Tree Frog Forestry News

Daily Archives: November 10, 2015

Business & Politics

Union laments sawmill closure

Cranbrook Daily Townsman
November 9, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

The union is decrying the closing of the Canal Flats sawmill, which will officially close up after nearly 100 years of operation in the Columbia Valley in various forms. According to Doug Singer, the president of the United Steelworkers Local 1-405, the union members actually ran the last log and boards through in late September and have spent their time since then preparing for the facility for closure. “This has been devastating for our members, their families, Canal Flats, surrounding communities and the Local Union,” said Singer. “This closure, including the layoffs in May, affect more than 170 employees and related jobs, which is significant.”

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Conifex To Upgrade El Dorado Mill Before Mackenzie

250 News
November 9, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

Prince George, B.C.- Conifex has made its decision , and the El Dorado sawmill in the Southern US will be upgraded first. Conifex had been assessing both its idled Mackenzie Site One sawmill and its recently purchased El Dorado facility in Arkansas as to which facility would be at the top of the priority list for upgrades. “We are doing the US first and Mackenzie second but it is not because of any local dissatisfaction” says Conifex CEO and President Ken Shields, it has more to do with plain dollars and cents. Shields says while the two projects are “pretty similar” there is one striking difference, and that is the selling price of the product . “It costs roughly the same to produce a thousand board feet in B.C. as it does in the Southern U.S.” says Shields, “But the selling price is $400 dollars in the U.S. and $270 dollars in B.C.”

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Last shift at Canal Flats

Kimberley Daily Bulletin
November 9, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

Today marked the last shift for some 65 workers and nine staff members at the CanFor owned Canal Flats saw mill. Canfor announced the closure on September 9 in Canal Flats, stating that recent downturns in the oil and gas and lumber markets that the mill served, combined with a lack of economically available fibre for the mill, had brought operating losses the company could no longer sustain. At the beginning of 2015, the mill had employed approximately 125 people, but 81 of those were laid off in May when the mill went to one shift in May. This closure does have an affect on Kimberley and Cranbrook, said Mayor Don McCormick.

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Weyerhaeuser buying Plum Creek for $8.44B deal, creating timber and paper giant

Vancouver Sun
November 9, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

Doyle Simons, the president and CEO of Weyerhaeuser, will be president and CEO of the new company. Holley will be non-executive chairman. The merger must be approved by the two companies’ shareholders. It is expected to close late in the first quarter of next year or early in the second quarter. Weyerhaeuser, based in Federal Way, Washington, also said Sunday that it may spin off its cellulose fibers business, which includes five pulp mills. Plum Creek is based in Seattle. Weyerhaeuser also has plans to move the company headquarters to Seattle in the middle of next year.

Weyerhaeuser Wagers on Scale, Housing Comeback with Plum Creek deal from The Wall Street Journal

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Freres Lumber fined $29,625 for stormwater violations

Statesman Journal
November 9, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States, US West

Freres Lumber Co. has been fined $29,625 for repeatedly failing to monitor stormwater discharges as required by its federal water pollution permit. The violations occurred at three of the family-owned company’s timber products plants, two in Lyons and one in Mill City, the state Department of Environmental Quality said. DEQ penalized the company for failing to monitor chemical oxygen demand and biochemical oxygen demand between Jan. 1 and June 30, 2015. The plants discharge stormwater into the North Santiam River, which is impaired for dissolved oxygen, for which biochemical oxygen is a surrogate pollutant. Freres Lumber Co. is required to test its stormwater discharge for benchmark pollutants at each outfall four times per year. The company previously was fined for similar violations that occurred during the 2013-14 monitoring year.

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Roseburg Forest Products names new president; Allyn Ford to continue as CEO until 2017

The Register-Guard
November 10, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States, US West

DILLARD — Roseburg Forest Products announced Monday that Grady Mulbery (right) will take over as company president on Jan. 1. Current President and Chief Executive Officer Allyn Ford (left) will stay on as CEO for another year, the Dillard-­based company said in a statement issued Monday. Mulbery will assume the joint role of CEO and president when Ford retires on Jan. 1, 2017. Ford will continue as chairman of the Roseburg Forest Products Board after retiring as CEO, the statement said. Mulbery came to Roseburg Forest Products in early 2011 as vice president of composites manufacturing and later became vice president of manufacturing, the statement said. He has led Roseburg’s production operations since 2012.

