Tree Frog Forestry News

Daily Archives: October 5, 2015

Business & Politics

Trans-Pacific Partnership: an Important Boost for Canada’s Forest Industry

Forest Products Association of Canada
October 5, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada

OTTAWA, – The Forest Products Association of Canada is pleased with the signing of the Trans-Pacific Partnership as it could pave the way to further diversifying markets and expanding exports. The comprehensive trade agreement reached with 12 countries was announced in Atlanta today. “The forest products industry in Canada has always been one of the country’s major exporters and this agreement is an historic opportunity to improve access to rapidly growing markets in the Asia Pacific”, says David Lindsay, the President and CEO of FPAC. Significant tariffs on forest products still exist in several of the Pacific markets with tariffs of up to 10% on wood and other forestry products in Japan, while Vietnam applies tariffs of up to 31%, Malaysia of up to 40%, Australia and New Zealand of up to 5% and Brunei up to 20%.

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Trans-Pacific trade deal reached after marathon talks

Canadian Press in City News
October 4, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada

Twelve countries, including Canada, have agreed to create the world’s largest regional trade zone. After five days of marathon, around-the-clock negotiations, a deal has been reached to create the Trans-Pacific Partnership, which would cover 40 per cent of the world’s economy. The proposed agreement reduces or eliminates barriers in a wide range of sectors and could lead to more Canadian exports of pork, beef, canola, high-tech machinery and a variety of other products. It also entrenches new international trade standards in Asia, setting a template should any other countries in that fast-growing region – like China – want to join someday. Other parts will be controversial in Canada.

Trans-Pacific Partnership trade agreement reached from the CBC News

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Northern Pulp mill in Nova Scotia gets final payment under now-defunct Job Fund

Canadian Press in the Province
October 2, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada East, Canada

HALIFAX – A pulp mill in Nova Scotia is getting a final payment of $13.7 million under a defunct provincial funding program. The government says it has made the final disbursement to help cover the cost of a precipitator and a natural gas conversion at Northern Pulp’s mill in Abercrombie. The government agreed to $21.7 million in loans and incentives in April 2013 for capital projects that improved air quality and efficiency. Those projects included the new precipitator, wood chip plant construction and natural gas conversion. Northern Pulp had two other Jobs Fund agreements, $15 million for working capital in 2009 and $75 million for land purchase in 2010.

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Timber company says it bears no responsibility in Oso mudslide

Herald Net
October 2, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States, US West

OSO — A timber company that over the years clear-cut and thinned trees above the hill that unleashed the Oso mudslide has asked a King County judge to spare it from being forced into court next year to fight claims that it is partially responsible for the tragedy.Grandy Lake Forest Associates contends that neither liability law nor emerging evidence about the hill’s geology support the case brought against it by lawyers representing people who lost families and homes in the mudslide.Attorneys for the Skagit County-based company have filed a summary judgment motion, now scheduled to be heard Oct. 16. They contend that the facts are so clearly in Grandy Lake’s favor that a trial would be unnecessary.

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Fire hits Stoltze fuel piles

Daily Inter Lake
October 3, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States, US West

Damage was minimal from a fire Saturday afternoon at F.H. Stoltze Land & Lumber Co. near Columbia Falls. The fire broke out in midafternoon in two hog fuel piles on the northwestern corner of the plant property. More than 10 fire engines from area volunteer departments and state and federal agencies responded and kept the fire confined to the piles. “There was no damage and it won’t affect production,” said Chuck Roady, the company’s vice president and general manager. The burning piles were more than 20 feet high and located near stacks of unprocessed logs and a large fuel silo that towers over the facility. The silo is part of a boiler system that uses the hog fuel to produce power for the plant.

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New growth, new timber harvests

Herald and News
October 4, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States, US West

New management for 400,000 acres of timberland in Klamath County means the region can expect to experience new growth in the timber industry. Green Diamond Resource Co., the timber company that purchased several thousand acres of land last year from the Klamath Falls timber company JWTR, plans to boost its timber harvest in the next decade. Green Diamond, which is headquartered in Seattle, owns 1.4 million timber acres in three western states: Oregon, Washington and California.

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Public input sought on city needs, industrial park

Hungry Horse News
October 5, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States, US West

From plans for a revamped industrial park to affordable housing, the city of Columbia Falls is looking for input from citizens during two public hearings next week… The plan allows for loans and possibly grants for businesses looking to expand into the park. SmartLam, cross-laminated timber manufacturer, is expected to be an anchor tenant at the Park. If its plans come to fruition, it would be the largest cross-laminated timber plant in the world, quadrupling its current output from the company’s smaller plant located behind Super 1 Foods in Columbia Falls.

