Tree Frog Forestry News

Daily Archives: October 5, 2015

Business & Politics

Trans-Pacific trade deal reached after marathon talks

Canadian Press in City News
October 4, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada

Twelve countries, including Canada, have agreed to create the world’s largest regional trade zone. After five days of marathon, around-the-clock negotiations, a deal has been reached to create the Trans-Pacific Partnership, which would cover 40 per cent of the world’s economy. The proposed agreement reduces or eliminates barriers in a wide range of sectors and could lead to more Canadian exports of pork, beef, canola, high-tech machinery and a variety of other products. It also entrenches new international trade standards in Asia, setting a template should any other countries in that fast-growing region – like China – want to join someday. Other parts will be controversial in Canada.

Trans-Pacific Partnership trade agreement reached from the CBC News

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Trans-Pacific Partnership: an Important Boost for Canada’s Forest Industry

Forest Products Association of Canada
October 5, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada

OTTAWA, – The Forest Products Association of Canada is pleased with the signing of the Trans-Pacific Partnership as it could pave the way to further diversifying markets and expanding exports. The comprehensive trade agreement reached with 12 countries was announced in Atlanta today. “The forest products industry in Canada has always been one of the country’s major exporters and this agreement is an historic opportunity to improve access to rapidly growing markets in the Asia Pacific”, says David Lindsay, the President and CEO of FPAC. Significant tariffs on forest products still exist in several of the Pacific markets with tariffs of up to 10% on wood and other forestry products in Japan, while Vietnam applies tariffs of up to 31%, Malaysia of up to 40%, Australia and New Zealand of up to 5% and Brunei up to 20%.

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Key insiders buying at Canfor Pulp Products

Who is Buying and Selling?
Globe and Mail
October 5, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

British Columbia focused Canfor Pulp Products Inc. has come to our attention because a number of key insiders have been buying. Canfor Pulp Products is 50.5-per-cent owned by Canfor Corp. Between July 29 and Sept. 24, director Peter Bentley acquired 40,000 common shares at an average price of $12.23. Mr. Bentley is the largest individual insider equity holder at the firm. In August, CEO Donald Kayne bought 1,050 shares at $11.76 while on September 21st Canfor director (and former B.C. Premier) Glen Clark bought 1,500 shares at $12.28. [END]

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Port Hawkesbury Paper to diversify as newsprint mill demolished

Mill continues to produce supercalendared paper, but eyes water bottling and sugar extraction
CBC News
October 2, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada East, Canada

Port Hawkesbury Paper is looking to the future and eyeing new projects as plans to demolish the idle newsprint mill move forward. “The roof of the mill is cement and from a safety standpoint, if not operating, roofs fail over time,” said Marc Dube, Port Hawkesbury Paper’s development manager. “We’re demolishing it before it becomes a safety issue,” The newsprint mill was idle when current owners, Stern Partners, bought the operation in 2012. Dube said there were never plans to restart it due operation costs and the dying market for newsprint. The company did try to sell it in its entirety, but Dube said there is no interest “across the globe” in dismantling and rebuilding it. Now, the company will sell what it can in parts, with the rest going to scrap.

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Public input sought on city needs, industrial park

Hungry Horse News
October 5, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States, US West

From plans for a revamped industrial park to affordable housing, the city of Columbia Falls is looking for input from citizens during two public hearings next week… The plan allows for loans and possibly grants for businesses looking to expand into the park. SmartLam, cross-laminated timber manufacturer, is expected to be an anchor tenant at the Park. If its plans come to fruition, it would be the largest cross-laminated timber plant in the world, quadrupling its current output from the company’s smaller plant located behind Super 1 Foods in Columbia Falls.

