Tree Frog Forestry News

Daily Archives: August 4, 2015

Froggy Foibles

Climbing trees can make you smarter in the boardroom

United Press International
August 4, 2015
Category: Froggy Foibles
Region: United States

Physical activities such as climbing a tree, running barefoot and navigating obstacles, even for a few minutes a day, can improve cognitive abilities, researchers found in a new study. The aim of the study was to see the effect of proprioceptive activities, which involve the awareness of body positioning and orientation, on potential gains in working memory. …The activities included climbing trees, walking and crawling on a beam, moving while maintaining posture, running barefoot, and navigating obstacles. …By taking a break to do activities that are unpredictable and require us to consciously adapt our movements, we can boost our working memory to perform better in the classroom and the boardroom.

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Business & Politics

Inquest recommendations give chance to heal for family of Burns Lake blast victim

Prince George Citizen
August 1, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

The sister of a Burns Lake millworker is greeting the end of a coroners inquest into his death with relief, exhaustion and the hope the recommendations arising from an explosive workplace disaster will not be ignored. Lucy Campbell said Saturday her family “can now start to heal” after the inquest into the January 2012 blast at the Babine Forest Products Inc. sawmill that killed her brother Carl Charlie, 42, Robert Luggi, 45, and injured 19 others wrapped up Friday.  “The last… weeks have been very heartwrenching, listening to the survivors of the explosion, the management, WorkSafe, the Steelworkers,” said Campbell. “The injustices… the accountability… All of this could have been avoided.

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Canfor Pulp Products insider Acquires C$137,258.53 in Stock

WKRB News & Analysis
August 2, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

Canfor Pulp Products (TSE:CFX) insider Canfor Pulp Products Inc. bought 10,700 shares of the firm’s stock in a transaction dated Thursday, July 30th. The shares were acquired at an average price of C$12.83 per share, for a total transaction of C$137,258.53. Canfor Pulp Products Inc. also recently made the following trade(s): On Wednesday, July 29th, Canfor Pulp Products Inc. acquired 10,000 shares of Canfor Pulp Products stock. The stock was purchased at an average price of C$12.39 per share, for a total transaction of C$123,927.00.

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Raw log export part of forestry’s massacre

Letter by Richard Berg
Alberni Valley Times
August 4, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

Port Alberni – It’s obvious that our current mayor knows nothing about forestry and our former mayor, Ken McRae, is very forgetful. What happened in 2004 is that Gordon Campbell and Mike De Jong took the private lands out of TFL 44, thereby making possible the unfettered export of raw logs. When the private and public forests were in TFL 44, there was an annual allowable cut and rules for harvesting, replanting, stream protection, etc. Now the owners of the private lands can do anything they want on them and export as many logs as they like. Doubtless the current massacre on area forest lands far exceeds the old annual allowable cut and the old restrictions on harvesting.

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Company Shares of Resolute Forest Products Inc. Rally 9.66%

American Trade Journal
August 2, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada East, Canada

Shares of Resolute Forest Products Inc. (NYSE:RFP) appreciated by 9.66% during the past week but lost 13.86% on a 4-week basis. The shares have outperformed the S&P 500 by 8.4% in the past week but underperformed the index by 14.97% in the last 4 weeks. Resolute Forest Products Inc. has dropped 35.51% during the last 3-month period . Year-to-Date the stock performance stands at -43.9%.

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California sawmills face massive backlog as fires rage

Breitbart News
August 3, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States, US West

California’s sawmills are reporting a massive lumber backlog as fires rage across the state, and environmental regulations are partly to blame. With just one sawmill left in the entire southern Sierra region, Sierra Forest Products is facing a tremendous backlog of wood from wildfire-salvaged trees. However, the damaged lumber brings in about 40 percent less profit than fresh trees do and laborers in this dying industry are having a difficult time making ends meet. Environmentalists have been fighting to keep large tracts of land off limits, and have restricted logging since President Bill Clinton designated the Giant Sequoia forest a National Monument in 2000. Yet loggers argue that many of the Golden State’s forest fires could be prevented if they were allowed to remove more fresh trees.

