: What a Long Strange Trip It Is

All About Advertising Law
June 16, 2015
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: United States

Rayon, or Viscose if you’re British or just want to sound British, is typically made from wood pulp or plant fibers, including bamboo. However, in doing so the fibers are subject to significant processing, including numerous chemicals, thus the Grateful Dead reference in the title. Nevertheless, in a time when consumers are concerned about the environment and their own health, manufacturers and retailers alike are often drawn to evoking the image of lush fields of bamboo and its sustainability and eco-friendly features and thus labeling or advertising textile products as “bamboo,” which, let’s face it, does sound a lot better than rayon.  

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Council moves to encourage home ‘deconstruction’ by hand

Portland Tribune
June 16, 2015
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: United States, US West

The City Council signaled its sympathy with residents concerned about the growing pace of residential demolitions on June 3, when it unanimously approved a pilot program to encourage deconstruction by hand instead. Mayor Charlie Hales and the other members of the council all said they want to make deconstruction mandatory when the marketplace can support the influx of surplus materials. “The community has shown a strong shared interest in moving in this direction, and the council shares that urgency,” Hales said before voting in support of the resolution he introduced. Developers say there are many questions that should be answered first, including whether requiring deconstruction will increase housing costs at a time when affordability is becoming a growing concern.

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Could The Empire State Building Be Built With Wood?

Gizmodo.com
June 16, 2015
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: International

High-rise buildings constructed from wood are having a bit of a moment. And that begs an important question: could the Empire State Building, the quintessential skyscraper, be built using wood? Finnish forestry company Metsä Wood teamed up with Canadian architect Michael Green to tackle that question, as part of Metsa’s Plan B project. The final concept is for a wooden building that is the same height, floor height, and column spacing, but with design changes made to accommodate the structural differences between steel and wood.

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Forestry

Board to audit forestry activities west of Quesnel

Press Release
BC Forest Practices Board
June 16, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

VICTORIA – The Forest Practices Board will examine the activities of Pacific Bioenergy Timber Corp. and RPP Holdings Inc. in the Quesnel district, during the week of June 22, 2015. The auditors will examine all operational planning, harvesting, roads, silviculture, and wildfire protection practices carried out over the last two years for compliance with the Forest and Range Practices Act and the Wildfire Act. Pacific Bioenergy and RPP Holdings both operate near the village of Nazko, about 100 kilometres west of Quesnel. 

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Tree protection bylaw should be even stricter

Letter to the editor
The Delta Optimist
June 17, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Editor: Re: Residents should have the ability to remove one tree a year, letter to the editor, June 10 I’m also sorry Delta council changed the tree removal bylaw. I’m sorry council didn’t make it far more stringent. We all love Delta for its big trees and natural environment. Why would you want to ruin that? Because you want a better view? Because of your garden or “neighbourly relations”? I can’t believe Gail Neff Bell could even question whether the environmental trade-offs are worth it. If you don’t like the lot, including the trees, don’t buy the house.

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Trees cut down illegally in Vancouver’s Dunbar neighbourhood again

Second time in little over a month that trees were chopped down without permit
CBC News
June 16, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

It’s the second time in little over a month that healthy trees have been illegally cut down in Vancouver’s Dunbar neighbourhood. The city says three healthy Douglas fir trees on the lot of a home under construction on West 38th Avenue were illegally cut down this weekend.  Cutting down mature trees, even on private property, outside of a home’s footprint is illegal without a permit in Vancouver… Last week, the city said it is considering how to increase penalties for those who cut down trees on their property illegally. This comes in reaction to a “chainsaw massacre” of six trees — five of which were old growth.

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About 5,000 ash trees to be removed in Barrie due to Emerald Ash Borer

CTV Barrier
June 16, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

One by one ash trees are being cut down across the City of Barrie and some people are disappointed it’s come to this. The reason for this massive tree removal is a tiny bug called the Emerald Ash Borer. The bugs are small, but they do a lot of damage to ash trees. “This tree right here shows signs of what’s called copus growth. Branches growing down on the trunk, popping out which is not normal. It’s a sign of infestation,” says Kevin Rankin, urban forester for the city. Small holes and unusual patterns under the bark are the telltale signs.

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Activists’ stance on forest protection an insult to Northerners

Timmins Press
June 16, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

TIMMINS – I am writing in response to an article I read in the Timmins Daily Press that can be found at here. While I respect Mr. Richard Brooks of Greenpeace having an opinion, I remain offended by the suggestion that somehow, as leaders and people of the North we are so naïve and incapable of making decisions for ourselves, that we are simply being misled by one forestry company and a forestry association, that somehow we have little to no capacity to understand any different and as such, are also victims of this one forestry company and their association; that somehow, we can’t conclude for ourselves that policies like the politically driven caribou policy that aims to shut down 65% of the whole boreal forest in all of Canada, actually impacts all companies and municipalities, not just one company as Mr. Brooks seems to imply.