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Plum Creek sale raises questions about public access, land deals, mill closures

by Rob Chaney
The Missoulian
November 9, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States, US West

Word of the proposed merger between Plum Creek Timber Co. and Weyerhaeuser Co. to become one of the nation’s biggest timber operations hit so fast, even Montana Gov. Steve Bullock was caught off guard. “I’ll give you a comment on that once I learn a little bit about that,” Bullock said on Monday morning after a speech at the Montana Farm Bureau Federation. “You’d think we’d have gotten some heads-up on that.” …“Canadians have been buying sawmills in the U.S., and three of the larger companies have as many or more mills in the U.S. as they do in Canada,” said Todd Morgan, director of forestry industry research at the Bureau of Business and Economic Research at the University of Montana. “This deal (between Plum Creek and Weyerhaeuser) could be a reaction to help their economies of scale and purchasing power.”

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Weyco to consider selling Norpac, other mills

The Longview Daily News
November 9, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States, US West

Weyerhaeuser Co. is considering selling Norpac and its liquid packaging plants in Longview as part of an evaluation of its cellulose fibers business, in which profits have sagged over the last year, the company announced Sunday. Weyerhaeuser says it will consider a broad range of alternatives, including continuing to hold and operate the business, selling it or spinning it off. In addition to the plants in Longview, the company is also evaluating mills in Georgia, North Carolina, Mississippi and Alberta, Canada. The two Longview plants employ about 850 workers combined.

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Here’s what the Weyerhaeuser-Plum Creek deal means for Washington state

One of Washington state’s largest public companies just got much bigger.
Puget Sound Business Journal
November 9, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States, US West

Weyerhaeuser (NYSE: WY) announced Monday an $8.4 billion deal to acquire Plum Creek. The move will create the largest timber company in the country. As part of the deal, Weyerhaeuser announced it is considering options for spinning out or selling its paper mill business, Cellulose Fibers. The companies hinted that the merger is likely to result in staff reductions in several regulatory filings after the deal was announced. …It’s unclear where exactly those cuts will come from. The new management team will be evaluating the two companies and figuring out the overlap in the months ahead. One place Weyerhaeuser indicated it would target is its paper and lumber mill business, known as cellulose fibers.

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Sale forms top timber owner in state, U.S.

Northwest Arkansas Democrat Gazette
November 10, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: US East, United States

Weyerhaeuser Co.’s plan to purchase Plum Creek Timber Co. for $8.44 billion will create the largest timber owner in both the United States and in Arkansas. …”It’s never good for one outfit to own all or most of anything,” John Ed Anthony said. …It also will be the largest landowner in Arkansas with more than 1.3 million acres of forestland, said Matthew Pelkki, who holds the George H. Clippert Endowed Chair of Forest Economics at the University of Arkansas at Monticello. Pelkki said Arkansas has a total of about 18.9 million acres of forestland, and 60 percent of that land is privately owned.

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Unique challenges, common goal: Maine paper industry eyes survival strategy

Bangor Daily News
November 9, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: US East, United States

PORTLAND, Maine — One challenge looms large over the future of Maine’s paper industry: all of the state’s mills are different. The details of each mill’s operations can become blurred behind the recent spate of bad news for the paper industry. Work in paper mills has declined sharply in the last few years. Closures, bankruptcies, sales and stock exchange delistings blend together to paint a dire picture. But each mill is a unique business, with different costs, different mixes of products and markets, and different margins. “Every mill has its own story,” Donna Cassese, chairwoman of the Maine Pulp and Paper Association, said.

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Domtar is in the hunt for the ‘manufacturing athlete’

Kingsport Times News
November 9, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: US East, United States

KINGSPORT — “Manufacturing athlete” is terminology that Domtar Mill Manager Bill MacPherson favors when he speaks about the mill employees and the future of the Kingsport facility. “The analogy ties in with sports but any great football team has the best potential players and the best facility,” said MacPherson. “We feel that we have that here in Kingsport, and we want to keep attracting the best of the best.” With that thought in mind, the Human Resources department at Domtar has gone through changes over the past year. Included in the changes were hiring a new Human Resource director and the restructuring of a hiring plan that plays strongly on the involvement of mill employees.