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New growth, new timber harvests

Herald and News
October 4, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States, US West

New management for 400,000 acres of timberland in Klamath County means the region can expect to experience new growth in the timber industry. Green Diamond Resource Co., the timber company that purchased several thousand acres of land last year from the Klamath Falls timber company JWTR, plans to boost its timber harvest in the next decade. Green Diamond, which is headquartered in Seattle, owns 1.4 million timber acres in three western states: Oregon, Washington and California.

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Second facility will allow reclaimed lumber company to expand product line

Albany Business Review
October 2, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: US East, United States

The founders of StoriedBoards will lease a manufacturing facility to expand the business’s line of fireplace mantels, built using reclaimed lumber from historic structures in the Northeast. Tyler Russell, who started the business about three years years ago with his brother and father, said the need for a second facility became apparent after the company received requests for mantels from customers outside of the area. “It expands our reach,” Russell said. “We sell our products in New York and New England right now because we can deliver materials there, but we can now box up a mantel locally in Lake George and send it to 90210. It expands the national reach of the business.”

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Global sawlog prices hit low levels in Q2

Timber Trades Journal
October 5, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: International

The Global Sawlog Price Index (GSPI) fell in the second quarter to its lowest level in six years, according to industry bulletin the Wood Resource Quarterly. Sawlog prices have fallen by 15-20% in a majority of the countries manufacturing softwood lumber in the past 12 months. The GSPI fell 1.5% to US$72.63/m3 in Q2. The index is currently at its lowest level since 2009, and is down 20% from its all-time high four years ago. Over the past year, sawlog prices have fallen the most in Central European, Eastern European and the Nordic countries predominantly as a result of a weakening Euro.

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Wood, Paper & Green Building

UBC, VAG propose tall wood towers: a sign of buildings to come?

Concrete plans
BC Business
October 5, 2015
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: Canada, Canada West

Where once only cement could go, a handful of high-profile building projects are opting to use a slightly more traditional material: timber. On Tuesday, it was plans for the new, wooden Vancouver Art Gallery. Then on Thursday, news came that construction on an 18-storey, 174-foot structure at UBC, to house around four hundred students, would begin later this fall. To be completed by early 2017, the future student residence will be made of timber atop a concrete base at a cost of $51.5 million. According to the architect, the use of wood will add an additional 8 per cent more to the cost compared to building with steel and concrete. All of that is to be funded by UBC with support from provincial and federal programs. The more prominent—but far least concrete—proposed future Vancouver Art Gallery would be an even taller 220-foot set of interconnected wooden boxes.

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UBC plans 18-storey wood building

Vancouver Courier
October 2, 2015
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: Canada, Canada West

The University of British Columbia plans to build what might be the world’s tallest wood building in B.C. — an 18-storey residence for students. … It is expected to be a showcase for B.C. engineered wood products. “By taking advantage of new building technologies, we’re also expanding our markets for B.C. wood products — and supporting jobs in the forest sector,” said B.C. Forestry Minister Steve Thomson. …“There are some additional costs associated with constructing in wood, at this height, for the first time that we’ve allowed,” said John Metras, UBC’s managing director of infrastructure development. He said those extras costs are being covered by funding from Natural Resources Canada, Forestry Innovation Investment, the Binational Softwood Lumber Council and B.C. Ministry of Forests.

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Column: Value-added jobs for Northern Ontario

By David Robinson – Green Party candidate in the Sudbury riding.
Northern Life
October 2, 2015
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: Canada East, Canada

Economic development for Northern Ontario means we have to learn to add value to the resources we export. I have heard a Conservative candidate say that by building pipelines we add value, but this is a deep, deep misunderstanding. Pumping oil out faster is not adding value.  To add value you have to do more to the resource before you ship it out. Wood is one of the two major export products for Northern Ontario. There is a major opportunity to add value to wood that we are passing up. Cross Laminated Timber (CLT) is a building product that will be in huge demand, and we have the resource and skill needed to produce it. This is an example “low-hanging fruit” for Northern economic development. …If I were elected as the Federal representative for Sudbury I would obviously be an effective promoter for this important economic initiative.

