Tree Frog Forestry News

Daily Archives: November 5, 2015

Business & Politics

Louisiana-Pacific reports 3Q loss

Associated Press in CNBC
November 4, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, United States

NASHVILLE, Tenn. _ Louisiana-Pacific Corp. (LPX) on Tuesday reported a loss of $26.5 million in its third quarter. The Nashville, Tennessee-based company said it had a loss of 19 cents per share. Losses, adjusted for non-recurring costs and to account for discontinued operations, were 12 cents per share. The results did not meet Wall Street expectations. The average estimate of five analysts surveyed by Zacks Investment Research was for a loss of 4 cents per share. The home construction supplier posted revenue of $464.9 million in the period.

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U.S. lumber interests could ruin Trudeau’s early months in office

Winnipeg Free Press
November 4, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, United States

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s toughest foreign policy challenge will not be climate change, China or even the Syrian refugee crisis. It will come in the form of our relations with the United States — our most important friend, partner and customer. And the Americans can, as past trade wars can attest, make life very difficult for Trudeau. The toughest set of discussions will need to begin soon on renegotiating the 2006 Canada-United States Softwood Lumber Agreement, which expired in mid-October. And you can be sure of one thing: “sunny ways” won’t work well with tough-minded U.S. trade negotiators. While a one-year standstill period on any future trade litigation will provide Trudeau with some breathing room, the Americans will be pushing hard for the immediate reintroduction of punitive tariffs on Canadian lumber.

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Catalyst Paper applies to pump Cowichan Lake water in case of extreme drought (audio)

My Cowichan Valley Now
November 4, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

People will have a chance to find out more about the steps Catalyst Paper is taking to ensure a disaster can be avoided if severe drought conditions return next year and beyond. Lake Cowichan mayor Ross Forrest says there will be a meeting taking place on Thursday, November 5th, at 6pm at the Centennial Hall. Forrest says Cowichan Lake and the Cowichan River are once again healthy heading into the rainy season, so the weir will be shut down. He says, however, the “proactive” application is being made because all signs point to another drought next summer.

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Tolko scales back Merritt mill

Merritt Herald
November 4, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

Tolko announced Wednesday that in response to expected reductions to the annual allowable cut coming at the end of the year, 29 full time equivalent positions would be cut, effective Friday, Nov. 6. The mill currently employs 229 people “With significant reductions in the annual allowable cut coming in the near future, we have had to evaluate and focus our operations to ensure we remain competitive and viable,” said Troy Connolly, general manager B.C. lumber for the company, in a news release. “At Nicola, we will curtail our small log line effective November 6, 2015.” The annual volume of lumber produced at the Nicola Valley mill will be reduced by 26 million board feet, or 12 per cent capacity.

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Lumber Liquidators names new CEO, continues sales struggle

Associated Press in Helena Independent Record
November 4, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States

NEW YORK — Lumber Liquidators Holdings Inc. named a new CEO as it continues to struggle with sales in the wake of allegations that imported Chinese-made laminate flooring contained high levels of the carcinogen formaldehyde. The Toano, Virginia-based company suspended the sale of all such products made in China this spring, but the CEO Robert Lynch resigned in May. He was replaced temporarily by the company’s founder, Thomas D. Sullivan, as acting CEO. Sullivan is now being replaced as CEO by board Chairman John M. Presley, who joined the board in April 2006. The company says he has held numerous roles in top executive positions at other companies, including First Capital Bancorp.

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Mill closure could have serious impacts across the region

Former SP Fiber Tech. mill, recently bought by WestRock, was accepting the vast majority of recovered wood from the Portland metro area
Pamplin Media Group
November 4, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States, US West

The closure of Newberg’s paper mill will have a significant impact on the local economy, but its ramifications will also ripple out into the Portland metro area particularly affecting wood recycling efforts. Until two weeks ago the WestRock mill had been receiving about 88 percent of recovered wood in the greater Portland area, Metro officials said last week. That pencils out to about 127,000 tons of clean wood and hog fuel (scrap wood without reuse value generally including treated, painted, stained or engineered wood like plywood and particle board) that was delivered to the mill and burned in 2014, Metro spokesman Ken Ray said. The mill would burn the wood as fuel to produce steam and electricity for plant operations.

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Hawthorne gives early OK to Plum Creek annexation

The Gainesville Sun
November 4, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: US East, United States

Timber giant Plum Creek’s plans for bringing jobs and housing to Hawthorne took a significant step forward this week. Tuesday evening, the city commission unanimously approved the first reading of the company’s request to annex about 1,200 acres into the city limits. A final hearing is scheduled Nov. 17 at 6:30 p.m. “We remain really excited about Hawthorne,” said Tim Jackson, project manager for Plum Creek. The areas to be annexed into the city from the county are two land areas, both west of U.S. 301, with one area to the north of State Road 20 and one just south of the road.

