Tree Frog Forestry News

Daily Archives: September 29, 2015

Business & Politics

Canfor Announces the Purchase of Anthony Forest Products

PR Newswire
September 29, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada

VANCOUVER – Canfor Corporation announces that it has entered into an agreement to purchase Anthony Forest Products Company located in El Dorado, Arkansas for a purchase price of $93.5 million US which includes approximately $15 million US of working capital. AFP operates 6 facilities producing lumber, engineered wood and wood chips with a combined capacity of 250 mmbf equivalent. AFP owns a sawmill located in Urbana, Arkansas which produces premium Southern pine lumber and has an operational capacity of 150 mmbf per year. It also owns laminating facilities in El Dorado, Arkansas and Washington, Georgia, which produce beams, columns and other glulam products with an annual combined capacity of 75 mmbf, and owns chip mills in Louisiana and Texas with a total annual capacity of 800,000 tons.

Paul Quinn, RBC Capital Markets comments on Canfor’s Southern expansion: Canfor Corporation – Further expanding its Southern footprint

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Commodity prices sink to 10-year low

Business in Vancouver
September 28, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

Commodity prices have sunk to a 10-year low, thanks in part to fears of a weakening Chinese economy, according to Scotiabank. The Scotiabank commodities index dropped 10.5% in August. That’s 13.9% lower than their lowest point of the 2009 recession, and their lowest since 2005. …For B.C., key commodities include metals and forestry, both of which continue to fall in price. Scotiabank’s metal and mineral index fell 1.6% in August; the forestry index fell 3.5%.

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Highest global sawmilling earnings are being achieved by mills located in the US South and now Russia

International Wood Markets
September 28, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States, International

WOOD MARKETS’ biennial global benchmarking survey has continued to place the U.S. South as the highest margin sawmill region in North America – a place it has held since 2008 – as well as the top global earner in 2014 and into the first part of 2015. However, the new dynamic that hit the global sawmilling industry in 2014, and has continued significantly in 2015, is the ongoing decline in foreign currency exchange rates of major producing and exporting regions against the U.S. dollar. While lower costs also created a massive erosion of lumber prices in many markets around the world, some countries saw their fortunes change dramatically.

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Hardwood Checkoff Opponents Dispute Dollars Raised by Program

Woodworking Network
September 28, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States

WASHINGTON – The US Hardwood Lumber Industrial Coalition is again calling into question the need for a Hardwood Checkoff Program, claiming the latest round of revisions would generate revenues of less than $2 million, an amount smaller than that claimed by the program’s proponents and far below the $10 million sought in the original proposal. Earlier this month, Hardwood Checkoff sponsor Blue Ribbon Committee submitted a letter to the USDA calling for plywood, flooring and green mills to be removed and fees scaled back program. According to the BRC, the proposed changes to the “Hardwood Lumber and Hardwood Plywood Promotion, Research, and Information Order” would result in $3 million to $4 million in funding for industry promotion.

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Layoffs at Tricon Timber impact 90 workers

NBC Montana
September 25, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States, US West

Another hit for Montana’s struggling timber industry is cutting deep into the economy of Mineral County. Last week, Tricon Timber was billed as Mineral County’s largest employer. Now that may not be the case. We received word that Tricon’s workforce has been cut by more than 50 percent. Owner Ken Verley confirmed that Tricon laid off one complete shift — that’s 90 workers and their families who are losing an income. Tricon has dodged some bullets in recent years and managed to survive. In January of 2014, Montana Sen. Jon Tester helped the company buy itself out of expensive timber contracts in the face of a struggling housing market.

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Tricon Timber Lays Off 90 In St. Regis

Montana Public Radio
September 28, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States, US West

Ninety employees of Tricon Timber in St. Regis were laid off Friday. The company’s website says it’s one of the largest employers in western Montana’s Mineral county. “I don’t know if we still are or are not now. We just laid off almost half of our work staff.” That’s Tricon’s Vice President of Logistics, Joe Zito, who says the layoffs will probably be a huge blow to Mineral County which already has a high unemployment rate… Tricon’s only the latest casualty in what’s been a long and difficult year for Montana’s timber industry. Earlier this month Sun Mountain Lumber in Deer Lodge closed down the night shift in several of its operations, leaving 50 people out of work.