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COMMENTARY: Stop lightweight wood construction

By Scott Rumana (R), New Jersey Legislature
The Daily Journal
October 5, 2015
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: US East, United States

Following January’s devastating Avalon Bay at Edgewater fire that raced through the apartment complex, it was clear changes to the state’s construction code were necessary. In response, I introduced legislation that would place a moratorium of up to two years on the approval for and/or construction of multifamily housing developments using lightweight wood construction until the state’s building code was revised and adopted. On Sept. 21, the newly revised code took effect — without the desperately needed changes… officials noted that state code could not exceed International Code Council guidelines. Not all stakeholders, however, agree with the DCA’s interpretation of how far from the International Code Council’s standards New Jersey’s code can deviate. Firefighters, residents and lawmakers were baffled by the DCA’s explanation.

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Forestry

In the ‘new North,’ forest fires are permanently altering the landscape

Public Radio International
October 3, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, United States

Scientists are warning that intense wildfires in the northernmost areas of North America are changing the composition of the tundra ecosystem, degrading permafrost and contributing to a northward migration of trees, all of which have serious implications for the future of the climate. Warming air masses resulting from climate change create the conditions for intense forest fires in the cold north, explains Scott Goetz, a senior scientist and deputy director at the Woods Hole Research Center in Massachusetts. The severity of the fires is an important factor in determining how forests change in the future — and forests in the Arctic are changing in significant ways.

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Drones in the forestry sector

by Jennifer Ellson, Senior Communications Specialist,, FPInnovations
Coast Forest Products Association
October 1, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

While drones are often associated with government and military, several industries recognise the benefits of unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) technology and are turning to drones for a competitive advantage. Thus, since the summer of 2014 a team of
FPInnovations researchers has been conducting tests across Canada to study the potential uses of drones and validate those applications in the forest sector. During flights, drones have the capability to take thousands of still photos or live stream videos – in natural colour, multi-spectral mode as well as thermal infrared (IR). The still images can be assembled into 3D models – to identify tree species and estimate size and position of trees down to a few centimetres.

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Forestry Boot Camp Benefits Cranbrook Students

B-104 Total Country Radio
October 2, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Twenty four students are benefiting from a Cranbrook forestry boot camp. The boot camp is the result of more than 700 thousand dollars in Community and Employer Partnership funding. The bootcamp give participants classroom and work experience through the College of the Rockies. The students also learn about tree identification, silviculture, plant identification and Level 3 First Aid. They also get experience operating a brush saw and chainsaw. The goal of the program is to prepare students for work in the forestry sector.
The first session of the program ran started on September 14th. Session 2 gets underway on January 4th. END OF STORY

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Forestry Innovation Focus of UNBC Conference

250 News Prince George
October 2, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Prince George, B.C. – Innovation in the forest industry is the focus of a conference at the University of Northern British Columbia this week. It includes the participation of researchers, industry, and government leaders. “The goal is to get the conversations going between industry and research and government to some extent about where can we take forest research to the benefit of our communities,” said Dr. Kathy Lewis, chair of the UNBC Ecosystem Science and Management Program. She added Canada needs to play catch up in order to avoid falling further behind other countries when it comes to technological advances, for instance the Chinese.

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Vancouver tree sale hopes to boost forest canopy

CBC News
October 3, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

The Vancouver Park Board has 1,000 trees on sale for $10 each and is asking residents to find a home from them. “We need residents to also plant trees on their property in order to increase the urban tree canopy,” said Vancouver Park Board Chair John Coupar in a release. Canopy cover is how much ground is covered by trees leaves when seen from the air. West Point Grey has the most coverage in the city at 28.9 per cent, while Strathcona has the least at 5.9 cent. Meanwhile the majority of Vancouver’s tree cover — more than 60 per cent — is on private property and in the past two decades close to 24,000 trees have been removed from those areas.