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Wood, Paper & Green Building

Announcing rare design seminar in Calgary

November 26, 2015
Wood WORKS!
November 5, 2015
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: Canada, Canada West

We are delighted to be able to bring this seminar to the Calgary design community. Marina Trifkovic debuted the TREET session at the Edmonton Wood Solutions Fair and received rave reviews. Both sessions are new to Calgary and delivered by inspirational presenters. We hope you are able to join us for this rare seminar.

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Forestry

Good Migrants, and Good News, From Canada’s Boreal Forest National Geographic

November 5, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada

Throughout the fall, migratory birds have been streaming through the United States, headed south from their breeding grounds in the boreal forest of Canada. Some will make very long journeys to places as distant as the Caribbean, Mexico, or South America. Many—an estimated 1 billion or more—will stop in the U.S. for the winter. Along with the birds, some good news has come from Canada in recent months: plans to protect more than 11 million acres of boreal forest, which supports millions of migratory birds that can return next spring to nest in a “nursery” with no logging, mining, hydro development, or other industrial activities. In July, in the province of Newfoundland and Labrador, the Canadian government created eastern Canada’s largest national park on the Atlantic Coast, more than 600 miles northeast of Maine.

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Good Migrants, and Good News, From Canada’s Boreal Forest National Geographic

November 5, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada

Throughout the fall, migratory birds have been streaming through the United States, headed south from their breeding grounds in the boreal forest of Canada. Some will make very long journeys to places as distant as the Caribbean, Mexico, or South America. Many—an estimated 1 billion or more—will stop in the U.S. for the winter. Along with the birds, some good news has come from Canada in recent months: plans to protect more than 11 million acres of boreal forest, which supports millions of migratory birds that can return next spring to nest in a “nursery” with no logging, mining, hydro development, or other industrial activities. In July, in the province of Newfoundland and Labrador, the Canadian government created eastern Canada’s largest national park on the Atlantic Coast, more than 600 miles northeast of Maine.

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Province accused of working with forest industry on mountain caribou recovery plan

The Nelson Daily
November 3, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

As the province’s wolf cull gets set to enter its second season, environmentalists are accusing the provincial government of letting logging companies affect mountain caribou management policies. The province launched into the wolf cull last winter, claiming it was necessary to protect the dwindling South Selkirk and South Peace caribou herds. Locally, the South Selkirk herd was down to just 18 members at the time – from 47 in 2009. The herd now sits at just 14 members. The wolf cull aimed to take out about 200 wolves province-wide last winter to protect the two herds, but sharpshooters in helicopters shot just 84 due to the low snowpack. So the cull is set to continue this winter.

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Sustainable forestry cause draws 100 for Duncan rally

Cowichan Valley Citizen
November 4, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

A march and rally for sustainable BC forestry garnered a crowd of upwards of 100 at Charles Hoey Park Friday afternoon. The event, organized by the Pulp, Paper, and Woodworkers of Canada Public and the Ancient Forest Alliance, and attended by folks from up and down the Island, had a message for the provincial government: exported logs equals exported jobs and that’s not acceptable. “If you’re going to cut a tree down and give it to somebody else, leave the goddamn thing in the ground,” PPWC president Arnie Bercov told the group. “Leave it in the ground. Let it get bigger. Let your kids take it.” He said it’s not that far away from election time and the province better take notice.

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Conservation event looks at why forests matter

Calgary Herald
November 4, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

As local concerns are being raised about the state of Alberta’s forests, the Nature Conservancy of Canada is hosting an event to talk about their future in the province and across Canada. The public forum, which will be held Thursday in Calgary, is part of a cross-country speaker series called Why Forests Matter. “They’re a series of talks the Nature Conservancy of Canada is doing with TD Bank,” said Dan Kraus, national director of conservation program development with the Nature Conservancy of Canada. “TD has been supporting forest conservation through NCC since 2012.” The partnership, he said, has led to the protection of nearly 16,000 hectares of forest across the country.

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City’s rough streets getting a little easier for trees

Cities are beginning to recognize street foliage as a valuable investment and work to boost the longevity of trees fighting to survive.
The Toronto Star
November 5, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada


Kentucky coffee trees line the road along Highway 7 and East Beaver Creek Rd., with the simple goal of growing into large majestic trees their planters would be proud of. But a glance at many tree-lined sidewalks across the GTA will tell you that for trees, mere survival on the streets is no easy feat. Every day thousands of buses, cars and trucks pass by, exposing them to harsh conditions that make their long-term viability difficult and, until recently, almost an anomaly. But there may be hope for the trees. Across the GTA, municipalities are realizing that trees are more than just another part of the streetscape that can be installed and then ignored. Street trees are finally being seen as an investment that must be taken care of, financially and physically, consistently and carefully, to reap returns.