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Our View: More than the jobs go when mills shut down

Portland Press Herald
October 4, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: US East, United States

The jobs lost through layoffs or closures are the most striking part of the now-regular announcements out of Maine’s pulp and paper industry. But that’s just the start. Every time a mill slows or shuts down, and dozens or hundreds of people lose their livelihood, it releases a set of consequences that are killing once-vibrant communities. And despite years to prepare, Maine does not yet have an articulable, long-term plan for helping towns recover. As a result, the clock is ticking for many mill towns, and for a certain way of life outside of the state’s more urban areas.

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Second facility will allow reclaimed lumber company to expand product line

Albany Business Review
October 2, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: US East, United States

The founders of StoriedBoards will lease a manufacturing facility to expand the business’s line of fireplace mantels, built using reclaimed lumber from historic structures in the Northeast. Tyler Russell, who started the business about three years years ago with his brother and father, said the need for a second facility became apparent after the company received requests for mantels from customers outside of the area. “It expands our reach,” Russell said. “We sell our products in New York and New England right now because we can deliver materials there, but we can now box up a mantel locally in Lake George and send it to 90210. It expands the national reach of the business.”

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China and Asia dominate the international hardwood timber trade

IHB The Timber Network
October 5, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: International

The International Hardwood Conference (IHC) held in Copenhagen from 16-18 September identified access to raw materials, changes in global trade flow patterns and growing purchasing competition with buyers from other parts of the world as well as innovation in non-wood materials as key challenges currently facing the European hardwood industry. Rupert Oliver… showed that the global value of hardwood trade, adjusted for inflation, had rebounded close to pre-crisis levels in 2014. The total value of global trade in hardwood products (including logs, sawn, mouldings/decking, veneer, and plywood) was around US$38.5 billion in 2014, an increase of 10% on the previous year.

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Upcoming Asia Pulp & Paper pulp mill ‘will guzzle timber’

The Straits Times
October 5, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: International

PALEMBANG (Indonesia) – About two hours by speedboat from Palembang, the capital of South Sumatra province in Indonesia, an army of workers are rushing to complete one of the world’s largest pulp mills being built by Singapore-based Asia Pulp & Paper (APP). At 2,800ha, the mill, river and sea ports are the size of a town. APP is building the US$2.6 billion (S$3.7 billion) mill, majority-funded by a Chinese bank, to feed ever- growing demand for paper products from Asia’s rapidly growing middle class. But to do that, the mill, once running at full capacity by around 2018, will consume a vast amount of timber. And that has conservationists worried.

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Wood, Paper & Green Building

UBC plans 18-storey wood building

Vancouver Courier
October 2, 2015
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: Canada, Canada West

The University of British Columbia plans to build what might be the world’s tallest wood building in B.C. — an 18-storey residence for students. … It is expected to be a showcase for B.C. engineered wood products. “By taking advantage of new building technologies, we’re also expanding our markets for B.C. wood products — and supporting jobs in the forest sector,” said B.C. Forestry Minister Steve Thomson. …“There are some additional costs associated with constructing in wood, at this height, for the first time that we’ve allowed,” said John Metras, UBC’s managing director of infrastructure development. He said those extras costs are being covered by funding from Natural Resources Canada, Forestry Innovation Investment, the Binational Softwood Lumber Council and B.C. Ministry of Forests.

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UBC, VAG propose tall wood towers: a sign of buildings to come?

Concrete plans
BC Business
October 5, 2015
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: Canada, Canada West

Where once only cement could go, a handful of high-profile building projects are opting to use a slightly more traditional material: timber. On Tuesday, it was plans for the new, wooden Vancouver Art Gallery. Then on Thursday, news came that construction on an 18-storey, 174-foot structure at UBC, to house around four hundred students, would begin later this fall. To be completed by early 2017, the future student residence will be made of timber atop a concrete base at a cost of $51.5 million. According to the architect, the use of wood will add an additional 8 per cent more to the cost compared to building with steel and concrete. All of that is to be funded by UBC with support from provincial and federal programs. The more prominent—but far least concrete—proposed future Vancouver Art Gallery would be an even taller 220-foot set of interconnected wooden boxes.

