Tree Frog Forestry News

Daily Archives: July 20, 2015

Business & Politics

Opinion: Trade deal would be a boost for B.C., Canada

Vancouver Sun
July 17, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada

One thing that would be nice to keep from becoming overheated is the rhetoric around the Trans Pacific Partnership, a trade deal comprised of 12 Asia-Pacific nations, including Canada, the U.S. and Japan. The TPP has been in the news recently, and when it comes to this agreement, Canada can’t afford to be left behind. …So why does the TPP matter to B.C. and Canada to the point that we should consider sacrificing supply management or allow more log exports? …Whether its forestry in the Central Interior, mining in the Kootenays, oil and gas in the Peace region, agriculture and agri-food in the Okanagan and Fraser Valley, or seafood and shellfish on the Island, B.C. businesses stand to benefit by having their products gain access to TPP markets duty-free.

Read More

Burns Lake mill should have been shut down before deadly explosion: worker

Canadian Press in Vancouver Sun
July 18, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

BURNS LAKE, B.C. – Freezing temperatures wrecked equipment at a sawmill that hadn’t been prepared for such weather before an explosion killed two workers, a coroner’s inquest has heard. Archie Alec, who worked as a chipper attendant, testified Friday that a cold snap made it tough to operate machinery at Babine Forest Products in the days before a blast on Jan. 20, 2012… He said employees were called into the lunchroom for a meeting the day before the explosion. “To us, we thought we would be sent home, but we weren’t,” Alec said. Instead, everyone in the mill was sent to clean out the debris that had piled up in the basement. They had to use jackhammers to dislodge the material because it had become frozen in water that had been leaking from burst pipes.

Also carried in the Prince George Citizen

Read More

Mill conditions changed after Hampton takeover: employee

Prince George Citizen
July 17, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

BURNS LAKE — Conditions at Babine Forest Products “totally changed” after production shifts were extended, a longtime employee told a Friday coroner’s inquest into the explosion that destroyed the sawmill and killed two workers. In an effort to boost production, management had increased the weekday time devoted to processing lumber at the mill by 20 hours per week, with employees on the morning and afternoon shifts working 10 hours per day, up from the previous eight. The change made a big difference in terms of dealing with debris and maintaining the machinery, Claude Briere told the inquest.

Read More

‘We shouldn’t have been running the mill that week,’ inquest hears

Prince George Citizen
July 17, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

BURNS LAKE — A former Babine Forest Products employee described to a coroner’s inquest Friday a “chaotic” situation in the days immediately before the explosion that destroyed the Burns Lake sawmill and killed two workers. …Archie Alec, who was a chipper attendant at the mill, said a cold snap had descended on the community of 2,000 people, 225 kilometres west of Prince George, and it had become a struggle to operate the facility as a result. Alec worked in the mill’s basement where he was primarily responsible for unplugging conveyors when they became clogged with debris.

Read More

Northern Pulp mill not off the hook despite clear air, Pictou group says

Precipitator installed to reduce emissions at Northern Pulp mill to be finalized Oct. 16
CBC News
July 20, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada East, Canada

Even though the smell and smog spewing out of Northern Pulp has faded this summer, a Pictou activist group remains skeptical the pulp mill’s emissions will stay out of their lungs for long. “It’s not a big issue in the town of Pictou any more, except for the people who comment, ‘Oh isn’t this nice we can breathe today and the sun is shining with blue sky and blue water,'” said Anne Emmett of Clean the Mill. “So the issue has sort of died, but we certainly know underneath this is nowhere near the end of it.” Emmett’s group aggressively lobbied the provincial government last summer, prompting a series of promises from Premier Stephen McNeil and Environment Minister Randy Delorey.

Read More

BLM ignores public concerns on timber management plans

Statesman Journal
July 18, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States, US West

The federal Bureau of Land Management controls over 2.5 million acres in Western Oregon. How the agency manages these lands significantly impacts our economy, environment and critical public services. Unfortunately, the BLM is sidestepping citizen input in its push to adopt new resource management plans (RMPs) before the next administration takes office. Considering the details of what the agency is proposing, many Oregon families, homegrown businesses and rural counties will pay the price if their rush to adopt new management plans is successful. … Few Oregonians have the time and expertise to review thousands of pages in technical documents and data to provide meaningful public comment before the current Aug. 21 deadline. 