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Timber sale at Busenbark County Park generates controversy

NR Today
November 3, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West, International

TENMILE — Busenbark County Park had no parking lot, no bathrooms, no trails, not even a sign to alert passers-by it was a park. Its amenities were more the natural sort. They included thick woods, with a few trees being at least 500 years old, and a natural spring from which area residents drew water by the gallon, especially when their wells turned sulphury in the summertime. Locals say memorials and weddings have been held there. Between July and September this year, the park was dramatically changed. All the trees were cut, leaving nothing but piles of sawdust and slash, and a lone standing snag. A tributary to Tenmile Creek, now unshaded, winds its way through the sawdust.

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Coos County talks revenue issues with other O&C counties

Coos Bay World
November 3, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

COQUILLE — Coos County has entered preliminary discussions with other neighboring Oregon counties about the management of O&C timber lands and lost revenue plaguing those involved. Coos County Commissioner Bob Main met with commissioners from Curry, Douglas, Josephine, Klamath and Lane counties and three of their legal counsels last Tuesday about employing different legal strategies and tact to improve the financial well-being of the counties. “For the last 37 years, the O&C board has tried to be logical, reasonable, et cetera without going to court,” Main said. “That really hasn’t worked much as it has been to the detriment, in my opinion.” With the meeting the first of many to come, Main said the particulars have still yet to be ironed out, but discussions will continue when the Association of Oregon Counties meets in two weeks.

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Forest Collaboration Series: Part 16: David Ehrmantrout

Evergreen Magazine
November 3, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

“Many people have been chasing consistent and viable forest thinning programs – what you are calling ‘certainty’ – for most of their professional lives. The timber industry, the Forest Service and our many forest stakeholders have been looking at overstocked forests and testing different treatments and thinning equipment for at least 25 years. We’ve done some things right and some things wrong. And then we’ve started over again in hopes of finding better results next time. I know this because I’ve participated in quite a few of these projects. During the same time frame, we have watched mills disappear because they could not find enough timber to keep operating. Every time we lose a mill we end up hauling logs greater distances, which is more costly.

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Same wildfire issue remains — lack of logging in national forests

The Idaho Statesman
November 4, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

The Idaho Statesman’s Rocky Barker penned an article lamenting the smoky Treasure Valley air and the longer wildfire season. The piece meandered quite a bit, but the gist of it was captured in one sentence, “The U.S. could spend the entire firefighting budget on logging and it wouldn’t be enough alone to address the fuel issue in the face of climate change.” That statement makes absolutely no sense. On the very same day Barker’s article was published, another article appeared in the Idaho Statesman describing the “shrunken” wood and paper industry in Idaho. The article contained a bar chart that demonstrates what many of us who have studied this issue know: logging on federal lands in Idaho has declined from nearly one billion board feet, annually, at the peak in the 1970s to well under 100 million board feet today.

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Land exchange would add forest next to Yellowstone

Helena Independent Record
November 4, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

BILLINGS — A billionaire businessman is offering prime wildlife habitat north of Yellowstone National Park to the Custer Gallatin National Forest in exchange for an inholding on his Gardiner-area ranch. It could take about two years for the proposal to be finalized and the land exchange concluded. If successful, the agreement would accomplish what the Forest Service and conservation agencies spent 30 years trying to achieve — the acquisition of the Slip and Slide Ranch. “He’s always looked for some opportunity to block up his ranch, so he was willing to work with us,” said Walt Allen, Gardiner District ranger, of William D. Morean.

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Letter: Fire experiment

By Terry Platts, Gooding
Idaho Statesman
November 4, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

My esteemed and educated friends promote forest management by fire, even creating a prestigious name: “Fire Science.” However, they are flummoxed by logic. We spend a billion dollars to burn a billion dollars’ worth of renewable resources and accidentally burn another billion dollars of private property. In the process we cause extensive erosion lasting for many years, damaging streams, reservoirs, roads, habitat and costing at least hundreds of millions of dollars. But most of all is the unnecessary deaths to achieve this fire experiment. There is little difference between most controlled burns and wildfires as to cost or results.