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Column: Value-added jobs for Northern Ontario

By David Robinson – Green Party candidate in the Sudbury riding.
Northern Life
October 2, 2015
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: Canada East, Canada

Economic development for Northern Ontario means we have to learn to add value to the resources we export. I have heard a Conservative candidate say that by building pipelines we add value, but this is a deep, deep misunderstanding. Pumping oil out faster is not adding value.  To add value you have to do more to the resource before you ship it out. Wood is one of the two major export products for Northern Ontario. There is a major opportunity to add value to wood that we are passing up. Cross Laminated Timber (CLT) is a building product that will be in huge demand, and we have the resource and skill needed to produce it. This is an example “low-hanging fruit” for Northern economic development. …If I were elected as the Federal representative for Sudbury I would obviously be an effective promoter for this important economic initiative.

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COMMENTARY: Stop lightweight wood construction

By Scott Rumana (R), New Jersey Legislature
The Daily Journal
October 5, 2015
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: US East, United States

Following January’s devastating Avalon Bay at Edgewater fire that raced through the apartment complex, it was clear changes to the state’s construction code were necessary. In response, I introduced legislation that would place a moratorium of up to two years on the approval for and/or construction of multifamily housing developments using lightweight wood construction until the state’s building code was revised and adopted. On Sept. 21, the newly revised code took effect — without the desperately needed changes… officials noted that state code could not exceed International Code Council guidelines. Not all stakeholders, however, agree with the DCA’s interpretation of how far from the International Code Council’s standards New Jersey’s code can deviate. Firefighters, residents and lawmakers were baffled by the DCA’s explanation.

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New timber product graces Wellington Airport’s extension

Stuff.co.nz
October 5, 2015
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: International

Wellington airport’s extension project is putting a new timber product to good effect. Glulam, short for glue laminated timber, is an unusual choice for cross bracing, but the airport has chosen curved dense pieces of timber about six metres high to structurally support the roof and facade of its $58 million domestic terminal extension. Assembled like a row of giant letter X’s, the glulam columns will be able to be seen through a glass facade.

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Forestry

In the ‘new North,’ forest fires are permanently altering the landscape

Public Radio International
October 3, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, United States

Scientists are warning that intense wildfires in the northernmost areas of North America are changing the composition of the tundra ecosystem, degrading permafrost and contributing to a northward migration of trees, all of which have serious implications for the future of the climate. Warming air masses resulting from climate change create the conditions for intense forest fires in the cold north, explains Scott Goetz, a senior scientist and deputy director at the Woods Hole Research Center in Massachusetts. The severity of the fires is an important factor in determining how forests change in the future — and forests in the Arctic are changing in significant ways.

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UBC is heading to Kamloops to talk about forestry

Kamloops This Week
October 4, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

UBC is heading to Kamloops to talk about forestry — and, in particular, how it affects the environment. UBC alumni relations officer Janna Kellett said the Thursday, Oct. 8, event will include information gleaned from research the university’s faculty of forestry is doing, studies addressing climate change, health links to forestry, habitat loss and minimizing the effects of wildfires. It will even bring in the concept of educational video games as students are working with Forest Humus Forms Quest, a game designed for smartphones that leads them through identifying soil and plants in the forest, answering questions along the way.

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Powell River?s Fuller brothers receive provincial woodlot honour

Ministry of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations
October 5, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

WEST KELOWNA – The Province is recognizing Ron and Doug Fuller for innovation and excellence in woodlot management, Minister of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations Steve Thomson announced today. The Fullers received a total of $5,000 for two of the Minister’s Awards for Innovation and Excellence in Woodlot Management: one for the Coast area and another for the Province overall. The brothers operate two woodlots with a combined area of 1,230 hectares near Hammil Lake, just east of Powell River. The awards recognize the Fuller family?s 30-year commitment to forest stewardship in the region.

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Logging worker deaths prompt WorkSafeBC inspections, 49 orders (w/ audio)

Intensive inspection finds poor cuts, bad safety practice and lack of first aid
CBC News
October 4, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

A spike in logger deaths in B.C. in July led to a barrage of WorkSafeBC site inspections and a campaign to urge tree fallers to refuse dangerous work. After 4 tree fallers died on the job in July 2015, WorkSafeBC carried out inspections of work sites along the province’s coast, and issued 49 orders for not following regulations. “Whenever we see a cluster of work-related deaths in one sector, it gets us concerned,” said Al Johnston, the vice-president of prevention services at WorkSafeBC. WorkSafeBC’s fatal and serious injury investigations team is investigating those deaths. Johnston said those orders were for violations such as poor tree falling cuts, having a tree brush up against another while it is being felled (which could pose a danger), and failing to have first aid available.

