Tree Frog Forestry News

Daily Archives: October 15, 2015

Business & Politics

U.S. department affirms duties against Canadian coated paper products

Canadian Press in CTV News
October 14, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, United States

HALIFAX — Canadian mills that produce glossy paper products will continue to pay costly duties levelled against them last summer by the U.S. Department of Commerce. In a decision released Wednesday, the department said it has determined that U.S. imports of supercalendered paper from Canada have received countervailable subsidies ranging from 17.87 to 20.18 per cent. The decision upholds, and in some cases increases the tariffs first put in place after a preliminary ruling in July. The trade action is the result of a petition filed by two American producers of supercalendered paper that say the Canadian paper goods are unfairly subsidized. Under the decision, Nova Scotia mill Port Hawkesbury Paper faces a 20.18 per cent duty, while Montreal-based Resolute Forest Products is hit with a duty of 17.87 per cent.

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Catalyst to Seek Expedited Review of U.S. Countervailing Duties

Canada Newswire press release
October 14, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada

RICHMOND, BC – Catalyst Paper (TSX:CYT) today announced that it will seek an expedited review of the Final Determination by the U.S. Department of Commerce (DOC), dated October 13, 2015, to impose countervailing duties on the company’s exports of supercalendered paper to the U.S. The DOC imposed preliminary countervailing duties on imports of supercalendered paper from four Canadian paper producers – Port Hawkesbury Paper, Resolute Forest Products, Irving Paper and Catalyst Paper – on July 27, 2015.

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Canfor ceasing production at Canal Flats sawmill

EUWID Wood Products and Panels
October 14, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

Canadian Canfor Corp. is to stop making lumber at its Canal Flats sawmill in British Columbia on 9 November. The company said that it had made this decision because of a lack of roundwood and dwindling demand for softwood lumber, especially from the oil and gas industry. Canfor had already switched production in Canal Flats to a single shift at the start of May for the same reasons. This production cutback halved the number of people working at the sawmill from 160 to 80.  The Canal Flats sawmill, which has a capacity of 180m bdft when running two shifts, has been owned by Canfor since March 2012. At that time, the firm acquired Tembec’s lumber activities in British Columbia that included both Canal Flats and a sawmill in Elko. END OF STORY

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BC pulp mill’s maintenance closure extends into 2016 with market downtown

Canadian Press in 680 News
October 14, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

CHETWYND, B.C. – What was to be a routine maintenance shutdown for the Chetwynd Mechanical Pulp Mill in northeastern B.C. will now be a longer closure because of poor market conditions. The mill had only reopened in the spring with a $50-million upgrade, after Paper Excellence Canada purchased the facility in 2014. In a news release, Paper Excellence says the decision to extend the shutdown will give the company the opportunity to make operational improvements on the mill. Deputy CEO Pedro Chang says the company is committed to the mill, its employees and the entire Chetwynd community and hopes the closure and improvements will lead to the operation’s long-term success.

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West Fraser to acquire Manning Diversified Forest Products

Lesprom
October 15, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

West Fraser has entered into an agreement to acquire Manning Diversified Forest Products Ltd. which has sawmill operations located in Manning, Alberta and related timber harvesting rights, as the company said in the press release received by Lesprom Network. The sawmill has operated at the site since 1993 and has been producing approximately 100 million board feet of lumber annually.  West Fraser plans to adjust current operations and expand annual production capacity to approximately 130 million board feet. The timber rights acquired have a current operational annual allowable harvest of approximately 440,000 cubic meters of coniferous timber.

Press release from West Fraser via Marketwired

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Tariffs related to Point Tupper mill upheld

Chronicle Herald
October 14, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada East, Canada

The United States Department of Commerce has upheld tariffs placed on American imports from Port Hawkesbury Paper. In a decision released Wednesday evening, the department ruled that a $124.5-million aid package the province granted to Pacific West Commercial Corp. in exchange for restarting the Point Tupper mill in 2012 constituted a subsidy that resulted in harm to American mills. “(The countervailing duties) law provides U.S. business and workers with a transparent and internationally accepted mechanism to seek relief from the market-distorting effects caused by injurious subsidization of imports into the United States, establishing an opportunity to compete on a level playing field,” reads the ruling.