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Lincoln tissue company files for bankruptcy

Bangor Daily News
September 28, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: US East, United States

LINCOLN, Maine — Lincoln Paper and Tissue LLC filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection on Monday, estimating it has between $10 million and $50 million in both debts and assets. Company co-owner Keith Van Scotter said he expects the mill will be auctioned in 45 days, with a stalking horse bidder setting the price to beat. He said he did not know whether the potential buyers would operate or scrap the mill, the town’s second-largest taxpayer and third-largest employer. …The destruction of the boiler, considered too expensive to replace, resulted in the layoff of about 185 of the mill’s 400 workers, ended paper production at the facility and forced the mill to buy pulp from off-site sources — two key elements to the bankruptcy, said Duane Lugdon, a United Steelworkers Union staff representative.

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Construction begins on major upgrade at Clearwater Paper

KLEW
September 28, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: US East, United States

LEWISTON, ID – Leaders at Clearwater Paper have officially broke ground for their new $160 million upgrade to the Lewiston mill. Officials said it will be a new and more improved digester. … the new state-of-the-art construction will help modernize the mill. “It really brings the mill into competition with other similar pulp mills in the country and it’s a major upgrade and optimization and it will make the mill much more efficient,” said Matt VanVlett, Spokesperson Clearwater Paper. 

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Canadian Company Buying Anthony Forest Products for $93.5M

Arkansas Business
September 28, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: US East, United States

Anthony Forest Products Co. of El Dorado, one of the largest private companies in Arkansas, is being sold to publicly traded Canfor Corp. of Vancouver for $93.5 million, the two companies announced late Monday afternoon. The transaction is expected to close in the fourth quarter. Anthony Forest Products ranked No. 67 on Arkansas Business’ most recent list of the state’s largest private companies with self-reported revenue of $123.25 million in the fiscal year that ended in April 2014… Anthony will retain its management, sales and manufacturing employees, but will become part of Canfor’s Southern forest products business. Canfor has been a supplier for Anthony’s glued laminated timber plants for more than 10 years, according to the news release.

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Timber industry expects a deterioration

EUWID
September 29, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: International

Companies involved in the German timber industry expect business development to slacken off considerably in the coming months. This is based on the results of the most recent survey conducted by the ifo Institute and published by the German Wood and Plastics Processing Industry Association (HDH). Although companies which participated in the survey assessed the business climate as predominantly good with only a slight deterioration from the value of 37 points recorded in July to 32 points in August, business expectations, nevertheless, dropped significantly.

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Family-owned enterprise with a rich history ready to embrace innovation

Courier-Mail, Aus
September 27, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: International

FOR 133 years and five generations, the Hyne family has poured blood, sweat and tears into their timber manufacturing company, Hyne Timber. Today Hyne Timber is the largest privately owned timber manufacturer in Australia operating from 11 sites along the eastern seaboard, and is the industry leader in preservative treatments. Most recently, Hyne Timber has been named the winner of the Queensland State Training Awards, the North Coast Region Training Awards and has been inducted into the Queensland Business Leaders Hall of Fame.

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Wood, Paper & Green Building

U.S. Green Building Council announced winners of 2015 LEED for Homes Awards

Wood Business Forum
September 28, 2015
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: United States

The U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC) announced winners of its 2015 LEED for Homes Awards. The organization’s award recognizes projects, developers and homebuilders that have demonstrated outstanding leadership and innovation in residential green building. It is given to outstanding multi- and single-family residential and affordable housing projects as well as builders and developers. The LEED for Homes Awards are given to recipients that have either completed an outstanding project in the previous year or are proven trailblazers in the field of sustainable home building. The organization admits an increase in project applications that proved how diverse and robust the LEED for Homes portfolio has become. 

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Turning Wood and Orange Peels Into Car Parts Stronger Than Steel

Bloomberg
September 28, 2015
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: International

The molecules of plant fibers are being transformed into a light-weight material five times stronger than steel that can be used to make everything from auto parts to electronic displays. No wonder the technology, called cellulose nanofiber, has piqued the interest of executives in Japan, where manufacturers in the world’s third-largest economy import almost all the metal and fuel they need. The new material is derived from common things like trees, rice straw and orange peel, which means supply is plentiful and more environmentally friendly than what’s used now. While development is in the early stages, the government estimates domestic sales may be worth about 1 trillion yen ($8.3 billion) in 15 years. The first commercial product is already out: a $2 pen that Mitsubishi Pencil Co. sells in North America. 