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Vancouver tree sale hopes to boost forest canopy

CBC News
October 3, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

The Vancouver Park Board has 1,000 trees on sale for $10 each and is asking residents to find a home from them. “We need residents to also plant trees on their property in order to increase the urban tree canopy,” said Vancouver Park Board Chair John Coupar in a release. Canopy cover is how much ground is covered by trees leaves when seen from the air. West Point Grey has the most coverage in the city at 28.9 per cent, while Strathcona has the least at 5.9 cent. Meanwhile the majority of Vancouver’s tree cover — more than 60 per cent — is on private property and in the past two decades close to 24,000 trees have been removed from those areas.

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Conservancy aims to cut down 5,000 trees

Canadian Press in the Northern View
October 3, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

PUGWASH, N.S. – They usually busy themselves planting trees, doing bird surveys or building hiking trails. But on Sunday, a small army of volunteers with the Nature Conservancy of Canada will fan out through a Nova Scotia forest to take down 5,000 pesky trees. Bearing handsaws and clippers, the group is going after the glossy buckthorn, a pretty but pernicious shrub that threatens to crowd out native species in the Pugwash estuary. “It sounds really unusual for a nature group to be ripping trees out of the forest, but that’s exactly what we’re going to be doing,” Andrew Holland, a spokesman for the group, said with a laugh. “We call it the glossy buckthorn beatdown!”

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New water bomber joins provincial fleet

CBC News
October 2, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

The newest addition to Newfoundland and Labrador’s water bomber fleet was unveiled in St. John’s on Friday. The Minister of Transportation and Works, David Brazil, said the new CL-415 water bomber increases the province’s fire-fighting capacity. “We wanted to ensure that we have adequate assets for our forest fire fighting potential,” said Brazil. “It’s another ability for us to be able to ensure people are safe, particularly around forest fire season.” The province earmarked $17.7 million in Budget 2015 for this plane, bringing the overall fleet investment to $150 million.

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Study: thinning kept Corner Creek Fire off the Ochoco

Recent report says clearing of dense stands of smaller trees helped slow intensity of fire as it approached Ochoco National Forest
East Oregonian
October 1, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Recent fuels treatments on the Ochoco National Forest and Prineville BLM District likely helped prevent spread of the Corner Creek Fire onto local public lands. A recent briefing paper from the USDA Forest Service found that previous fuel treatments were very effective in helping firefighters control the spread of the massive wildfire that scorched much of the John Day area. The Corner Creek Fire, started by lightning on June 29 about 11 miles south of Dayville, grew to nearly 30,000 acres before it was successfully contained. “It really reduced the amount of fuel that the fire had to burn,” said Patrick Lair, public affairs specialist with Ochoco National Forest. “The intensity of that fire dropped way down in those places. That really gives firefighters the ability to go in and put in a direct line. In other words, they can get in front of it.”

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Habitat variability key to protecting cutthroat trout

“We concluded that variability in stream habitat protects trout,” researcher Brooke Penaluna said.
United Press International
October 2, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

PORTLAND, Ore., — New research suggests trout like and need variety. Variety, scientists say, can work to shield them from environmental troubles. Deforestation and climate change are two of the top threats to America’s native trout species. Scientists are trying to understand how to better protect cutthroat trout — the red-jawed species of the Rockies and Pacific tributaries. A new study published in the journal PLOS ONE, suggests habitat variability is key to safeguarding a favorite of both fishermen and conservationists in the American West. Streams with high habitat variability are those with a greater variety of water depths and characteristics — slow runs and fast riffles, deep holes and long, medium-depth pools.

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Supervisors to consider dead trees emergency

Visalia Times-Delta
October 4, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Tulare County supervisors are expected to discuss Tuesday whether to join four other Valley counties in proclaiming a local state of emergency because of the large number of trees dying in the Sierrra-Nevada mountains due to the drought. The board the members believe the millions of dying trees is a serious problem, as they provide potential fuel for wildland fires, but the situation doesn’t yet constitute an emergency, said Debbie Vaughn, a senior administrative analyst for the county.

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The Numbers Crunch: New normal for wildfires requires new approaches

Sacramento Bee (blog)
October 2, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

We’ve all seen how bad this year’s wildfire season has been in California. Now we have confirmation of how historically horrible it has been – along with a warning that we better get used to it. The Public Policy Institute of California updated Cal Fire records to account for the late-summer Rough, Valley and Butte fires. The Rough fire in Fresno County makes the all-time top 20 list for acres burned, while the Valley fire in Lake County and Butte fire in Amador and Calaveras counties make the top 10 for most destructive. …Fire season isn’t over yet. Now the highest risk moves to Southern California, which usually has its biggest wildfires in the fall when Santa Ana winds pick up. Many on the all-time lists burned in Los Angeles, San Diego or Ventura counties.