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Irving Paper loses tariff battle with U.S., faces new duties

J.D. Irving Ltd. says U.S. Commerce Department process was ‘completely unfair’ and ‘inconsistent with the law’
CBC News
October 15, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada East, Canada

In a stinging defeat for New Brunswick’s largest forestry company, the U.S. Commerce Department has set the stage for punishing new duties on some J.D. Irving Ltd. paper products. The department ruled Monday that Irving’s “subsidy rate” for supercalendered paper is 18.85 per cent, which means that’s the level of import duty that could be applied when the product is exported to the United States. That rate is actually higher than the preliminary rate of 11.19 per cent set by the department in July. By applying the rate to Irving paper, it will make the product more expensive, and less attractive, to U.S. buyers.

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Northern Pulp charged with releasing effluent into fish habitat

Pictou Landing First Nation wants the mill to close its treatment facility at Boat Harbour
CBC News
October 14, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada East, Canada

The Northern Pulp mill has been charged under Environment Canada’s Fisheries Act with releasing pulp and paper effluent into water inhabited by fish. On June 10, 2014, a leak in an effluent pipe forced a shutdown of the Pictou County mill. That pipe carries 90-million litres of pulp waste every day from the mill site at Abercrombie Point, under the East River to a treatment facility at Pictou Landing. At the time, then Environment Minister Randy Delorey estimated the pooled effluent totalled about four- to five-million litres. Environment Canada ordered the company to contain and clean up the spill and an investigation was launched. The charge was laid by Fisheries and Oceans Canada on Aug. 27, 2015. Northern Pulp is scheduled to make a court appearance in Pictou on Nov. 30.

Nova Scotia’s Northern Pulp mill facing pollution charge after effluent leak from Canadian Press in CTV News
Northern PUlp charged with spilling raw effluent into Pictou Harbour from The Chronicle Herald

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Port Hawkesbury Paper’s future might depend on low Canadian dollar

Duty could cost mill $50M a year if it’s upheld by the U.S. International Trade Commission
CBC News
October 15, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada East, Canada

Port Hawkesbury Paper is preparing itself for the long haul in a trade battle with the United States and it isn’t sure it can afford to wait and see if the decision is overturned. A ruling by the United States Commerce Department on Wednesday said the company should pay a duty of 20 per cent on the glossy supercalandered paper it exports to the U.S. Marc Dube is the development manager at the mill. He said if the duty is put in place, they have several ways to fight back. “We can go to the U.S. courts and we’re confident in the U.S. courts that our case would be changed to match what we believe, or we can go to NAFTA, the North American Free Trade Agreement, and again we’re confident in that arena. The federal government could decide to go to the World Trade organization on this.”

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Port Hawkesbury among organizations singled out

Chronicle Herald
October 14, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada East, Canada

SYDNEY — A Cape Breton music festival, a golf course and a paper mill are among five organizations to be honoured for their economic impact on the island. The Cape Breton Partnership revealed its economic impact award winners on Wednesday, which include the Celtic Colours International Festival, Louisbourg Seafoods, Port Hawkesbury Paper, J.A. Douglas McCurdy Sydney Airport and Cabot Cliffs. Organizers say this year’s honourees have made a significant impact on the local economy and display strong qualities of culture, innovation, longevity and success.

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Montana wood products industry concerned about expiration of Canadian trade agreement

Helena Independent Record
October 15, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States, US West

MISSOULA — Approximately 500 jobs supported by Montana’s wood products industry have dried up this year alone, and with the expiration Monday of the 2006 Softwood Lumber Agreement between Canada and the U.S., even broader repercussions are expected to hit the state’s economy. In a nutshell, the U.S. wood products industry has a long-standing trade dispute – going back to the 1950s – with the Canadians because the Canadian lumber industry is subsidized by its government. The prices charged to harvest timber – called the stumpage fee – are set by the government there, rather than being determined by the free market, which is the case in the U.S.