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Logging worker deaths prompt WorkSafeBC inspections, 49 orders (w/ audio)

Intensive inspection finds poor cuts, bad safety practice and lack of first aid
CBC News
October 4, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

A spike in logger deaths in B.C. in July led to a barrage of WorkSafeBC site inspections and a campaign to urge tree fallers to refuse dangerous work. After 4 tree fallers died on the job in July 2015, WorkSafeBC carried out inspections of work sites along the province’s coast, and issued 49 orders for not following regulations. “Whenever we see a cluster of work-related deaths in one sector, it gets us concerned,” said Al Johnston, the vice-president of prevention services at WorkSafeBC. WorkSafeBC’s fatal and serious injury investigations team is investigating those deaths. Johnston said those orders were for violations such as poor tree falling cuts, having a tree brush up against another while it is being felled (which could pose a danger), and failing to have first aid available.

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Powell River?s Fuller brothers receive provincial woodlot honour

Ministry of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations
October 5, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

WEST KELOWNA – The Province is recognizing Ron and Doug Fuller for innovation and excellence in woodlot management, Minister of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations Steve Thomson announced today. The Fullers received a total of $5,000 for two of the Minister’s Awards for Innovation and Excellence in Woodlot Management: one for the Coast area and another for the Province overall. The brothers operate two woodlots with a combined area of 1,230 hectares near Hammil Lake, just east of Powell River. The awards recognize the Fuller family?s 30-year commitment to forest stewardship in the region.

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New water bomber joins provincial fleet

CBC News
October 2, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

The newest addition to Newfoundland and Labrador’s water bomber fleet was unveiled in St. John’s on Friday. The Minister of Transportation and Works, David Brazil, said the new CL-415 water bomber increases the province’s fire-fighting capacity. “We wanted to ensure that we have adequate assets for our forest fire fighting potential,” said Brazil. “It’s another ability for us to be able to ensure people are safe, particularly around forest fire season.” The province earmarked $17.7 million in Budget 2015 for this plane, bringing the overall fleet investment to $150 million.

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Conservancy aims to cut down 5,000 trees

Canadian Press in the Northern View
October 3, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

PUGWASH, N.S. – They usually busy themselves planting trees, doing bird surveys or building hiking trails. But on Sunday, a small army of volunteers with the Nature Conservancy of Canada will fan out through a Nova Scotia forest to take down 5,000 pesky trees. Bearing handsaws and clippers, the group is going after the glossy buckthorn, a pretty but pernicious shrub that threatens to crowd out native species in the Pugwash estuary. “It sounds really unusual for a nature group to be ripping trees out of the forest, but that’s exactly what we’re going to be doing,” Andrew Holland, a spokesman for the group, said with a laugh. “We call it the glossy buckthorn beatdown!”

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Santa Fe National Forest Issues Closure Order To Protect New Mexico Meadow Jumping Mouse Habitat

Los Alamos Daily Post
October 3, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

SANTA FE – The Santa Fe National Forest today issued a closure order for four areas on the Jemez Ranger District that have been identified as occupied habitat for the endangered New Mexico meadow jumping mouse. The closure areas are located along the Rio Cebolla and San Antonio Creek in the Jemez Mountains. In October 2014, the Forest constructed temporary fences in marshy areas along the Rio Cebolla and San Antonio Creek to protect the mouse’s habitat. The US Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) listed the mouse as an endangered species in June 2014, and these protections are needed until the Forest Service concludes consultation with the FWS. …Violations are punishable by a fine of not more than $5,000 for individuals and $10,000 for organizations, imprisonment of not more than six months, or both.

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Alder and Douglas fir seedlings endure hot, dry summer

The Longview Daily News
October 1, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Call them the little trees that could. Despite the excessively hot, dry weather that has parched the Northwest since spring, the millions of alder and Douglas fir seedlings planted in Southwest Washington forests have mostly survived, state foresters say. Jared Larwick, reforestation coordinator for the state Department of Natural Resource’s Pacific Cascade Region, said he predicts slightly higher mortality among the planted trees than in past years, but not by much. However, Larwick noted that the trees didn’t grow as tall this year, which he said is likely the result of the lack of precipitation.