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Wood, Paper & Green Building

In defense of the residential sprinkler mandate

Delmarva Daily Times
November 9, 2015
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: US East, United States

I support the requiring of residential fire sprinklers, and oppose the attempt by the building industry to weaken the International Building Code for their benefit. …An excellent example of why residential sprinklers are now needed was demonstrated in the photograph that accompanied the October 26 Daily Times article that provided the builders’ perspective on this issue. In the background sits a stack of “engineered lumber” – specifically, Oriented Strand Board (OSB) I-beams. These are made of parallel 2-by-3 boards, between which is glued a thin web, itself consisting of wood fragments glued and pressed together to form a flat sheet. They are used for floor joists, replacing what was formerly a solid 2×10 or larger piece of lumber, but are lighter, cheaper, and probably squeak less.

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Downers Grove changes building code to allow wood construction

Suburban Life Publications
November 9, 2015
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: US East, United States

DOWNERS GROVE – The Downers Grove Village Council has approved building code changes that will allow structures anywhere in the village to be built with wood. The changes, which were approved at the council’s Oct. 20 meeting, would allow Type III construction in all zoning districts of the village, which would allow builders to use treated wood instead of steel or concrete. The changes also would require wood trusses and joists to have a one-hour fire rating. The changes are part of a village priority to review the building development and permitting process in an effort to make the village more business-friendly, according to Alex Pellicano, the village’s building division manager.

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Tokyo’s first multistory building made of 100% wood overcomes rigid fire regulations

Inhabitat
November 9, 2015
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: International

After a decade of research aimed at reintroducing wood into Japanese urban architecture, the first multi-story building designed entirely with timber materials has finally met Tokyo’s strict fire regulations. The 3-level Miyamura Veterinary Clinic, created under the lead of Toshihiko Suzuki from the Tokyo based offices Atelier OPA with Takao Nishizawa from Buildinglandscape, is a combination of a traditional post-and-beam wooden structure and LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber), a cutting-edge material which can resist fire for an entire hour. This exceeds Tokyo’s regulations, which require a minimum resistance of 45 minutes.

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Dezeen Architects embrace “the beginning of the timber age”

Dezeen Magazine
November 9, 2015
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: International

Wood is taking over from steel and concrete as the architectural wonder material of the 21st century, with architects praising its sustainability, quality and speed of construction. (+ slideshow). New types of engineered timber that are considerably stronger and more stable than regular wood are allowing architects to build bigger and higher, with timber skyscrapers now a real prospect. “This is the beginning of the timber age,” said UK architect Andrew Waugh, whose firm Waugh Thistleton is behind a housing development in London that will use more timber than any other project in the world.  According to Waugh, building in wood is “super fast, super accurate, and
also makes the most amazingly beautiful spaces.” He said: “These are
buildings that feel very good to be in, very robust and very solid.”

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Developer showcases wood structure in Rotorua building

By Rotorua Lakes Council
Scoop Independent News
November 10, 2015
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: International


Rotorua developer Ray Cook of R & B Consultants has used wood as the key structural component for premises he has been constructing in the city for ACC (pictured earlier during construction). Mr Cook says utilising wood as the primary construction material supports Rotorua Lakes Council’s Wood First policy, a recent council initiative aimed at encouraging more use of New Zealand timber and wood products. Throughout the ACC building Mr Cook (pictured showing the new premises to Rotorua mayor Steve Chadwick on Monday night) has employed innovative timber technology involving laminated veneer lumber and cross-laminated timber panels made from New Zealand pine.

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Forestry

Moose cull prompts protests

November 10, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

Dennis Day was all ready to protest a Mi’kmaq moose hunt that Parks Canada approved for Monday on North Mountain in Cape Breton Highlands National Park, but there was nothing to protest. Day, a resident of nearby Cape North, set up camp along the Cabot Trail just outside the park on Sunday night, but Mi’kmaq hunters and Parks Canada officials were still putting things in place Monday and were not expected to start hunting until Tuesday at the earliest. “I’m not even going up on the mountain,” Day said Monday morning inside his roadside hut, which is equipped with a wood stove inside and a porta-potty next to it. “I’m staying right here.” Day said he intends to peacefully protest Parks Canada’s plan to cull up to 90 per cent of the moose population in a 20-square-kilometre area on North Mountain.

