Tree Frog Forestry News

Daily Archives: July 13, 2015

Special Feature

Where we’ve come and where we’re going

The following is a speech given by David Lindsay, President and CEO of FPAC, at the Canadian Council of Forest Ministers, in Thunder Bay.
Forest Products Association of Canada
July 13, 2015
Category: Special Feature
Region: Canada

Minister thank you for that introduction and good morning to all. I am very pleased to be here on behalf of the Forest Products Association of Canada. I’ve been asked to speak with you today about the transformation and innovation journey of the forest sector. It’s a story about creating opportunity out of necessity. It’s a story about foresight and leadership. And, I hope from my remarks this morning, you will agree — it is a story about Canada’s potential and future opportunity. An opportunity for partnership and collaboration between industry, governments – Federal and Provincial, researchers, the academic community and others.

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Froggy Foibles

Tree surgeons taking all the women

The Daily Mash
July 11, 2015
Category: Froggy Foibles
Region: International

MANLY but sensitive tree surgeons are making too many women fall in love with them, it has been claimed. Researchers found that 82 per cent of the UK’s female population currently has feelings for trees surgeons, who are strong and brave but also know about nature. Professor Henry Brubaker of the Institute for Studies said: “‘Tree surgeon’ isn’t so much a real job as a contrived female fantasy. “But those men are getting so much romance that practically everyone else is being excluded.” Office manager Helen Archer said: “They have chainsaws, and they are also clever enough to know the latin names of things. I’m in.”

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Man spent four years growing a church out of trees

Metro News
July 10, 2015
Category: Froggy Foibles
Region: International

It looks like something from a computer game, but this church made out of trees is very much real. The picturesque ‘Tree Church’ was built (er… grown?) by Barry Cox in New Zealand. Unsurprisingly couples are stepping over each other for a chance to get married in the magical church, which can sit 100 people. Barry spent years travelling around Europe studying church architecture, giving him both the knowledge and the inspiration to create an organic one of his own. 

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Business & Politics

Inquest into Babine blast starts Monday

Prince George Citizen
July 13, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

A coroner’s inquest into the fatal Babine Forest Products explosion is set to begin Monday in Burns Lake and the sister of one of the two men killed in the blast is bracing herself for the emotional impact. “I’m doing a lot of praying,” Lucy Campbell said Friday. “It does open a lot of hurtful wounds, a lot of triggers from that night and our hearts are still heavy from that time.” Campbell’s brother, Carl Charlie, 42, and Robert Luggi, 45, died following the Jan. 20, 2012 dust-related blast that also injured 20 others as it leveled the sawmill located on the outskirts of the community of 2,000 residents about 225 kilometres west of Prince George.

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Mailbag: Better treatment needed for river

Letter to the editor
Albany Democrat-Herald
July 12, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States, US West

Over the years I have had concerns regarding the waste water discharged by the Cascade Pacific pulp mill and Georgia Pacific tissue plant into the Willamette River near Halsey. …My question is: Why is this awful waste water even allowed to discharge into the Willamette River? The discharged waste water can be smelled all along the river from Halsey to Corvallis. I can imagine that this waste water effects water quality for quite some distance downstream from Corvallis. …I do not know what type of treatment the Cascade Pacific Pulp and the Georgia Pacific waste water undergoes before it is released into the Willamette River, but I think that this is where the problem lies.

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GPC second largest log export operation in country

Gladstone Observer
July 10, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: International

THE Gladstone Ports Corporation now has the second largest log export operation in Australia, processing one shipment per month with a new woodchipping facility. The new log and woodchip is a collaborative effort to salvage timber plantations that were impacted in the Category 5 Tropical Cyclone Marcia earlier this year. Thousands of hectares of trees were left wind-thrown and damaged, and needed to be salvaged as soon as possible. GPC has been working closely with HQ Plantations to finalise a contract to commence export of the damaged trees and woodchip from Auckland Point.

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Wood, Paper & Green Building

‘Cutting trees for timber good for forest growth’

Sun Star
July 11, 2015
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: United States

UNDERSTANDING the environmental impacts when using certain materials, specifically wood, is important so end-users could see its real benefits. American Hardwood Export Council (AHEC) executive director Michael Snow said it is also equally important for people to understand why trees have to be harvested before they die. “By not harvesting mature trees, we are allowing carbon dioxide back into the atmosphere,” he told participants of AHEC’s 20th Annual Greater China and Southeast Asia Convention in Nanning City in China. Snow said that what should be done ideally to trees in forest lands is to cut the mature ones to allow sunlight into the soil, thereby allowing new species to grow.

