Tree Frog Forestry News

Daily Archives: November 18, 2015

Business & Politics

Resolute Forest Products wins 2015 AF&PA Leadership in Sustainability Award for safety

PPI Environment
November 17, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, United States

WASHINGTON, DC -TheAmerican Forest & Paper Association(AF&PA) recognized Resolute Forest Products as a leader in sustainability with a 2015 AF&PA Sustainability Award. The award was presented at AF&PA’s annual meeting on Friday, November 13 in San Antonio, Texas. Resolute received the Leadership in Sustainability Award for Safety for its Working Towards Zero Incidents project. Designed to recognize exemplary sustainability programs and initiatives in the paper and wood products manufacturing industry, AF&PA’s annual sustainability awards are given based on the merit of entries received across multiple categories. 

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FOREST PRODUCTS ASSOCIATION ANNOUNCES TEMPORARY CEO

Forest Products Association of Canada
November 17, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada

OTTAWA: The Chair of the Board of Forest Products Association of Canada, Curt Stevens, today announced that Paul Lansbergen will be taking over as acting President and CEO of FPAC as of December 14th, 2015. Lansbergen will replace the departing CEO, David Lindsay, who held the leadership position for the last three years. “We wish David well as he takes on a new job closer to his family. During his time at FPAC, he strived to position the Canadian forest products industry as innovative, environmentally friendly and global in its reach,” says Stevens, the CEO of Louisiana Pacific (LP).

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Logrolling: The softwood lumber dispute is lurching back to life

iPolitics
November 17, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, United States

For anyone thinking that the Obama administration’s decision on the Keystone pipeline represents a clearing of the Canada-U.S. decks — guess again. Another major trade dispute is lurking just around the corner, and it’s on an all-too familiar topic: softwood lumber. Against the backdrop of a U.S. presidential election, the Softwood Lumber Agreement — which ushered in a nine-year truce for Canadian lumber exporters — expired on October 12. What’s more, the U.S. lumber industry already has a domestic ‘consultation’ underway to assess the current regime (unpopular south of the border) and that process is set to wrap up on November 22.

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Softwood Lumber Agreement missing from trade minister’s mandate letter

iPolitics
November 17, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada

When the Prime Minister’s Office released the ministerial mandate letters for the new cabinet last Friday, the thing that stood out to political observers, beyond the unprecedented nature of their publication at the federal level, was the specificity of the marching orders. Which is why the omission, from Trade Minister Chrystia Freeland’s mandate, of the unresolved Canada-U.S. softwood lumber file raised eyebrows. But, rest assured — the government is working on it. The issue rests on a bilateral trade deal between Canada and the United States that lasted for the better part of a decade. Initially ratified in 2006, the agreement expired just prior to the 2015 federal election. A spokesman for the Department of Foreign Affairs, Trade and Development suggests the agreement hasn’t been forgotten.

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Canfor Disspells Rumours of Pulp Mill Shutdown

250 News
November 17, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

Prince George, B.C.- Canfor representatives were before Prince George City Council last night, to give them an update on the state of the company. Councillor Terri McConnachie asked if there was any truth to the rumours that one or more of the pulp mills will be facing a shut down. Stephen Mackie, Senior Vice President for Canfor, says while there are some challenges, “I cannot see any shutdowns in the near future” he said the rumours, are, just that rumours, and there is no truth to them. Canfor took the opportunity to share with Council the success they have had in making improvements to the air quality in Prince George.

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Terrace, B.C. sawmill curtails operations

Terrace Standard
November 17, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

Terrace’s only sawmill has shut down one of its main wood processing units as log supply and foreign markets dwindle, which is the second slowdown in the last year. “This time the mill has cut production by half,” said Skeena Sawmills official Roger Keery last week. “Our sawmill isn’t running but the planner mill is running this week, so we are at partial operations and have been doing that for a bit now.” This summer the mill closed entirely for two months. Currently 45 people are working of the 85 usually employed in front end roles. The reason for the partial closure has to do with gaining adequate log supply and sales orders, Keery said.