Read More

Wood, Paper & Green Building

Montreal’s ash trees find new nautical life

Montreal Gazette
July 17, 2015
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: Canada East, Canada

Trees felled by emerald ash borer beetles have found new life as a sailboat for Montreal youth. In a joint initiative between the Côte-des-Neiges–Notre-Dame-de-Grâce borough and the Jeunes Marins Urbains, an organization that promotes social inclusion through naval-based projects, wood from infected trees is being used to build a 7.6-metre sailing-rowing boat to be used on the St. Lawrence River. “They are going to use (the boat) to teach other teenagers how to sail in the water of the St. Lawrence, so it is a demonstration of how we can recycle, reuse and redevelop things in a constructive way,” N.D.G. Councillor Lionel Perez said.

Read More

Is LEED Dying?

Woodworking Network
July 17, 2015
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: United States

What was once the great movement that was touted by all in the construction industry as a revolutionary way to consider construction, is now becoming a waning fad just like granite counter tops and brightly colored Croc shoes. How has the LEED program met with such a precipitous decline? …After you suffer through a LEED certified project, you have a better understanding of what costs are associated with achieving such a designation. …The administrative burden is another reason that LEED has lost popularity. …our company has to spend one complete day per year to undergo a Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) certification to be able to provide the required FSC wood for a LEED project. It became such an exercise in nonsense, I recently told FSC we would pass on the renewal this year.

Read More

Call for Entries: Maine Wood 2016 Biennial Exhibition

Bangor Daily News
July 18, 2015
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: US East, United States

ROCKPORT, ME – The Center for Furniture Craftsmanship in Rockport, Maine announces a statewide call for entries for the fifth juried Maine Wood biennial. The exhibition, which takes place in the Center’s Messler Gallery from January 22 – April 6, 2016, will once again showcase the breadth, creativity, and excellence of wood craftsmanship in the state of Maine. …Jurors for this year’s biennial are Peter Fleming, professor at Sheridan College in Toronto, Matthew Kenney, Senior Editor at Fine Woodworking magazine, and Emily Zilber, curator at the Boston Museum of Fine Arts.

Read More

Bosley explosion: Four missing in Wood Flour Mills blast

BBC News
July 18, 2015
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: International

Rescuers searching for four people missing after an explosion devastated a mill are focusing on two areas identified by sniffer dogs. The four-storey Wood Flour Mills in Bosley, near Macclesfield in Cheshire, collapsed after the blast on Friday.
Some areas are still alight while dogs have been used to help search for the three missing men and one woman. Cheshire Fire and Rescue Service said they were also working to protect what could potentially be a crime scene.

Read More

Forestry

Groups taking steps to protect the ancient forest

My Prince George Now
July 17, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

The provincial government has signed an agreement with the Lheidli T’enneh First Nation and the Caledonia Ramblers Hiking Society to preserve the Ancient Forest. The groups are working to get the rare rainforest designation as an official protected area. “I think there’s also a sense that once we receive an appropriate designation of protected area, you could go on to have this particular site potentially designated as a World Heritage Site,” says MLA Shirley Bond. The Ancient Forest covers more than 10,000 hectares of mostly unlogged land.

Read More

Grizzly bear attack near Bella Bella, B.C., ends with kick to the face

CBC News
July 18, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

An engineer with a Vancouver logging company thought he was going to die yesterday as a mother grizzly bear tore the flesh of his arm and back, and tried to throw him in the air. But George Knoll, 41, survived thanks to quick thinking, his work boots and luck. Knoll, who works with A&A Trading, had been walking through the bush, flagging trees for logging along a creek at Burke Channel near Bella Bella, on B.C.’s Central Coast. At about 8:30 a.m. PT, he looked up and saw a mother grizzly bear and her cub. Because of the sound of the rushing water, he hadn’t heard the bear and her cub approach through the bush — nor had the bear heard him — until they were just six metres apart. “I knew I was in trouble, because of the cub,” said Knoll from his hospital bed in Vancouver Friday.

Read More

Cowichan anxious to solve a drying river

TimesColonist
July 18, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Cowichan Tribes Chief Chip Seymour has watched the once robust Cowichan River reduced to a mere stream. Drought conditions are stranding salmon fry in warm pools, he said, and hampering mature chinook from completing their spring run up to Cowichan Lake… A long-term solution seems desperate. But stakeholders say one has already been identified: Raise the weir… The weir, owned and operated by Catalyst Paper, controls the river’s flow out of the Cowichan Lake. But conditions have changed since its 1956 construction, Hunter said.

