Tree Frog Forestry News

Daily Archives: October 6, 2015

Business & Politics

Coast Forest Products Association Applauds Signing of the Trans-Pacific Partnership

Coast Forest Products Association
October 5, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada

VANCOUVER: Coast Forest Products Association applauds Minister Ed Fast and the Government of Canada for completing the negotiations today in the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP). Forest products are the number one export category in British Columbia with approximately $11.7 billion worth of products exported annually. A significant portion is shipped to Asian-Pacific markets. The completion of the new agreement between Canada and eleven other partner countries will eliminate tariffs on a range of forest products from newsprint to lumber to panels in TPP countries. This will provide further opportunities for British Columbian companies – including those on the coast.

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Canadian business owners applaud signing of TPP

The Globe and Mail
October 5, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada

A broad-cross section of Canadian businesses – from cattle ranchers and grain exporters to small-scale manufacturers – applauded Canada’s signing of the Trans Pacific Partnership, a monumental trade deal that will open up new export opportunities in a number of fast-growing markets along the Pacific Rim. …“From our perspective, agreements that work to remove tariffs and other barriers to our products are good news,” said Wayne Guthrie, a senior vice-president for sales and marketing at Canfor Corp., one of Canada’s largest forestry companies. “About $1-billion in Canadian forest products were subject to tariffs last year, so we are hopeful the TPP will improve access and eliminate unfair treatment of Canadian products in key Pacific markets.”

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Business fined $25K after log shoots into man’s groin, exits through buttocks

Manitoba lumber company fined for workplace safety violation after case of ‘worst possible timing’
CBC News
October 5, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

A Manitoba lumber manufacturer has been fined $25,000 after one of its employees had a log shot through his groin and out his buttocks in a case of “worst possible timing” while on the job. Judge Christine Harapiak made the ruling on Friday, after Swan-River based Spruce Products Ltd. pleaded guilty to violating the Workplace Safety and Health Act. The employee was working on an edger, a machine used to smooth rough pieces of lumber, in May 2013 when the accident happened. The worker noticed a log had gotten stuck on its way into the machine, and put it in reverse so he could adjust its position on the conveyer belt.

Lumber company fined $20K after serious accident from the Winnipeg Free Press

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Canfor shows it’s an important linchpin

Clearwater Times in BC Local News
October 5, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

There are about 150 employees at Canfor-Vavenby Steve Planeta mugand their payroll is close to $20 million per year, according to division manager Steve Planeta. Overall, the division brings in nearly $100 million per year to the local economy, he said. Those statistics were among the information passed along during a public tour of the sawmill facility held Sept. 24 as part of National Forest Week. Despite the big numbers, it isn’t easy to make money in the forest industry these days. “It’s getting tougher and tougher,” Planeta said. “There’s very little left for profit.” Canfor-Vavenby was profitable during the first part of this year but not in the second. Two-thirds of the cost of producing lumber is in the logs.

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BC business likes Pacific trade deal

By Tom Fletcher
BCLocalNews
October 5, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

B.C.’s Asia trade will benefit from the Trans-Pacific Partnership, the world’s largest free trade agreement, reached Monday after all-night discussions with 11 Pacific Rim countries, according to business and provincial government officials. …Much of B.C.’s progress in lumber exports has been in China, which is not part of the TPP talks. B.C. averages $4.8 billion annually in forest products to TPP countries and 1.5 billion worth of pulp and paper, despite duties up to five per cent in Australia and New Zealand, up to 10 per cent in Japan and up to 40 per cent in Malaysia.

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B.C. expected to gain in Trans-Pacific Partnership trade pact

By Gordon Hoekstra and Tara Carman: Deal must yet be ratified by 12 participating governments
Vancouver Sun
October 5, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

A tentative agreement reached on a sweeping Pacific Rim trade pact is expected to be a net benefit to British Columbia, which already has extensive trade links with Asia.  Most business and industry leaders here said had Canada — and British Columbia — not been part of the 12-country Trans-Pacific Partnership, it would likely have lost market share and faced the threat of becoming marginalized in the growing Asian economy. …Among business and industry groups in the province that support the deal are the B.C. Business Council, the B.C. Chamber of Commerce, the Vancouver Board of Trade, the Mining Association of B.C., the Council of Forest Industries and the B.C. Seafood Alliance.