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117000 trees to be planted along the Highway of Heroes

Trees will pay tribute to each of Canada’s fallen soldiers while helping the environment
kawarthaNOW.com
November 9, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

The Highway of Heroes Tribute and Forests Ontario have launched a campaign to honour Canada’s fallen by planting 117,000 trees — one for every soldier since Confederation — along Highway 401 between Trenton and Toronto. In 2007, the portion of Highway 401 between Glen Miller Road in Trenton and Keele Street in Toronto was officially designated the “Highway of Heroes”, as the road is travelled by funeral convoys for fallen Canadian Forces personnel from CFB Trenton to the Ontario Coroner’s office in Toronto. The official launch of the tree-planting campaign took place in Trenton and Toronto on Friday, November 6th.

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Environmental Commissioner says bear hunt proponents ignored key evidence ONTARIO

Thunder Bay News Watch
November 9, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

THUNDER BAY — The province’s environmental commissioner is criticizing a decision to reintroduce the spring bear hunt last year. Canceled in 1999, the province announced in April of 2014 that it would launch the hunt again as a pilot program in several wildlife units, including Thunder Bay. In her annual report, Environmental Commissioner of Ontario Ellen Schwartzel said the Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry ignored evidence that the program, potentially expanding next year, would work to reduce interactions between humans and bears. It also ignored advice from the Nuisance Bear Review Committee, which was set up to try and minimize the number of orphaned cubs in the province.

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Fire chiefs, White House see climate change impact on wildfires

By Michael Doyle
McClatchy Washington Bureau
November 9, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States

WASHINGTON – Fire chiefs from California, Idaho, Washington and other vulnerable states reinforced on Monday the Obama administration’s campaign against climate change. Fresh off a devastating wildland fire season that saw millions of acres burned nationwide, a number of leading chiefs convened with Vice President Joe Biden to spotlight what they called the “climate change impacts” found where homes meet tinder. “You can’t point to climate change and say there’s a direct impact on any one fire, but across the board it’s changing weather patterns,” said Ken Pimlott, director of the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection. “You have more drought persisting in areas, and all of that leads to drier vegetation and ultimately fires that burn more aggressively.”

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Report: Forest restoration work not keeping pace with demand

By Kevin Freking
Associated Press in Washington Post
November 10, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

WASHINGTON — The U.S. Forest Service says it has increased the pace and scale of its forest restoration work since 2011, but progress waned this year and the agency risks following further behind without more resources. Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack is using a new report to press Congress to change the way in which the federal government funds wildfire fighting. The report states that the Forest Services was able to thin out more than 4.6 million acres of forest lands in 2014, a 9 percent increase from 2011. The amount of timber produced for public consumption increased by about 12 percent during that same period. Vilsack said he expects that improvements will drop off this year, but will still exceed the 2011 levels.

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Our View: LePage’s strange grudge puts working forest at risk

Instead of accepting federal funds to conserve land, Maine will take its chances this year.
Portland Press Herald
November 10, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

The projects that have protected some of Maine’s most cherished areas are the result of complex work that can take years. The one assurance through long negotiations and tedious legal work is that, in Maine, funding will always be available for the most meaningful projects. However, the LePage administration, in a few short years, has ended that assurance, first by withholding voter-approved bonds for the Land for Maine’s Future program, and then, most recently, by opting not to apply for funding from the federal Forest Legacy program.  By all but halting state involvement in conservation, Gov. LePage has injected uncertainty into a process that requires reliability and consistency, and put at risk the framework that has made Maine’s efforts the envy of the nation.

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Forest service restoring more acres but not enough to curb fires

Visalia Times-Delta
November 9, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

WASHINGTON – The U.S. Forest Service restored 4.6 million acres of forest land last year to reduce the threat of devastating wildfires — an area the size of New Jersey, and a 9 percent increase over the acreage treated in 2011. But that’s not nearly enough, a Forest Service report being released Tuesday concludes. In order to reduce the number and severity of wildfires, Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack said Congress needs to pass legislation that changes the way the government funds fighting fires. “I say that we are at a tipping point,” Vilsack said. “The Forest Service has done as much as it can do.”