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Forest industry spotlight: Tribal timber mill running once again

The White Mountain Independent
October 14, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States, US West

WHITERIVER — The mills in Whiteriver are working again after being shut down for years. The White Mountain Apache Timber Company closed down in mid-2009 when the timber industry was not doing well and the tribe was having trouble managing the mill. The last large sawmill in northern Arizona, a significant part of the wood industry that supported it went with it when it closed. “The mill wasn’t competitive in the previous 10 to 15 years and needed upgrading and new technology,” said Gary Cantrell, CEO of Affiliated Timber Investment Conversion Advisors, or ATICA, and WMATCO. “In 2011, (WMAT Chairman) Ronnie Lupe called and asked me to see if I could get it restarted,” he recalled.

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Forestry

Global Forestry Leaders Express Mutual Support for Advancing Sustainable Forestry

Sustainable Forestry Initiative Press Release
October 15, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States

The Sustainable Forestry Initiative Inc. (SFI), American Forest Foundation (AFF) and the Programme for the Endorsement of Forest Certification (PEFC) made announcements this week expressing mutual support for new approaches to forest management planning and certification, which will help streamline forest certification, and ensure access to the global marketplace. Among these efforts, the American Tree Farm System (ATFS) announced a joint effort by AFF, the Florida Forest Service and the University of Florida for a pilot landscape management plan to encourage sustainable forestry and bring more wood grown on family-owned forests into the sustainable global supply chain.

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Fighting Wildfire With Finance

Huffington Post
October 12, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States

…It is clear that we need cost-effective, innovative solutions to build the resilience of the communities in dealing with both mega-fires and the drought. Recognizing that it costs up to 40 times more to put out a fire than prevent it, the private finance community has seen an opportunity to shape a solution that raises the capital needed to fund prevention efforts — not by donating, but by investing through a Forest Resilience Impact Bond. Spearheaded by Blue Forest Conservation, Private Capital for Public Good, and Encourage Capital, the Forest Resilience Impact Bond is a proposed new form of pay-for-success funding that seeks to leverage financial innovation to fund environmental conservation.

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Oregon Judge Grounds Aerial Pesticide Sprayer After It Defies License Suspension

Oregon Public Broadcasting
October 13, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

The Oregon Department of Agriculture secured a restraining order this week to stop a company from spraying pesticides commercially without a license. Last month the agency fined Applebee Aviation $1,110 and immediately suspended its commercial license to apply pesticides after a former Applebee truck driver and pesticide handler sought emergency medical care for on-the-job chemical exposure. Oregon’s Occupational Safety and Health Division fined the company an additional $8,850. The case marks the first time the Oregon Department of Agriculture has ever gone to court for a restraining order against a pesticide applicator, spokesman Bruce Pokarney said.

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Federal agency issues plan for coastal coho salmon recovery

Associated Press in The Washington Post
October 14, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

PORTLAND, Ore. — A federal agency has released a road map for the recovery of threatened Oregon Coast coho salmon. The draft plan from the National Marine Fisheries Service focuses on protecting and restoring freshwater and habitats that have a mixture of freshwater and saltwater, including streams, lakes and wetlands. The plan also calls on the state to strengthen regulations on activities such as agriculture and logging to protect water quality and habitat. …A large part of the land with critical coho habitat lies on private land, including farmland and timber land. Because the plan is only a blueprint, its implementation will rely on the efforts of local jurisdictions, farmers, timber companies and other private citizens.

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Letter – Forest fires: Policies resulting in ‘firenadoes’

By Jan Butler Gervais, Corvallis
The Missoulian
October 14, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

During the worst fire season in recorded history affecting most of the west, fires have broken out in an incredible number of our national forests as well as many prized national parks, including Glacier, Yellowstone, Yosemite and a list of others. Thousands of homeowners were displaced, what were once beautiful forests of old stand trees are now a barren smoldering waste. Damage to wildlife and domestic animals is incalculable. …It is time Smokey the bear got off his seat, put down his cigar and gas can, and put the fires out while they can be stopped.