Read More

Emerald ash borer target of new Thunder Bay awareness campaign

Emerald ash borer has potential to wipe out an entire species of tree
CBC News
July 17, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

The city of Thunder Bay has launched an awareness campaign to fight the spread of the emerald ash borer. The invasive insect is already found in many parts of Ontario and is making its way north. It has the potential to wipe out an entire species of tree. “It totally devastates all species of ash and it’s killed hundreds of millions of trees,” said city of Thunder Bay forester Shelley Vescio. “It will change the ecosystems. You’ll lose all the ecosystem services associated with those trees, ” she said.

Emerald Ash borer threat to local ecology from The TB Newswatch

Read More

Spruce budworm eating its way through northeastern Ontario forests

It may be hard to believe that this insect is a natural part of the forest ecosystem, Backroads Bill explains
CBC News
July 19, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

A Spruce budworm infestation is on its way and it appears to be entering a new outbreak phase in northeastern Ontario, according to CBC Sudbury’s backroads adventurer Bill Steer. The Spruce budworm is the most destructive pest of spruce and fir forests in North America, notes Steer. The larvae are wasteful feeders as they only eat partial needles and then move on to other needles. Steer’s research shows the last outbreak in Ontario peaked at about 18 million hectares in 1981. It may be hard to believe that this insect is a natural part of the forest ecosystem. And another wave is coming. How do the scientists know?

Read More

Continued opposition to Wyden O&C Land Grant Act

U.S. Senate Committee Also Holds Hearing on National Forest Ecosystem Improvement Act to Improve Health of Federal Forest Lands
Oregon Catalyst
July 17, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

The Senate Energy & Natural Resources Committee yesterday held a hearing on the Oregon and California Land Grant Act of 2015 (S. 132), legislation sponsored by U.S. Senator Ron Wyden to change the management of O&C timberlands administered by the Bureau of Land Management. …Representing Western Oregon forest products manufacturers, American Forest Resource Council (AFRC) President Tom Partin highlighted how the Wyden O&C proposal lacks balance and won’t address the needs of rural, forested communities. S. 132 is identical to Senator Wyden’s proposal from last year (S. 1784), which was opposed by Oregon’s forest products industry and the affected counties in Western Oregon.

Read More

Planning continues at the Wallowa-Whitman National Forest

A look at how the planning process works for the national forest that covers much of northeastern Oregon.
The Capital Press
July 16, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

The Wallowa-Whitman National Forest is well into summer mode. And that means the usual increase in forest activities, forest visitation and the opportunity to enjoy the seasonal splendor of the Blue Mountains. As we approach the bustling summer season, I wanted to relay the status of ongoing planning projects here on the forest. As most of you know, we are continuing to engage our communities on forest plan revision, focusing on several key topics that have been brought forward through formal public comments and continued public involvement.

Read More

Still no recovery plan for coho salmon, advocacy groups sue NOAA

The Oregonian
July 16, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Oregon Wild and the Center for Biological Diversity are suing the federal government for failing to protect the Northwest’s endangered coho salmon. The National Marine Fisheries Service, which is a division of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Association, has no recovery plan in place for the fish. Coho have been on the endangered species list since 2008. …In 2011 the fisheries service concluded that the salmon were still not adequately protected from land use activities and climate change. This was partly blamed on weak regulations that govern state and private forestlands, including the Oregon Forest Practices Act.

Read More

Applaud Schrader’s efforts on federal forest management

Letter to the editor
Statesman Journal
July 18, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Rep. Kurt Schrader deserves our thanks for working across the aisle to pass the Resilient Federal Forests Act through the U.S. House. Despite opposition from far-left special interest groups and his own party leadership, Schrader supported legislation to give the Forest Service and Bureau of Land Management policy and legal tools to restore the health of federal forests in Oregon and throughout the country. Schrader understands that active management is critical to reducing the risks of catastrophic wildfire, insects and disease in our forests and watersheds.

Read More

Letter: DeFazio supports Resilient Federal Forests Act

Good forestry is essential
The News-Review
July 16, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

This letter is to thank U.S. Rep. Peter DeFazio for voting in favor of the Resilient Federal Forests Act in the U.S. House of Representatives on July 9. DeFazio deserves credit for breaking ranks with party leadership and joining 18 other Democrats in supporting this bill to restore the health of federally-owned forests. As a representative of Douglas County in Congress, DeFazio understands the pendulum has swung too far toward the non-management of national forests and O&C timberlands. DeFazio’s vote isn’t just an example of political courage, it’s a vote to help put people back to work, while reducing the threats of wildfire, insects and disease in our federal forests.