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Maine won’t participate in Forest Legacy program

Bangor Daily News
November 9, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

AUGUSTA, Maine — The LePage administration has decided to take a pass on applying for its share of federal conservation funds. Over the past 25 years, Maine has tapped federal funds under the Forest Legacy program, which has infused more than $75 million into Maine conservation projects, protecting more than 750,000 acres from development. Critics of the administration say this yet another blow for land conservation in Maine. Last fall, Wolfe Tone of the Trust for Public Land was involved in a Forest Legacy proposal for submission to the U.S. Department of Agriculture. The expectation was that the LePage administration would approve the major conservation project, in western Maine, and seek a nomination to the federal program.

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Discover how Norway saved its vanishing forests

BBC News
November 5, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: International

Knut Ole Viken’s history is tied to the forest. As a child he spent summers with his father in remote woodlands close to the Arctic Circle. There they measured the growth of trees, the foundation of Norway’s wilderness. 27 years later, Viken has been working in the forest long enough to notice it change. Unlike many other forests, that change has been positive. Norway was once at risk of losing much of its forests. After centuries of logging for timber and firewood, the country had consumed much of this previously vast natural resource. All that has changed. Today, Norway has triple the amount of standing wood in forests than it had 100 years ago. The annual harvest of wood only takes about half the amount that grows each year, so overall the forests are growing. This forest growth is enough to offset roughly 60% of the country’s annual greenhouse gas emissions.

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Logged forest near Bendoc that didn’t regenerate a ‘major disaster’ says East Gippsland environmentalist

ABC News, Australia
November 10, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: International

An East Gippsland environmentalist is calling for an investigation into areas of state forest that have failed to regenerate after being logged. Jill Redwood said there was a parcel of land outside of Bendoc, near the New South Wales border, where there was nothing but dead bracken on land that was logged 11 years ago. Ms Redwood said State Government data showed there was 10,000 hectares of land across Victoria where trees and plants had not regrown after clear-felling. “It is going to cost the Government … i.e. the taxpayer, millions, I think, to go back over these 10,000 hectares,” she said. “It’s going to take a lot of money and time and possibly even hand planting.

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Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy

Aspen could become too warm for its namesake tree by 2030

Aspen Times
November 9, 2015
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: United States, US West

At a time when the American public remains largely unconcerned about climate change, the Aspen Center for Environmental Studies has helped develop a tool that could more clearly convey the grim consequences of a warming planet. One implication is that the environment in Aspen could become too warm by 2030 to support the aspen tree species. The center’s staff worked with climate scientists from the University of Arizona to develop ForestForecasts.org, a website that shows how 100 species of trees now found in Western states might fare by 2100.

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General

Hidden grove showcases largest trees in Columbia Gorge

Statesman Journal
November 9, 2015
Category: Uncategorised

WILLARD, WASH. — To find the largest waterfalls in the Columbia River Gorge, all that’s required is a drive out Interstate 84 to the many viewpoints and trailheads east of Portland. To find the largest trees in the Gorge, however, you’re in for a lot more work. In an area with a long history of logging, precious few groves of old-growth trees remain intact. The ones that do remain are way off the beaten path, known only to a handful of big-tree hunters often reluctant to share the location. Such is the case with what Hood River photographer Darryl Lloyd has dubbed the “Giant Trees of Lost Creek,” a 170-acre patch of forest home to titanic Douglas-fir and western red cedar.

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Moose cull prompts protests

November 10, 2015
Category: Uncategorised

Dennis Day was all ready to protest a Mi’kmaq moose hunt that Parks Canada approved for Monday on North Mountain in Cape Breton Highlands National Park, but there was nothing to protest. Day, a resident of nearby Cape North, set up camp along the Cabot Trail just outside the park on Sunday night, but Mi’kmaq hunters and Parks Canada officials were still putting things in place Monday and were not expected to start hunting until Tuesday at the earliest. “I’m not even going up on the mountain,” Day said Monday morning inside his roadside hut, which is equipped with a wood stove inside and a porta-potty next to it. “I’m staying right here.” Day said he intends to peacefully protest Parks Canada’s plan to cull up to 90 per cent of the moose population in a 20-square-kilometre area on North Mountain.

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