Opinion: TPP more comprehensive than NAFTA from the Vancouver Sun

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Pacific trade deal good for Sudbury, says Slade

Northern Life
October 5, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada East, Canada

“The Trans-Pacific Partnership agreement will benefit all of Canada but, we in Greater Sudbury with our strong resource and manufacturing sectors, will see many more doors opened for products and services produced here in Greater Sudbury with our new trading partners” says Fred Slade, Conservative Party of Canada candidate. …Ontario’s forest products sector supports over 170,000 direct and indirect jobs in over 260 communities, including Greater Sudbury. The TPP will eliminate tariffs on forestry and value-added wood products and create new opportunities in key markets such as Japan, Malaysia and Vietnam.

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2-alarm commercial fire rages at Pierce County lumber mill

Q13 FOX
October 5, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States, US West

PIERCE COUNTY– Fire crews worked against a large 2-alarm fire at a Pierce County lumber mill Monday morning. Central Pierce Fire crews tweeted about the fire at the Cascade Mill and Supply around 7:30 a.m., officials said. A short time later, the fire was knocked down, crews said. The damage was estimated at about $1.5 million to the mill. A preliminary cause of the fire was listed as accidental, fire crews said.

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As Weyerhauser’s policies shift, so should ours

South County Spotlight
October 2, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States, US West

Weyerhaeuser Co. is not the timber company it once was. Now, it operates in speculation, real estate and subdivisions, and is run by hedge fund managers. The people who now run the company care nothing for rural areas whose residents for generations have hunted and hiked through the vast forests of Columbia County. The new Weyerhaeuser officials have little regard for the term “good corporate neighbors.” Their bottom line is simply making more money, no matter how small in the scheme of the company’s overall wealth, by selling a limited supply of local permits and closing off access to the forests.

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No lift on log export ban: Ministry

Jakarta Post
October 6, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: International

The Trade Ministry is currently revising a number of import and export policies to regain investors’ trust, but the ban on the export of logs will remain in place. “We will leave open [exporting] for pulp, but log exports will stay closed,” said the ministry’s director of agriculture and forestry exports, Nurlaila Nur Muhammad, on Monday as quoted by Antara news agency. Previously, the Industry Ministry’s director general for agro-industry, Panggah Susanto, said that any decision to boost log exports would be misguided, since the domestic processing industry still needed the material. According to Panggah, expanding domestic wood processing industries, such as furniture manufacturing, represented a big opportunity since the sector could absorb many workers, especially in more remote areas.

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Wood, Paper & Green Building

OSU receives $6 million pledge from Sierra Pacific Industries for wood products lab

The Register-Guard
October 6, 2015
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: United States, US West

California-based Sierra Pacific Industries, one of the largest lumber companies in the United States, has pledged $6 million to the College of Forestry at Oregon State University for its new advanced wood products laboratory. In recognition of Sierra Pacific’s contribution, OSU officials said Monday, the laboratory will be named in honor of A.A. “Red” Emmerson who, with his father R. H. “Curly” Emmerson, founded the company. The 20,000-square-foot laboratory is part of OSU’s 85,000-square-foot Oregon Forest Science Complex initiative, which will be the new home of the College of Forestry. The university hopes to use the laboratory to establish Oregon as an international leader in the way wood is used in tall commercial and residential structures, which could have a major impact on the state’s economy, particularly the rural areas, OSU President Ed Ray said.