Read More

Forest bill will allow more clear cuts without benefits (OPINION)

By Michael C. Blumm
The Oregonian
July 20, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

The Oregonian/OregonLive editorial board on July 5 gave a full-throated endorsement of proposed federal forest legislation that would shred the Northwest Forest Plan — the two-decades-old plan, promulgated in 1994, that remains the foremost national (perhaps international) example of an ecosystem management plan. It covers 24 million acres of federal forestlands in northern California, Oregon and Washington. The plan, which governs federal Bureau of Land Management (BLM) land plans like the Oregon and California (O&C) lands currently undergoing revision, ended an era of industrial management of federal forests on both Forest Service and BLM lands. The pre-1994 era was a sorry one, with overharvests of O & C lands commonplace, bringing on endangered species listings and widespread water quality degradation from which the federal forests have yet to recover. 

Read More

Portland talks green, but ignores the value of trees (OPINION)

By Robert McCullough
The Oregonian
July 18, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

As a community activist, I am often asked how the city’s policies have drifted so far from our basic values… Neighbors in southeast are currently engaged in a desperate attempt to save a stand of heritage trees — giant sequoias that have dominated the vista near Reed College for the past 150 years. In doing so, they only have one tool — greenmail — to buy the property back from a developer who had planned to clear-cut the site. Appeals to the city went unanswered. The city’s tree code — requiring experts and lawyers to interpret — is basically impotent where developers are concerned. The responsible city commissioner did not answer calls, letters or emails. This is wrong, both politically and scientifically. 

Read More

Arkansas Forestry Commission’s nursery program fills niche for landowners big and small

Arkansas On-line
July 19, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

When I heard the conversation among the landowners’ family members, my mind immediately rewound to the 1990s. Then, I was a nontraditional student at Arkansas State University-Beebe, returning to college life after a switch in my major and some time in the real world doing that four-letter word — work. Now, back to the present, where I am a caretaker on a farm in southeast Arkansas. That’s where I heard the plight of some of the timber found on the family’s farm. Standing water in one area of hardwood timber had repeatedly been slow to drain from the landscape and into the borrow ditch adjacent to the wooded ground. The result was oaks, hickories and native pecans suffering from prolonged exposure to high water.

Read More

Our native forest regulations need to move with the times

ABC News, Australia
July 20, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: International

BIT BY BIT, Tony Abbott is dismantling everything scientists are telling us we need to do to protect our environment and combat climate change. A large chunk of this destructive agenda is aimed squarely at our native forests. This came to a head when the government needled through a deal with Labor and the crossbenchers on the Renewable Energy Target. Apart from R-E-D-U-C-I-N-G the target by more than 20 per cent and introducing the flat-earther inspired ‘wind farm commissioner’, the deal also allowed wood from native forests to be burnt for energy and be classified as ‘renewable’. Take a moment to think about what that means.

Read More

Forestry standards will ‘harm region’s biodiversity’

Stuff NZ – Nelson Mail
July 18, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: International

Nelson environmentalists are concerned that new forestry legislation will make it easier for logging companies to muddy the region’s biodiversity while taking power away from local authorities in monitoring the industry. Rules governing the environmental impact of the plantation forestry industry are being taken away from local government and replaced with a new National Environmental Standard under the Resource Management Act. The move hopes to to streamline forestry operations and improve environmental outcomes. Consultation is now open on the legislation that has been in the works since 2009. 

Read More

How to sustain the world’s forests

IOL-Scitech
July 19, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: International

Bangkok – Asia has a unique opportunity to fight climate change and lift many more people out of poverty if it invests more in the communities living in its forests, experts said. More than 450 million people in the region rely on forests for income and food, but forest dwellers often struggle to make a living as rural poverty, deforestation and climate change threaten their livelihoods. “If we truly want to sustain Asia’s forests, we need to address inequality and poverty by investing in people living in the forests,” said Tint Lwin Thaung, executive director of RECOFTC, which promotes community forestry in Asia.