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Forecast has crews battling Alaska wildfires on high alert

Associated Press
June 16, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

ANCHORAGE, Alaska  — Two wildfires burning north and south of Anchorage stretched Alaska firefighting resources Tuesday as crews scrambled to protect rural homes and cabins. The human-caused Sockeye Fire grew but consumed no new structures around the community of Willow, about 40 miles north of Anchorage. It started Sunday and has blackened 12 square miles along the Parks Highway, the main route between Anchorage and Fairbanks. Through Monday, the fire had burned 25 homes and 10 to 20 other structures. About 1,700 structures are in a voluntary evacuation zone.

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Home General Report commissioned by Sen. Bennet details Fire Mitigation recommendations from CO experts

High Plains Journal
June 15, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Colorado U.S. Sens. Michael Bennet and Cory Gardner sent the Innovations in Forestry and Fire Mitigation report to U.S. Department of Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack. The report commissioned by Bennet details recommendations from Colorado fire and forestry experts on the steps the federal government can take to better support Colorado’s wildfire mitigation efforts. The senators presented these recommendations by representatives from the U.S. Forest Service, the Bureau of Land Management, Colorado State University, the Colorado Water Congress, County Commissioners from across the Front Range and West Slope and other members of the forestry, conservation and wildfire prevention community in May of this year.

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Reinforcements scheduled for Alaska wildfires

Associated Press
June 17, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

ANCHORAGE, Alaska — Another 300 firefighters are joining the fray in Alaska against wildfires that threaten rural highway communities north and south of Anchorage. The ground reinforcements from Lower 48 states and Canada expected Wednesday, plus additional support staff and aircraft, will help battle blazes near the communities of Willow on the Parks Highway about 40 miles north of Anchorage and near Sterling on the Sterling Highway about 60 miles south of Alaska’s largest city. Both fires were human caused and have displaced hundreds of residents.

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Buckskin Fire puts plume of smoke up over SW Oregon

KVAL
June 16, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

CAVE JUNCTION, Ore. – The Buckskin Fire burning out of control in the scar from the 2002 Biscuit Fire has put up a plume of smoke visible from Medford, Cave Junction, Brookings and other southwestern Oregon communities. Nearly 500 people are battling the blaze as of Tuesday. The fire is estimated at 2,200 acres. Crews are working to avoid the extreme danger from dead trees from the fire more than a decade ago. Nine helicopters are assigned to the fire to make water dumps. Ground crews are developing containment lines along existing roads and trails, according to fire managers.

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Excluding wildfire: Our conundrum with fire-dependent forests

The Missoulian
June 16, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West


In “Montana, an Uncommon Land,” K. Ross Toole explains why the government program that granted small homesteads for dry-land farming in central and eastern Montana was bound to fail: “No human force can superimpose a theory over the facts of nature.” This axiom also applies to management of our fire-dependent forests. Up until the 1880s, most of western Montana’s lower-elevation forests, and some at mid-elevations, featured large, centuries-old ponderosa pines often growing with big old Western larch and Douglas firs. Analysis of remnant trees and old stumps on dozens of study sites shows that most of these forests burned at intervals averaging between 7 and 30 years, primarily in low-intensity fires that kept the forest open, and controlled the growth of small trees and accumulation of fuel.

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DC Circuit Court of Appeals overturns ruling concerning Roseburg, Medford timber

KPIC.com
June 15, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

The American Forest Resource Council (AFRC) says it’s disappointed after the D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals overturned a 2013 ruling against the Bureau of Land Management. According to AFRC, in 2013 Federal District Judge Richard Leon ordered the BLM to sell the timber promised in its resource management plans for the Medford and Roseburg districts. Judge Leon found that the BLM violated the O&C act, but on Friday the circuit court said that the timber companies who brought the lawsuit failed to present evidence that linked the actions of the BLM to the cause of operational losses.

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Bullies try to derail local control

The Billings Outpost
June 15, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Over the past three years, the idea of transferring federally managed public lands to the states has swelled from a small town dream to a full-fledged national movement. As grass roots support grows, organized opposition bolsters their attempts to distort the truth and dirty the reputations of good, honest people. For example, opponents have repeatedly told everyone that if Montanans were in charge of our own lands and resources, we would sell them all off. Well, I think that kind of criticism is selling Montanans short. Whether it is work, play, or the scenic beauty of our rolling prairies, majestic mountains, or clear blue waters, Montana’s public lands are special to all of us.