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I bought a plain, white button-up made of this ‘luxury’ fabric — and now I’m hooked

Tech Insider
September 28, 2015
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: International

Often basics are the most difficult articles of clothing to buy. So a few months ago, when I needed all-season wardrobe staple —a white button-up — I prepared for battle. Despite my less than optimistic expectations, I stumbled upon what I needed in an unexpected material: Tencel, a fiber made from cellulose found in wood pulp. Created by Austrian textile giant Lenzing, Tencel is actually a branded version of a similar fiber, lyocell. Think “Kleenex” versus “facial tissue.”… Tencel is also made from eucalyptus trees, which don’t require pesticides or irrigation, according to the Natural Resource Defense Council. Lenzing says it can grow enough trees for a ton of Tencel on half an acre of forestland that is unsuitable for farming. Cotton needs up to five times as much high-quality farmland, according to the NRDC.

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Forestry

Much discord on defining cord of wood

The Chronicle Herald
September 28, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada

What’s in a cord of firewood? A great deal of debate, actually, and the federal body that administers how everything is measured has weighed in. Measurement Canada, a division of Industry Canada, is suggesting people stop buying and selling firewood by the cord. “Measurement Canada recommends that the use of the cord as a unit of measurement be discontinued, as it is largely misunderstood and often misused by people selling firewood,” reads a statement on Measurement Canada’s website. A cord of firewood is 128 cubic feet, or a pile four feet by four feet by eight feet. Sound simple? Well, it’s supposed to be. But if you’ve bought much firewood, you’ve likely heard terms like stacked cord and processed cord.

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Spike in forest fatalities sparks WorkSafeBC blitz

This is the first instalment in a series by Gordon Hamilton
Business in Vancouver
September 29, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

A rash of deaths in B.C. forests this summer has prompted WorkSafeBC to launch an inspection “blitz” on logging operations over what it calls “outstanding and systemic safety deficiencies.” Four forest workers died in the month of July alone – raising alarm bells among workers over what they say is a lapse in safe practices that’s putting loggers’ lives at risk. WorkSafeBC called industry leaders together August 6 for a special meeting aimed at preventing more forest worker deaths. At the same time, it launched a month-long blitz, where inspectors visited 44 logging operations. They found enough safety violations to issue 49 orders requiring employers to bring operations into compliance with the safety regulations, and six warning letters. A warning letter puts employers on notice that further violations could result in penalties.

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Board to audit forestry activities near Smithers

BC Forest Practices Board
September 28, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

VICTORIA – The Forest Practices Board will examine the activities of Lowell A. Johnson Consultants Ltd. on forest licence A77026 and non-replaceable forest licence A90554, during the week of Oct. 5, 2015. The auditors will examine all operational planning, harvesting, roads, silviculture and wildfire protection practices for compliance with the Forest and Range Practices Act and the Wildfire Act. Lowell A. Johnson’s forestry activities are located east of Smithers, near Chapman Lake, in the Skeena Stikine forest district.

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Howard Hampton – “Tom Mulcair’s plan to invest in Canada’s forestry sector good news”

Net News Ledger
September 25, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

KENORA – ELECTION 2015 – “NDP Leader Tom Mulcair’s plan to invest in Canada’s forestry sector to create jobs and support innovation is good news for the industry in Northern Ontario”, says Kenora NDP candidate Howard Hampton. “Since Stephen Harper’s Conservatives formed government, we have lost 30,000 forestry jobs in this province,” continued Hampton. “We need to ensure Canada’s forestry sector remains innovative and competitive to create the highly skilled jobs needed to move the industry forward.”

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Martock family named Woodland Owner of the Year

Nova News Now
September 29, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

MARTOCK — A Hants County family has been honoured for being outstanding woodland stewards by the Department of Natural Resources. Mike and Dianne Oulton, of Martock, and their family were selected as the Central Woodland Owner of the Year for 2015. For Mike Oulton, who opened up his woodlot to the public Sept. 19 for a DNR field day and tour, it was an honour to be selected. “I would just say that as a family, we were honoured to be recognized for what we’re doing. It’s not doing anything different than anybody else but somebody thought we were and wanted to show it around,” he said in an interview.