Read More

Rare ferns, rainforest species found in Victorian forest earmarked for logging, environment group says

ABC News, Australia
July 20, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: International

Rare ferns and rainforest species have been discovered in a part of the Eastern Victoria region that is earmarked for logging, according to an environment group. The Goongerah Environment Centre (GECO) has been running citizen science camps to map the biodiversity of the remote Kuark Forest, outside of Orbost in East Gippsland. In an unreleased report given exclusively to the ABC, GECO said it had made a number of significant finds. GECO spokesman Ed Hill said he and a group of volunteers who surveyed the Kuark forest in April found a bristly shield fern, which has never been documented in East Gippsland before.

Read More

Environment group wins battle to protect habitat for threatened powerful, sooty, masked owls

ABC News, Australia
July 20, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: International

The Victorian Government has agreed to set aside 2,000 hectares of forest in East Gippsland to help protect three threatened species of owl. Environment East Gippsland took legal action against the Victorian Department of Environment, Land, Water and Planning (DELWP) and state-owned VicForests over the issue. An agreement was reached on Friday between the parties before the case was scheduled to appear in the Supreme Court. Environment East Gippsland’s Jill Redwood said it was a “fairly significant” win for the threatened Sooty, Masked and Powerful Owls.

Read More

Forest Fires

Regina volunteers still out in full force to help forest fire evacuees

Leader-Post
July 17, 2015
Category: Forest Fires
Region: Canada, Canada West

REGINA — Two weeks and counting. The staff at Regina Treaty Status Indian Services (RTSIS) have been working overtime to ensure the evacuees from the forest fires have what they need. Although the emergency shelter set up at Evraz Place has been shut down and those evacuees were transported to Saskatoon or their home communities, Erica Beaudin, (RTSIS) urban manager, says she, her staff and volunteers are still in it for the long haul with about 500 evacuees in Regina who are staying in hotels and at the University of Regina.

Read More

Firefighters battle two blazes near Kelowna

Vancouver Sun
July 20, 2015
Category: Forest Fires
Region: Canada, Canada West

WEST KELOWNA — An evacuation alert remains for 80 properties along Bear Creek and neighbouring roads due to a fire that started near the provincial park Sunday afternoon and grew to more than two hectares by nightfall. Residents should “be prepared to be away from their home for an extended period of time, make arrangements for pets and pack essential items such as medicines and important documents,” according to the Regional District of the Central Okangan. Twenty-four B.C. Forestry Service firefighters will remain on the ground overnight to monitor the fire. Residents have been told “that fire and smoke can appear more threatening at night” but fire crews are working to contain the blaze.

Read More

Montreal Lake fires leave 40 homeless

CBC News
July 17, 2015
Category: Forest Fires
Region: Canada, Canada West

While an estimated 1,500 people were able to return to the community of Montreal Lake, which had been evacuated due to forest fires, six structures were destroyed by fire and 40 people are homeless. The community, about 200 kilometres northwest of Prince Albert, sits among a forested area which was seriously scorched by fire. “It’s going to be a lot of mental toll on our people,” Edward Henderson, chief of Montreal Lake Cree Nation, said Thursday. “I’ve talked to our people the last couple of days, letting them know our community is going to look totally different.”

Read More

Dog Mountain update: ‘contained doesn’t mean fire is out’

Alberni Valley News
July 19, 2015
Category: Forest Fires
Region: Canada, Canada West

The Dog Mountain forest fire southwest of Port Alberni is 100 per cent contained, but that doesn’t mean the fire is out, says fire information officer Marg Drysdale from the Coastal Fire Centre. Smoke and flames will still be visible on parts of Dog Mountain as conditions continue to dry out over the weekend and into next week. “We’ve got containment on that fire. Most people are assuming that containment means out. That’s not the case,” Drysdale said.  BC Wildfire branch crews are allowing forest fuel within the perimeter
to burn itself out, and the perimeter is being patrolled. “ I know
they’re monitoring that fire very carefully, largely because of the
concern in the community.”

Read More

Martin Mars water bomber back to fighting blazes in B.C.

Canadian Press in Vancouver Sun
July 18, 2015
Category: Forest Fires
Region: Canada, Canada West

The Martin Mars water bomber is back on Vancouver Island after helping to fight a wildfire near Nelson, B.C. Provincial Fire Information Officer Ryan Turcot says the aged air tanker dropped nine loads on a wildfire burning near Boswell and Highway 3A Saturday, with each load carrying about 27,000 litres. It was the first time in two years that the Martin Mars has been used to fight wildfires in B.C. The provincial government signed a one-month contract earlier in July to use the water bomber. Turcot says there are currently 154 blazes burning, down from 223 last weekend.