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Reintroduction of bobwhite quail to Pinelands going well

Philly.com
June 16, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

Their Pinelands habitat had been carefully prepared over more than 10 years. Controlled forest fires and tree-thinning opened up the landscape. And tall grasses filled in, providing cover for nests. Then came the decisive moment on April 1 – the release of 80 northern bobwhite quail, captured in Georgia only about a day earlier. They took flight from wooden boxes and began exploring an isolated Burlington County woodland that had not heard their distinctive calls for decades. But would they adapt to the new environment? Would they reproduce and begin to restore the quail population in New Jersey?

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New forestry standard proposed

The government is proposing a new national forestry standard that it says would simplify the sector’s confusing rules and save millions of dollars.
Radio New Zealand
June 16, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: International

New Zealand – The change is part of ongoing reforms to the Resource Management Act. Environment Minister Nick Smith said the current forestry systems were confusing because there were thousands of different rules to abide by, across nearly 80 different councils. He said the new standard would make the process simpler and cheaper by bringing in one set of rules for each of the industry’s main activities, such as earthworks, harvesting, and replanting. The proposal will open for public submissions and, if it gets the go ahead, will come into force next year.

Press release from New Zealand Government

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National environmental standard to untangle forestry rules

Scoop.co.nz
June 17, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: International

Detailed rules governing the environmental impact of the plantation forestry industry are being taken out of the hands of local government and replaced by a new National Environmental Standard under the Resource Management Act in a bid to streamline forestry operations and improve environmental outcomes. The forestry sector is the latest to be targeted by an NES or one of its companion documents, a National Policy Statement, as the government moves increasingly to use the RMA’s tools for nationally dictated standards.

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Audit could see WA Forest Products Commission lose certification, environmentalists say

ABC News, Australia
June 17, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: International

Western Australia’s Forest Products Commission should lose its “green tick” accreditation because its activities are not sustainable, environmentalists say. The commission will undergo its annual scheduled audit next week and environmentalists are hoping this will result in it losing the certification, which shows its products come from sustainable operations. … WA Conservation Council director Piers Verstegen said consumers were being duped. “It’s clear to everybody that these are not responsibly managed forests that are not sustainably harvested — we’re talking about clearfelling of ancient forests, old growth forests that are habitat for threatened species,” he said.

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Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy

Report: We Energies using central Wisconsin bio-mass plant far less than anticipated

WHBL.com
June 16, 2015
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: United States

ROTHSCHILD, WI – We Energies is getting some heat for not using its new bio-mass power plant near Wausau as much as it expected. The Milwaukee-based electric utility teamed up with the Domtar paper mill in Rothschild to open the plant in late 2013. We Energies expected it to be used 45 percent of the time last year — but the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel said it only ran 16 percent of the time. In December, the plant was shut down for 6 months for repairs while it was covered under warranty — which the utility said was a prudent thing to do. The plant burns wood waste and sawmill scraps. It provides steam for Domtar’s factory, while helping We Energies meet its state mandated requirements for producing electricity from renewable sources.

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NC State researchers explore future of climate change on ecosystems

WRAL.com
June 16, 2015
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: US East, United States

RALEIGH, N.C. — Scientists wonder how plants and animals will cope with gradually rising temperatures in the decades to come. An experiment in Orange County is giving researchers a glimpse into a warmer future. According to Clint Penick, a postdoctoral researcher at North Carolina State University, small rises in global temperatures—about a degree Fahrenheit—over the past 50 years have already changed ecosystems around the world… The initial goal was to study the effect on ants. Scientists found that the most common ant species in North Carolina forests—insects that help keep soil healthy—struggled as temperatures increased. “If this species is gone, we’re predicting pretty major shifts in the health of forests,” Penick said.

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Climate negotiators make key breakthrough on forest protection deal ahead of Paris talks

Mongabay.com
June 16, 2015
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: International

Negotiators at U.N. climate talks in Bonn, Germany, have produced a draft agreement on the technical provisions of a plan to reduce emissions from deforestation and forest degradation. Known as REDD+, the forest conservation plan is now far more likely to be included in a climate deal to be negotiated in Paris this December, thanks to the breakthroughs made in Bonn. The fact that a complete REDD+ draft was agreed to in Bonn came as a bit of a surprise to many observers of U.N. climate negotiations, which are notorious for proceeding at a glacial pace. Some particularly difficult issues needed to be resolved, and it seemed likely that settling them would be left to the Paris talks — even countries fully in support of REDD+ want every bargaining chip they can get.

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