Tree Frog Forestry News

Daily Archives: October 7, 2015

Business & Politics

Working in the woods to change forest industry’s culture of risk-taking

By Gordon Hamilton
Business in Vancouver
October 6, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

Despite 10 years of committing itself to safe practices, WorkSafeBC says the B.C. forest industry still harbours a culture that accepts risk as part of the job. The additional cost of safety is still an issue between contractors and licensees, and workers still feel they can be blacklisted for refusing to do work that they feel is unsafe. They are not industry-wide problems, but Al Johnson, vice-president of prevention services at WorkSafeBC, said they’re enough of an issue that both forest companies and WorkSafeBC need to pay more attention to them. Logging is dangerous work, and an acceptance of danger – loggers often feel they are expected to “suck it up” when faced with risk – is part of a culture that has existed for decades in the timber harvesting sector.

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Chetwynd Councillors Split Over Canfor Tax Exemption

PeaceFM
October 6, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

On Monday October 5th, 2015, the District of Chetwynd held a Regular Council Meeting at the Cottonwood Hall with all Councillors and the Mayor present. …A major discussion between Councillors ensued regarding a Tax Exemption for Canadian Forest Industries related to the construction of their new pellet plant located beside their present lumber and planer mills. The estimated cost of this plant is 5.3 million dollars, and is set to be complete by October 31st. Canfor applied for the full tax exemption on the pellet plant, and councillors Mel Deck and Ernest Pfanner voted against the motion to grant the tax exemption.

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Full house for All Candidates Forum (Log Exports)

Scroll down the story to the sub-head on Economy for forestry topic
Comox Valley Record
October 6, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

In terms of developing the local economy, Biley suggests changing direction to develop resources domestically instead of exporting raw logs. Duncan said there are sawmills on Vancouver Island, and that the forest industry is seeking laborers because they can’t find them. “I can tell you that the forest sector is on its way back,” he said. “The industry is now profitable again…We have innovation going on in mills as close as Port Alberni.” Johns says raw log exports have gone up tenfold on the Island over the past decade. “I haven’t seen a lot of Help Wanted signs in Port Alberni,” he said. “Unemployment is extremely high there. A third of the children are living in poverty. They’re desperate…We need to diversify our economy.”

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Faller’s death rekindles B.C. forestry safety concerns

By Gordon Hamilton
Business in Vancouver
October 6, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

Second in a series: Compressing time and space in multi-phase logging operations sparks industry debate: On July 24, faller Jeremy Tanaka was working on northern Vancouver Island when he was struck and killed by a falling hemlock tree. The tree had been accidentally uprooted by a piece of heavy equipment, striking the unsuspecting faller and killing him. The tragedy of Tanaka’s death is that he was killed in an operation aimed at making the cutblock safer for the hand-falling crew. Tanaka was the third forest worker killed within a three-week period in July, and before the month was over, another would die. Eight workers have died industry-wide in B.C. this year. Until a WorkSafeBC investigation is completed, questions about how such an accident could happen, how a machine and a man could be working in such close proximity, remain unanswered.

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Mining, forestry companies hail TPPA

Thunder Bay News Watch
October 6, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada East, Canada

THUNDER BAY — Representives of the extractive industries that drive Northwestern Ontario’s economy believe the Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement will bring them prosperity. The TPPA deal signed in Atlanta on Sunday will lock Canada into a free trade area of 12 countries on both shores of the Pacific Ocean. Together, they encompass two-fifths of the entire global economy. Forest Products Association of Canada president David Lindsay expects accessing new markets could net his industry $20 billion by 2020. …”The forest products industry in Canada has always been one of the country’s major exporters and this agreement is an historic opportunity to improve access to rapidly growing markets in the Asia Pacific,” Lindsay said in a release.