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What Does A Regional Forester Do? Region One Forester Leanne Marten Explains

Montana Public Radio
October 12, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Historically the beneficiaries of Forest Service lands often disagree about how they should be used. Should we increase or decrease timber harvest and why. Open more roads or close some we put it in in past years? Add Wilderness or not? The hot seat for many of those issues is the Regional Forester in Region One based in Missoula Montana. Leanne Marten is the guest on “Home Ground” this week. The U. S. Forest Service is a major player in Montana, providing stewardship for 15 million acres of land which in turn provide multifaceted economic benefits, environmental health and treasured recreation to hundreds of thousands of Montanans and other citizens of this country.

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Salvage logging is first step to recovery after fires

by David Bischel, president of the California Forestry Association
The Sacramento Bee
October 12, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

As California nears the end of another devastating wildfire season, it’s important that we understand the comprehensive nature of wildfire and how it impacts our forests. Although fire has always been an important part of the Sierra Nevada, the explosive fires we see today pose a significant threat to public health and safety, air and water quality, and to wildlife habitat. In the past 15 years, we have seen a dramatic increase in the number of acres burned, as well as the severity of these fires. A 2012 study found that wildfires are burning at a higher intensity – killing the trees and seed source, sterilizing the landscape and creating soil that lacks the ability to absorb water. These combined effects inhibit natural regeneration and increase erosion into critical watersheds.

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Idaho firefighters could remotely operate helicopters to battle blazes

Idaho Statesman
October 14, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

The U.S. Department of Interior and the Forest Service hosted a demonstration of an unmanned K-MAX helicopter at Lucky Peak Wednesday morning. Remote-operated helicopters have been used in military operations for years, said Art Hinaman, assistant director of aviation for the Forest Service. But now that technology is being developed to fight fires as well. It will be years out before remote-operated helicopters could see widespread use among firefighting crews, Hinaman said it will make nighttime operations easier and safer.

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OPINION: Marbled murrelet conservation choices founded in years of study, dialogue

Peninsula Daily News
October 14, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

TODAY, THE STATE Department of Natural Resources and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service will present a range of options for the long-term conservation of the threatened marbled murrelet on lands managed by DNR. The options we’ll be presenting are the result of years of research and substantial dialogue with environmental groups and timber communities across Washington. It is the work of those who cherish our forests and wildlife resources. It reflects the strong conservation values of our state. This small marine bird does not recognize international, federal, state or private boundaries, yet its fate lies in the ability of landowners to work together to conserve its nesting habitat and fishing grounds.

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US Forest Service sued over Nestle water permit

The Desert Sun
October 14, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Three environmental groups sued the U.S. Forest Service on Tuesday for allowing Nestle, the country’s largest bottled water producer, to pipe water out of a national forest for years using a permit that lists an expiration date of 1988. The lawsuit was filed in U.S. District Court by the Center for Biological Diversity, the Story of Stuff Project and the Courage Campaign Institute. The groups said the Forest Service has violated the law by letting the company draw water from the San Bernardino National Forest without a valid permit. They argue the taking of water threatens sensitive habitat along a creek, and they are demanding the agency halt Nestle’s use of wells and a water pipeline in the forest “unless and until it issues a valid special use permit.”

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Forest Service proposing 13500-acre project in Elkhorn Mountains

Helena Independent Record
October 14, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

The Helena National Forest is soliciting public comment for a more than 13,500-acre project in the Crow Creek area of the Elkhorn Mountains it says is aimed at improving wildlife habitat. The Johnny Crow Habitat Improvement Project located about 10 miles from Townsend would include prescribed burning along with noncommercial cutting and slash burning of small trees. The work will reduce the encroachment of conifers into traditional grasslands, increasing tree-age diversity and promoting forage for wildlife, according to Forest Service documents. …Another focus of the project is thinning trees and using prescribed fire at higher elevations, which officials believe will benefit whitebark pine, a species important for wildlife but hit hard by disease and insects in recent years.