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Forestry

Forest Service adds ‘next generation airtanker’ to fleet

Herald and News
July 12, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States

The U.S. Forest Service has added a “next generation airtanker” to their fleet of firefighting aircraft, with the new plane cleared as of Friday to take on local wildfires. Announced in a press release from the Forest Service, Tanker 118, as the new plane has been designated, was acquired from the U.S. Coast Guard as part of a federal program transferring seven Lockheed HC-130Hs to the Forest Service. Tanker 118 was the first of the seven, with its acquisition made possible through the 2014 National Defense Authorization Act. “The Coast Guard is very happy with the outstanding cooperation we have experienced with the Forest Service in establishing this first-of-its-kind program for our service,” said Cmdr. Michael Frawley, chief of Aeronautical Engineering, Coast Guard Headquarters. 

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The push for better forest management

by U.S. Rep. Bruce Westerman, R-Hot Springs
The City Wire
July 12, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States

My first bill, the Resilient Federal Forests Act, passed the House of Representatives on Thursday (July 9). It is bipartisan legislation that will give the Forest Service the tools it needs to better manage our national forests. As a professional forester, I see that our forests are no longer resilient due to overgrowth, wildfire, and disease. …We have problems with our current forest policy that has left one of our most treasured natural resources, our federal forests, less resilient and decreased in value. My bill aims to fix these problems through proactive, scientifically sound management.

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House passes bill to hasten timber projects, treat wildfires like other federal disasters

Associated Press
July 9, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States

WASHINGTON — The House passed a bill Thursday designed to improve the health of national forests by scaling back the environmental reviews that go into some timbering projects and discouraging lawsuits that delay projects. The goal is to speed up timber harvests and underbrush removal that the U.S. Forest Service deems necessary to improve the health of national forests, which are taking a hit from drought, density and infestation. Altogether, up to 40 percent of the entire national forest system is in need of treatment to reduce the threat of catastrophic wildfire and disease.

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Forest Service to hear wide-ranging objections to Divide Travel Plan

Independent Record
July 12, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

The Helena National Forest will hold a meeting in August to hear objections to its proposal for travel planning near the Continental Divide west of Helena. The objections include those from motorized users for the Forest Service’s plans to close some routes, while others thought the plan violates environmental laws and would harm wildlife and habitat. In April, the Forest Service issued a draft final environmental impact statement for the Divide Travel Plan and draft record of decision, which defines which routes are open to motorized travel in the 155,000-acre planning area. 

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In Central Oregon, landscape benefits from removing juniper trees

In Central Oregon,landowner John Breese hosts an on-going experiment on the benefits of removing Western juniper.
The Capital Press
July 9, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

PRINEVILLE, Ore. — Removing intrusive Western juniper trees from the landscape is the buzz among researchers, ranchers and government land managers. Cutting juniper can improve greater sage grouse habitat, restore rangeland for grazing cattle and even provide jobs in struggling rural communities, the experts say. John and Lynne Breese have a 30-year jump on them. In the draws and slopes outside Prineville, the Breeses have been cutting juniper since the late 1980s.  Walking a section of what’s called the Stump Puller Pasture, John Breese explains the rapid impact of cutting juniper.

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Tenderfoot Creek drainage land acquired by Forest Service

The Missoulian
July 10, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

HELENA, Mont. (AP) — Montanans now have more than 8,200 acres of new national forest land in the central part of the state. U.S. Forest Service officials and others celebrated the completion of the eight-year acquisition effort Friday at the state Capitol in Helena. The Bair Ranch Foundation offered in 2007 to sell the checkerboard-pattern sections of land in the Tenderfoot Creek drainage so it could be incorporated into the Lewis and Clark National Forest.

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House OKs bill aimed at curbing wildfires; critics call it ‘bad for forests’

Cronkite News
July 10, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

WASHINGTON – The House voted 262-167 Thursday for a bill that supporters said will reduce wildfires by streamlining the process for managing federal forests before and after outbreaks. But where supporters of the Resilient Federal Forests Act of 2015 saw much-needed protections, critics saw a bill that they said guts environmental regulations and promotes high-risk logging, among other issues. “The bill is bad for forests, it’s bad for wildlife, and it’s bad for the impacted communities that are trying to engage in forest management decisions,” said Jenny Keatinge, government relations associate for the Defenders of Wildlife.