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1 fatally struck by train near Stimson Lumber

The Oregonian
October 6, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States, US West

Emergency responders are on the scene of a fatal train collision near Stimson Lumber Company in Gaston, Forest Grove Fire & Rescue said Tuesday. One person was struck and killed in the crash, said fire spokesman Dave Nemeyer, reported to 911 about 1 p.m. The crash appears to have occurred near the entrance to the mill. The mill has a small locomotive that moves rail cars, Nemeyer said. Washington County sheriff’s deputies and deputy medical examiner are investigating at the scene off Southwest Scoggins Valley Road.

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Wood, Paper & Green Building

UBC planning one of world’s tallest wood towers

Journal of Commerce
October 6, 2015
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: Canada, Canada West

One of the tallest wood buildings in the world will soon be constructed at University of British Columbia (UBC), providing housing for hundreds of students. When completed, the $51.5 million residence building will stand 53 metres tall. “This beautiful, new tall wood building will serve as a living laboratory for the UBC community,” said Martha Piper, university interim president. It will advance the university’s reputation as a hub of sustainable and innovative design, and provide our students with much-needed on-campus housing.” …Because the structure will be far higher than the six storeys B.C. currently allows for wood buildings, the school obtained a Site Specific Regulation (SSR) from the B.C. Building Safety & Standards Branch. …A similar SSR was used for the Wood Innovation Design Centre project in Prince George, which also exceeded the standard six-storey building code limit.

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Oregon State University gets $6 million gift to spur innovation in wood products

The Oregonian
October 6, 2015
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: United States, US West

A California lumber company led by an Oregon State University graduate has pledged to give OSU $6 million to build an advanced wood products laboratory, university officials announced Monday. The 20,000-square-foot lab is envisioned as a way to help build expertise at cutting-edge products such as strong-as-steel cross-laminated timber, they said. …The 85,000-square-foot Oregon Forest Science Complex will itself be made with advanced wood products. Oregon State leaders say they aim to use the advanced lab to establish Oregon as an international leader in the way wood is used in tall commercial and residential structures. That research, said OSU president Ed Ray, could have a profound impact on the state’s economy.

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Pride of New York Branding Program to Include Forest Products

MachineFinder
October 6, 2015
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: US East, United States

In an effort to support and grow the forest products industry in the Central New York area, New York State Department of Agriculture and Markets Commissioner Richard Ball announced on Oct. 5 that he is launching new marketing and educational initiatives. As a result, the “Pride of New York” branding program will be expanded to include wood products. Pride of New York promotes agricultural products created or grown in New York. Forest producers will now be welcomed into the program. “We are pleased to work with our members on how Pride of New York can help market New York’s diverse forest products,” said Steve Servies, director of procurement at the Gutchess Lumber Company.

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Danish dining table breaks world record, selling for $1.3 million

Domain.com.au
October 7, 2015
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: International

An unassuming dining table is the most expensive piece of Nordic design to be sold at auction, at more than £600,000 ($1.3 million). The 63-year-old table is a one-off by Denmark’s late Peder Moos, sold at London auction house Phillips’ October design auctions. It achieved more than four times its pre-sale estimate, reaching £602,500 to surpass the world record for Nordic designs. Moos’ dining table was made in 1952 for the renowned Villa Aubertin in Nakskov, Denmark – the home of timber merchant M. Aubertin and his wife – and was the only Moos piece in the house.

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Forestry

Researcher plants seeds of caribou recovery

The Star Phoenix
October 6, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Caribou and grizzly bear populations are low in Western Canada, and a University of Saskatchewan researcher has been trying to figure out an effective way to help them. Gordon Stenhouse has spent three years studying how linear features — power lines, seismic lines and roads that criss-cross boreal forest — affect the predators and prey in Alberta. This week, he’s presenting his findings at the Sustainable Forestry Initiative Annual Conference in California. The StarPhoenix called him up for a biology lesson. This interview has been condensed and edited.