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Report: USFS won’t let forest ecologist talk about reforming fire management

Wildfire Today
September 28, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States

An article at Capital Public Radio claims that the U.S. Forest Service will not let a forest ecologist talk about an article he co-wrote titled “Reform Forest Fire Management”. The two-page opinion piece about making forests less prone to wildfire appeared in Science, and was written primarily by USFS and university employees. Below is an excerpt from the article at Capital Public Radio about the controversy: …“The US Forest Service Pacific Southwest Research Station won’t let forest ecologist Malcolm North talk about the study he authored in the journal Science. The agency even unsuccesfully requested that Science editors hold the article or remove North’s name and affiliation from the peer-reviewed study.

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Mapping America’s Unprecedented Vulnerability to Wildfires

CityLab
September 28, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States

In the U.S., the steadiest population growth isn’t happening in urban centers. It’s in suburbs, exurbs, and rural areas. And as we make more and more homes along the very fringes of metropolitan areas, the more we come into contact with natural habitats. And the consequences might not be obvious. Putting aside conservation concerns, higher numbers in the “wildland/urban interface” (or the “WUI,” as the U.S.D.A Forest Service calls it) means higher numbers of homes vulnerable to wildfire. As of 2010, 99 million people, or about one-third of all people in the United States, lived in the WUI. The WUI is is formally defined as any area with at least one structure per 40 acres that’s either next to (what’s called “WUI Interface”) or sprinkled within (“WUI intermix”) a certain minimum expanse of naturally vegetated land. (Urban homes adjacent to a park, for example, wouldn’t included.)

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Fire season second costliest in history

Statesman Journal
September 28, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

The 2015 fire season so far is the second most expensive in Oregon history. To date, 946 wildfires have scorched nearly 95,000 acres of state-protected land, costing an estimated $76 million. That’s the most since 2013, when 1,119 wildfires fires burned nearly 105,000 acres, costing about $122 million. In all, three consecutive years of severe fires, brought on by the drought afflicting the entire West, has severely taxed state resources, fire officials told a legislative committee Monday. That doesn’t just mean money. During big fires, every Department of Forestry employee leaves their regular job to pitch in on fire duties.

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Neighbors worry over impact of Hamilton forest thinning project

KECI
September 25, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Landowners are worried about the impacts of a proposed thinning project on the Bitterroot National Forest near Hamilton. The West Side Project would allow commercial logging, noncommercial thinning and prescribed burns on 2,300 acres between Lost Horse Creek and Roaring Lion on the Darby Ranger District. The area west of Hamilton is an urban interface where the national forest meets private land and houses. Thinning the area of overcrowded and diseased trees and reducing fuels would improve forest health, said Bitterroot National Forest supervisor Julie King. She said the work would reduce the risk of a catastrophic wildfire. “It’s not a matter of if,” said King, of such a fire, “but when.”

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Pie in the sky?

Arizona Daily Sun
September 27, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

On a breezy morning earlier this month, Jason Rosamond and Maya Minkova hopped into a beige SUV with Arizona Senator Jeff Flake and took off down a dirt road in the Kaibab National Forest. Their final destination was a 1,600-acre forest thinning project where work was underway. When they arrived Rosamond and Minkova plunged into an explanation of the train-car sized machine that was de-limbing and cutting dozens of felled trees. The husband and wife team leads Good Earth Power AZ, the 2-year-old company that holds the biggest contract in the largest forest restoration project in the history of the U.S. Forest Service, the 2.4 million-acre Four Forest Restoration Initiative, or 4FRI.

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Fire transfer halts some work on the Custer Gallatin National Forest

Bozeman Daily Chronicle
September 27, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

The Gallatin Valley didn’t see major fires in its forests this year, but the large fire season nationwide has tied up a significant portion of the Custer Gallatin National Forest’s budget. Nearly a million dollars in discretionary spending in the Custer Gallatin has been marked for fire transfer, meaning the money has been redirected in case the U.S. Forest Service needs to spend it fighting fire. That’s happening on forests across the country, and the Custer Gallatin’s million is a mere fraction of the $700 million marked for transfer nationwide. This comes in a year when more than 9 million acres have burned, according to the National Interagency Fire Center. The agency had about $1 billion — about 50 percent of its budget — to spend on fire suppression nationally, and in August it appeared they’d need a little bit more.