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Former Simpson Tideflats sawmill on the block again

The News Tribune
July 31, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States, US West


Just five months after it completed its purchase of a Simpson Lumber Co. mill on the Tacoma Tideflats, a Canadian forest products company is putting it back on the market. … The Tacoma mill alone, the company said in its second-quarter earnings release, was responsible for $7.7 million of Interfor’s $20.6 million net loss for the quarter. … “The decision to exit the Tacoma sawmill was taken after much analysis and deliberation,” said Duncan Davies, the company’s president and chief executive officer. “We understood at the time the mill was acquired that a turnaround was required at Tacoma. While good progress has been made from an operating standpoint, the drop in product prices experienced in the second quarter of 2015 resulted in operating losses greater than expected when the mill was acquired,” he said.

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Sizzling temperatures could help Weyerhaeuser’s bottom line, executive says

The Longview Daily News
July 31, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States, US West

Dry weather has sparked earlier-than-normal fire restrictions that could cut into local logging supplies but help to boost prices, Weyerhaeuser Co.’s top executive told investors in a conference call Friday. “I can tell you just drive around the Pacific Northwest, it’s dry out there. It almost looks like you’re in Arizona as opposed to the normally wet Pacific Northwest,” said Doyle Simons, Weyerhaeuser Co. CEO and president. Large swaths of Oregon and Washington timberlands are under fire restrictions that limit logging hours. In the past week, a chunk of Oregon forests were closed off to logging under even tighter restrictions. That affected 15 percent of Weyerhaeuser’s Western timberlands.

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Peter DeFazio aide to take top spot at Portland-based timber industry trade group

The Oregonian
August 1, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States, US West

Travis Joseph, who has been a top advisor to Oregon Rep. Peter DeFazio, will become the new president of the Portland-based American Forest Resource Council. Joseph’s new role is indicative of the good relationship the industry has built with the Democratic congressman in recent years — and of the council’s desire to build bipartisan support for its agenda in Congress. “We understand the politics” of Congress, said Tom Partin, outgoing president of the council. “You have to take a bipartisan approach.” …The council represents the timber industry in Oregon, Washington, Idaho, Montana and California.

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Weyerhaeuser achieves higher sales in the wood products segment

IHB The Timber Network
August 1, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States, US West

Sales for Weyerhaeuser’s Wood Products segment totaled $1,004 million (Q1/2014: $923 million). Sales volumes increased seasonally across all product lines, says Weyerhaeuser. Manufacturing costs improved due to higher operating rates and operational excellence initiatives, and Western log costs were lower. These higher sales volumes and lower costs were partially offset by lower average sales realizations for lumber and oriented strand board, Weyerhaeuser reports. Sales for the Timberlands segment came in at $336 million in the quarter, while sales for the Cellulose Fibers segment came in at $467 million. Overall, Weyerhaeuser’s quarterly net income slipped to $133 million versus a year-ago profit of $280 million.

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Guilty plea over forestry death

NZ City
August 3, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: International

A forestry company has pleaded guilty after the death of a worker in Waikato. Charles Finlay, 45, died in 2013 while working at Taumata Forest, Kinleith, near Tokoroa. CTU took a private prosecution against his employer M & A Cross Limited for health and safety failings. The company pleaded guilty in Rotorua District Court on Monday and faces up a fine up to $250,000. It will be sentenced on October 2.

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Wood, Paper & Green Building

New Designs: Is Hybrid Wood Replacing Concrete?

Realty Today
August 3, 2015
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: International

Some of Europe’s new high rise buildings are now made up of mixed concoctions – hybrid wood and concrete. Believe it or not, one can never easily tell the difference as these impressive creations are also becoming more popular as seen in the recent years. Architonic.com featured an article about the Stadthaus, which was completed in 2008 and was regarded as the world’s tallest structure made of timber wood. Yes, wood (not just concrete). The building was 30 metres tall and sat in the heart of the borough of London Hackney – all made of wood. The said structure is of 9 stories high; and what’s amazing about it was that it was just completed in less than a month by 4 people. The architectural wonder still stands beautiful until today.