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Research group focused on cumulative impact of resource development

Prince George Citizen
October 4, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

When it comes to resource development, northern B.C. has strong researchers looking at the impact on environment, and community and human health. But the groups aren’t necessarily working together and sharing that knowledge, said Chris Buse. “There’s not a lot of integrative cross-talk,” said Buse, the project lead for the new Cumulative Impacts Research Consortium. The University of Northern B.C. initiative launched this weekend to introduce its research team and showcase other experts in an event open to the public on Friday and Saturday. CIRC was born in January 2014, Buse said, out of “this idea that we need a new kind of body that’s capable of spending a significant amount of time and energy really focusing on this issue and doing it in an integrative way.”

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All hail the mushroom!

Parksville Qualicum Beach News
October 6, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Fascinated by fungi? You’re in luck — this month the Arrowsmith Naturalists and North Island Wildlife Recovery Centre (NIWRC) are hosting the inaugural, Mushroom Show in Errington. “There are literally thousands of species of mushrooms on the Island,” self-proclaimed mushroom enthusiast Jessica Wolf told the News. …Wolf said there will be mushrooms of all shapes and sizes at the show with experts on hand to explain which one is which and answer questions. …Aside from being edible and fatally poisonous, Brookes explains mushrooms are also sought after for their fabric dying qualities and medicinal properties. Attendees of the Mushroom Show will have the opportunity to learn about mushrooms’ role in the ecosystem and their many functions.

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Man who died fighting BC wildfire receives unprecedented provincial honour

Canadian Press in The Vancouver Observer
October 6, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

VICTORIA — A father of three who died fighting a forest fire on British Columbia’s Sunshine Coast has been named the first recipient of the province’s Medal of Good Citizenship. Premier Christy Clark said Tuesday that 60?year?old John Phare exemplifies the purpose of the new medal, which recognizes exemplary contributions to community life. The tree faller who also had other forest fire jobs died last July while fighting the Old Sechelt Mine blaze. Clark said Phare was one of thousands of firefighters who displayed courage and sacrifice during this year’s extensive and sometimes life?threatening forest fire season. Phare’s fiancee, Kimi Hawkes, accepted the medal at a ceremony at the B.C. legislature.

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Tree faller who died fighting forest fire honoured by province

Victoria Times Colonist
October 6, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

If there was a job to do, Johnny Phare was the kind of guy who got it done. The Roberts Creek logger never thought he was doing anything out of the ordinary. “This word ‘hero’ is something that’s been used, and I know he would really feel uncomfortable with that,” his fiancée, Kimi Hawkes, said Tuesday. “I don’t think he thought of himself as a hero. He thought of himself as a person who was part of the community and did what had to get done.” So when the Old Sechelt Mine wildfire threatened residents of the Sunshine Coast this summer, Phare was there to help fight the blaze. A father of three, he was falling trees when one of them struck and killed him on July 5. He was 60. Premier Christy Clark paid tribute to Phare’s sacrifice Tuesday by making him the first recipient of a new Medal of Good Citizenship.

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Gov?t seeking public input on Ancient Forest

Prince George Citizen
October 6, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

The Ancient Forest has its own aura. At least that’s how Nowell Senior explains the special connection volunteers and visitors have with the temperate rainforest an hour east of Prince George that boasts giant red cedars, repres enting some of the largest in the province. “It’s a globally unique site,” said Senior, president of the Caledonia Ramblers Hiking Society, which spearheaded the drive to protect the area and make it a public site. “People do not expect to come across an inland temperate rain forest between two mountain ranges so far from the ocean or so far north.” In the last two years, more than 200 volunteers have helped construct 4,500 feet of plank pathway to make the trail more accessible after the wear and tear of so many visitors

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NDP plan to bring back Indian Head tree nursery if elected

Global News
October 6, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

REGINA – The NDP Candidate for Regina Qu’Appelle announced Tuesday the NDP would re-open the Indian Head Tree Nursery Program if elected. The re-opening of the tree nursery would be part of the NDP’s commitment to renew support for public agricultural programs across the Prairies. “New Democrats understand the important role that the Tree Nursery has played in prairie agriculture,” said Regina Qu’Appelle NDP Candidate Nial Kuyek. “After the bungled sales attempt under the Conservatives, Western farmers deserve a government that will invest in valuable local services“.