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Walden optimistic for ‘Resilient Forests’ bill

U.S. Rep. Greg Walden, R-Oregon, is backing a bill to improve wildfire funding and expedite forest thinning projects on federal land.
East Oregonian
July 9, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

…U.S. Rep. Greg Walden, R-Oregon, discussed his support of the bill Thursday, which passed the House handily and once again puts forest management reforms to the Senate. Last year, Walden promoted legislation that would have required the Secretary of Agriculture to designate land in every national forest suitable for commercial timber harvest, and reduce hazardous wildfire fuels in at-risk areas established by the governor. That bill passed the House two years in a row, but was never taken up by the Senate and was threatened with a veto from the White House. Environmental groups criticized the proposal, saying it would result in unprecedented and unsustainable timber harvest levels.

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Oregon delegates split as forest management bill passes US House

Bill seeks to let feds clear forests, removes ban on cutting larger trees
The Bend Bulletin
July 10, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Oregon Democratic Reps. Peter DeFazio, of Springfield, and Kurt Schrader, of Canby, joined Rep. Greg Walden, R-Hood River, in supporting the bill, which passed 262-167, largely along party lines. “This bill takes that first step in ending that practice of fire-borrowing,” DeFazio said. “That alone gives this bill tremendous merit.” Oregon’s representatives split on the bill that would also require the Bureau of Land Management to conduct further studies on a proposed management plan for Western Oregon’s federal forests known as O&C lands for the Oregon and California Railroad that once owned the land.

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Wildlife group wants moose on endangered species list

July 13, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

A national wildlife protection group wants to place moose alongside the polar bear as a tragic symbol of climate change by petitioning the federal government to protect it under the Endangered Species Act. Warming global temperatures are a driving factor in the sharp decline of moose numbers in Minnesota, Michigan and Wisconsin, according to the Center for Biological Diversity, which Thursday asked the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to review the animal’s status. Listing it would provide permanent protection against hunting and legal incentives to improve its habitat, the petition said. “Under a warming climate, those habitats are shifting,” said Collette Adkins, a Minnesota attorney with the center. “It’s a contributing factor that intensifies other threats that moose are facing.”

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Caterpillars invade Colorado forests

An outbreak of Tussock Moths in our state is affecting thousands of acres of Douglas-firs and some species of spruces.
9NEWS
July 9, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

KUSA – Some of Colorado’s forests face a lethal threat from a little caterpillar. An outbreak of tussock moths in the state is affecting thousands of acres of Douglas-firs and some species of spruces. It’s the picturesque view that people who live near Larkspur love so much. “The mountains are normally bright green,” resident Mike Meyer said. “You don’t see a lot of brown.” That’s no longer the case, though. “Everything had turned brown, it seems like overnight,” he said. Like many in this area of Douglas County, Mike and Diana Meyer have watched swaths of trees, mainly-Douglas-firs, turn a dull reddish-brown.

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Thompson fights to keep bat species from being called ‘endangered’

The Bradford Era
July 9, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

U.S. Rep. Glenn Thompson, R-Pa., has proposed to keep the northern long-eared bat off the endangered species list for another year. The proposal was made in the form of an amendment to the FY16 Interior & Environment Appropriations Act, an amendment that was passed by a voice vote Tuesday night. Thompson said the Interior & Environment Appropriations Act — a funding bill for Oct. 1, 2015, to Sept. 30, 2016 — will be considered today. “What I offered is a limiting amendment,” Thompson said, explaining if the amendment becomes law, it will serve to prevent the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service from elevating the northern long-eared bat from “threatened” to “endangered” status by ruling that no money will be spent for that purpose during the fiscal year.

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Increased Logging and Oversight on Maine Public Lands Passed into Law

The Free Press
July 9, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

In spite of increasing questions about whether Maine’s Public Lands are being treated more like commercial forests than the multiple-use forests they were established by law to be, logging targets increased from 141,000 to 160,000 cords per year when the new biennial budget was signed into law in late June. The 160,000-cord-per-year limit (averaged, over three years) was introduced quietly and late into the budget process after the committee that oversees public lands held the line at 141,000 cords. The new law calls for an independent timber inventory to be conducted after July 1, 2015, to see if the 160,000-cord limit meets the requirements of sustainable forestry.