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Scottsdale Will Fund Forest Health Programs

Payson Roundup
October 14, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

The Scottsdale City Council has approved a three-year partnership with the National Forest Foundation (NFF) to help protect Scottsdale’s water supply by helping finance watershed projects in northern Arizona. Scottsdale will invest $120,000 over three years in the Northern Arizona Forest Fund, a program developed by the NFF and Salt River Project (SRP).The Fund is working on a variety of forest restoration and watershed projects, including a project to thin the overgrown forests on the watershed that feeds into he C.C. Craigin Reservoir. Payson is building a pipeline to take 3,000 acre-feet annually from the reservoir. A crown fire on the watershed could lead to dramatically increased erosion, which would reduce the capacity of that reservoir.

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Group works to restore forest, communities

Executive Director Mark Webb discuss the Blue Mountains Forest Partners group, plans.
Blue Mountain Eagle
October 14, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

In 2006, the Blue Mountains Forest Partners (BMFP) was formed in Grant County by a diverse group of individuals who wanted to restore and sustain the Malheur National Forest and the communities it supports. The collaborative now includes loggers, ranchers, environmentalists, landowners, elected officials and other stakeholders who are working together to maintain the forest as both an ecological and economic asset. Supporters of the forest collaborative say prior to the group’s establishment, management of the forest was mired in litigation brought by stakeholders with competing interests. … The collaborative says that since its start there has been no litigation involving the forest, while timber harvest and restoration projects on the Malheur have increased dramatically.

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Report: Sudden wind shift contributed to firefighter’s death

Rapid City Journal
October 14, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Rapid City firefighter Dave Ruhl apparently was trapped by a sudden shift in the direction of the California wildfire he was scouting in July, according to a newly issued Forest Service report on his death. The body of Ruhl, 38, was found July 31 at the scene of the Frog Fire in the Modoc National Forest, where he was on a temporary assignment away from his regular duties as an engine captain in South Dakota’s Black Hills National Forest. The 15-page preliminary report on his death describes a fire that quadrupled in size within 30 minutes after the arrival of firefighters and then shifted direction. Ruhl was scouting the fire’s west flank when the wind direction changed.

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Canyon Creek Fire Rehabilitation Begins

Oregon Public Broadcasting
October 14, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Crews will start this week rehabilitating areas that were burned in the Canyon Creek complex fire in August. Forest managers are focused on preventing flooding near Canyon City. The fire burned through a steep, narrow canyon and the risk for erosion and runoff is high. Malheur National Forest supervisor Steve Beverlin said rehabilitation is the agency’s highest priority this fall.  “We’re looking at some aerial mulching, so putting some mulch on the steepest and most eroded hillsides,” said Beverlin. “We’re looking at trying to stabilize some of the stream drainages — putting large wood in the stream which helps filter the debris and sediment.”  

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Drought, beetle taking toll on Mother Lode trees

The Union Democrat
October 13, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Suzie Gerlitz didn’t know what a bark beetle was when she and her husband, Brandon, moved into their dream home in Leisure Pines this past February. The stay-at-home mom, 29, has since become well acquainted with the wood-dwelling pests that have killed nearly every drought-stressed pine on her quarter-acre property. “It’s our first time buying a home, and we thought we were so lucky,” she said. “A few months later, everything was dead.” Hundreds of trees in the subdivision about three miles east of Twain Harte are dead or dying due to bark beetle infestation, another sign of the cascading impacts from the state’s four-year drought.

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9 homes destroyed, no injuries reported in Central Texas wildfire

Associated Press in Fox News
October 14, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

SMITHVILLE, Texas At least nine homes have been destroyed by a Central Texas wildfire that has grown to more than 3 square miles and no injuries have been reported. Bastrop County Judge Paul Pepe said the number of homes burned could grow in the next few days. The Texas A&M Forest Service said challenging topography and uncontrolled fire lines slashed the containment of the Bastrop County fire to 10 percent as night fell Wednesday. The Forest Service initially estimated 50 percent containment earlier in the day. The fires have prompted the evacuations of several neighborhoods, and the Texas Parks & Wildlife Department closed Buescher State Park on Wednesday due to the fire. 