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Timmins mill urges support to preserve wood access

Timmins Press
October 6, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

TIMMINS – A key executive of EACOM Timber Corporation said this week it is important for communities such as Timmins to continually voice support for the forestry industry which is just getting back on its feet after a multi-year slump. Brian Nicks, EACOM’s vice-president and chief forester, was speaking in a presentation to Timmins city council, to provide an update on company operations in Timmins. He said EACOM, the largest lumber producer in Ontario is walking a fine line between sustainability and the possibility of over-reaching regulations, which could hurt the industry and scare off investment. He said one of the key concerns, not just for EACOM, but all forest industry operations is having a government commitment to a long-term wood supply.

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This Bird Didn’t Start the Fires, But It May Need Them to Survive

An endangered bird once threatened by humans now relies on us for its survival
The Smithsonian
October 5, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States

Two hundred years ago, the Kirtland’s warbler had its pick of the jack pine forest when it came to choosing nesting grounds. Regular wildfires sweeping through the sandy forests of Michigan, where the majority of these birds still nest, kept the trees not too tall and not too short—just the way the warbler liked them. Then humans moved to town, bringing with them an advancement that was great for civilization but not so great for this bird’s habitat: the ability to control fire.  “It’s a very specific habitat they need that historically was managed by naturally occurring fires,” says Jonathan Lutz, executive director of Michigan Audubon, which bears the iconic bird as its logo. “Now we have to mimic those historic conditions.”

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Forest Service plans more dead lodgepole harvest in North Routt County

Steamboat Today
October 6, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Steamboat Springs — Time is beginning to run thin on U.S. Forest Service goals to restore the lodgepole forests of North Routt County through commercial harvest of standing dead timber in areas decimated by an outbreak of mountain pine beetles. The insect infestation was declared an epidemic in 2007. By 2021, the timber may be too far gone to have any commercial value. Hahn’s Peak Bears Ears District Ranger Chad Stewart told Routt County commissioners Tuesday that logging of the dead trees is underway at the Wyoming border in existing timber sales with picturesque names such as Raghorn, Whale Tail and Bootleg. And not far to the south, the Forest Service is currently analyzing the Big Red sale just northwest of Hahn’s Peak. A formal decision on the sale is due in June.

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Study: Higher temps, more fires, 1000 years ago in Rockies

Associated Press in The Missoulian
October 6, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

CASPER, Wyo. (AP) — New research by scientists at the University of Wyoming has found that extreme wildfire seasons are nothing new in the Rocky Mountain region: They also happened hundreds of years ago, after global temperatures had risen slightly. The study suggests that fire seasons like the last bad one, in 2012, could become more commonplace because of global warming. People living in the region can expect a new normal of wildfire cycles, said John Calder, a co-author of the study published Monday in the scientific journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. “We will live in a different West. This is happening now, and it will continue happening,” said Calder, a University of Wyoming doctoral student.

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What others say: Forest management

Kenai Peninsula Online
October 7, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Rep. Don Young, R-Alaska, made an interesting point about the U.S. Forest Service on Tuesday during a congressional hearing on federal timber policy. …“I look at this and the Forest Service is no longer the Forest Service, it’s the Park Service,” Young said. “They’re not trying to manage the timber.” The concept of national forests as being mostly off-limits to timber harvesting was noted also by Greater Ketchikan Chamber of Commerce Executive Director Chelsea Goucher, who told the House Natural Resources Committee’s Subcommittee on Federal Lands in Washington, D.C., that the 17-million acre Tongass National Forest encompassed 90 percent of the land in Southeast Alaska, “91 percent of which is categorized as roadless and therefore functionally unavailable for any type of development.”

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Logging dispute continues on Parrett Mountain

October 7, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

A logging job on Parrett Mountain has turned into a dispute between the property owner and logging company over the details of the contract, with no agreement between the parties as the cutting operation approaches. The Martinez family received a flier in the mail over the summer, advertising money for trees. They weren’t interested in clear-cutting their land off Corral Creek Road, but thought thinning the forest would improve its health and bring in some cash as well. “We wanted to thin because this forest is important to us, it’s been in our family for a while,” Mike Martinez said. Theresa Martinez’s family has owned the property since the 1970s. The wood lot contains primarily Douglas fir but also features alder, cedar and maple trees.