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Resolute counters dwindling paper demand by accelerating entry into tissue making

The Chronicle Journal
November 17, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada East, Canada

MONTREAL — Resolute Forest Products is stepping up efforts to counter dwindling demand for paper by accelerating its entry into the North American tissue business. The Montreal-based company expects to become the continent’s 10th largest tissue maker — joining Canadian rivals Cascades and KP Tissue — with the acquisition of Florida-based Atlas Paper and investing in one of its own factories, which is due to start production in 2017. Tissue sales from Atlas will immediately generate six per cent of Resolute’s overall pre-tax operating earnings, while the addition of production from the company’s plant in Calhoun, Tenn., will raise that even further. Newsprint, specialty paper, pulp and lumber are expected to contribute a smaller share of earnings going forward.

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US softwood lumber prices drop in mid-November

IHB The Timber Network
November 17, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States

The framing lumber composite’s six week price run came to an end in the week of Nov. 13 with a US$5 (1.51%) drop to $326 per thousand board ft. (mbf), reflecting a slowdown in framing markets which led to price softening, reported Random Lengths. Compared to this time last year ($367/mbf), the composite was down $41 (11.17%). The approaching holidays, buyer caution and Friday’s close of the November futures contract were among reasons cited for the slowdown, reported Random Lengths. After gaining for the first three days of the week, November futures dipped slightly on Thursday and dropped $4.70 on Friday to close at $251/mbf – up $3.90 (1.58%) from Monday’s opening price of $247.10/mbf. 

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As Merger Looms, Questions Linger About Plum Creek’s Future

A week after deal was announced, Plum Creek officials say it is too soon to know what could change in deal with Weyerhaeuser
Flathead Beacon
November 17, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States, US West

More than a week after the Weyerhaeuser Company and Plum Creek Timber announced they would be merging, little has changed at mills in Columbia Falls and Evergreen. But community members and industry observers are wondering aloud what the multibillion-dollar merger will mean for the mills and their 750 employees in the Flathead Valley. The merger, expected to be finalized sometime next spring, will create one of the largest timber companies in the world that will hold more than 13 million acres of timberland across the United States. While nearly everyone in the industry agrees that it’s still too early to determine what might result from the merger, there are some concerns that it could mean layoffs or even mill closures.

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Paper industry charts plan for navigating ‘challenging times’

Bangor Daily News
November 17, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: US East, United States

BANGOR, Maine — Maine’s paper industry is down, but not for lack of effort. The industry’s power to draw a crowd was clear Tuesday, with more than 200 people ranging from woodlot owners and loggers to paper mill managers, economic development officials, lawmakers and lobbyists gathering in Bangor for a daylong summit. Pulp and paper’s challenges served as the backdrop for a range of broader economic and infrastructure issues Maine faces, from energy to workforce development to transportation. By the end of the event organized by the Maine Pulp and Paper Association, energy costs and high property tax valuations emerged from a survey of attendees as the top priorities for saving the legacy industry in Maine.

Maine’s paper industry is still strong despite challenges, summit speakers say from Central Maine

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Mill closure means 60000 tons of Portland wood waste is headed for the landfill

Portland Business Journal
November 17, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: US East, United States

At least 60,000 tons of wood waste collected at Metro facilities that was formerly burned as biomass is expected to be sent to area landfills. With news of the closure of a Newberg paper mill that received more than a hundred thousand tons of Portland’s salvaged timber last year, the Metro Council scrambled for alternatives. That came in the form of suspending part of its wood product recovery requirements, allowing the waste wood to be disposed of in landfills. The code section in question allowed no more than 15 percent of landfill-bound waste be wood, metal or cardboard. The council temporarily removed wood from that equation.