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End destructive practice of logging forests after wildfires

by Monica Bond, a wildlife biologist with the Wildlife Nature Institute
Sacramento Bee
September 26, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

When it comes to wildfire, the U.S. Forest Service has it all wrong. In its just-released plan to chop down trees in nearly 17,000 acres hit by last year’s King fire in the Eldorado National Forest – including logging in 28 occupied spotted owl territories – the agency trots out the same tired falsehoods. First, the Forest Service claims burned areas must be logged and replanted to “restore” the forest. In truth, wildfire is natural and necessary in the Sierra Nevada, even fires that burn very hot over huge areas, and human interference after fires is harmful rather than helpful. For thousands of years, big fires have burned in the Sierra Nevada and are as ecologically critical for native plants and animals as rain and snow. And the trees have always grown back on their own.

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Wildfire retardant flights under review; some ‘just painting stuff red’

Aerial drops of fire retardant on wildfires are one of the most dramatic images of firefighting. But critics cite high cost, limited effectiveness and potential harm to fish.
The Seattle Times
September 26, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Hundreds of thousands of gallons of chemical fire retardant were dumped from planes all over wildlands in Washington last fire season, more than almost anywhere in the West. And this summer’s even bigger fire season could see just as much of the crimson chemical slurry dumped on the landscape, if not more. Retardant can save human lives, property and wildland habitat. “It is a very important tool in the toolbox, for sure,” said Beth Lund, an incident commander with the U.S. Forest Service and veteran of 40 fire seasons, including the 110,000-acre Canyon Creek wildfire near John Day, Ore., this past summer. But fire retardant, she cautioned, is not a silver bullet. “You always have to follow up with boots on the ground,” Lund said. “It doesn’t put the fire

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LTE: NIMBY is back, again

Letter by Chris A. Linkenhoker
Ravalli Republic
September 26, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Jeff Lonn, of Hamilton, sent a very disturbing letter to the Missoulian entitled “Timber project threatens trail.” NIMBY (Not in My Back Yard), all over again. Apparently looking for sympathy in the Missoula community, Jeff is opposing a critically important forest health initiative, worth millions of dollars, because it’s going to disturb his idyllic bike ride for a few years. What Jeff doesn’t understand is that the ponderosa pine forest he is enjoying is not going to be there in a few years if we don’t start dealing with this Northern Rockies ecosystem that is seriously out of balance, and at risk. I’m very familiar with that Bitterroot National Forest project area. It is in serious need of treatment to fend off insect and disease outbreaks.

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How Good Earth’s plans have played out

Arizona Daily Sun
September 26, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Good Earth Power has made various commitments and projections since it took over the largest contract in the Four Forest Restoration Initiative two years ago. Here are a few of them with an update on how they are progressing. According to Good Earth Power’s initial projections, outlined in a technical plan submitted to the Forest Service in 2014, the company would be thinning 45,000 acres per year in 2015. According to Forest Service reports, the company had mechanically thinned 1,470 acres so far in 2015. In all, it has thinned just 4,700 acres.

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Letter – Oppressive regulation won’t prevent forest fires

Letter by Charles Phillips
Union-Bulletin
September 26, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

I make reference to the recent letter to the editor in the U-B about climate change and forest fires. Wow! Even the most zealous climate-change devotees will generally acknowledge there’s no connection between their theory, drought and resulting forest fires. Droughts occur from time-to-time due to natural changes in the climate and there is absolutely no correlation between the warming of the planet (real or imagined) and dry spells. Even Michael Mann and James Hansen will admit this. One of the primary causes of all the horrific fires this year is the refusal of the U.S. Forest Service to allow the clearing of all the dead wood, slash, diseased trees and other debris, which have made our forests tinder boxes.

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US Forest Service, WVU team up for national forest surveys

Associated Press in The Washington Post
September 29, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

ROANOKE, Va. — West Virginia University will survey visitors to the George Washington and Jefferson National Forests, with the aim of assisting state and local governments with tourism strategies. The voluntary surveys will start on Thursday, the beginning of a new month. The WVU students and employees are working in partnership with the U.S. Forest Service. Park visitors who agree to participate will be interviewed on their park activities and questioned related to their overall satisfaction with the experience. Besides assisting with local tourism and planning, the surveys are also intended to help forest managers and Congress learn how many people visit forest lands, what activities they enjoy and how much spending they bring to local economies.