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Neptune Aviation awarded contract with Forest Service

NBC Montana
October 6, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

MISSOULA, Mont. –  The Forest Service will double the number of next generation air tankers it uses against wildfires. The aircraft can fly faster and carry more retardant than older firefighting aircraft that are still in use. Neptune Aviation in Missoula was selected for a five-year contract to supply four of the air tankers. Neptune has been in the business of flying air tankers for 23 years. Each summer they fly air tankers to fight forest fires under temporary contracts. Neptune officials said being selected for a five-year contract for four air tankers is a big deal. It means stability for the company to grow and build.

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Not a baaaa-d idea: Sheep help curb Ochoco fire danger

Animals called in to much on grass around thinning piles
KTVZ
October 2, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

PRINEVILLE, Ore. – Reducing fire danger with … sheep? It’s not something you hear every day. That was a creative solution to some hazardous fuels along major access routes on the Ochoco National Forest this summer.  The woolly little livestock came to the rescue, removing hundreds of acres of knee-deep, dried-out grasses along busy forest roads. The Forest Service had recently thinned smaller trees to reduce fire danger along Forest Service Roads 22, 4210 and other roads commonly used by the public. They left behind neatly stacked piles of branches awaiting wetter weather when firefighters return to burn them.

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Frustration with handling of wilderness fire

Letter by Kelly Hanson
Helena Independent Record
October 6, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

I would like to revisit the fire policies and the responses of the Forest Service officials regarding the Sheep Mountain fire. This fire is in the Bob Marshall Wilderness. The policies regarding this fire have been misleading and intolerable. …Thousands of dollars have been lost to several outfitters over the weekend due to this fire. Millions of dollars have been spent to put out this fire over the weekend with hot shot crews and helicopters. Wouldn’t it have been easier to put the fire out with thousands of dollars and let the people work for their livings and their livelihoods?

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Cal Fire receives funding to improve forests in California

KRCRTV.com
October 5, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

FORTUNA, Calif. – Cal Fire has received a two year grant from the Timber Regulation and Forest Restoration fund. The grant makes around 3-million dollars available statewide for 2015 and 3.5-million in 2016. The grant is part of the California Forest Improvement Program which encourages private and public investment in improving management of California’s forest lands and resources. TRGRF is a cost sharing program that reimburses 75 percent of the cost from forest improvement projects and 90 percent for projects on properties that have sustained major damage by fire, insects and disease with in the past 10 years. CFIP funds multiple activities, major ones include forest management plans, Registered Professional Forester supervision and conservation practices.

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Deschutes Land Trust holding out hope for Skyline Forest near Bend

Associated Press in Register Guard
October 6, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

BEND — An Oregon land trust says it might be able to follow through on its proposed Skyline Forest project despite an investment company’s purchase of the land it was planning to use. Singapore-based Whitefish Cascade Forest Resources bought nearly 200,000 acres of Oregon forestland for $855 million in Feburary, reported The Bulletin. That included the 33,000 acres that Deschutes Land Trust had hoped to turn into a community forest. For 12 years, the trust had been thinking of turning the former Bull Springs Tree Farm into 51.5 square miles of trails and outdoor space just minutes from Bend. The Deschutes Land Trust came close to purchasing the property from its previous owner.

Skyline Forest still a possibility from the Bend Bulletin

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Federal court knocks down NM resolution on forest lands

Ruidoso News
October 6, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

A federal ruling in the U.S. District Court for the District of New Mexico has ruled that an Otero County resolution authorizing them to remove trees from the Lincoln National Forest without their consent is unconstitutional because it violates the Supremacy Clause of the U.S. Constitution according to Chief U.S. District Judge Christina Armijo. The decision was invalidated by the federal court because it was ruled that Congress, not the state or the county, has authority to control federal lands. County Commission Chairman Ronny Rardin said the County does not have plans to move forward at this time until they discuss the matter during their executive session Oct. 8.