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Verso Corp Considers Bankruptcy Following Wickliffe Mill Idling

WKMS
November 17, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: US East, United States

The Verso Corporation is considering bankruptcy proceedings after idling its paper mill in Ballard County and laying off more than 300 employees in August. Verso released its third quarter financial report yesterday. The Q3 shows seasonal paper sales up this quarter, but overall sales, volume and prices down from the same time last year. But the report does note a $293 million net loss for the first nine months of 2015, which Verso President David Paterson attributes to oversupply and increased demand for foreign paper. The company is now considering a financial restructuring which may include Chapter 11 bankruptcy or a out-of-court settlement.

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Arctic Paper decides to close Mochenwangen mill

EUWID
November 18, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: International

The search for a buyer for the Arctic Paper Mochenwangen mill has not been successful so far and the company now announced the closure of the German site in December. The German paper mill Arctic Paper Mochenwangen will cease production and operations in December 2015. The decision by the parent company, the Polish pulp and paper manufacturer Arctic Paper S.A., was based on the losses incurred by the mill and the lack of success in negotiations with potential investors, the site’s managing director Lothar Burchardt told EUWID.

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Wood, Paper & Green Building

Corvallis company striving to introduce first formaldehyde-free, bio-based adhesive for manufacturing particleboard and other wood products

Register Guard
November 17, 2015
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: United States, US West

A Corvallis startup is making strides to be the first to introduce a formaldehyde-free adhesive used to manufacture particleboard and medium density fiberboard. If successful, the innovation would be a breakthrough in the burgeoning green building materials industry and likely in high demand since California implemented the world’s strictest regulation of formaldehyde emissions in 2012. The Corvallis company, EcoPro Polymers, is developing a plant-based adhesive that contains no urea-formaldehyde, a chemical that releases formaldehyde — known to cause cancer in humans. The company has received support from Oregon State University and Oregon BEST, a nonprofit focused on clean technology innovation.

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Wood’s heyday has arrived

Portland Tribune
November 17, 2015
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: United States, US West

Announcements practically weekly about tall wooden buildings, government grants and wood products research is changing perceptions about wood’s potential. Here in Oregon, long regarded the nation’s leader in timber and wood production, we’re on the threshold of something big with Portland in the vanguard. Growing recognition of timber’s environmental benefits is fueling a renaissance in construction of multistory structures using wood. In the metro area alone, more than a dozen buildings are being erected using mass timber products such as glulam posts and beams, and exposed wood ceilings and walls. In September, D.R. Johnson in Riddle became the first company in the nation certified to produce structural cross-laminated timber, or CLT. 

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Forestry

Forestry graduates ready for employment

Williams Lake Tribune
November 17, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Graduates of a new forestry equipment operator program say they are ready to get to work. “The program has given me the knowledge I need to excel,” said Alkali Lake resident Sheldon Paul during the grad celebration held Friday at the Old School Training and Recreation Complex in Riske Creek. “There was a lot to learn that I didn’t know about operating heavy equipment.” Rachel Jeff, the only woman in the program, said she was a haul truck driver at three different mines but decided to go into forestry. “I conquered the buncher before the boys did,” she smiled, adding her home community is Redstone. “The skidder was easy like truck driving, which is not what I wanted to do.”

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EDITORIAL: Park should release scientific evidence for moose cull

The Chronicle Herald
November 17, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

On any visit to Cape Breton Highlands National Park, to see a moose is a highlight. But the proliferation of those giant, lumbering creatures has stirred up a giant controversy. Derek Quann, a spokesman for the park, says its 1,800 moose are eating too many young evergreen trees, reducing once-dense forest to meadows. Destruction of boreal forest habitat, says Parks Canada’s website, poses a threat to species like the American marten, the Canada lynx and rare birds and plant life. The eastern wolf used to keep Cape Breton’s moose in check but it was wiped out in the mid-1800s. According to a Parks Canada website, Cape Breton moose were also gone by 1930. Today’s herd is descended from 18 moose introduced in 1947-48 from Elk Island National park in Alberta.