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National forests in ‘shocking ruin’

Daily News
July 11, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: International

THE rate of destructive deforestation, which has been rated as alarming, has pushed the country to the extreme. The reality is that it will take 16 years of continuous tree replanting, covering 185,000 hectares annually, to bridge the gap created so far, forest researchers have established. An inventory prepared by the National Forest Resources Monitoring and Assessment (NAFORMA) of Tanzania Mainland, has revealed that the total annual losses in areas covered by forests stood at 68,000 hectares between 1990 and 2000. However, the situation deteriorated as deforestation increased rapidly to 81,000 hectares between 2000 and 2010.

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Australian agroforestry movement gains momentum, farmers diversify into timber plantations

ABC News, Australia
July 13, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: International

Australia’s “agroforestry” movement is gaining momentum, as farmers revegetate their land with harvestable timber, while reaping all the natural benefits trees offer livestock systems. Described as “the wise use of trees and shrubs”, hundreds of producers are signing up to Government-funded Master Tree Grower courses, that teach them how to diversify into forestry without affecting their existing farm enterprise. Kalangadoo sheep and cattle farmer, Nick Hunt, has spent decades trying to reverse the damage done when his great-grandfather cleared his South Australian property for precious grazing land.

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Forest Fires

Evacuees from Sask. reserve clear to go home as officials assess other fires

CTV News
July 12, 2015
Category: Forest Fires
Region: Canada, Canada West

Residents of an evacuated reserve in northern Saskatchewan were heading home Sunday, as officials began evaluating forest fires threatening other communities to determine if thousands more could return. Duane McKay with the province’s emergency management department said fires and thick smoke were no longer posing a risk to Grandmother’s Bay and buses were to transport at least 130 people back to the First Nation. “That’s a good positive step forward and hopefully over the next couple of days, as we plan for this, we’ll have other opportunities for people to return home,” he said. Wildfires sparked in the north over the past two weeks have forced about 13,000 out of their homes in at least 50 communities.

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Troops trade camo for jumpsuits in forest fire fight in Saskatchewan

Canadian Press
July 13, 2015
Category: Forest Fires
Region: Canada, Canada West

MONTREAL LAKE, SASK.—“Watch out for the widow-makers!” The platoon commander shouts the warning to about 200 soldiers slogging their way through the dense brush, blackened trees and smouldering ash in the tiny First Nations community of Montreal Lake, about 250 km. north of Saskatoon. …For soldiers in northern Saskatchewan, for now, orange is the new green. A handful of homes and cabins in the area have already been destroyed by fires. The army was called in this week to help save the rest and get 10,000 people who have fled the smoke and flames back home. The help is sorely needed.

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Visitors told to leave Maligne Valley in Jasper National Park due to wildfire

Victoria Times Colonist
July 9, 2015
Category: Forest Fires
Region: Canada, Canada West

JASPER, Alta. – An evacuation of part of Jasper National Park was ordered Thursday due to a forest fire in the picturesque Maligne Valley. Greg Fenton, superintendent of Jasper National Park, said the 200-hectare fire north of Medicine Lake was “still out of control” but the plan of attack was to keep it from moving further south toward Maligne Lake, one of the most photographed spots in all of Canada. He said Parks Canada staff, RCMP and commercial operators in the valley were all assisting. “Evacuation activities are going well,” he said. “It will take some time because it’s a busy operational season, and (there are) lots of visitors both on Maligne Lake and some of the wilderness trails — the Skyline, as an example.”

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Welcome rain helps to dampen Vancouver Island wildfires

Victoria Times Colonist
July 13, 2015
Category: Forest Fires
Region: Canada, Canada West

Forecast rain and lower temperatures should provide a reprieve for firefighters across Vancouver Island, who have spent the past week battling wildfires amid tinder-dry conditions. Between five and 10 millimetres of rain are expected to fall on the south Island over the next three days, said Environment Canada meteorologist Trevor Smith. Heavier rain — 25 millimetres or more — is expected to drench the north Island. Victoria temperatures are expected to top out in the low 20s until at least Friday, far from the near 30 C scorchers of late June. “Temperatures have cooled significantly and we’re getting rain everywhere for the southern parts of B.C.,” Smith said. “It’s certainly a welcome pattern for the B.C. Forest Service.”