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Forestry

One week left to weigh in on B.C. government’s plan for Great Bear Rainforest

The public is invited to comment on the province’s plans for mining and tourism areas and revised land uses.
Vancouver Observer
August 4, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

The public review and comment period on the B.C. government’s proposed land use changes in the Great Bear Rainforest closes next Monday, Aug. 10. Comments are sought on the potential for new biodiversity, mining and tourism areas (BMTAs) and a conservancy and revised land use objectives. The intent of the proposed Great Bear Rainforest land use order and potential BMTAs and conservancy is to meet the goals of reserving 70 per cent of historic old-growth forests (with minor exceptions), while maintaining a viable forest industry in the Great Bear Rainforest.

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Forest Service considering timber project south of Elliston

Helena Independent Record
August 3, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, United States, US West

The Helena National Forest is taking public comment on proposed prescribed burning, logging and thinning in the Telegraph drainage south of Elliston. The forest released a draft environmental impact statement in July for the Telegraph Vegetation Project, which covers nearly 24,000 acres. The EIS includes alternatives proposing work on more than 6,700 acres and nearly 4,200 acres, respectively. The EIS also includes a no action alternative. Forest officials held an open house in Helena Monday to discuss the project, and will hold another open house in Elliston Tuesday. After extensive logging in the early part of the century, moist growing conditions and fire suppression caused dense, same-aged stands of lodgepole pine.

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Ontario’s moose management project needs hunters’ input: OFAH

CBC News
August 1, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

Ontario’s largest outdoors sports lobby group says it’s time for the province’s moose hunters to be heard by the Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry. The Ontario Federation of Anglers and Hunters says comments are now open on the Environmental Registry about what’s being called Phase 2 of the ministry’s Moose Project. OFAH biologist Mark Ryckman said the ministry is seeking input from hunters. “They want to hear the concerns of moose hunters surrounding moose populations, the impact of wolves or bears, diseases … maybe a lack of habitat, and forestry operations — all those things outside of licensed hunting,” he said.

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Beaconsfield offers reduced price for inoculation of ash trees

Montreal Gazette
August 1, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

Beaconsfield is putting citizens on alert. It’s last call for TreeAzin. The deadline for treating ash trees on private property with the organic insecticide is Aug. 7. And to make the effort more attractive, the city has devised a pricing scale which reduces the regular cost of tree inoculation for homeowners. The charge is $4.07 per centimetre of width. It will cost, for example, $170.94 every second year to inoculate a tree which is 42 centimetres in diameter. If a tree becomes infested, or dies, it must be felled. The price of felling a dead or infested, mature ash tree can run anywhere from $1,500 to $2,000, depending on the size of the tree. The invasive emerald ash borer has laid waste to millions of ash trees since it was first detected in North America in 2002.

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Guest Opinion: Lawsuit is about what is right, not a quest for ‘profit’

Idaho Statesman
August 3, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

…We believe the Forest Service has violated the law by giving permission to the Idaho Department of Lands to use a road across my private property, which is protected by a scenic easement, for a commercial timber sale. The clear-cut sale planned by the state on the banks of the Selway is likely to cause massive landslides and erosion in the exceptionally steep terrain of the river corridor. In fact, the Forest Service abandoned plans for a similar timber harvest in the 1960s over the same resource concerns. So far, the federal court agrees we are likely to succeed on the merits. It recently issued a preliminary injunction, blocking the use of the road across my property in connection with the timber sale.