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Wildland Fires Recognize No Borders

USDA Blog
November 17, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, International

An uncontained forest fire burning in Greece, Germany, or the U.S. looks basically the same: they are all destructive. For this important reason, the U.S. Forest Service has a well-established international leadership role in wildland fire management. The Fire and Aviation Management or FAM’s international program coordinates Forest Service leadership in wildland fire through three main efforts starting with support for international disasters. The next effort is mobilization of fire suppression resources in support of established bilateral arrangements, coordinated by the National Interagency Fire Center and finally through FAM’s international activities coordinated with the Forest Service’s International Programs Office.

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Feds face lawsuits over Idaho wolf-killing derby

Idaho Statesman
November 17, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

BOISE, IDAHO  – Environmental groups filed lawsuits Tuesday in Idaho and Washington, D.C., seeking to force federal officials to reveal reasons behind allowing a wolf- and coyote-shooting contest in parts of Idaho. The lawsuits contend the U.S. Bureau of Land Management is violating the Freedom of Information Act by withholding records sought by the Center for Biological Diversity and Western Watersheds Project. Steve Alder of Idaho for Wildlife said the group isn’t holding its Predator Hunting Contest this winter because hunters were unable to kill any wolves the previous two winters. “We don’t care about lawsuits, but we failed miserably at harvesting a wolf,” Alder said. “There’s no point getting sponsorships and doing this and that and not being able to get a wolf.”

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Congress should support fire prevention on family forests (Opinion)

By Scott Hayes
The Oregonian
November 17, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

The recently ended fire season, for private landowners, was the third most expensive in the last 10 years. It managed to touch almost every Oregonian. Some Oregonians were directly impacted by one of the many blazes. Road blockages, campground closures and days of unhealthy, smoky air over Portland and many other urban and rural areas were just some of the inconveniences. As a result, policymakers are scrambling to find ways to avoid a repeat next year. They would do well to review a new report from the American Forest Foundation (AFF). AFF is a non-profit that helps private and family owned forests meet Americans’ needs for clean air and water. 

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Guest opinion: Okanogan fires shows pre-emptive forest management works

by Bob Schumacher, onsulting forester
The Spokesman-Review
November 15, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

….Once the fires were contained and the woods reopened to the public, I made two trips into the burned areas. First, I visited the northwest reaches of the North Star fire, in the vicinity of Lyman Lake Road and Devils Canyon. Many of the managed forest stands displayed little damage at all, appearing much the same as I had seen them a year ago. A few treated areas had been lost, but considering the extreme conditions that prevailed — hot windy days and low fuel moisture — the survival of so much timber was impressive. My second foray into the woods took me to the northeastern part of the Tunk Block fire, near Peony Creek at the west end of Aeneas Valley. Here, the difference between treated and untreated forests was even clearer.

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US Forest Service, Pit River Tribe Sign Landmark Stewardship Agreement

Native News Online
November 17, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

SACRAMENTO – The U.S. Forest Service, Pit River Tribe and Lomakatsi Restoration Project have signed one of the largest stewardship agreements in U.S. history between the agency and a Native American Tribe. Encompassing one hundred square miles of ancestral tribal homelands, within the Lassen, Modoc and Shasta-Trinity National Forests, the stewardship agreement will allow the Pit River Tribe and the U.S. Forest Service to work together, with the support of Lomakatsi Restoration Project, to design and implement forest and watershed restoration projects that will create tribal jobs and support local industry.

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Katahdin-area residents understand national park idea well. That’s why it fails.

Bangor Daily News
November 17, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

When East Millinocket and Medway overwhelmingly rejected Roxanne Quimby’s national park proposal last June, David Farmer, her media consultant, said “big ideas take time,” so supporters would continue “explaining the details of this incredible opportunity.” You’ve heard the arguments. Supporters focus on the possibility of jobs in an area hungry for jobs. Opponents contend supporters exaggerate the job potential while downplaying the negative impact of national park restrictions on current and potential employers. Did you ever wonder, though, why Quimby has failed to win over local residents, despite a massive public relations campaign, Washington lobbyists, large donations to environmental and community groups and a terribly battered economy? It became clear to me during a debate before those June votes.