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Editorial: The temporary fix in the temporary fix

The Bend Bulletin
October 2, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

The bar is set low for Congress when people celebrate that it managed to avoid a government shutdown. But in the legislation to keep the government running through Dec. 11, there was something vital for the West: $700 million in emergency funding to help with this year’s wildfire season costs. “Without emergency funding, the Forest Service and other agencies would be forced to sustain massive cuts to operations that Oregonians rely on, from campground maintenance, to timber harvests, to the very thinning and fuel reduction programs that help prevent these out-of-control wildfires,” said Sen. Jeff Merkley, D-Ore. The $700 million is needed. What Congress really needs to do, though, is make progress on a permanent fix for wildfire funding.

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The liberal mindset

The Nevada Appeal
October 1, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

I am always amazed at the thought processes people employ in their daily lives. None is more fascinating than those of liberals. … By curtailing or banning logging and grazing, they have created tinderboxes across the West. By many accounts, fires today are larger and more severe than in the past. Apparently, that is caused by climate change rather than the banned harvesting of renewable resources. Besides, aren’t burned tree stumps accentuated by the surrounding black ground more scenic and useful than a cow pie? Once the rains come again, and they will, the blackened landscape will most likely erode into something far less useful than a forest because roots and plants that hold the soil are gone. That will also be caused by climate change. I guarantee it.

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Pesticide Spraying Firm Penalized After Chemical-Exposure Incident

Oregon Public Broadcasting
October 1, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Two Oregon state agencies have fined helicopter company Applebee Aviation close to $10,000 and suspended the company’s license to spray pesticides after a worker complained of chemical exposure in Douglas County. Both the Oregon Occupational Safety and Health and the Oregon Department of Agriculture opened investigations in the case brought by Darryl Ivy, a truck driver and pesticide handler who was exposed to herbicides on the job and who released hundreds of photos and videos in alleging unsafe conditions during aerial herbicide sprays. Ivy’s case is the latest in an ongoing controversy over aerial herbicide spraying on private forestland in Oregon.

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Judge says Forest Service violated FOIA in Wolf Creek plan

Grand Junction Daily Sentinel
October 2, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

DENVER — A federal court judge has ruled that the U.S. Forest Service unjustifiably withheld documents from environmentalists seeking information related to a proposed development in southwestern Colorado. The Durango Herald reports the judge found that the Forest Service violated the Freedom of Information Act by failing to conduct an adequate search and limiting what was disclosed without proper explanation. Environmental groups had requested information on the Village at Wolf Creek proposal, which they say would threaten wildlife in the area. Wednesday’s ruling marked a victory for Rocky Mountain Wild, the conservation group that filed the lawsuit.

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Roseburg’s timber industry tied to Umpqua Community College by family, livelihood

The Oregonian
October 2, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

In the heart of Roseburg’s biggest industry, there is no one not affected by Thursday’s shooting at Umpqua Community College. The victims were coworkers, spouses and children of Roseburg Forest Products employees. …”The people of Douglas County are a crucial part of Roseburg Forest Products and our success as a company,” said a company spokeswoman. “Our hearts and praryers are with the victims and this has had a direct effect on our operations.” The timber company has 1,800 employees in the Roseburg and Riddle area, making it the region’s largest private employer. As well as providing the livelihood for a good portion of the town, the company has close ties with Umpqua Community College through the company’s founding Ford family.

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Soggy start to forest fire season

West Virginia MetroNews
October 5, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

CHARLESTON, W.Va. — Foresters in West Virginia probably couldn’t have scripted a better start to the fall forest fire season. The remenants of Hurricane Joaquin coupled with a stalled front over much of the state soaked the forests for the first weekend in October. “We had an extended dry spell through September, but that’s broken,” said Walt Jackson, Assistant State Forester for Forest Protection with the West Virginia Division of Forestry. “We’ve got significant rainfall and expect quite a bit more over the next several days, so it’s starting out as a wet fire season so far.” A wet fire season is the best kind of fire season for officials like Jackson, but even he knows in the autumn months conditions rarely stay damp for too long.