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Bitterroot National Forest: Timber project should be replicated

Letter by Chris A. Linkenhoker
The Missoulian
October 2, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Jeff Lonn of Hamilton sent a very disturbing letter to the Missoulian titled “Timber project threatens trail” (Sept. 13). NIMBY (not in my back yard) all over again. Apparently looking for sympathy in the Missoula community, Jeff Lonn is opposing a critically important forest health initiative, worth millions of dollars, because it’s going to disturb his idyllic bike ride for a few years. What Lonn doesn’t understand is that the ponderosa pine forest he is enjoying is not going to be there in a few years if we don’t start dealing with this Northern Rockies ecosystem that is seriously out of balance, and at risk. I’m very familiar with that Bitterroot National Forest project area. It is in serious need of treatment to fend off insect and disease outbreaks.

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Comment period closes for timber project

Ravalli Republic
October 3, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

The public’s opportunity to comment on the Bitterroot National Forest’s first vegetative management project proposed under new rules allowing for an expedited process is over. Forest officials received 80 letters on the Westside Collaborative Vegetation Management Project by its scoping deadline earlier this week. The project proposes to commercially harvest or thin about 2,300 acres of national forest lands between Lost Horse Creek and Roaring Lion Creek, including some lands in the popular Coyote Coulee recreation area near Hamilton. Most of the concerns from the public focused on the estimated 3.5 miles of new permanent roads that would be constructed, said Chris Fox, the Bitterroot National Forest’s co-leader of the project. “

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Roseburg’s timber industry tied to Umpqua Community College by family, livelihood

The Oregonian
October 2, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

In the heart of Roseburg’s biggest industry, there is no one not affected by Thursday’s shooting at Umpqua Community College. The victims were coworkers, spouses and children of Roseburg Forest Products employees. …”The people of Douglas County are a crucial part of Roseburg Forest Products and our success as a company,” said a company spokeswoman. “Our hearts and praryers are with the victims and this has had a direct effect on our operations.” The timber company has 1,800 employees in the Roseburg and Riddle area, making it the region’s largest private employer. As well as providing the livelihood for a good portion of the town, the company has close ties with Umpqua Community College through the company’s founding Ford family.

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Judge says Forest Service violated FOIA in Wolf Creek plan

Grand Junction Daily Sentinel
October 2, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

DENVER — A federal court judge has ruled that the U.S. Forest Service unjustifiably withheld documents from environmentalists seeking information related to a proposed development in southwestern Colorado. The Durango Herald reports the judge found that the Forest Service violated the Freedom of Information Act by failing to conduct an adequate search and limiting what was disclosed without proper explanation. Environmental groups had requested information on the Village at Wolf Creek proposal, which they say would threaten wildlife in the area. Wednesday’s ruling marked a victory for Rocky Mountain Wild, the conservation group that filed the lawsuit.

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Pesticide Spraying Firm Penalized After Chemical-Exposure Incident

Oregon Public Broadcasting
October 1, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Two Oregon state agencies have fined helicopter company Applebee Aviation close to $10,000 and suspended the company’s license to spray pesticides after a worker complained of chemical exposure in Douglas County. Both the Oregon Occupational Safety and Health and the Oregon Department of Agriculture opened investigations in the case brought by Darryl Ivy, a truck driver and pesticide handler who was exposed to herbicides on the job and who released hundreds of photos and videos in alleging unsafe conditions during aerial herbicide sprays. Ivy’s case is the latest in an ongoing controversy over aerial herbicide spraying on private forestland in Oregon.