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‘Ponderosa’ Explores The Evolving Understanding Of Montana’s State Tree

Montana Public Radio
August 3, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

A new book about ponderosa pine trees, written by a pair of Montana forest researchers, offers insight into past mistakes and current policies. If you’ve spent any time outside in the western U.S., you’ve probably seen a ponderosa pine. It’s the tree with bark that looks like puzzle pieces. Logging and fire suppression practices during the 20th century devastated ponderosa pine forests. But, now, thanks partly to the work of educators and researchers like Carl Fiedler and Stephen Arno, the book’s authors, things are changing. “I think there’s a better understanding of forest ecology, far better now, among foresters, than there was when my career started in the woods in the 1960s,” Arno says.

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4FRI thinning project begins on Coconino National Forest near Flagstaff

AZ Daily Sun
August 4, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

A 1,017-acre forest thinning project associated with the Four Forest Restoration Initiative began Monday on the Flagstaff Ranger District of the Coconino National Forest. The project, known as the Weatherford 4FRI Task Order, is part of the 4FRI Phase One Stewardship Contract held by Good Earth Power AZ. According to a U.S. Forest Service press release, the thinning project is occurring north of Flagstaff and west of Highway 89 adjacent to the burn area of the 2010 Schultz fire. It is the first 4FRI task order to be implemented on the Coconino National Forest. Work will be ongoing throughout the season as weather and conditions allow.

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Input sought on beetle issue

The Pueblo Chieftain
July 30, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

CANON CITY — The U.S. Bureau of Land is seeking public comments on an environmental assessment focusing on treating bark beetle-infested areas in Fremont County. “The purpose of the project is to reduce the threat to public safety and infrastructure posed by beetle-killed trees in travel corridors and other high-risk areas,” said Keith Berger, field manager…The Northwest Fremont Bark Beetle Salvage project would take place on approximately 2,900 acres in northwestern Fremont County near Stoney Face, Waugh and Jack Hall mountains. Activities under consideration include commercial timber harvest, non-commercial timber management and prescribed fire.

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How Oregon Rivers Carried Millions Of Trees Into Production

Oregon Public Broadcasting
August 1, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Around the same time famed photographer Carelton Watkins first captured the Columbia River Gorge with his traveling darkroom, on the south fork of the Coos River in southwest Oregon a large dam helped fuel Oregon’s burgeoning timber industry. The Tioga Dam was the largest splash dam in the Northwest. It was the first of what would grow to become 230 splash dams throughout western Oregon. Let’s start big picture. From 1849-1924, Oregon produced over 47 billion board feet of lumber production, most of it hauled out on rivers. For context, trucks carried about 4 billion board feet lumber out of the woods on forest roads in 2014. 

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Forest Service scraps Echo Lakes tree-thinning plan

News.10.net
July 31, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

EL DORADO COUNTY – The U.S. Forest Service has abandoned its controversial plan to remove trees and brush around Echo Lakes. The plan, announced in 2012, was aimed at preventing a catastrophic fire by providing defensible space around the rustic summer homes that are built on leased forest service land. A conservation biologist who owns a cabin on Upper Echo Lake sued the agency in Sacramento federal court shortly after contractors with chainsaws went to work in the fall of 2013. Dennis Murphy, an adjunct professor at the University of Nevada, Reno, claimed the work was unnecessary because history had never recorded a wildfire at the lakes due to the 7,400-foot elevation and sparse soil.

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Investment in the Tongass is an investment in southeast Alaska

The HIll
July 31, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

As the Forest Service revises its land management plan for the Tongass National Forest and Congress considers bills related to national forest management, the people of southeast Alaska and the Tongass are in the middle of another successful tourism and fishing season. We have a unique opportunity to make some forward-looking changes to support these community economic drivers in our largest national forest. The Tongass is a world-class tourism destination, drawing more than a million visitors every year. Tourism brings $1 billion to our region each year, directly employing 6,700 people and supporting a total of 10,000 year-round and seasonal jobs according to the McDowell Group and Southeast Conference.