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Park considers using beetles to fight destructive insect

Associated Press in Washington Post
October 5, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

STRASBURG, Va. — Predatory beetles could become a new tool in Shenandoah National Park’s effort to combat a destructive insect. The park plans to release predatory beetles at four locations within its boundaries. Public comments on the plan will be accepted through Oct. 15. Rolf Gubler, the park’s forest pest manager, tells the Northern Virginia Daily  that the beetle is the natural predator of the hemlock wooly adelgid. The beetle originates from Osaka, Japan. The hemlock wooly adelgid is an invasive species that has been devastating hemlock trees in the East for more than half-a-century. If the beetles are released, Gubler says visitors won’t see an immediate impact. He says the beetles take a long time to build populations to a point where they are successful.

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Public lands about much more than cutting trees

Bangor Daily News
October 4, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

Over the past few months, the revenue generated from the timber harvest on Maine’s public lands has been in the spotlight. The Bangor Daily News published an editorial Sept. 25 that highlights the numerous problems with Gov. Paul LePage’s plan to increase timber harvesting on these lands and divert timber harvest revenue to heating assistance for rural, low-income households. The BDN’s critique is right on target, but let’s delve a little more deeply. Many Mainers aren’t aware of what makes Maine’s public lands so special and what’s at stake if the governor gets his way.

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Forest fires in Indonesia choke much of south-east Asia

Weeks of acrid haze have caused flight delays, school closures in Malaysia and respiratory problems for thousands
The Guardian
October 5, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: International

The illegal burning of forests and agricultural land across Indonesia has blanketed much of south-east Asia in an acrid haze, leading to one of the most severe regional shutdowns in years. Malaysian Prime Minister Najib Razak said Indonesia needs to convict plantation companies for the noxious smoke, created by the annual destruction of plants during the dry season. Burning the land is a quick way to ready the soil for new seed. “We want Indonesia to take action,” he was quoted as saying by the state news agency Bernama, adding the smog was affecting the economy. “Indonesia alone can gather evidence and convict the companies concerned.”

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Orana-bred kiwi to be released to the wild in the Tongariro Forest

The Press in NZ Stuff
October 2, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: International

Canterbury born and raised, and now North Island-bound – two of our smallest, fuzziest and most endangered residents are moving out. Spot and Nui, two young brown kiwi, will travel from their homes at Orana Wildlife Park to be released into the wild in the Tongariro Forest on Saturday. The male and female kiwi were bred at Orana last breeding season and are two of nine kiwi from the park being released into this wild this year as part of the Kiwi Recovery Programme. The birds will be flown to Palmerston North and then be released by Department of Conservation staff.

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Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy

Warmer Winters Slow the Growth of Forest Giants

Truthdig
October 4, 2015
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: Canada West, International

LONDON—Spring is arriving ever earlier as greenhouse gas levels rise and global temperatures warm, and the northern hemisphere growing season is now two weeks longer than it was in 1900. But, paradoxically, new research shows that forest giants that once responded to the early spring are beginning to slow down—because they miss the chill. Yongshuo Fu, an Earth system scientist at Peking University, Beijing, and colleagues report in Nature journal that they have measured a slowdown in the response of oaks and other forest citizens to the change in temperatures and carbon dioxide levels. …The reason is that, to take full advantage of the ever-earlier spring, these deciduous species first need to feel a period of chill. And as temperatures on average rise, the extent of true winter chill diminishes.

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Bioenergy is an Alberta-grown solution: Opinion

Edmonton Journal
October 5, 2015
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: Canada, Canada West

The recently strengthened provincial climate change regulation (Specified Gas Emitter’s Regulation) has raised some eyebrows and questions as to how these targets will affect Alberta’s economic outlook. We took a close look at the bioenergy sector and found some surprising results, and even more encouraging promise. …In 2006, the forestry and agricultural sectors worked with the province to launch a bioenergy plan to develop and expand the production of renewable, low-carbon bioenergy products. A key part of the plan was the province’s Bioenergy Producer Credit Program, which expires in March 2016.

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Southland wood supply suitable: report

Stuff.co.nz
October 5, 2015
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: International

A Southland scheme to reduce emissions has received a confidence boost as a study confirms the region has enough wood fuel to support it. Wood Energy South is a $1.5M joint project between Venture Southland and the Energy Efficiency and Conservation Authority (EECA), and offers subsidies for industries which switch to woodfuel boilers. But business owners were concerned Southland would not be able to supply enough fuel for the boilers to continue being cost effective. A new report from industry experts reveals the Southland and South Otago regions can produce enough wood fuel for those who choose to switch until 2050.

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