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Britain’s forests, soil and rivers worth £1.6tn, says environment secretary

The Guardian
October 14, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: International

Britain’s forests, soil and riversare worth at least £1.6tn and should be quantified in the same way as the country’s man-made infrastructure, the environment secretary, Liz Truss, has said. In a move which embraces the natural capital agenda, Truss said that trees and bees should be valued as “national assets” in the same way as structures such as the Forth rail bridge in Scotland. The environment secretary cited the example of Britain’s trees, which she says are more valuable in their natural form than as timber in the enjoyment they provide for people and their ecological role. …For example, by quantifying what trees do to provide enjoyment for
people, filter pollution and store carbon, we can see they are worth at
least 15 times their value as timber. Britain’s overall stock of natural
capital is now at least £1.6tn.”

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Forest owners welcome border levy

New Zealand Scoop
October 14, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: International

Forest owners are welcoming the planned introduction of the new clearance levy to help fund border biosecurity. “It is important that those who benefit from travel and tourism pay their share of keeping our farms, forests, orchards and national parks safe from pest incursions,” says Forest Owners Association biosecurity chairman Dave Cormack.“The costs borne by individual travellers will be small, relative to the cost of flying or sailing to New Zealand, but collectively they will make a big contribution.” …“The forest industry has funded its own forest health surveillance scheme for many decades. This is now being refined using international expertise, to ensure we are monitoring the areas of greatest risk as well as keeping a close watch on a cross-section of forests nationwide,” Mr Cormack says.

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Forest science awards go to Canterbury and Rotorua

New Zealand Scoop
October 15, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: International

Canterbury-based researchers took home four out of five of New Zealand’s forest growing research awards at an industry dinner in Nelson last night. The recipients of the 2015 awards were: Communication and sector engagement – John Moore, Scion Rotorua, for his work in identifying opportunities to improve productivity and the value of forests and engaging with large and small forest owners to communicate the key findings of his research. Innovation that enhances sector value – Professor XiaQiChen, Bart Milne and Chris Meaclem, College of Engineering, Canterbury University, for their work on tele-operation and autonomous harvesting machines. Their development of innovative guidance systems and a new tree felling head have acted as a further catalyst to the rapidly expanding use of machines for felling and extracting trees off steep land.

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Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy

Opinion: We can and should Leap into action against climate change

By Damon Matthews, associate professor and research chair in climate science and sustainability at Concordia University
Montreal Gazette
October 14, 2015
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: Canada East, Canada

Reading the Leap Manifesto was a startling and inspiring experience. Launched on Sept. 15 by Naomi Klein and an impressive list of signatories, the Leap presents a remarkable vision of change that is both necessary and possible to achieve. In a political climate where climate change has been all but forgotten, reading such a clear and compelling call to abandon fossil fuel energy sources within the next few decades was like waking from a bad dream. I have worked as a climate scientist and researcher now for more than a decade. I and others have shown how each emission of carbon dioxide leads to a discrete and essentially irreversible increase in world temperatures. 

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Research Points to Bright Future for Biomass

Humboldt State University
October 12, 2015
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: United States, US West

A potential revolution is unfolding on out-of-the-way logging roads. Foresters and researchers are innovating unique ways to make use of forest residues—low quality trees, tree tops, limbs, and chunks that formerly would have been left in slash piles and burned, or worse, left to rot. Last year, HSU and 15 regional partners began the Waste to Wisdom project after receiving a $5.88 million grant from the U.S. Department of Energy to dramatically expand biomass research. The grant is part of the Biomass Research and Development Initiative, a collaborative effort between the Department of Energy and the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Now, initial research from that project is beginning to show promising results.

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