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Upscaling Forest Certification Important Towards a Haze-Free Future

PEFC
November 17, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: International

“What we can see is that the certified companies have plans and procedures, active monitoring and suppression ongoing to limit the extent of fire and ultimately protect the forests,” said Sarah Price, Head of Projects & Development, PEFC International, at a workshop in Singapore discussing the contribution of sustainable forest management to a greener environment, held on 11 November. With fires ongoing in Indonesia, the event explored how responsible forestry and forest certification can support progress towards a haze-free future, how stakeholders can be better engaged and involved, and how to best empower consumers to choose certified products.

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Forestry Crown research institute Scion first to apply for drone beyond-line-of-sight flying

The National Business Review
November 17, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: International

Scion, the forestry Crown research institute, will become the first organisation in New Zealand to fly drones beyond line of sight when it seeks approval under new Civil Aviation Authority rules to use unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) for forest monitoring. Scion has been conducting publicly and privately funded trials of UAVs for the past three months, including flying along the edge of forests to evaluate tree harvesting and using a UAV with interchangeable remote sensing technology to transmit information on tree health and pests in North and South Island forests.

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Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy

Clearcutting Our Carbon Accounts: How the Timber Industry Shields its Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Public Scrutiny

Counter Punch
November 18, 2015
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: United States, US West

A flawed methodology developed by the UN’s Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change at the international level to calculate greenhouse gas emissions attributable to the forest sector and adopted by countries around the world allows the timber industry—the bad actor– to shield its global warming pollution from public scrutiny by taking credit for carbon sequestered on lands it did not protect. Practices such as clearcutting, conversion of native forests into tree plantations, construction of logging roads and application of carbon-intensive pesticides, herbicides and fertilizers release significant greenhouse gas pollution into the atmosphere.

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UC Merced Professors Gasification Projects in North Fork and Biochar Products Could Benefit the Environment, Economy

Sierra Sun Times
November 17, 2015
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: United States, US West

Two overlapping research projects involving UC Merced professors could have big implications for the region’s economy and effects on renewable energy, water and wildfires. Professor Gerardo Diaz, with the School of Engineering, received nearly $900,000 through two grants: one from the California Energy Commission for the analysis and optimization of a 1-megawatt biomass gasification plant in North Fork, and the other from the U.S. Department of Agriculture to study a gasification byproduct for use in agriculture and air and water filtration. …Diaz and a group of industry experts are working on a new gasification plant in North Fork, a little town in the foothills between Merced and Fresno. It’s a $5 million project that aims to take biomass from nearby Sierra forests and, using a gasifier, turn the dead material into energy.

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Climate change projections along with expanding invasive pest ranges pose a serious threat to forest

November 18, 2015
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: US East, United States

U.S. Forest Service research indicates a “virtually certain” long term increase in annual temperature, over time, in the Lake State’s region. If there is adequate precipitation, this gradual warming should increase annual forest growth due to lengthening growing seasons. However with this potential increased growth comes the threat of new or expanding populations of invasive pest species. Newly established or increasing ranges of invasive insect and disease species pose a serious threat to the health and vitality of our forest resources. For example many wildlife species are directly connected with these forests resources. Loss of plant habitat due to invasive pest activity can have a direct impact on associated dependent animal populations.

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Climate change projections along with expanding invasive pest ranges pose a serious threat to forest

November 18, 2015
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: US East, United States

U.S. Forest Service research indicates a “virtually certain” long term increase in annual temperature, over time, in the Lake State’s region. If there is adequate precipitation, this gradual warming should increase annual forest growth due to lengthening growing seasons. However with this potential increased growth comes the threat of new or expanding populations of invasive pest species. Newly established or increasing ranges of invasive insect and disease species pose a serious threat to the health and vitality of our forest resources. For example many wildlife species are directly connected with these forests resources. Loss of plant habitat due to invasive pest activity can have a direct impact on associated dependent animal populations.

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