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By the numbers: northern Sask. forest fires, July 12

Total area burned is larger than Prince Albert National Park
CBC News
July 12, 2015
Category: Forest Fires
Region: Canada, Canada West

Wildfire numbers:
475,000 hectares: Total area burned so far this year.
387,400 hectares: Size of Prince Albert National Park.
100: Hectares in one square kilometre.
4,750: Total square kilometres burned in 2015.

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Saskatchewan firefighters racking up injuries in the forest

Fire commissioner: several injuries over past few days
CBC News
July 13, 2015
Category: Forest Fires
Region: Canada, Canada West

Twisted ankles, dehydration and steam burns are just a few of the injuries firefighters are chalking up in the northern forests. “We have had a number of injuries over the past several days,” said Duane McKay, Saskatchewan’s provincial fire commissioner. “It is tough work and particularly dry work up there.” In addition to ankle twists and cuts, McKay said a member of the rapid response team received steam burns on Friday while putting out hot spots. The individual “received steam burns to their arms and hands simply because of the tremendous heat that is stored up in the ground in some of these hot spots,” he said.

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Pilot escapes after air tanker crashes into Puntzi Lake

Williams Lake Tribune
July 13, 2015
Category: Forest Fires
Region: Canada, Canada West

A pilot helping battle a wildfire in the Chilcotin escaped after the single seat air tanker he was flying crashed into Puntzi Lake Friday afternoon. “He was able to get out and get to shore,” said Kevin Skrepnek, Chief Information Officer with the BC Wildfire Co-ordination Centre late Friday. The pilot was treated for minor injuries on site and then transferred by helicopter to the hospital in Williams Lake for precautions, Skrepnek said, noting the Transportation Safety Board has been notified and will be investigating the incident.

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B.C. fire count grows to 250 despite weekend rain

CTV News
July 12, 2015
Category: Forest Fires
Region: Canada, Canada West


It’s another weekend, another 120 new fires for British Columbia – bringing the total number of active blazes in the province to 250. An estimated total of 283,430 hectares have burned across the province since April, according to BC Wildfire Services – an area nearly the size of Metro Vancouver. Cooler temperatures and wetter weather are helping firefighters, says Kevin Skrepnek, chief fire information officer at BC Wildfire Service, although lightning has been responsible for the majority of new blazes.

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Edmontonians can breathe easier Monday, forecast says

Edmonton Journal
July 13, 2015
Category: Forest Fires
Region: Canada, Canada West

EDMONTON – A shift in the winds is forecast to give relief on Monday from smoky conditions that sparked air-quality warnings over the weekend in Edmonton. The city ranked as a nine on the Alberta government’s air quality health index, where 10 denotes the worst conditions. Edmonton’s rating was expected to moderate to eight Sunday night and five for Monday. Smoky haze wafting from forest fires in Saskatchewan and northern Alberta prompted the federal and provincial governments to issue a special air quality statement on Sunday.

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The West is so dry even a rain forest is on fire

The Washington Post
July 13, 2015
Category: Forest Fires
Region: United States, US West

In a normal year, Washington state’s Olympic National Park is arguably the wettest place in the continental U.S. An annual 150 inches of rain inundate the park’s western slopes, soaking the soil and slicking the branches of the lush temperate rain forest that grows there. Mosses, lichens and ferns festoon the trunks of centuries-old trees, whose thick canopy casts the forest floor into damp, dark shadow. … This year, ancient tree trunks smolder at their base as they burn from within. The downed wood and debris that carpet the forest floor have dried up into kindling. The abundant lichens that are characteristic of this type of rain forest are now facilitating the fire that’s burning it up: The flammable plant-like organisms pass the flames from tree to tree.

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Lightning storm sparks fires from Bitterroot to Lookout Pass

The Missoulian
July 11, 2015
Category: Forest Fires
Region: United States, US West

A late-afternoon lightning storm sent wildland firefighters scurrying to as many as a dozen new starts Friday night in a zone stretching from the northern Bitterroot Valley to Lookout Pass. Chad Pickering at the Missoula Interagency Dispatch Center said there were four confirmed fires in the Ninemile Valley as of 9:30 p.m., and four other reports of fires that had not yet been located by fire crews. U.S. Forest Service firefighters were working, or en route, to all of the Ninemile starts. A scattering of rain was helping, Pickering said, and so far the fires were either single-tree torchings or one-tenth acre in size.