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Idaho Forest Group endorses Scotchman wilderness designation

Associated Press in KSL
October 6, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

SANDPOINT, Idaho — The Idaho Forest Group is calling on Congress to designate the Scotchman Peaks area a wilderness. The Bonner County commissioners adopted a resolution in March adopted a resolution calling for the wilderness designation. The timber company is sending a letter to Idaho’s federal delegation supporting the wilderness designation, according to the Bonner County Daily Bee. “Idaho Forest Group is dedicated and committed to good stewardship of our forests, and works within the community to increase the timber production from our national forests and to advance the preservation of certain locally-supported wilderness areas,” Idaho Forest Group owner and Chairman Marc Brinkmeyer wrote in the letter.

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Loggers cutting firs to restore 25 acres of Marys Peak meadowland

KVAL
October 6, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

CORVALLIS, Ore. – For the next 6 weeks, a timber company contracted by the USDA Forest Service will be removing about 3,000 trees from Marys Peak. Loggers are working to cut noble firs, which have since 1948 taken over the meadow. The area was open, more like one single meadow. Over the years as the trees encroached, the meadows have been cut off and are now more like five separate meadows. The trees have spread into 100 acres of meadow. The Forest Service plans to cut back on 25 of those acres. On the peak, the tallest mountain in the coastal range, the trees are special. But the Forest Service said the meadows are less replaceable.

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Charlie Nichols: Mature forests need to be timbered

The Charleston Gazette
October 2, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

…Yet with all that acreage available, wildlife populations are dropping. And it’s not due to hunting. …There are few, far too few, young age stands of timber. Optimum wild turkey habitat is in decline. The young turkey poults need insects, a bugging area to dine in, during those first crucial months after hatching; the ruffed grouse and American woodcock likewise. No meadows, no monarch butterflies. No sunlight, no browse. …Commercial sales of timber are slow to be let because some environmental groups do not want to see any trees cut, and they protest nearly every planned cut, while demanding fewer Forest Service roads.

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Another Tennessee county under lumber quarantine because of Emerald Ash Borer

WBIR
October 6, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

(WBIR-Wilson County) A quarantine on lumber in Tennessee to stop the Emerald Ash Borer, an invasive insect that destroys ash trees, has been expanded to include another county. Authorities found Emerald Ash Borers in traps in Wilson County. This brings the total number of counties under quarantine to 47. EAB beetles were found in Knox County in 2010. The pest was discovered in the United States in the 1990s. Typically, EAB beetles can kill an ash tree within three years. The quarantine prohibits moving firewood, ash nursery stock, ash timber and other wood materials that can spread the insects.

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These people are practically the last line of defense for Louisiana’s endangered cypress swamps

Public Radio International
October 7, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

The Atchafalaya Basin in Louisiana is one of the country’s last great cypress swamps, and a Spanish fisherman-turned-conservationist named Dean Wilson is fighting to protect it. Most days you can find Wilson patrolling the flooded forests of the Atchafalaya Basin in his little powerboat. “The swamps of the Atchafalaya are considered by scientists the most productive in the entire world,” he says. “You can go to the Amazon and you may have more biodiversity, but if you get an acre of the Atchafalaya Basin you get more pounds of fish and crawfish than any other wetlands in the world.” Swamps like the Atchafalaya once covered much of the American South, as the Mississippi River flooded over 24 million acres. But by 1920, the timber industry had logged nearly every cypress forest in the state.

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Forestry boss’ mishap sparks forest fire

The Local
October 7, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: International

Bavarian Forestry Minister Helmut Brunner accidentally started a forest fire over the weekend, after dumping ashes in a thicket near his house. The Bavarian forestry ministry confirmed on Wednesday that Brunner tipped what he thought were extinguished ashes into a small forest near his house. But a few hours later he found flames rising from the same spot and had to call the fire services. “I totally underestimated it, it’s really embarrassing,” the minister told Bavarian Radio. “You can’t be careful enough.” Half a dozen firefighters turned up to quell the blaze. The number was deemed necessary due to the heightened fire risk caused by a dry summer.