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The liberal mindset

The Nevada Appeal
October 1, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

I am always amazed at the thought processes people employ in their daily lives. None is more fascinating than those of liberals. … By curtailing or banning logging and grazing, they have created tinderboxes across the West. By many accounts, fires today are larger and more severe than in the past. Apparently, that is caused by climate change rather than the banned harvesting of renewable resources. Besides, aren’t burned tree stumps accentuated by the surrounding black ground more scenic and useful than a cow pie? Once the rains come again, and they will, the blackened landscape will most likely erode into something far less useful than a forest because roots and plants that hold the soil are gone. That will also be caused by climate change. I guarantee it.

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Editorial: The temporary fix in the temporary fix

The Bend Bulletin
October 2, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

The bar is set low for Congress when people celebrate that it managed to avoid a government shutdown. But in the legislation to keep the government running through Dec. 11, there was something vital for the West: $700 million in emergency funding to help with this year’s wildfire season costs. “Without emergency funding, the Forest Service and other agencies would be forced to sustain massive cuts to operations that Oregonians rely on, from campground maintenance, to timber harvests, to the very thinning and fuel reduction programs that help prevent these out-of-control wildfires,” said Sen. Jeff Merkley, D-Ore. The $700 million is needed. What Congress really needs to do, though, is make progress on a permanent fix for wildfire funding.

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Raising timber revenues from state forests unnecessary

Letter by Judith Lieberman
Indy Star
October 3, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

The Division of Forestry at Indiana Department of Natural Resources has proposed allowing a timber harvest in Indiana’s state forests of 14 million board feet per year. For years, timber harvests in Indiana state forests were only around 3 million board feet per year. But in recent years there has been an immense increase in timber taken from our state’s forests, 12 million board feet in 2013 and 17 million board feet in 2014. The reason cited for cutting down these trees — owned by Indiana citizens — is revenue, primarily to fund the Division of Forestry. These trees are cut down by commercial companies without much oversight by the state, which results in sloppy logging practices that inflict much more harm than necessary on the forest habitat.

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Public lands about much more than cutting trees

Bangor Daily News
October 4, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

Over the past few months, the revenue generated from the timber harvest on Maine’s public lands has been in the spotlight. The Bangor Daily News published an editorial Sept. 25 that highlights the numerous problems with Gov. Paul LePage’s plan to increase timber harvesting on these lands and divert timber harvest revenue to heating assistance for rural, low-income households. The BDN’s critique is right on target, but let’s delve a little more deeply. Many Mainers aren’t aware of what makes Maine’s public lands so special and what’s at stake if the governor gets his way.

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Park considers using beetles to fight destructive insect

Associated Press in Washington Post
October 5, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

STRASBURG, Va. — Predatory beetles could become a new tool in Shenandoah National Park’s effort to combat a destructive insect. The park plans to release predatory beetles at four locations within its boundaries. Public comments on the plan will be accepted through Oct. 15. Rolf Gubler, the park’s forest pest manager, tells the Northern Virginia Daily  that the beetle is the natural predator of the hemlock wooly adelgid. The beetle originates from Osaka, Japan. The hemlock wooly adelgid is an invasive species that has been devastating hemlock trees in the East for more than half-a-century. If the beetles are released, Gubler says visitors won’t see an immediate impact. He says the beetles take a long time to build populations to a point where they are successful.

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Soggy start to forest fire season

West Virginia MetroNews
October 5, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

CHARLESTON, W.Va. — Foresters in West Virginia probably couldn’t have scripted a better start to the fall forest fire season. The remenants of Hurricane Joaquin coupled with a stalled front over much of the state soaked the forests for the first weekend in October. “We had an extended dry spell through September, but that’s broken,” said Walt Jackson, Assistant State Forester for Forest Protection with the West Virginia Division of Forestry. “We’ve got significant rainfall and expect quite a bit more over the next several days, so it’s starting out as a wet fire season so far.” A wet fire season is the best kind of fire season for officials like Jackson, but even he knows in the autumn months conditions rarely stay damp for too long.