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Forestry

Province funds job skills training

Cranbrook Daily Townsman
October 5, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

The provincial government is pitching in some funding towards forestry training for 24 students enrolled at a program at the College of the Rockies. Roughly $700,000 was funnelled into the Community and Employer Partnerships program, which will give the students both classroom and field experience in the forestry sector. The students will learn about tree identification, silviculture, brush saw and chainsaw operation and maintenance, plant identification and Level 3 First Aid. The field experience will prepare the students for jobs such as junior field technicians, chainsaw operators, research assistants or silviculture surveyors. “Acceptance into the Advanced Forestry Skills Training program allows me the opportunity to enter into a strong, growing industry with more than an entry-level skill set,” said Pamela Currie, a student within the program.

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Kelowna forester honoured with award

Kelowna Capital News
October 5, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Kelowna resident Ernie Day was honoured for his innovation and excellence in woodlot management at the BC Woodlot Association’s annual meeting in West Kelowna last weekend. Day runs a 730-hectare woodlot in and around the Mission Creek watershed. The $2,500 award, presented to Day by local MLA Steve Thomson, the provincial cabinet minister responsible for forest management, recognized Day’s 30-year commitment to forest stewardship and acknowledges the work he has done to integrate his woodlot into the surrounding community. Day’s woodlot contains a portion of private land that has been in his family since 1897 and supports a variety of activities including horseback riding, hiking, biking, cattle grazing and timber harvesting.

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Warming Will Have Big Impact On Rim Country Forests

Payson Roundup
October 2, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

A mounting tally of studies have cast doubt on the hope that forests can buffer climate change. In fact, forests may actually exaggerate the impact of a steady rise in temperatures. The complex way forests respond to drought, rising temperatures and rising levels of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere underscores the complex impact of the near doubling of carbon dioxide levels in the past century. Many of those impacts will hit home in Rim Country, perched on the edge of the world’s largest ponderosa pine forest. Payson sits right on the boundary between six million acres of ponderosa pine to the north and a vast expanse of juniper to the south.

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Salvage and forest restoration project begins

The Porterville Recorder
October 2, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Implementation of the Shirley Fire Salvage and Forest Restoration Project in the Sequoia National Forest, Kern River Ranger District is underway. Sierra Forest Timber Products has been awarded the contract for the project and will begin work soon. Dead trees will be cut and transported by truck to the sawmill in Terra Bella. Felling, piling and burning trees less than 12 inches in diameter within 100 feet of public roads and trails will also be incorporated as part of the project to reduce fuel-loading within portions of the burn scar not being commercially harvested. Burning of piles and understory will not occur until later in the fall and winter.

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Why the spruce can’t be a little more orderly

First lodgepole pine, now spruce trees: succession in our mountain forests
Mountain Town News
October 4, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

GUNNISON, Colo. – With not much left to feed on, the mountain bark beetles of northern Colorado have been faltering the last few years. But spruce trees in south-central Colorado have been getting hit hard. Foresters estimate 30 percent morality of spruce trees on the Grand Mesa, Uncompahgre, and Gunnison National Forests. “What we’re really facing is a natural process exacerbated by all the droughts we’ve had,” said Scott Armentrout, the forest supervisor. In one area of the San Juan Mountains, near Lake City, all spruce trees larger than 3 inches in diameter have been attacked. In response, the Forest Service plans to “treat” up to 120,000 acres during roughly the next decade. In most cases, the agency “treats” forests by cutting trees, sometimes in clear cuts but also in techniques such as shelter cuts.

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Forest Management

Ketchikan Daily News
October 2, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Rep. Don Young, R-Alaska, made an interesting point about the U.S. Forest Service on Tuesday during a congressional hearing on federal timber policy. It came while Young was highlighting the differences between the timber programs managed on State of Alaska lands versus those on federal land controlled by the Forest Service, saying that the Forest Service takes five years on average to put up a timber sale while the state only takes two years — and the state puts up a much higher precentage of its available timber than does the Forest Service. “I look at this and the Forest Service is no longer the Forest Service, it’s the Park Service,” Young said. “They’re not trying to manage the timber.”