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Feds tour Ashland Forest Resiliency project

The Mail Tribune
August 3, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Two high-level officials from the Interior and Agriculture departments got a tour Wednesday of Ashland’s watershed and a tutorial on the Ashland Forest Resiliency project, which they deemed a pioneering model for a “cohesive wildfire strategy” that also restores forests and supports jobs and the environment. The pair have learned that “Ashland has done as much as anyone to restore forests to their natural state and deal with wildfire,” said Under Secretary of Agriculture Robert Bonnie, a senior advisor to Secretary Tom Vilsack. The Forest Service is in that department. Bonnie noted that, for the past 100 years we’ve put out forest fires, radically changing the ecosystem, creating much higher fuel levels and making the fire season 78 days longer than it was three decades ago.

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Ash borer threatens Knoxville trees

WBIR
August 4, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

KNOXVILLE) – An invasive species continues to spread in Tennessee. Forty-one counties in Tennessee are on a state and federal quarantine for the movement of ash trees and ash tree products. Cumberland County was added in July. The quarantine comes from the emerald ash borer, a pest that’s destroying the trees. On Monday, Knoxville crews tore down 22 diseased trees along a greenway between Northwest Middle School and Victor Ashe Park. The trees had fallen victim to the bug. “The emerald ash borer is a beetle that is from Asia. It’s a pretty little bug, it’s iridescent and shiny,” said Elizabeth Benton, a doctoral student focused on combating the pest.

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Thompson treats first eastern hemlock to combat pest

Bradford Era
August 1, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

WARREN — This week, Congressman Glenn Thompson, R-Pa., applied a chemical treatment to the first eastern hemlock tree to suppress the hemlock woolly adelgid. …High Allegheny Unglaciated Plateau Hemlock Woolly Adelgid Partnership — a collaborative effort organized to suppress the hemlock woolly adelgid. The project encompasses nearly 2.5 million acres of federal, state, and private lands in Northwestern Pennsylvania and the southern tier of New York around the Seneca Nation of Indians Reservation. …If left untreated, the hemlock woolly adelgid could potentially kill all of the eastern hemlocks across the ANF and the Allegheny Plateau over the next 50 years.

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Check trees now for Asian Longhorned Beetle, USDA says

Farm Futures
August 1, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

More than 130,000 trees have been lost in Illinois, Massachusetts, Ohio, New Jersey and New York due to Asian Longhorned Beetle, and USDA is urging outdoor enthusiasts to watch for the bug during August, its time of peak emergence. “Early detection is critical to stopping the spread of the ALB,” said Rhonda Santos of the USDA Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service. “The good news is that the public plays an important role in our efforts to eradicate the pest. It only takes a few minutes to look for the signs of the ALB.” ALB was first discovered in the U.S. in 1996, likely arriving here unknowingly inside wood packing material from Asia.

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How state forest industry grew anew

Crain’s Detroit Business
August 2, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

At one time, Michigan’s forests were as synonymous with industry as the Great Lakes and the automobile. Between the 1860s and 1900, the state was the largest producer of lumber in the country. But by the late 1800s, the forests were nearly decimated by overharvesting from nearly 2,000 sawmills. The barren lands, now unproductive to foresters, became state-owned through tax reversion, said David Price, acting supervisor of forest planning and operations at the Michigan Department of Natural Resources. Under the nurturing of the U.S. Forest Service in the early 1900s, the forests were restored, Price said. Large sawmills, such as those owned by Louisiana-Pacific Corp., returned to Michigan.

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Horse chestnut parasite could soon spread to Scotland

August 4, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: International

Parasitic “hitchhiking” moths, which infect and destroy the leaves of horse chestnut trees, are moving north and could soon invade Scotland. The horse chestnut leaf-mining moth, which originates in the Balkans, was first recorded in London in 2002 and has spread throughout England and Wales. Dr Darren Evans, an expert in conservation biology at the University of Hull and a co-founder of Conker Tree Science, said “it’s only a matter of time” before the species expands further north into Scotland. The invader feasts on the leaves of the conker-producing trees, turning them brown and causing them to drop in the late summer.