Read More

Greek firefighters battle blazes; save 200 trapped on beach

Associated Press – Helena Independent Record
July 17, 2015
Category: Forest Fires
Region: International

ATHENS, Greece (AP) — Greek firefighters battled large fires in the south, on the outskirts of Athens and on an island near the capital Friday as flames fed by strong winds forced the evacuation of villages and summer camps. About 200 people trapped by one fire were plucked off a beach by rescue boats. In all, firefighters were battling 59 fire fronts, mainly in southern Greece and near the capital. Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras said Greece had requested help from his country’s army and air force, as well as the European emergency response center, to fight the blazes.

Read More

Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy

Are B.C.’s climate goals a lot of hot air?

A summer that has included one of B.C.’s worst droughts and forest fire seasons has many in the province thinking about climate change
Business in Vancouver
July 20, 2015
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: Canada, Canada West

A summer that has included one of B.C.’s worst droughts and forest fire seasons has many in the province thinking about climate change and what the future will bring. But critics are questioning whether the provincial government’s plan to start a second round of climate change planning is a lot of hot air, given the work that has already been done on policies to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Environment Minister Mary Polak is asking the public to fill out online surveys indicating their support for regulations requiring buildings be more energy-efficient, incentives to encourage people to drive less and expanding the carbon tax. A draft of the plan, which the government says will guide emissions targets between 2020 and 2050, will be released in December 2015, timed to coincide with international climate talks in Paris.

Read More

Science Confirms 2014 Was Hottest Yet Recorded, On Land And Sea

NPR
July 17, 2015
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: United States

For the past quarter-century, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration has been gathering data from more than 400 scientists around the world on climate trends. The report on 2014 from these international researchers? On average, it was the hottest year ever — in the ocean, as well as on land. Deke Arndt is a climate scientist with the agency and an author of the State of the Climate in 2014 report, released Thursday. It’s the lower atmosphere that’s warming, not the upper atmosphere, he points out — just as the total of greenhouse gases in the lower atmosphere continues to increase. That’s not a coincidence.

Read More

Missoula study: Climate change increasing length of wildfire seasons worldwide

Missoulian
July 19, 2015
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: United States, US West

The length of wildfire seasons across the globe and the burnable areas of Earth’s surface have drastically increased in the past three decades due to climate change, according to a groundbreaking new study supported by years of research from the U.S. Forest Service’s Missoula Fire Sciences Laboratory. In a paper published Tuesday in the international journal Nature Communications, a team of researchers concluded that from 1979 to 2013, fire weather seasons have lengthened across 18.39 million square miles of Earth’s vegetated surface, resulting in an 18.7 percent increase in the global average fire season length.

Read More

Native wood waste hoped to fire up Tasmanian energy industry as environmentalists oppose biomass as renewable energy

ABC News, Australia
July 19, 2015
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: International

An energy industry powered by native wood waste is hoped to finally fire up in Tasmania, now that it is considered a renewable energy source by the Federal Government. Last month the Senate passed a bill to include native forest biomass in the revised Renewable Energy Target (RET). Pavel Ruzicka, who sits on the Resources Minister’s Special Advisory Council, said it was fantastic news given Tasmania produced millions of tonnes of native wood residues every year. “Lifting the RET is the best thing that could have happened because it’s sent a great ripple through the industry,” he said.

Read More

Former Gunns boss Greg L’Estrange warns new biomass industry needs a ‘social licence’

ABC News, Australia
July 20, 2015
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: International

The former head of Gunns believes Tasmanian politicians and the forest industry need to heed the lessons of the past if any new biomass industry is going to attract investment. Greg L’Estrange told ABC Radio National’s Background Briefing program he was not confident there had been enough change since the demise of the timber company and the mothballing of its $2.5 billion Tamar Valley pulp mill. The pulp mill project, which is being offered for sale by the company’s receivers, faced significant community opposition, with many arguing the project failed to gain a “social licence”.

Read More

General

Drones Delayed North Fire Response: Officials

NBC Los Angeles
July 18, 2015
Category: Uncategorised
Region: United States, US West

Drones forced the landing of planes deployed to fight the so-called North Fire in southern California that burned cars and homes along the 15 Freeway Friday, delaying response to the frightening blaze, officials said. All air units not only pulled back from the fire because of the drones, but all five were forced to touch back down at the airport in San Bernardino after jettisoning their loads, John Miller of the U.S. Forest Service said. …”It can kill our firefighters in the air …

Read More