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Ten-acre Badger Lake Fire causes evacuations, shutdowns on Mount Hood

The Oregonian
October 5, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

A wildfire in the Badger Creek Wilderness has triggered evacuations on the southeast flank of Mount Hood, shut down a forest road and a campground popular with hunters. A 2-acre fire was discovered late Saturday night, burning in heavy timber in the Mount Hood National Forest’s Barlow Ranger District. The blaze, since named the Badger Lake Fire, has since grown to 10-12 acres, said Laura Pramuk, Mount Hood National Forest spokesman. Helicopters have been dumping water on the fire since Saturday. “This area features very rugged, steep terrain and numerous snags, making it particularly dangerous for firefighters and the public,” Pramuk said.

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Okanogan County: Some complaints, compliments in after-fire review

The Seattle Times
October 3, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

This summer’s disastrous fire season came on the heels of last summer’s 156,000-acre Carlton complex fire, at the time deemed the largest in Washington’s history. This summer, some 600,000 acres burned in three different major fires, consuming 297 structures along with forests and rangeland in all parts of the county. And while some commended the efforts of local fire departments, state DNR crews and local Forest Service firefighters, they also criticized interagency teams called in to manage the fires. Dale Johnson, of Okanogan, said he told his wife not to worry about the Beaver Lake fire burning between Twisp and Okanogan, because fire managers would never make the same mistakes they made last year. “No government agency would want to look that stupid,” he said.

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Transformation of wildfires presents new challenges

The Sacramento Bee
October 3, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

…We are witnessing the transformation of fire from an essential element of most forest ecosystems – as vital as sunshine and rain – into a feral force. Megafires are joining calving glaciers and rising sea levels as one more indication that the Earth is warming. The Forest Service has responded to this escalation by doubling down on suppression and appealing to Congress for more money to fight the 2 percent of ignitions that grow into severe wildfires. .. In a paper published last month in the journal Science, lead author Malcolm North, a Davis-based Forest Service ecologist, argues that the traditional policy of fighting every fire is “dangerous, expensive and ill-advised.”

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Reader View: ‘Let it burn’ approach to preventing forest fires is destructive

by Cate Moses, Ph.D., educator, wildlife artist and member of Once a Forest.
Santa Fe New Mexican
October 3, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

…The catastrophic fire in the watershed that the Forest Service has been fear-mongering about for decades has finally come to pass. It is being ignited as I write this by the Forest Service, releasing more than 4,000 tons tons of carbon into the atmosphere and poisoning our air, water and soil. Contrary to their fear mongering, the only fires in our watershed have been those started by the Forest Service. There is no science to support prescribed burns. The Forest Service has for decades been repeating the lie that prescribed burns somehow prevent big forest fires.

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UW wildfire research argues for letting fires burn

King 5 News
October 2, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West


SEATTLE — A University of Washington professor wants the state to change how it fights wildfires. Jerry Franklin believes fire seasons are getting worse, in large part because of decades of trying to stop them. Buried among piles of papers and maps of Washington’s forests in his office, Franklin has a book that dates back to the 1940s. “As a high school student: ‘Trees’,” he said. “One of my first manuals.” Back then, Franklin says, books on forest management often demonized wildfires. “We wanted the forest,” he said. “Mainly for wood production.” Because of that, Franklin says, the dynamics of forests have changed. “This is the forest as it was historically – this is the forest as it is today,” he said, pointing at two pictures. One showed a forest that’s had little fire suppression.

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New study shows western wildfires to become more frequent, extreme

Billings Gazette
October 5, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

CASPER, Wyo. — The Rocky Mountains should brace for more, bigger fires, if history is any indication. Even though Wyoming has experienced a couple of wetter years, more years like the fiery summer of 2012 could be coming, according to recent research out of the University of Wyoming. “We will live in a different West. This is happening now, and it will continue happening. It will be a new normal,” said John Calder, a UW Ph.D. student and co-author of the paper “Medieval warming initiated exceptionally large wildfire outbreaks in the Rocky Mountains.” The paper was published Monday in the scientific journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

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So-called ‘fire transfers’ don’t make sense

The Bozeman Daily Chronicle
October 4, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

The Custer Gallatin National Forest will have to forego some of the trail and campground work it planned this year because of widespread fires — in California? The forest will give nearly $1 million as part of $700 million from national forests nationwide that will allocated for firefighting in regions hit hardest by wildfire this season. And it’s not the first time this has happened. In fact the Custer Gallatin has been forced to give up money for forest management projects for firefighting costs during about half the fire seasons in recent years. That doesn’t make sense.