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Horse chestnut parasite could soon spread to Scotland

August 4, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: International

Parasitic “hitchhiking” moths, which infect and destroy the leaves of horse chestnut trees, are moving north and could soon invade Scotland. The horse chestnut leaf-mining moth, which originates in the Balkans, was first recorded in London in 2002 and has spread throughout England and Wales. Dr Darren Evans, an expert in conservation biology at the University of Hull and a co-founder of Conker Tree Science, said “it’s only a matter of time” before the species expands further north into Scotland. The invader feasts on the leaves of the conker-producing trees, turning them brown and causing them to drop in the late summer.

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Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy

Cheakamus Community Forest can now generate and sell GHG credits

Whister Question
August 3, 2015
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: Canada, Canada West

In its quest to achieve carbon neutrality, the Resort Municipality of Whistler (RMOW) is now able to trade off its corporate greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions by purchasing carbon offsets locally through the Cheakamus Community Forest. A carbon offset is a credit for GHG reductions achieved by one party that can be used to compensate, or offset, the emissions of another party. The community forest’s sale of carbon offsets recently became possible thanks to its Ecosystem-Based Management (EBM) Plan, which employs techniques like harvest rotations, reduced harvest volumes and protection of old-growth forests and wildlife habitats. “The province and the Cheakamus Community Forest entered into an agreement to sell carbon offsets,” said Whistler Mayor Nancy Wilhelm-Morden.

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Forest Fires

Climate change is fueling a spike in wildfires across the Americas

Public Radio International
August 2, 2015
Category: Forest Fires
Region: Canada, United States

North America is on fire. Nearly five million acres in Alaska have burned in 2015, and the wildfires are on pace to become the largest ever in Alaska’s history. More wildfires are spreading across Canada, California, Oregon and Washington. Climate change, scientists warn, will only continue to make the wildfires worse. Nicky Sundt, a climate policy analyst at the World Wildlife Fund, used to work as a smokejumper in the 1980s. He has seen wildfires in North America get continually worse over the last three decades. “The average annual number of large fires in Alaska has doubled, and there’s also been a big increase in the size of those fires,” Sundt said. 

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Wildland Firefighters from Mexico take Days of Rest in Hinton

Hinton Parklander
July 31, 2015
Category: Forest Fires
Region: Canada, Canada West

Sixty-two wildland firefighters from Mexico took “Days of Rest” at the Hinton Training Centre (HTC) last week. The firefighters arrived at the facility after firefighting efforts in High Level, and left to fight fires in Peace River on Aug. 2. According to Rob Galon, Director of Agriculture and Forestry Division, “Days of Rest” are mandatory for wildland firefighters working long hours tackling wildfires. Depending on how many hours the firefighter works determines how many days the firefighter is required to take for rest. This protects firefighting personnel from burning out due to exhaustion. “It gets pretty stressful, I mean firefighters are working 14 days … 14 hours a day,” explains Galon in an interview.

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Campers evacuated as crews continue to fight aggressive Harrison Lake wildfire

Vancouver Sun
August 4, 2015
Category: Forest Fires
Region: Canada, Canada West

Stephanie Rosencrans was relaxing with friends and family at the recreational campground at Wood Lake Sunday when the kids came running up to say they saw smoke. …Shortly after, helicopters were on scene, pulling up buckets of water from Wood Lake and dumping on the fire, which was burning about 20 kilometres north of Harrison Lake in an area thick with brush and logging debris that is a heavily used recreation area. …About 70 firefighters remained on the ground Sunday morning, aided by four helicopters, while officials considered whether they could bring in six fixed wing air tankers and the Martin Mars bomber to help dampen the 45-hectare blaze. The fire was believed to have increased in size overnight Sunday as the winds picked up.

BC Fires: Harrison Lake wildfire grows to 100 hectares in size from CBC News

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NASA Satellites Help US Forest Service Better Detect Wildfires

KJZZ.org
August 3, 2015
Category: Forest Fires
Region: United States

The U.S. Forest Service now has a better view of wildfires from space, thanks to a new agreement with NASA. The agreement gives wildland fire managers access to data from a satellite imaging system called VIIRS (Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite). In the daytime, VIIRS can theoretically detect a flaming fire just 50 square meters — about the size of a small house. At night, VIIRS can detect a fire five times smaller. That’s an improvement on current technology, called MODIS, which routinely detects wildfires about 1,000 square meters in size. 