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Massive Pine Tree Die-Off Scares Forest Service, Dead Trees Could Harm Visitors

Valley Public Radio
November 3, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

The bark beetle has killed so many trees in the Sierra Nevada that officials are worried that people visiting places like the Sierra National Forest are in danger just by being there. Last week Governor Jerry Brown declared a state of emergency when it comes to the dead trees and is asking for federal resources to remove them safely. FM89’s Ezra David Romero reports from the Bass Lake area on what the Forest Service is doing to protect visitors. …We’re here to cut down trees with chainsaws. The bark beetle has sucked the life out of so many pine trees along this well-used trail that Rangers says it’s become increasingly unsafe for visitors. “Basically they’re taking them choking them out, starving them out and the trees are starting to fade,” Wilson says. “The top will go red and the next thing you know you have a standing dead tree which is a pretty big hazard.”

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Colorado fourth state to sign federal-state forest management agreement

Bend senator announces plans for February session
Summit Daily
November 4, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

The U.S. Forest Service and the Colorado State Forest Service (CSFS) signed a forest management agreement this week, allowing projects to cross the boundaries between federal and privately-owned land. The Master Good Neighbor Agreement will make projects at the intersection of private and federal lands more efficient, by allowing partnerships in forest, rangeland and watershed restoration projects on federal lands, officials said. Some of the projects might include wildfire mitigation, bark beetle management and efforts to improve forest resiliency or health. “One of the problems we’ve had over the years is somebody wants to do something positive and it goes right up to the fence line,” CSFS assistant staff forester Rich Edwards said

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Forest Service monitoring trees in northeast Colorado

Gandee: Sterling trees are aging but healthy
Journal-Advocate
November 4, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

While the Colorado State Forest Service is worried about two threats to tree health in northeast Colorado, Sterling Parks, Library and Recreation Department Director Wade Gandee says the city’s trees are healthy. However, they are vulnerable to disease and insect damage because of their age, he said. The Forest Service said Tuesday that thousand cankers disease of black walnuts, and emerald ash borer in ash trees are a “significant concern” — but so far neither threat has had a widespread impact in the area.

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‘Trees in Trouble’ documentary a local endeavor

Cincinnati.com
November 4, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

Until a few years ago, filmmaker Andrea Torrice hadn’t given much thought to the trees around her. That’s pretty common of the subjects of her documentaries, whether it’s factors that contributed to the 1994 genocide in Rwanda or global warming through the eyes of Pacific Islanders. Or trees, in this case. The ideas don’t come to her until she stumbles upon a fact she can’t ignore. This project began on a jog through Burnet Woods. As she passed through the park, Torrice noticed all of the dead trees around her. They were ash trees, her neighbor told her, infested with a foreign bug. All of them would be cut down. Torrice began to research what was happening. What she found led her to produce the documentary, “Trees in Trouble,” which has its first public showing Thursday evening at 20th Century Theater.

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Tree-filled state benefits us all

Andres Villegas, President of the Georgia Forestry Association.
Atlanta Journal-Constitution
November 3, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

Whether you’ve flown over our state or driven through it, you probably think of Georgia as a state filled with trees. And it is. But you may not realize that more than 90 percent of those trees – so crucial to the air we breathe, the water we drink and many of the jobs on which Georgians are dependent – are owned by private landowners. As Congress considers how to reform our country’s tax code, there are provisions that are critical to keeping Georgia full of these economically and environmentally important forestlands. Of the 24.3 million acres of forest in Georgia, 91 percent are privately owned – more than any other state in the nation. Forest landowners – large and small – invest in managing healthy forests that benefit every Georgian. These are called “working forests” because they increase the economic vitality of the state and provide environmental benefits to every citizen.

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Can trees really change sex?

The Conversation
November 5, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: International

The revelation that the UK’s oldest tree is showing signs of switching sex has sparked much excitement in the world of horticultural science. The Fortingall yew (main image) in Perthshire, Scotland, having apparently spent 5,000 years as a male tree, has suddenly produced female berries. So what is going on? …Yews are one of the species that clearly divide into male and female plants. You do occasionally see male flowers on female yews and vice versa, but you wouldn’t expect it on as ancient a tree as the Fortingall. Yet having been male for all of living memory, it has definitely produced female flowers and red berries on some shoots. It is possible that the tree has produced what is known as a “sport”, which is a new growth that is morphologically different to the rest of the plant.

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Forest defence bolstered by agreement with government

By NZ Forest Owners Association
Scoop Independent News
November 5, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: International

The Forest Owners Association says having a biosecurity agreement with the government is a vital part of the forest industry’s defence system. FOA chief executive David Rhodes and primary industries minister Nathan Guy today signed what is known as a Government-Industry Agreement at Parliament. The agreement defines where responsibilities and costs will fall in the event of an outbreak of a serious forest pest or disease. “For 50 years we have had a forest health surveillance scheme that is seen by overseas experts as one of the best in the world. But being ‘best’ is not good enough, we need it to be as near to perfect as we can make it,” says Mr Rhodes.

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