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In North Idaho, wildfires last seen a century ago could be in the offing

Idaho Statesman
July 10, 2015
Category: Forest Fires
Region: United States, US West

Idaho’s fire season has been turned on its head this year. North Idaho, the wettest part of an otherwise dry state, is where the greatest threat of big fires exists. Conditions look hauntingly like those 105 years ago, when a million acres burned in two days across North Idaho and Montana. That year, there was little spring rain and the snow cover melted early, said Elers Koch, the Forest Service supervisor who wrote the official history of the 1910 fires. “July followed with intense heat, and drying southwest winds from the Columbia plains,” Koch wrote. “Crops burned up all over the region.” Sounds familiar.

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WA firefighters set to battle wildfire blazes in Canada

WA Today
July 12, 2015
Category: Forest Fires
Region: International

WA firefighters have joined an Australian crew to help battle dozens of wildfires that are threatening communities across the western part of Canada. Twelve fire and emergency services personnel and forest firefighters from the Department of Fire and Emergency Services and the Department of Parks and Wildlife officers will form part of a national contingent of 106 experts that will fly to Canada on Monday. The firefighters are expected to be based in British Columbia and Alberta and return on August 19. The fires have caused tens of thousands of people to be evacuated and have burned more than 1.9 million hectares of forest.

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Kiwis to help fight Canada forest fires

Otago Daily Times
July 13, 2015
Category: Forest Fires
Region: International

Firefighters from rural New Zealand are flying to Canada to help battle blazes raging in almost 800,000 hectares of forest. The western Canada wildfires have forced thousands of people to evacuate and thick smoke has triggered air quality warnings across the country and into the United States. One of the fires was more than five times the size of Saskatchewan’s largest city Saskatoon, officials said.

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Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy

Eoin Madden: What the Salish Sea can tell us about climate change

Georgia Straight
July 12, 2015
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: Canada, Canada West

This summer, B.C.’s forest fire season arrived a month early—and with a ferocity not witnessed in our lifetime. While struggling to breathe the smoke-filled air in Metro Vancouver this week, I’ve been reminded of the predictions made by experts who say that climate change will make this “freak” situation the new normal. We are disrupting weather systems, creating bone-dry conditions for months on end, by burning ever increasing amounts of coal, gas, and oil. To save ourselves from the worst impacts of climate disruption, it is critical that we quickly learn to adopt renewable energies like wind, geothermal, and solar. In the face of such urgency, it can be hard to remain optimistic.

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When forests become the “big polluters” | Don Brunell

By Don Brunell
Maple Valley Reporter
July 12, 2015
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: Canada, Canada West

We associate air pollution with big cities, but millions of people are feeling the impacts of pollution from wildfires burning from California to Alaska and as far east as Colorado. It is one of the worst years on record for forest fires and we will spend billions to fight the fires and protect people, homes and businesses… Triggered by a mild winter and low snow pack, this year’s fire season is earlier than normal and could be devastating. Just as damaging, these fires are releasing millions of tons of carbon dioxide, a greenhouse gas, into the atmosphere. Last month, The Vancouver Sun published a Sierra Club analysis showing that, over the last two decades, British Columbia forests have turned from a big absorber of CO2 into a big emitter of CO2… Sierra Club, take note: when it comes to pine beetle infestations or massive wildfires, letting nature take its course is not always the best course of action.

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Scientists predict huge sea level rise even if we limit climate change

The Guardian
July 13, 2015
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: United States, International

Even if world manages to limit global warming to 2C — the target number for current climate negotiations — sea levels may still rise at least 6 meters (20 ft) above their current heights, radically reshaping the world’s coastline and affecting millions in the process. That finding comes from a new paper published on Thursday in Science that shows how high sea levels rose the last time carbon dioxide levels were this high. That was about 3m years ago, when the globe was about 3-5F warmer on average, the Arctic 14.4F warmer, megasharks swam the oceans, and sea levels stood at least 20 ft above their current heights.

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UK scraps zero carbon homes target

The Guardian
July 13, 2015
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: International

Housebuilders, planners and green groups have condemned the government for scrapping plans to make all new UK homes carbon neutral. The zero carbon homes policy was first announced in 2006 by the then-chancellor Gordon Brown, who said Britain was the first country to make such a commitment. It would have ensured that all new dwellings from 2016 would generate as much energy on-site – through renewable sources, such as wind or solar power – as they would use in heating, hot water, lighting and ventilation. This was to be supported by tighter energy efficiency standards that would come into force in 2016, and a scheme which would allow housebuilders to deliver equivalent carbon savings off site.

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