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Wildfires prompt Brown to declare state of emergency in Calif.

USA Today
August 1, 2015
Category: Forest Fires
Region: United States, US West

Gov. Jerry Brown declared a state of emergency for all of California in the wake of wildfires that killed one firefighter and drove hundreds of people from their homes. California’s record drought, now in its fourth year, has “turned much of the state into a tinderbox,” he said. The emergency declaration, which included the activation of the California National Guard, will speed up help for thousands of firefighters, Brown said Friday. About 9,000 firefighters were battling 24 large wildfires in California on Saturday, Ken Pimlott, the chief of the California Department of Forestry and Fire said in an interview. Dry thunderstorms were expected to threaten much of Northern California through much of the the weekend, Pimlott said.

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California wildfires torch 134,000 acres — and counting

CNN
August 3, 2015
Category: Forest Fires
Region: United States, US West

Firefighters worked Monday in steep terrain and other rugged conditions to fight California’s Rocky Fire, one of nearly two dozen wildfires that have torched more than 134,000 acres of the parched state this year, according to state fire officials. That’s nearly three times the state’s 5-year wildfire average of 48,153 acres for this time of year, according to statistics posted by the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection, or Cal Fire. …Cal Fire says most of the fires are more than 60% contained. But damage has been substantial in some cases. …Brown declared a state of emergency Friday, mobilizing the National Guard to support the disaster response.

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Wildfire near Lake Chelan quadruples

Seattle Times
August 1, 2015
Category: Forest Fires
Region: United States, US West

The Wolverine Creek Fire has suddently grown in size and forced the evacuation of at least 350 people living nearby. The Wolverine Creek Fire near Lake Chelan has quadrupled in size since Friday, forcing hundreds of people to evacuate, according to the U.S. Forest Service. “Last night air temperatures in [the] area were very high and the relative humidity was very low, causing extreme fire behavior,” Carly Reed, a spokeswoman for the U.S. Forest Service Chelan-Entiat Ranger District, said in an emailed statement Saturday. “The fire moved direction and moved quicker than it has in the past.”

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Glacier Park wildfire continues to burn in Two Dog Creek area

by Roby Chaney
Helena Independent Record
July 31, 2015
Category: Forest Fires
Region: United States, US West

ST. MARY — Towers of smoke made the Reynolds Creek fire look busy on Friday, but most of the flames ran themselves into Glacier National Park’s rocky cliffs. “The vast majority of what we’re seeing today is up in the Two Dog Creek area on the fire’s north flank,” fire information officer Mark Struble said. “It’s burning some timber there, but then it runs up into the rocks and peters out. It’s doing what we expected it to do.” The fire remains at 3,170 acres along the northwest shore of St. Mary Lake on the park’s east side. It’s considered 63 percent contained. Investigators suspect the fire was human caused sometime between July 14 and 21. It burst into action on the 21st, growing from a spot blaze to more than 1,000 acres in hours.

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Paradise Fire still growing in Olympic National Park; blaze blossoms by 504 acres

Peninsula Daily News
August 4, 2015
Category: Forest Fires
Region: United States, US West


QUEETS — The Paradise Fire grew by 504 acres between Thursday and Sunday and as of Monday had scorched a total of 2,292 acres in the Queets River Valley in southeastern Olympic National Park, according to new measurements by fire managers. Hot, dry weather contributed to the fire’s growth, and the blaze is now burning toward the northwest. The new fire activity followed the riverbed west and north from the where the fire was sparked by lightning May 14. The fire — considered slow-moving — has grown by 1,020 acres since July 3 and is the largest wildfire on record since Olympic National Park was created. On Monday morning, the fire remained east of Bob Creek and north of the Queets River.

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