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Defending the Amazon

In Brazil, militias of indigenous people take up arms against illegal logging, but their tactics raise fears of greater violence
The Washington Post
October 6, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: International

A beat-up sign on the edge of this Amazon reserve warns strangers not to enter. For years, loggers ignored it and barreled straight into the protected indigenous territory, cutting tracks ever deeper into the diminishing forest. But on a recent day, visitors approaching Juçaral village, just inside the reserve, encountered an improvised checkpoint operated by a militia called the Guardians. Wearing disheveled uniforms and face paint, members of the 48-man militia sauntered out, shotguns in hand, to check every arriving vehicle. The Guardians are one of two indigenous groups on this eastern fringe of
the Amazon that have taken radical action to reduce illegal logging.
They have tied up loggers, torched their trucks and tractors, and kicked
them off the reserves.

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7 Things You Probably Didn’t Know About Sweden’s Forest Economy

Sustainable Brands
October 7, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: International

Sweden is so heavily forested that open areas are the exception. It’s the opposite of continental Europe, where Germany’s well-known Black Forest or France’s Bois Des Landes are deviations in the landscape, which was deforested centuries ago. In Sweden, the slatten, or “plains,” are distinct. They carry geographic names recognizable to the average Swede, such as Uppsala-slätten or Västgöta-slätten. Not surprisingly, the huge swaths of forest in Sweden are central to the culture and economy, both of which have lofty reputations globally for sustainability. Both the culture and forest economy will be on display at the San Francisco Film Centre on November 5, 2015, during a taste of Sweden culinary event that’s open to the public and hosted by Iggesund Paperboard.

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Singapore pressures Indonesia as forest fire footage emerges

AFP in Yahoo News
October 8, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: International

Jakarta – New aerial footage released Wednesday showed smoke billowing from Indonesian forest fires as smog-choked Singapore’s biggest supermarket chain announced a ban on products from a paper company accused over the haze shrouding Southeast Asia. Fires illegally started to clear land for plantations on Indonesia’s Sumatra island and the Indonesian part of Borneo have for weeks belched out thick haze, cloaking Singapore and Malaysia and prompting the cancellation of outdoor events and school closures. The blazes are an annual occurrence during the dry season, but scientists have warned this year’s could be the worst on record due to an El Nino weather system that has created tinder-dry conditions in Indonesia.

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Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy

Trees-on-farmland program ‘not expanding’

By Tom Fletcher
Victoria News in BC Local News
October 6, 2015
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: Canada, Canada West

A British-based manufacturing company is considering switching its B.C. tree-planting program from farmland to areas deforested by fire or pine beetles. Reckitt Benckiser Group plc added another three farms to its B.C. land holdings over the summer, prompting an accusation in the legislature that it was breaking its promise to suspend planting trees on farmland. The company halted the program in June after more than 10,000 ha of farmland in the Peace, Prince George and Cariboo regions were acquired to use as carbon offsets for the company’s world-wide operations. Delta South MLA Vicki Huntington released title documents for a 320 ha grain and cattle farm purchased near Dawson Creek in July, three weeks after the company, now known by its initials RB, said the program was halted.

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Tackling Discrepancies in Forest Definitions

R&D Magazine
October 6, 2015
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: International

Depending on where you live, a glance out the window may yield a perimeter of trees. The leaves and branches thicken to the untouched wilds beyond. But what constitutes a forest? Published in Nature Climate Change, a study from NASA and other institutions aimed to tackle discrepancies between “forest” definitions from different organizations. “Whereas previous studies mentioned the discrepancy, our analysis quantified and mapped it globally, and connected it to estimates of biomass and economic value,” said lead author Joseph Sexton, of the Univ. of Maryland’s Global Land Cover Facility.  According to the United Nations (UN), more than 800 different definitions for forest and wooded areas exist.

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