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Pine beetles killing trees at Chincoteague

Whole patches of evergreen woods have turned red, but beetles could do more good than bad.
Delmarva Now
September 28, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

Southern Pine beetles are moving through Chincoteague National Wildlife Refuge like a fire, with about 200 acres of pine trees impacted in the most recent outbreak. And the damage is easy to see, even if you don’t know what to look for: whole patches of evergreen woods have turned red. But for the refuge’s managers, that’s not as bad as it sounds. The forest on the refuge isn’t very diverse, dominated by pines which out compete other types of trees for resources like sunlight, which they need to grow. The beetles are killing trees, but only the pine trees, leaving holes in the canopy for light to peek through to the floor below.

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Tom Still: In northern Wisconsin, economic worries and opportunities are unique

by TOM STILL | Wisconsin Technology Council president
Wisconsin State Journal
September 26, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

Forest products and paper: What worries many people close to Wisconsin’s forest products industry is a combination of threats that make it difficult to responsibly harvest enough timber. Regulations at the state and federal level are seen as daunting, the workforce is aging, and transportation costs and access hurdles get in the way of shipping wood products to mills and markets. Transporting wood products by truck can be too expensive, and pressures on the rail industry — including competition for freight trains and cars from the oil fields in the Dakotas — have become a daily challenge in northern Wisconsin. Scott Suder, a former legislator who works for the Wisconsin Paper Council, noted the nation’s fleet of rail boxcars has declined from about 200,000 to 120,000 boxcars in 10 years, with mandatory retirements on the horizon for many more.

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UK team geminates critically endangered Japanese birch

BBC News
September 29, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: International

UK scientists have successfully germinated seeds from the critically endangered Japanese Birch, a species that has just 21 known trees remaining. The seeds were collected last year during an expedition to a remote location in mountains near Tokyo. Experts suggest that the remaining wild population of Betula chichibuensis is too small to sustain itself unaided. The young trees will be shared with other arboretums in an effort to help conserve the threatened species. The International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN) forecasts a bleak outlook for the tree species in the wild. In its Red List of Threatened Species, it observes: “The small population and restricted distribution… make it susceptible to natural disaster or disease.

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Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy

Controversial pellet plant opens in Lavington

Global News
September 28, 2015
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: Canada, Canada West

LAVINGTON — Despite opposition from some residents, a pellet plant in Lavington is now up and running. “We are very pleased that the construction has been completed in a safe and efficient manner,” says Lavington Pellet president Leroy Reitsma. He says the plant is a $47 million investment in partnership with Tolko Industries and Pinnacle Renewable Energy. “Our new employees have worked hard to ready themselves for the task of safely operating this beautiful new state-of-the-art facility,” he says.  Some Lavington residents have spoken out against the location of the plant and the emissions it will be producing.

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Could forests store more carbon as the climate warms?

Grist.org
September 28, 2015
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: United States

Public lands are considered one of America’s best defenses against rising greenhouse gas emissions because the forests there pull vast quantities of carbon from the atmosphere and store it in tree trunks and roots. As the climate warms, public lands may become even more valuable in America’s effort to fight greenhouse gas emissions because climate change may increase the amount of carbon federal public lands in the lower 48 states are able to store by nearly 20 percent by 2050, a new study shows. The study, conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey and published Monday in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, is the first of its kind researching the carbon storage and sequestration potential on federal land. 

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Lignetics acquires wood pellet manufacturing plant in Strong, Maine

Lesprom Network
September 29, 2015
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: US East, United States

Lignetics, Inc. acquires assets of GF Funding LLC (whose facility was formerly known as Geneva Wood Fuels), expanding its footprint into Maine and upper New England, as the company says in the press release received by Lesprom Network. Ken Tucker, CEO of Lignetics stated, “Completing this acquisition is in line with our strategy to continue to expand our geographic footprint in the U.S. and remain the market leader in the residential wood pellet industry.” Tucker added, “Geneva has great customers which we look forward to continuing to support with the help of Jeff and Lucinda Allen and the rest of the team in Strong, Maine, whose goal is to continue to provide a superior product and excellent customer service.”

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