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Forest Collaboration Series: Part 15: Tom Tidwell Q&A

Evergreen Magazine
October 2, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

“I still have some doubts about how arbitration might substitute for litigation, but I know that there is interest in the concept in Congress. Authorizing the Secretary of Agriculture the discretion to try arbitration on a pilot basis is something that may prove beneficial. However, I think those who litigate still believe collaborative forest projects place their highest priority on revenue generation, which they oppose on public lands. But no privately held company is going to do the necessary restoration work if they can’t earn a profit from their investment. The country can’t afford the cost of restoration exclusive of private investment, so publicly acceptance of private capital investments in environmentally important forest restoration projects is essential.

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Oregon counties urge forestry reforms

East Oregonian
October 1, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

County commissioners from across Oregon want to see Congress increase the pace and scale of forest management in the wake of another devastating wildfire season. Members of the Association of Oregon Counties sent a letter Sept. 15 to Oregon’s congressional delegation asking for bipartisan support on reforms to “effectively fight wildfires, rehabilitate burned forests and actively manage our federal forests to meet the needs of local communities.” Federally managed forests are growing at a rate of 3.3 billion board feet per year in Oregon, according to the association, yet only 7 percent of the wood is removed through logging. That’s resulted in years of overgrowth, making the landscape more vulnerable to disease, insects and large fires.

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Poor stewards of forest land

Letter by KENT HART
Rutland Herald
October 6, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

Poor stewards of forest land “Keeping our wildlife healthy” (Oct. 1 Herald) by Kim Royer, special assistant to the Vermont commissioner of Fish & Wildlife, was propaganda at its worst, full of lies. The Op-Ed claims that Vermont Fish & Wildlife Department is dedicated to conserving fish, wildlife and habitat. …During the last three years that land was cashed in — ravaged. Many areas were clearcut. Other areas had almost all their mature trees removed. While trunks were harvested, tops and branches were wasted, strewn about in a tangle that only the smallest creatures could navigate. The streams have largely dried up, except for muddy torrents with oil slicks after storms.

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Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy

BC mayors council calls on federal candidates to speak to climate change

Castlegar Source
October 5, 2015
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: Canada, Canada West

The B.C. Mayors Climate Leadership Council is calling for B.C.-based Federal Parliamentary Candidates to outline how they and their parties will respond to the challenge of climate change and the need for energy conservation and greenhouse gas reduction. Communities across BC are experiencing climate change impacts such as pine beetle, forest fires, and increased severity of storms. Over 100 local governments across B.C., representing over 75 per cent of B.C.’s population, are demonstrating leadership by implementing community-wide Energy Plans that reduce greenhouse gases, conserve energy, and build the local economy.

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In the fight to stop climate change, forests are a vital weapon

In addition to mitigating the emissions that cause climate change, conserving tropical forests contributes to development in myriad ways
The Guardian
October 6, 2015
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: International

Forests are undervalued assets in meeting the twin global challenges of our time: achieving prosperity and safeguarding climate stability. It’s time we gave them the attention – and finance – that they deserve. Last week, dozens of countries announced a late-breaking wave of commitments to reduce greenhouse gas emissions ahead of the climate change summit in Paris this November. While such pledges are welcome, they are not yet sufficient to avert catastrophic global warming. Tropical forests provide an opportunity to close the gap. When tropical forests are cut and left to decay or are burned, as happened on an area almost twice the size of Costa Rica last year, the carbon stored in leaves, branches, trunks, roots and soil is released into the atmosphere.

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