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Pickersgill calls for better use of Jamaica’s forest resources

Jamaica Gleaner
October 3, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: International

Minister of Water, Land, Environment and Climate Change, Robert Pickersgill is calling for a more sustainable use of the country’s forest resources. He says Jamaica’s forest resources have been negatively affected by the activities of individuals and corporations. The activities he points out include mining and quarrying for ore, housing and other forms of development and agriculture. In a message delivered by Chief Technical Director in the Ministry, Lieutenant Colonel Oral Khan, at the official national tree day planting ceremony and project at the St Andrew Technical High School, yesterday, Pickersgill said the unregulated cutting of trees for these activities can lead to widespread soil erosion.

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Asia Pulp and Paper ‘losing battle’ against forest fires

BBC News
October 5, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: International

Forest fires have blanketed parts of Malaysia in haze for months and show no sign of abating. Authorities in Indonesia and Singapore are putting legal pressure on a number of companies over their role in the fires. One is Asia Pulp and Paper, one of the world’s biggest paper and pulp producers. Aida Greenbury – the company’s managing director of sustainability – told the BBC’s Kiki Siregar the fires were starting outside its land, but that it was trying to be transparent about the situation.

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Orana-bred kiwi to be released to the wild in the Tongariro Forest

The Press in NZ Stuff
October 2, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: International

Canterbury born and raised, and now North Island-bound – two of our smallest, fuzziest and most endangered residents are moving out. Spot and Nui, two young brown kiwi, will travel from their homes at Orana Wildlife Park to be released into the wild in the Tongariro Forest on Saturday. The male and female kiwi were bred at Orana last breeding season and are two of nine kiwi from the park being released into this wild this year as part of the Kiwi Recovery Programme. The birds will be flown to Palmerston North and then be released by Department of Conservation staff.

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Forest fires in Indonesia choke much of south-east Asia

Weeks of acrid haze have caused flight delays, school closures in Malaysia and respiratory problems for thousands
The Guardian
October 5, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: International

The illegal burning of forests and agricultural land across Indonesia has blanketed much of south-east Asia in an acrid haze, leading to one of the most severe regional shutdowns in years. Malaysian Prime Minister Najib Razak said Indonesia needs to convict plantation companies for the noxious smoke, created by the annual destruction of plants during the dry season. Burning the land is a quick way to ready the soil for new seed. “We want Indonesia to take action,” he was quoted as saying by the state news agency Bernama, adding the smog was affecting the economy. “Indonesia alone can gather evidence and convict the companies concerned.”

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Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy

Bioenergy is an Alberta-grown solution: Opinion

Edmonton Journal
October 5, 2015
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: Canada, Canada West

The recently strengthened provincial climate change regulation (Specified Gas Emitter’s Regulation) has raised some eyebrows and questions as to how these targets will affect Alberta’s economic outlook. We took a close look at the bioenergy sector and found some surprising results, and even more encouraging promise. …In 2006, the forestry and agricultural sectors worked with the province to launch a bioenergy plan to develop and expand the production of renewable, low-carbon bioenergy products. A key part of the plan was the province’s Bioenergy Producer Credit Program, which expires in March 2016.

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Warmer Winters Slow the Growth of Forest Giants

Truthdig
October 4, 2015
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: Canada West, International

LONDON—Spring is arriving ever earlier as greenhouse gas levels rise and global temperatures warm, and the northern hemisphere growing season is now two weeks longer than it was in 1900. But, paradoxically, new research shows that forest giants that once responded to the early spring are beginning to slow down—because they miss the chill. Yongshuo Fu, an Earth system scientist at Peking University, Beijing, and colleagues report in Nature journal that they have measured a slowdown in the response of oaks and other forest citizens to the change in temperatures and carbon dioxide levels. …The reason is that, to take full advantage of the ever-earlier spring, these deciduous species first need to feel a period of chill. And as temperatures on average rise, the extent of true winter chill diminishes.

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